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Witold Lutosławski

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Witold Lutosławski
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Lutosławski in 1992
Born
Witold Roman Lutosławski

(1913-01-25)25 January 1913
Warsaw, Congress Poland, Russian Empire
Died7 February 1994(1994-02-07) (aged 81)
Warsaw, Poland
EducationUniversity of Warsaw
Occupations
  • Composer
  • conductor
WorksList of compositions
AwardsFull list

Witold Roman Lutosławski (Polish: [ˈvitɔld lutɔsˈwafski] (listen); 25 January 1913 – 7 February 1994) was a Polish composer and conductor. Among the major composers of 20th-century classical music, he is "generally regarded as the most significant Polish composer since Szymanowski, and possibly the greatest Polish composer since Chopin".[1] His compositions—of which he was a notable conductor—include representatives of most traditional genres, aside from opera: symphonies, concertos, orchestral song cycles, other orchestral works, and chamber works. Among his best known works are his four symphonies, the Variations on a Theme by Paganini (1941), the Concerto for Orchestra (1954), and his cello concerto (1970).

During his youth, Lutosławski studied piano and composition in Warsaw. His early works were influenced by Polish folk music and demonstrated a wide range of rich atmospheric textures. His folk-inspired music includes the Concerto for Orchestra (1954)—which first brought him international renown—and Dance Preludes (1955), which he described as a "farewell to folklore". From the late 1950s he began developing new, characteristic composition techniques. He introduced limited aleatoric elements, while retaining tight control of his music's material, architecture, and performance. He also evolved his practice of building harmonies from small groups of musical intervals.

During World War II, after narrowly escaping German capture, Lutosławski made a living playing the piano in Warsaw bars. After the war, Stalinist authorities banned his First Symphony for being "formalist": accessible only to an elite. Rejecting anti-formalism as an unjustified retrograde step, Lutosławski resolutely strove to maintain his artistic integrity, providing artistic support to the Solidarity movement throughout the 1980s. He received numerous awards and honours, including the Grawemeyer Award and a Royal Philharmonic Society Gold Medal. In 1994, Lutosławski was awarded Poland's highest honour, the Order of the White Eagle.

Discover more about Witold Lutosławski related topics

20th-century classical music

20th-century classical music

20th-century classical music describes art music that was written nominally from 1901 to 2000, inclusive. Musical style diverged during the 20th century as it never had previously, so this century was without a dominant style. Modernism, impressionism, and post-romanticism can all be traced to the decades before the turn of the 20th century, but can be included because they evolved beyond the musical boundaries of the 19th-century styles that were part of the earlier common practice period. Neoclassicism and expressionism came mostly after 1900. Minimalism started much later in the century and can be seen as a change from the modern to postmodern era, although some date postmodernism from as early as about 1930. Aleatory, atonality, serialism, musique concrète, electronic music, and concept music were all developed during the century. Jazz and ethnic folk music became important influences on many composers during this century.

Karol Szymanowski

Karol Szymanowski

Karol Maciej Szymanowski was a Polish composer and pianist. He was a member of the modernist Young Poland movement that flourished in the late 19th and early 20th century.

List of compositions by Witold Lutosławski

List of compositions by Witold Lutosławski

This is a list of compositions by Polish composer Witold Lutosławski. A complete list of Lutosławski's compositions in chronological order can be found at The Polish Music Center.

Concerto

Concerto

A concerto is, from the late Baroque era, mostly understood as an instrumental composition, written for one or more soloists accompanied by an orchestra or other ensemble. The typical three-movement structure, a slow movement preceded and followed by fast movements, became a standard from the early 18th century.

Concerto for Orchestra (Lutosławski)

Concerto for Orchestra (Lutosławski)

Polish composer Witold Lutosławski's Concerto for Orchestra was written in the years 1950–54, on the initiative of the artistic director of the Warsaw Philharmonic, Witold Rowicki, to whom it is dedicated. It is written in three movements, lasts about 30 minutes, and constitutes the last stage and a crowning achievement of the folkloristic style in Lutosławski's work. That style, inspired by the music of the Kurpie region, went back in him to the pre-1939 years. Having written a series of small folkloristic pieces for various instruments and their combinations, Lutosławski decided to use his experience of stylisation of Polish folklore in a bigger work. However, the Concerto for Orchestra differs from Lutosławski's earlier folkloristic pieces not only in that it is more extended, but also that what is retained from folklore is only melodic themes. The composer moulds them into a different reality, lending them new harmony, adding atonal counterpoints, turning them into neo-baroque forms.

Cello Concerto (Lutosławski)

Cello Concerto (Lutosławski)

The Concerto for Cello and Orchestra is a cello concerto by the Polish composer Witold Lutosławski. The work was commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society with support from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. It received its world premiere at the Royal Festival Hall on October 14, 1970 by the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Edward Downes.

Aleatoric music

Aleatoric music

Aleatoric music is music in which some element of the composition is left to chance, and/or some primary element of a composed work's realization is left to the determination of its performer(s). The term is most often associated with procedures in which the chance element involves a relatively limited number of possibilities.

Harmony

Harmony

In music, harmony is the process by which individual sounds are joined together or composed into whole units or compositions. Often, the term harmony refers to simultaneously occurring frequencies, pitches, or chords. However, harmony is generally understood to involve both vertical harmony (chords) and horizontal harmony (melody).

Interval (music)

Interval (music)

In music theory, an interval is a difference in pitch between two sounds. An interval may be described as horizontal, linear, or melodic if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and vertical or harmonic if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord.

Solidarity (Polish trade union)

Solidarity (Polish trade union)

Solidarity, full name Independent Self-Governing Trade Union "Solidarity", is a Polish trade union founded in August 1980 at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk, Poland. Subsequently, it was the first independent trade union in a Warsaw Pact country to be recognised by the state. The union's membership peaked at 10 million in September 1981, representing one-third of the country's working-age population. Solidarity's leader Lech Wałęsa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983 and the union is widely recognised as having played a central role in the end of Communist rule in Poland.

Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition

Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition

The Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition is an annual prize instituted by Henry Charles Grawemeyer, industrialist and entrepreneur, at the University of Louisville in 1984. The award was first given in 1985. Subsequently, the Grawemeyer Award was expanded to other categories: Ideas Improving World Order, Education (1989), Religion (1990) and Psychology (2000). The prize fund was initially an endowment of US$9 million from the Grawemeyer Foundation. The initial awards were for $150 000 each, increasing to $200 000 for the year 2000 awards. After the economic crash of 2008, the prize was reduced to $100,000.

Order of the White Eagle (Poland)

Order of the White Eagle (Poland)

The Order of the White Eagle is Poland's highest order awarded to both civilians and the military for their merits. It was officially instituted on 1 November 1705 by Augustus II the Strong, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony, and bestowed on eight of his closest diplomatic and political supporters. It is one of the oldest distinctions in the world still in use.

Life and career

Early years (1913–1938)

Lutosławski's parents were both born into the Polish landed nobility;[2] they owned estates in the area of Drozdowo. His father Józef was involved in the Polish National Democratic Party ("Endecja"), and the Lutosławski family became intimate with its founder, Roman Dmowski (Witold Lutosławski's middle name was Roman). Józef Lutosławski studied in Zürich, where in 1904 he met and married a fellow student, Maria Olszewska, who later became Lutosławski's mother. Józef pursued his studies in London, where he acted as correspondent for the National-Democratic newspaper, Goniec. He continued to be involved in National Democracy politics after returning to Warsaw in 1905, and took over the management of the family estates in 1908. Witold Roman Lutosławski, the youngest of three brothers, was born in Warsaw shortly before the outbreak of World War I.

In 1915, with Russia at war with Germany, Prussian forces drove towards Warsaw. The Lutosławskis travelled east to Moscow, where Józef remained politically active, organising Polish Legions ready for any action that might liberate Poland (which had been divided over a century earlier—Warsaw was part of Tsarist Russia). Dmowski's strategy was for Russia to guarantee security for a new Polish state. In 1917, the February Revolution forced the Tsar to abdicate, and the October Revolution started a new Soviet government that made peace with Germany. Józef's activities were now in conflict with the Bolsheviks, who arrested him and his brother Marian. Thus, although fighting stopped on the Eastern Front in 1917, the Lutosławskis were prevented from returning home. The brothers were interned in Butyrskaya prison in central Moscow, where Witold—by then aged five—visited his father. Józef and Marian were executed by a firing squad in September 1918, some days before their scheduled trial.[3][4]

After the war, the family returned to the newly independent Poland, only to find their estates ruined. After his father's death, other members of the family played an important part in Witold's early life, especially Józef's half-brother Kazimierz Lutosławski, a priest and politician.[5][3][4]

At age six, Lutosławski started two years of piano lessons in Warsaw. After the Polish-Soviet War the family left Warsaw to return to Drozdowo, but after a few years of running the estates with limited success, his mother returned to Warsaw. She worked as a physician, and translated books for children from English.[5] In 1924, Lutosławski entered secondary school (Stefan Batory Gymnasium) while continuing piano lessons. A performance of Karol Szymanowski's Third Symphony deeply affected him. In 1925, he started violin lessons at the Warsaw Music School.[6] In 1931, he enrolled at Warsaw University to study mathematics, and in 1932 he formally joined the composition classes at the Conservatory. His only composition teacher was Witold Maliszewski, a renowned Polish composer who had been a pupil of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Lutosławski was given a strong grounding in musical structures, particularly movements in sonata form. In 1932, he gave up the violin, and in 1933 he discontinued his mathematics studies to concentrate on the piano and composition.[3][4] As a student of Jerzy Lefeld, he gained a diploma for piano performance from the Conservatory in 1936, after presenting a virtuoso program including Schumann's Toccata and Beethoven's fourth piano concerto.[7] His diploma for composition was awarded by the same institution in 1937.[8]

World War II (1939–1945)

Lutosławski (right) greets his old friend Andrzej Panufnik (left) in 1990.
Lutosławski (right) greets his old friend Andrzej Panufnik (left) in 1990.

Military service followed; Lutosławski was trained in signalling and radio operating in Zegrze near Warsaw.[9] He completed his Symphonic Variations in 1939. The work was premiered by the Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Grzegorz Fitelberg, with the performance broadcast on radio on 9 March 1939.[10][11] Like most young Polish composers, Lutosławski wanted to continue his education in Paris. His plans for further musical study were dashed in September 1939, when Germany invaded western Poland and Russia invaded eastern Poland.[12] Lutosławski was mobilised with the radio unit for the Kraków Army.[13] He was soon captured by German soldiers,[13] but escaped while being marched to prison camp, walking 250 miles (400 km) back to Warsaw.[14] Lutosławski's brother was captured by Russian soldiers and later died in a Siberian labour camp.[14][15]

To earn a living, Lutosławski joined "Dana Ensemble", the first Polish revellers, as an arranger-pianist, singing in "Ziemiańska Cafe".[16][17] He then formed a piano duo with friend and fellow composer Andrzej Panufnik, performing together in Warsaw cafés.[18][19] Their repertoire consisted of a wide range of music in their own arrangements, including the first incarnation of Lutosławski's Variations on a Theme by Paganini, a transcription of the 24th Caprice for solo violin by Niccolò Paganini.[19] Defiantly, they sometimes played Polish music (the Nazis banned Polish music in Poland—including that of Frédéric Chopin), and composed Resistance songs.[20] Listening in cafés was the only way in which the Poles of German-occupied Warsaw could hear live music; putting on concerts was impossible since the Germans occupying Poland prohibited any organised gatherings.[21] In café Aria, where they played, Lutosławski met his future wife Maria Danuta Bogusławska, a sister of the writer Stanisław Dygat.[22]

Lutosławski left Warsaw in July 1944 with his mother, just a few days before the Warsaw Uprising. During the complete destruction of the city by Germans after the failure of the uprising,[23] most of his music was lost, as were the family's Drozdowo estates.[24] He was able to salvage only a few scores and sketches;[25] of the 200 or so arrangements that Lutosławski and Panufnik had worked on for their piano duo, only Lutosławski's Variations on a Theme by Paganini survived.[19] Lutosławski returned to the ruins of Warsaw after the Polish-Soviet treaty in April 1945.[26]

Post-war years (1946–1955)

Lutosławski on 16 August 1946
Lutosławski on 16 August 1946

During the postwar years, Lutosławski worked on his First Symphony—sketches of which he had salvaged from Warsaw—which he had started in 1941.[27] It was first performed in 1948, conducted by Fitelberg.[28] To provide for his family, he also composed music that he termed functional, such as the Warsaw Suite (written to accompany a silent film depicting the city's reconstruction),[29] sets of Polish Carols, and the study pieces for piano, Melodie Ludowe ("Folk Melodies").[26]

In 1945, Lutosławski was elected as secretary and treasurer of the newly constituted Union of Polish Composers [pl] (ZKP—Związek Kompozytorów Polskich).[30] In 1946, he married Danuta Bogusławska.[29] The marriage was a lasting one, and Danuta's drafting skills were of great value to the composer: she became his copyist,[29] and solved some of the notational challenges of his later works.[31]

In 1947, the Stalinist political climate led to the adoption and imposition by the ruling Polish United Workers' Party of the tenets of socialist realism. The political authorities condemned new compositions deemed to be non-conformist. This artistic censorship, which ultimately came from Stalin personally, was to some degree prevalent over the whole Eastern bloc, and was reinforced by the 1948 Zhdanov decree.[32] By 1948, the ZKP was taken over by musicians willing to follow the party line on musical matters. Lutosławski resigned from the committee,[33] implacably opposed to the ideas of socialist realism.[34]

Lutosławski at the piano, c. 1952–1953
Lutosławski at the piano, c. 1952–1953

Lutoslawski's First Symphony was proscribed as "formalist",[35] and he found himself shunned by the Soviet authorities, a situation that continued throughout the era of Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Andropov and Chernenko.[36] In 1954, the climate of musical oppression drove his friend Andrzej Panufnik to defect to the United Kingdom. Against this background, Lutosławski was content to compose pieces for which there was social need,[37] but in 1954 this earned him—much to the composer's chagrin—the Prime Minister's Prize for a set of children's songs.[38] He commented: "[I]t was for those functional compositions of mine that the authorities decorated me ... I realised that I was not writing indifferent little pieces, only to make a living, but was carrying on an artistic creative activity in the eyes of the outside world."[39]

It was his substantial and original Concerto for Orchestra of 1954 that established Lutosławski as an important composer of art music. The work, commissioned in 1950 by the conductor Witold Rowicki for the newly reconstituted Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, earned the composer two state prizes in the following year.[40]

Maturity (1956–1967)

Stalin's death in 1953 allowed a certain relaxation of the cultural totalitarianism in Russia and its satellite states.[41] By 1956, political events had led to a partial thawing of the musical climate, and the Warsaw Autumn Festival of Contemporary Music was founded.[42] Conceived as a biennial festival, it has been held annually ever since 1958 (except under Martial law in 1982 when, in protest, the ZKP refused to organise it).[43] The first performance of his Musique funèbre (in Polish, Muzyka żałobna, English Funereal Music or Music of Mourning) took place in 1958. It was written to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the death of Béla Bartók, but took the composer four years to complete.[44] This work brought international recognition,[45] and the annual ZKP prize and the International Rostrum of Composers prize in 1959.[46] Lutosławski's harmonic and contrapuntal thinking were developed in this work, and in the Five songs of 1956–57,[47] as he introduced his twelve-note system, he realised the fruits of many years of thought and experiment.[48] Another new feature of his compositional technique became a Lutosławski signature: he introduced randomness into the exact synchronisation of various parts of the musical ensemble in Jeux vénitiens ("Venetian games").[49] These harmonic and temporal techniques became part of every subsequent work, and were integral to his style.[50]

Lutosławski during his visit to Finland, 10 March 1965
Lutosławski during his visit to Finland, 10 March 1965

In a departure from his usually serious compositions in 1957 to 1963, Lutosławski also composed light music under the pseudonym Derwid. Mostly waltzes, tangos, foxtrots and slow-foxtrots for voice and piano, these pieces are in the genre of Polish actors' songs. Their place in Lutosławski's output may be seen as less incongruous in light of his own performances of cabaret music during the war, as well as his relationship by marriage to his wife's sister-in-law, the famous Polish cabaret singer Kalina Jędrusik.[51]

In 1963, Lutosławski fulfilled a commission for the Music Biennale Zagreb, his Trois poèmes d'Henri Michaux for chorus and orchestra. It was the first work he had written for a commission from abroad, and brought him further international acclaim.[52] It earned him a second State Prize for music (Lutosławski was not cynical about the award this time), and he gained an agreement for the international publication of his music with Chester Music, then part of the Hansen publishing house.[52] His String Quartet was first performed in Stockholm in 1965,[53] followed the same year by the first performance of his orchestral song-cycle Paroles tissées. This shortened title was suggested by the poet Jean-François Chabrun, who had published the poems as Quatre tapisseries pour la Châtelaine de Vergi.[54] The song cycle is dedicated to the tenor Peter Pears, who first performed it at the 1965 Aldeburgh Festival with the composer conducting.[54] (The Festival was founded and organised by Benjamin Britten, with whom the composer formed a lasting friendship.)[55]

Shortly after this, Lutosławski started work on his Second Symphony,[56] which had two premieres: Pierre Boulez conducted the second movement, Direct, in 1966, and when the first movement, Hésitant, was finished in 1967, the composer conducted a complete performance in Katowice.[54] The Second Symphony is very different from a conventional classical symphony in structure, with Lutosławski using his many compositional innovations to build a large-scale, dramatic work worthy of the name.[57] In 1968, the Symphony earned Lutosławski first prize from the International Music Council's International Rostrum of Composers, his third such award,[54] confirming his growing international reputation. In 1967, Lutosławski was awarded the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, Denmark's highest musical honour.[58]

International renown (1967–1982)

The Second Symphony, and Livre pour orchestre and a Cello Concerto which followed, were composed during a particularly traumatic period in Lutosławski's life. His mother died in 1967,[59] and in 1967–70 there was a great deal of unrest in Poland. This sprang first from the suppression of the theatre production Dziady, which sparked a summer of protests; later, in 1968, the use of Polish troops to suppress the liberal reforms in Czechoslovakia's Prague Spring, and the Gdańsk Shipyards strike of 1970—which led to a violent clampdown by the authorities, both caused significant political and social tension in Poland.[60] Lutosławski did not support the Soviet regime, and these events have been postulated as reasons for the increase in antagonistic effects in his work, particularly the Cello Concerto of 1968–70 for Rostropovich and the Royal Philharmonic Society.[61][62] Indeed, Rostropovich's own opposition to the Soviet regime in Russia was just coming to a head (he shortly afterwards declared his support for the dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn).[63] Lutosławski himself did not hold the view that such influences had a direct effect on his music, although he acknowledged that they impinged on his creative world to some degree.[64] In any case, the Cello Concerto was a great success, earning both Lutosławski and Rostropovich accolades. At the work's première with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, Arthur Bliss presented Rostropovich with the Royal Philharmonic Society's gold medal.[65]

In 1973, Lutosławski attended a recital given by the baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau with the pianist Sviatoslav Richter in Warsaw; he met the singer after the concert and this inspired him to write his extended orchestral song Les Espaces du sommeil ("The spaces of sleep").[66] This work, Preludes and Fugue, Mi-Parti (a French expression that roughly translates as "divided into two equal but different parts"), Novelette, and a short piece for cello in honour of Paul Sacher's seventieth birthday, occupied Lutosławski throughout the 1970s, while in the background he was working away at a projected Third symphony and a concertante piece for the oboist Heinz Holliger. These latter pieces were proving difficult to complete,[67] as Lutosławski struggled to introduce greater fluency into his sound world and to reconcile tensions between the harmonic and melodic aspects of his style,[68] and between foreground and background.[69] The Double Concerto for oboe, harp and chamber orchestra—commissioned by Sacher—was finally finished in 1980,[70] and the Third Symphony in 1983. In 1977, he received the Order of the Builders of People's Poland. In 1983, he received the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize.[71]

During this period, Poland was undergoing yet more upheaval: in 1980, the influential movement Solidarność was created, led by Lech Wałęsa;[72] and in 1981, martial law was declared by General Wojciech Jaruzelski.[64] From 1981 to 1989, Lutosławski refused all professional engagements in Poland as a gesture of solidarity with the artists' boycott.[73] He refused to enter the Culture Ministry to meet any of the ministers, and was careful not be photographed in their company.[73] In 1983, as a gesture of support, he sent a recording of the first performance (in Chicago) of the Third Symphony to Gdańsk to be played to strikers in a local church.[73] In 1983, he was awarded the Solidarity prize, of which Lutosławski was reported to be more proud than any other of his honours.[74]

Final years (1983–1994)

Lutosławski in 1993, by Betty Freeman
Lutosławski in 1993, by Betty Freeman

Through the mid-1980s, Lutosławski composed three pieces called Łańcuch ("Chain"), which refers to the way the music is constructed from contrasting strands which overlap like the links of a chain.[75] Chain 2 was written for Anne-Sophie Mutter (commissioned by Sacher), and for Mutter he also orchestrated his slightly earlier Partita for violin and piano, providing a new linking Interlude,[76] so that when played together the Partita, Interlude, and Chain 2 form his longest work.[77]

In 1985, the Third Symphony earned Lutosławski the first Grawemeyer Prize from the University of Louisville, Kentucky.[78][79] The significance of the prize lay not just in its prestige but in the size of its financial award (then US$150,000). The award is intended to remove recipients' financial concerns for a period to allow them to concentrate on serious composition. In a gesture of altruism, Lutosławski announced that he would use the fund to set up a scholarship to enable young Polish composers to study abroad; Lutosławski also directed that his fee from the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for Chain 3 should go to this scholarship fund.[80]

In 1986, Lutosławski was presented (by Tippett) with the rarely awarded Royal Philharmonic Society's Gold Medal during a concert in which Lutosławski conducted his Third Symphony;[81] also that year a major celebration of his work was made at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival.[81] In addition, he was awarded honorary doctorates at several universities worldwide, including Cambridge.[82]

At this time Lutosławski was writing his Piano Concerto for Krystian Zimerman, commissioned by the Salzburg Festival.[83] His earliest plans to write a piano concerto dated from 1938; he was himself in his younger days a virtuoso pianist.[84] It was a performance of this work and the Third Symphony at the Warsaw Autumn Festival in 1988 that marked the composer's return to the conductor's podium in Poland, after substantive talks had been arranged between the government and the opposition.[85]

Around 1990 Lutosławski also worked on a fourth symphony and his orchestral song-cycle Chantefleurs et Chantefables for soprano.[86] The latter was first performed at a Prom concert in London in 1991,[87] and the Fourth Symphony in 1993 in Los Angeles.[87] In between, and after initial reluctance, Lutosławski took on the presidency of the newly reconstituted "Polish Cultural Council",[88] which was set up after the 1989 legislative elections led to the end of communist rule in Poland.[88]

In 1993, Lutosławski continued his busy schedule, travelling to the United States, England, Finland, Canada and Japan,[89] and sketching a violin concerto,[90] but by the first week of 1994 it was clear that cancer had taken hold,[91] and after an operation the composer weakened quickly and died on 7 February, aged 81.[92] He had, a few weeks before, been awarded Poland's highest honour, the Order of the White Eagle (only the second person to receive this since the collapse of communism in Poland—the first had been Pope John Paul II).[92] He was cremated; his wife Danuta died shortly afterwards.[93]


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October Revolution

The October Revolution, officially known as the Great October Socialist Revolution in the Soviet Union, also known as the Bolshevik Revolution, was a revolution in Russia led by the Bolshevik Party of Vladimir Lenin that was a key moment in the larger Russian Revolution of 1917–1923. It was the second revolutionary change of government in Russia in 1917. It took place through an armed insurrection in Petrograd on 7 November 1917 [O.S. 25 October]. It was the precipitating event of the Russian Civil War.

Butyrka prison

Butyrka prison

Butyrskaya prison, usually known simply as Butyrka, is a prison in the Tverskoy District of central Moscow, Russia. In Imperial Russia it served as the central transit prison. During the Soviet Union era (1917-1991) it held many political prisoners. As of 2022 Butyrka remains the largest of Moscow's remand prisons. Overcrowding is an ongoing problem.

Second Polish Republic

Second Polish Republic

The Second Polish Republic, at the time officially known as the Republic of Poland, was a country in Central and Eastern Europe that existed between 11 November 1918 and 17 September 1939. The state was established at the end of the First World War. The Second Republic ceased to exist in 1939, when Poland was invaded by Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union and the Slovak Republic, marking the beginning of the European theatre of the Second World War. The Polish government-in-exile was established in Paris to replace the Second Republic in the war.

Kazimierz Lutosławski

Kazimierz Lutosławski

Kazimierz Lutosławski was a Polish physician, priest and Polish Scouting founder and activist. He designed the Krzyż Harcerski.

Music

Lutosławski conducting
Lutosławski conducting

Lutosławski described musical composition as a search for listeners who think and feel the same way he did—he once called it "fishing for souls".[94]

Folk influence

Lutosławski's works up until and including the Dance Preludes (1955) show the influence of Polish folk music, both harmonically and melodically. Part of his art was in transforming folk music, rather than quoting it exactly. In some cases, such as the Concerto for Orchestra, folk music is unrecognisable as such without careful analysis.[95] As Lutosławski developed the techniques of his mature compositions, he stopped using folk material explicitly, although its influence remained as subtle features until the end. As he said, "[in those days] I could not compose as I wished, so I composed as I was able",[96] and about this change of direction he said, "I was simply not so interested in it [using folk music]". Also, Lutosławski was dissatisfied with composing in a "post-tonal" idiom: while composing the first symphony, he felt that this was for him a cul-de-sac.[97] As such, Dance Preludes would prove to be his final composition centered around folk music; he described it as a "farewell to folklore".[1]

Pitch organisation

In Five Songs (1956–57) and Musique funèbre (1958) Lutosławski introduced his own brand of twelve-tone music, marking his departure from the explicit use of folk music.[48] His twelve-tone technique allowed him to build harmony and melody from specific intervals (in Musique funèbre, augmented fourths and semitones). This system also gave him the means to write dense chords without resorting to tone clusters, and enabled him to build towards these dense chords (which often include all twelve notes of the chromatic scale) at climactic moments.[98] Lutosławski's twelve-note techniques were thus completely different in conception from Arnold Schoenberg's tone-row system,[99][100] although Musique funèbre does happen to be based on a tone row.[101] This twelve-note intervallic technique had its genesis in earlier works such as Symphony No. 1, and Variations on a Theme by Paganini.[102]

Aleatory technique

Although Musique funèbre was internationally acclaimed, his new harmonic techniques led to something of a crisis for Lutosławski, during which he still could not see how to express his musical ideas.[103] Then on 16 March 1960,[104] listening to Polish Radio broadcast on new music, he happened to hear John Cage's Concert for Piano and Orchestra. Although he was not influenced by the sound or the philosophy of the music, Cage's explorations of indeterminacy set off a train of thought which resulted in Lutosławski finding a way to retain the harmonic structures he wanted while introducing the freedom for which he was searching.[105] His Three Postludes were hastily rounded off (he had intended to write four) and he moved on to compose works in which he explored these new ideas.[106]

In works from Jeux vénitiens, Lutosławski wrote long passages in which the parts of the ensemble are not to be synchronised exactly. At cues from the conductor, each instrumentalist may be instructed to move straight on to the next section, to finish their current section before moving on, or to stop. In this way, the random elements within compositionally controlled limits defined by the term aleatory are carefully directed by the composer, who controls the architecture and harmonic progression of the piece precisely. Lutosławski notated the music exactly; there is no improvisation, no choice of parts is given to any instrumentalist, and there is thus no doubt about how the musical performance is to be realised.[107]

For his String Quartet, Lutosławski had produced only the four instrumental parts, refusing to bind them in a full score, because he was concerned that this would imply that he wanted notes in vertical alignment to coincide, as is the case with conventionally notated classical ensemble music. The LaSalle Quartet, however, specifically requested a score from which to prepare for the first performance.[108] Bodman Rae relates that Danuta Lutosławska solved this problem by cutting up the parts and sticking them together in boxes (which Lutosławski called mobiles), with instructions on how to signal in performance when all of the players should proceed to the next mobile.[53] In his orchestral music, these problems of notation were not so difficult, because the instructions on how and when to proceed are given by the conductor. Lutosławski's called this technique of his mature period "limited aleatorism".[109]

Example 1, numbers 7 to 9 from the score of the Second Symphony (1966–67), illustrates Lutosławski's harmonic and aleatory procedures from his mature style
Example 1, numbers 7 to 9 from the score of the Second Symphony (1966–67), illustrates Lutosławski's harmonic and aleatory procedures from his mature style

Both Lutosławski's harmonic and aleatory processes are illustrated by example 1, an excerpt from Hésitant, the first movement of the Symphony No. 2. At number 7, the conductor gives a cue to the flutes, celesta and percussionist, who then play their parts in their own time, without any attempt to synchronise with the other instrumentalists. The harmony of this section is based on a 12-note chord built from major seconds and perfect fourths. After all the instrumentalists have finished their parts, a two-second general pause is indicated ("P.G. 2" at top right of the example). The conductor then gives a cue at number 8 (and indicates the tempo of the following section) for two oboes and the cor anglais. They each play their part, again with no attempt to synchronise with the other players. The harmony of this part is based on the hexachord F–G–A–C–D–D, arranged in such a way that the harmony of the section never includes any sixths or thirds. When the conductor gives another cue at number 9, the players each continue until they reach the repeat sign, and then stop: they are unlikely to end the section at the same time. This "refrain" (from numbers 8 to 9) recurs throughout the movement, slightly altered each time, but always played by double-reed instruments which do not play elsewhere in the movement: Lutosławski thus also carefully controls the orchestral palette.[110]

Late style

The combination of Lutosławski's aleatory techniques and his harmonic discoveries allowed him to build up complex musical textures. According to Bodman Rae, in his later works Lutosławski evolved a more mobile, simpler, harmonic style, in which less of the music is played with an ad libitum coordination.[111][112] This development first appeared in the brief Epitaph for oboe and piano,[113] around the time Lutosławski was struggling to find the technical means to complete his Third Symphony. In chamber works for just two instrumentalists the scope for aleatory counterpoint and dense harmonies is significantly less than for orchestra.[114]

Lutosławski's formidable technical developments grew out of his creative imperative; that he left a lasting body of major compositions is a testament to his resolution of purpose in the face of the anti-formalist authorities under which he formulated his methods.[115][116]

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List of compositions by Witold Lutosławski

List of compositions by Witold Lutosławski

This is a list of compositions by Polish composer Witold Lutosławski. A complete list of Lutosławski's compositions in chronological order can be found at The Polish Music Center.

Semitone

Semitone

A semitone, also called a half step or a half tone, is the smallest musical interval commonly used in Western tonal music, and it is considered the most dissonant when sounded harmonically. It is defined as the interval between two adjacent notes in a 12-tone scale. For example, C is adjacent to C♯; the interval between them is a semitone.

Chord (music)

Chord (music)

A chord, in music, is any harmonic set of pitches/frequencies consisting of multiple notes that are heard as if sounding simultaneously. For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords, or sequences of chord tones, may also be considered as chords in the right musical context.

Arnold Schoenberg

Arnold Schoenberg

Arnold Schoenberg or Schönberg was an Austrian-American composer, music theorist, teacher, writer, and painter. He is widely considered one of the most influential composers of the 20th century. He was associated with the expressionist movement in German poetry and art, and leader of the Second Viennese School. As a Jewish composer, Schoenberg was targeted by the Nazi Party, which labeled his works as degenerate music and forbade them from being published. He emigrated to the United States in 1933, becoming an American citizen in 1941.

Aleatoric music

Aleatoric music

Aleatoric music is music in which some element of the composition is left to chance, and/or some primary element of a composed work's realization is left to the determination of its performer(s). The term is most often associated with procedures in which the chance element involves a relatively limited number of possibilities.

John Cage

John Cage

John Milton Cage Jr. was an American composer and music theorist. A pioneer of indeterminacy in music, electroacoustic music, and non-standard use of musical instruments, Cage was one of the leading figures of the post-war avant-garde. Critics have lauded him as one of the most influential composers of the 20th century. He was also instrumental in the development of modern dance, mostly through his association with choreographer Merce Cunningham, who was also Cage's romantic partner for most of their lives.

Indeterminacy (music)

Indeterminacy (music)

Indeterminacy is a composing approach in which some aspects of a musical work are left open to chance or to the interpreter's free choice. John Cage, a pioneer of indeterminacy, defined it as "the ability of a piece to be performed in substantially different ways".

Musical notation

Musical notation

Music notation or musical notation is any system used to visually represent aurally perceived music played with instruments or sung by the human voice through the use of written, printed, or otherwise-produced symbols, including notation for durations of absence of sound such as rests.

Improvisation

Improvisation

Improvisation is the activity of making or doing something not planned beforehand, using whatever can be found. Improvisation in the performing arts is a very spontaneous performance without specific or scripted preparation. The skills of improvisation can apply to many different faculties, across all artistic, scientific, physical, cognitive, academic, and non-academic disciplines; see Applied improvisation.

Major second

Major second

In Western music theory, a major second is a second spanning two semitones. A second is a musical interval encompassing two adjacent staff positions. For example, the interval from C to D is a major second, as the note D lies two semitones above C, and the two notes are notated on adjacent staff positions. Diminished, minor and augmented seconds are notated on adjacent staff positions as well, but consist of a different number of semitones.The intervals from the tonic (keynote) in an upward direction to the second, to the third, to the sixth, and to the seventh scale degrees (of a major scale are called major.

Perfect fourth

Perfect fourth

A fourth is a musical interval encompassing four staff positions in the music notation of Western culture, and a perfect fourth is the fourth spanning five semitones. For example, the ascending interval from C to the next F is a perfect fourth, because the note F is the fifth semitone above C, and there are four staff positions between C and F. Diminished and augmented fourths span the same number of staff positions, but consist of a different number of semitones.

Cor anglais

Cor anglais

The cor anglais, or English horn in North America, is a double-reed woodwind instrument in the oboe family. It is approximately one and a half times the length of an oboe, making it essentially an alto oboe in F.

Legacy

In the 21st century, Lutosławski is generally considered the most important Polish composer since Szymanowski, and perhaps the most outstanding since Chopin. This evaluation was not apparent after World War II, when Panufnik was more highly regarded in Poland. The success of Lutosławski's Concerto for Orchestra and Panufnik's 1954 defection to England brought Lutosławski to the forefront of modern Polish classical music. Initially, he was coupled with his younger contemporary Krzysztof Penderecki, due to their music's shared stylistic and technical characteristics. When Penderecki's reputation declined in the 1970s, Lutosławski emerged as the major Polish composer of his time and among the most significant 20th-century European composers.[1][117] His four symphonies, the Variations on a Theme by Paganini (1941), the Concerto for Orchestra (1954), and a cello concerto (1970) are his best known works.[118]

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Polish School (music)

Polish School (music)

The Polish School is the music of several post-1945 Polish composers who share generational and stylistic similarities. Representatives include Tadeusz Baird, Henryk Górecki, Wojciech Kilar, Witold Lutosławski, Krzysztof Penderecki, Grażyna Bacewicz, and Kazimierz Serocki. According to Polish music scholar Adrian Thomas, Zygmunt Mycielski used the term at the Łagów conference in 1949, and it was later used at the 1956 Warsaw Autumn festival. Their common purpose was in part retrospective, reacting to socialist realism, and in part speculative. Sound mass and sonorism influenced these post-war composers.

Krzysztof Penderecki

Krzysztof Penderecki

Krzysztof Eugeniusz Penderecki was a Polish composer and conductor. His best known works include Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima, Symphony No. 3, his St Luke Passion, Polish Requiem, Anaklasis and Utrenja. Penderecki's oeuvre includes four operas, eight symphonies and other orchestral pieces, a variety of instrumental concertos, choral settings of mainly religious texts, as well as chamber and instrumental works.

Concerto for Orchestra (Lutosławski)

Concerto for Orchestra (Lutosławski)

Polish composer Witold Lutosławski's Concerto for Orchestra was written in the years 1950–54, on the initiative of the artistic director of the Warsaw Philharmonic, Witold Rowicki, to whom it is dedicated. It is written in three movements, lasts about 30 minutes, and constitutes the last stage and a crowning achievement of the folkloristic style in Lutosławski's work. That style, inspired by the music of the Kurpie region, went back in him to the pre-1939 years. Having written a series of small folkloristic pieces for various instruments and their combinations, Lutosławski decided to use his experience of stylisation of Polish folklore in a bigger work. However, the Concerto for Orchestra differs from Lutosławski's earlier folkloristic pieces not only in that it is more extended, but also that what is retained from folklore is only melodic themes. The composer moulds them into a different reality, lending them new harmony, adding atonal counterpoints, turning them into neo-baroque forms.

Cello Concerto (Lutosławski)

Cello Concerto (Lutosławski)

The Concerto for Cello and Orchestra is a cello concerto by the Polish composer Witold Lutosławski. The work was commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society with support from the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. It received its world premiere at the Royal Festival Hall on October 14, 1970 by the cellist Mstislav Rostropovich and the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Edward Downes.

Awards and honours

Bust of Witold Lutosławski by Arkadiusz Latos [pl], Kielce, Poland
Bust of Witold Lutosławski by Arkadiusz Latos [pl], Kielce, Poland
Monument to Witold Lutosławski and his wife Danuta at the Powązki Cemetery, Warsaw
Monument to Witold Lutosławski and his wife Danuta at the Powązki Cemetery, Warsaw

See The Witold Lutosławski Society for a comprehensive list.

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Kielce

Kielce

Kielce is a city in southern Poland, and the capital of the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. In 2021, it had 192,468 inhabitants. The city is in the middle of the Świętokrzyskie Mountains, on the banks of the Silnica River, in the northern part of the historical Polish province of Lesser Poland.

International Music Council

International Music Council

The International Music Council (IMC) was created in 1949 as UNESCO's advisory body on matters of music. It is based at UNESCO's headquarters in Paris, France, where it functions as an independent international non-governmental organization. Its primary aim is to facilitate the development and promotion of international music-making.

International Rostrum of Composers

International Rostrum of Composers

The International Rostrum of Composers (IRC) is an annual forum organized by the International Music Council that offers broadcasting representatives the opportunity to exchange and publicize pieces of contemporary classical music. It is funded by contributions from participating national radio networks.

Académie Charles Cros

Académie Charles Cros

The Académie Charles Cros is an organization located in Chézy-sur-Marne, France, that acts as an intermediary between government cultural policy makers and professionals in music and the recording industry.

Jurzykowski Prize

Jurzykowski Prize

The Alfred Jurzykowski Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Alfred Jurzykowski Foundation in New York City for the translation of Polish works into English. Its recipients have included such writers as Witold Lutosławski (1966), Leszek Kołakowski (1969), Miron Białoszewski, (1982), Ryszard Kapuściński (1993), and Bogusław Schaeffer (1998). Scientists were also among recipients of the "Alfred Jurzykowski Prize", among them the Member of the Manhattan Project and co-father of hydrogen bomb Stanislaw Ulam or immunologist, Member of the Polish Academy of Learning (PAU), Marian Zembala.

Herder Prize

Herder Prize

The Herder Prize, named after the German philosopher Johann Gottfried Herder (1744–1803), was a prestigious international prize awarded every year from 1964 to 2006 to scholars and artists from Central and Southeast Europe whose life and work have contributed to the cultural understanding of European countries and their peaceful interrelations. Established in 1963, the first prizes were awarded in 1964.

Léonie Sonning Music Prize

Léonie Sonning Music Prize

The Léonie Sonning Music Prize, or Sonning Award, which is recognized as Denmark's highest musical honor, is given annually to an international composer or musician. It was first awarded in 1959 to composer Igor Stravinsky. Laureates are now selected by the directors of The Léonie Sonning Music Foundation, which was founded in 1965.

Maurice Ravel

Maurice Ravel

Joseph Maurice Ravel was a French composer, pianist and conductor. He is often associated with Impressionism along with his elder contemporary Claude Debussy, although both composers rejected the term. In the 1920s and 1930s Ravel was internationally regarded as France's greatest living composer.

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń

Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń or NCU is located in Toruń, Poland. It is named after Nicolaus Copernicus, who was born in Toruń in 1473.

Ernst von Siemens Music Prize

Ernst von Siemens Music Prize

The Ernst von Siemens Music Prize is an annual music prize given by the Bayerische Akademie der Schönen Künste on behalf of the Ernst von Siemens Musikstiftung, established in 1972. The foundation was established by Ernst von Siemens (1903–1990) and promotes contemporary music. The prize honors a composer, performer, or musicologist who has made a distinguished contribution to the world of music. In addition to the main prize, other prizes are also given. The total prize money given is currently 3.5 million euros, with the winner of the main prize receiving €250,000. The prize is sometimes known as "the Nobel Prize of music".

Durham University

Durham University

Durham University is a collegiate public research university in Durham, England, founded by an Act of Parliament in 1832 and incorporated by royal charter in 1837. It was the first recognised university to open in England for more than 600 years, after Oxford and Cambridge, and is thus, following standard historical practice in defining a university, the third-oldest university in England. The City of Durham has a history as a site of higher education for over a thousand years, including a short-lived college in the 17th century, though the university does not claim these as its roots. As a collegiate university its main functions are divided between the academic departments of the university and its 17 colleges. In general, the departments perform research and provide teaching to students, while the colleges are responsible for their domestic arrangements and welfare.

Jagiellonian University

Jagiellonian University

The Jagiellonian University is a public research university in Kraków, Poland. Founded in 1364 by King Casimir III the Great, it is the oldest university in Poland and the 13th oldest university in continuous operation in the world. It is regarded as Poland's most prestigious academic institution. The university has been viewed as a guardian of Polish culture as well as a significant contributor to the intellectual heritage of Europe.

Source: "Witold Lutosławski", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witold_Lutosławski.

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References
  1. ^ a b c Bodman Rae 2001.
  2. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b c Stucky 1981, pp. 1–7.
  4. ^ a b c Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 1–8.
  5. ^ a b Witold Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Marszałkowska 21. NIFC 2013
  6. ^ Witold Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Plac Trzech Krzyży 18. NIFC 2013.
  7. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 10.
  8. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 11.
  9. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 10.
  10. ^ Stucky 1981, pp. 10–11.
  11. ^ Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Konopnickiej 6. NIFC 2013.
  12. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 12–13.
  13. ^ a b Stucky 1981, p. 14.
  14. ^ a b Stucky 1981, p. 15.
  15. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 14.
  16. ^ Witold Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Mazowiecka 12. NIFC 2013.
  17. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 14–15.
  18. ^ Witold Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Królewska 11 („SiM"); Szpitalna 5 („Lira"); Mazowiecka 5 (Aria, U Aktorek). NIFC 2013
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  20. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 17.
  21. ^ Panufnik 1987, see particularly Chapter 8, "Occupation", for an account of Panufnik and Lutosławski's duo in German-occupied Warsaw.
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  34. ^ Stucky 1981, pp. 36–37; Stucky 1981, p. 63 quotes Lutosławski speaking in 1957, "[I]t is difficult to conceive of a more absurd hypothesis than the idea that the achievements of the past several decades should be abandoned and that one should return to the musical language of the nineteenth century ... The period of which I speak may not have lasted long ... but all the same it was long enough to do our music immense harm."
  35. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 36.
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  94. ^ Lutosławski & Varga 1976, "Lutosławski's notebook", also quoted and discussed in Jacobson (1996), p. 100. "[...] I have a strong desire to communicate something, through my music, to the people. I am not working to get many 'fans' for myself; I do not want to convince, I want to find. I would like to find people who in the depths of their souls feel the same way as I do. That can only be achieved through the greatest artistic sincerity in every detail of music, from the minutest technical aspects to the most secret depths. I know that this standpoint deprives me of many potential listeners, but those who remain mean an immeasurable treasure for me. [...] I regard creative activity as a kind of soul-fishing, and the 'catch' is the best medicine for loneliness, that most human of sufferings."
  95. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 49: "Folk tunes are never simply quoted: they are radically transformed, manipulated, made to serve the composer's artistic vision. This approach makes possible a style which is at once so demonstrably 'national' as to be politically unassailable, yet modern enough and personal enough to burst the bounds of socrealizm"; and p. 53: "Przedzierzgnę się siwą golębicą is distorted beyond audible recognition ... it is thoroughly dismembered.".
  96. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 59.
  97. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 32.
  98. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 120 quotes Lutosławski, "The different parts can play very complicated rhythms [...] and yet play only the notes of that [twelve-note] chord [...] It may occur that the chord never actually sounds in its entirety—it is supplemented by our memory and imagination."
  99. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 63.
  100. ^ Bodman Rae, C. (1992). Pitch Organisation in the Music of Witold Lutoslawski Since 1979 (PhD thesis). University of Leeds.
  101. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 71.
  102. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 71, also discussion of Symphony No. 1 pp. 24–25 and symmetrical chords in the pitch organisation of Overture for Strings pp. 37–39
  103. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 79: "Solutions to some rhythmic and formal questions still eluded him."
  104. ^ Witold Lutosławski – Guide to Warsaw: Zwycięzców 39. NIFC 2013
  105. ^ Lutosławski & Varga 1976, p. 12, says, with reference to this event, "Composers often do not hear the music that is being played; it only serves as an impulse for something quite different—for the creation of music that only lives in their imagination"; see also Nordwall (1968), p. 20 and Stucky (1981), p. 84.
  106. ^ Stucky 1981, pp. 78–83; Bodman Rae 1999, p. 72.
  107. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 110 quotes Lutosławski: "I do not presuppose any improvised parts, even the shortest, in my works. I am an adherent of a clear-cut division between the role of the composer and that of the performer, and I do not wish even partially to relinquish the authorship of the music I have written."
  108. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 91–92.
  109. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 109.
  110. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 103–104; Stucky 1981, pp. 160–161.
  111. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 84.
  112. ^ Jacobson 1996, pp. 112–113.
  113. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 145.
  114. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, pp. 146–147.
  115. ^ Stucky 1981, p. 106: "Lutosławski's life has given ample evidence of the strength of character and sureness of artistic purpose necessary to regard with equanimity both the blandishments of his 'fans' and the disparagements of his detractors."
  116. ^ Bodman Rae 1999, p. 262: "Above all, he is admired for the musical and moral integrity of his long search, and often difficult struggle, for the personal language and consummate technique that served his individual voice."
  117. ^ Będkowski & Hrabia 2001, p. 1.
  118. ^ Thomas, Adrian (21 August 2019). "Composer of the Month: Witold Lutosławski". Limelight. Retrieved 7 August 2021. (subscription required)
  119. ^ a b The Witold Lutosławski Society, "Medals".
  120. ^ Będkowski & Hrabia 2001, p. 65.
  121. ^ a b "Witold Lutosławski—kolory muzyki, kolory życia" (PDF). Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  122. ^ a b The Witold Lutosławski Society, "Awards".
  123. ^ "Léonie Sonnig Musikfond. All recipients". Retrieved 2 November 2019.
  124. ^ "History of the Fondation Maurice Ravel". Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  125. ^ "Członkowie honorowi". Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  126. ^ "Wihuri Sibelius Prize". Retrieved 2 November 2019.
  127. ^ a b c d The Witold Lutosławski Society, "Honorary doctorates".
  128. ^ a b c d Będkowski & Hrabia 2001, p. 10.
  129. ^ "Witold Lutosławski". The Recording Academy. 23 November 2020. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  130. ^ "Witold Lutosławski". Pour le Mérite. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  131. ^ Będkowski & Hrabia 2001, p. 162.
  132. ^ "M.P. 1994 nr 19 poz. 142". Retrieved 2 November 2019.
Sources

Books

Online

Further reading
See Stucky 1981, pp. 219–237 and Bodman Rae 2001 for extensive bibliographies.
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