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Winnersh Triangle railway station

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Winnersh Triangle
National Rail
Winnersh Triangle railway station - geograph.org.uk - 3292596.jpg
The station platforms
General information
LocationWinnersh, Wokingham
England
Coordinates51°26′13″N 0°53′28″W / 51.437°N 0.891°W / 51.437; -0.891Coordinates: 51°26′13″N 0°53′28″W / 51.437°N 0.891°W / 51.437; -0.891
Grid referenceSU771714
Managed bySouth Western Railway
Platforms2
Other information
Station codeWTI
ClassificationDfT category E
History
Original companyBritish Rail
Key dates
12 May 1986 (1986-05-12)Station opened
Passengers
2017/18Decrease 0.431 million
2018/19Decrease 0.402 million
2019/20Decrease 0.359 million
2020/21Decrease 42,654
2021/22Increase 0.121 million
Notes
Passenger statistics from the Office of Rail and Road
The station building
The station building
Access from station building to London-bound platform
Access from station building to London-bound platform
Access under the railway to Wokingham Road (left, outside fence) and Reading-bound platform (inside fence)
Access under the railway to Wokingham Road (left, outside fence) and Reading-bound platform (inside fence)

Winnersh Triangle railway station is one of two railway stations in Winnersh, Berkshire, England. It is served by South Western Railway services between London Waterloo and Reading. The station is on the west side of Winnersh, 39 miles 35 chains (63.5 km) from London Waterloo and 6.4 kilometres (4.0 mi) from Reading. It is situated on an embankment by which the railway crosses the valley of the River Loddon, and is some 500 metres (1,600 ft) east of the bridge across that river.[1][2]

Winnersh Triangle railway station should not be confused with the much older Winnersh railway station, which is situated on the same line some 1.25 kilometres (0.78 mi) in the London direction.[2]

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Winnersh

Winnersh

Winnersh is a large suburban village and civil parish in the borough of Wokingham in Berkshire, England. The village is located around 2 miles (3.2 km) northwest of Wokingham town centre and around 4 miles (6.4 km) southeast of central Reading. It is roughly bounded by the M4 motorway to the south, the A329(M) motorway to the north, and the River Loddon to the west. The parish extends beyond the M4 to cover the estate village of Sindlesham.

Berkshire

Berkshire

Berkshire is a historic county in South East England. One of the home counties, Berkshire was recognised by Queen Elizabeth II as the Royal County of Berkshire in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974. Berkshire is a county of historic origin, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The county town is Reading.

South Western Railway (train operating company)

South Western Railway (train operating company)

First MTR South Western Trains Limited, trading as South Western Railway (SWR), is a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup (70%) and MTR Corporation (30%) that operates the South Western franchise.

Reading railway station

Reading railway station

Reading railway station is a major transport hub in Reading, Berkshire, England. It is on the northern edge of the town centre, near the main retail and commercial areas and the River Thames, 36 miles (58 km) from London Paddington.

Mile

Mile

The mile, sometimes the international mile or statute mile to distinguish it from other miles, is a British imperial unit and United States customary unit of distance; both are based on the older English unit of length equal to 5,280 English feet, or 1,760 yards. The statute mile was standardised between the British Commonwealth and the United States by an international agreement in 1959, when it was formally redefined with respect to SI units as exactly 1,609.344 metres.

Chain (unit)

Chain (unit)

The chain is a unit of length equal to 66 feet. It is subdivided into 100 links or 4 rods. There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile. In metric terms, it is 20.1168 m long. By extension, chainage is the distance along a curved or straight survey line from a fixed commencing point, as given by an odometer.

River Loddon

River Loddon

The River Loddon is a tributary of the River Thames in southern England. It rises at Basingstoke in Hampshire and flows northwards for 28 miles (45 km) to meet the Thames at Wargrave in Berkshire. Together, the Loddon and its tributaries drain an area of 400 square miles (1,036 km2).

Winnersh railway station

Winnersh railway station

Winnersh railway station, previously known as Sindlesham and Hurst Halt and then Winnersh Halt, is a railway station located in the centre of the village of Winnersh in Berkshire, England. It is served by South Western Railway services between London Waterloo and Reading. The station is 38 miles 53 chains (62.2 km) from London Waterloo and 7.7 kilometres (4.8 mi) from Reading, at the point where the B3030 road crosses the line on an overbridge.

History

British Rail opened the station on 12 May 1986[3] to serve housing developments at Lower Earley, Woodley and Winnersh, as well as the Winnersh Triangle business park which had been developed to the north.[4][5] Constructed at a cost of £375,000,[5] the housing developers contributed 20% while the remainder was met by Berkshire County Council and British Rail. The station's opening coincided with the introduction of the Southern Region's summer timetable which saw an initial basic half-hourly service to both Waterloo and Reading, with some extra services running to Reading and Guildford.[5]

Over the years, the business park has evolved from a mixed office and warehousing form to a more dense office park, including several hotels. At the beginning of the 2010s, a new landscaped bridge was constructed between the front of the station and the business park, avoiding the need for travellers to cross the busy intermediate road. In 2015, a new park and ride site was opened outside the front of the station, the result of the relocation of a site at nearby Loddon Bridge that was found to be prone to flooding.[6][7]

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British Rail

British Rail

British Railways (BR), which from 1965 traded as British Rail, was a state-owned company that operated most of the overground rail transport in Great Britain from 1948 to 1997. It was formed from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies, and was privatised in stages between 1994 and 1997. Originally a trading brand of the Railway Executive of the British Transport Commission, it became an independent statutory corporation in January 1963, when it was formally renamed the British Railways Board.

Lower Earley

Lower Earley

Lower Earley is the southern portion of Earley civil parish and a large suburb of Reading, within the English county of Berkshire. It forms part of a large suburban conurbation of over 85,000 inhabitants adjoining east and south-east Reading. Lower Earley and Earley have a combined population of around 32,000 and Lower Earley itself has developed since the late 1970s. By the mid 1980s it was considered to be the largest private housing development in the United Kingdom. Lower Earley forms a major part of Wokingham Borough. In 2014, the RG6 postcode area was rated one of the most desirable postcode areas to live in England.

Woodley, Berkshire

Woodley, Berkshire

Woodley is a town and civil parish in the Borough of Wokingham, Berkshire, England, four miles (6.4 km) east of Reading and joined to the neighbouring town of Earley, two miles (3.2 km) to the west, and five miles (8 km) from Wokingham. Nearby are the villages of Sonning, Twyford, Winnersh, Hurst and Charvil.

Berkshire County Council

Berkshire County Council

The Council of the Royal County of Berkshire, also known as the Berkshire County Council, was the top-tier local government administrative body for Berkshire from 1889 to 1998. The local authority had responsibilities for education, social services, public transport, planning, emergency services and waste disposal, and had 87 members. Berkshire County Council shared power with six lower-tier district councils, each of which directed local matters.

London Waterloo station

London Waterloo station

Waterloo station, also known as London Waterloo, is a central London terminus on the National Rail network in the United Kingdom, in the Waterloo area of the London Borough of Lambeth. It is connected to a London Underground station of the same name and is adjacent to Waterloo East station on the South Eastern Main Line. The station is the terminus of the South West Main Line to Weymouth via Southampton, the West of England main line to Exeter via Salisbury, the Portsmouth Direct line to Portsmouth Harbour which connects with ferry services to the Isle of Wight, and several commuter services around west and south-west London, Surrey, Hampshire and Berkshire.

Reading railway station

Reading railway station

Reading railway station is a major transport hub in Reading, Berkshire, England. It is on the northern edge of the town centre, near the main retail and commercial areas and the River Thames, 36 miles (58 km) from London Paddington.

Guildford railway station

Guildford railway station

Guildford railway station is at one of three main railway junctions on the Portsmouth Direct Line and serves the town of Guildford in Surrey, England. It is 30 miles 27 chains down the line from London Waterloo via Woking.

Park and ride

Park and ride

A park and ride, also known as incentive parking or a commuter lot, is a parking lot with public transport connections that allows commuters and other people heading to city centres to leave their vehicles and transfer to a bus, rail system, or carpool for the remainder of the journey. The vehicle is left in the parking lot during the day and retrieved when the owner returns. Park and rides are generally located in the suburbs of metropolitan areas or on the outer edges of large cities. A park and ride that only offers parking for meeting a carpool and not connections to public transport may also be called a park and pool.

Facilities

The station has two side platforms, which are long enough for an eight-car train. These are built of timber, the lightweight construction being to reduce the load on the railway embankment across the Loddon Valley. The station building is brick-built and situated at ground level, to the north of the embankment and platforms, with direct pedestrian access to the Winnersh Triangle business park via the landscaped bridge. A secondary entrance to the station is available on the south side, connecting to a footpath to the Wokingham Road and nearby residential roads; both this and the access to the southern platform make use of a pre-existing arch under the railway.[1][8][9]

The station building includes a ticket office, but it is currently staffed only on Monday to Saturday mornings. On Sundays the station is open but the booking office is closed. There is also a self-service ticket machine outside the station building. There is no disabled access to the platforms, and all access between the station entrances and the platforms is by stairs.[9]

The station is situated near to a junction of the A329(M) motorway, providing convenient access from places along that motorway and the M4 motorway, which the A329M intersects 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) to the east. Outside the main entrance to the station is the park and ride site, which is served by express buses (№ 500) running every 15 minutes into central Reading, in addition to the trains at the station. The car park has capacity for 390 cars, and has a current usage of 70% bus and 20% rail park and ride users. 200 metres (660 ft) walk to the south of the station, on Wokingham Road, are stops on the 4 and X4 local bus route that links Reading, Wokingham and Bracknell.[2][7][10]

Services

The station is served by two Waterloo to Reading line trains per hour in each direction off-peak (including Sundays), and up to four trains per hour in peak hours. All North Downs line trains, which share tracks with the Reading to Waterloo line trains between Wokingham and Reading, currently pass through the station without stopping.[11]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Winnersh   South Western Railway
Waterloo to Reading line
  Earley

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National Rail

National Rail

National Rail (NR) is the trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group, an unincorporated association whose membership consists of the passenger train operating companies (TOCs) of England, Scotland, and Wales. The TOCs run the passenger services previously provided by the British Railways Board, from 1965 using the brand name British Rail. Northern Ireland, which is bordered by the Republic of Ireland, has a different system. National Rail services share a ticketing structure and inter-availability that generally do not extend to services which were not part of British Rail.

Winnersh railway station

Winnersh railway station

Winnersh railway station, previously known as Sindlesham and Hurst Halt and then Winnersh Halt, is a railway station located in the centre of the village of Winnersh in Berkshire, England. It is served by South Western Railway services between London Waterloo and Reading. The station is 38 miles 53 chains (62.2 km) from London Waterloo and 7.7 kilometres (4.8 mi) from Reading, at the point where the B3030 road crosses the line on an overbridge.

South Western Railway (train operating company)

South Western Railway (train operating company)

First MTR South Western Trains Limited, trading as South Western Railway (SWR), is a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup (70%) and MTR Corporation (30%) that operates the South Western franchise.

Earley railway station

Earley railway station

Earley railway station serves the town of Earley in Berkshire, England. It is 66 miles 1 chain down the line from London Charing Cross via Redhill. It is on the Waterloo to Reading Line, and forms the last stop before the terminus of the line at Reading.

Future

A new development for the station environment, known as Winnersh Triangle Parkway, has been proposed by Wokingham Borough Council. This will involve the addition of a parking deck over the existing Park and Ride car park that will add an extra 130 parking spaces, a revamp of the ticket office and waiting areas inside the station building, and improvements to pedestrian access in the station forecourt area. Work commenced on the development in April 2021, with completion expected by Spring 2022.[7][12]

Source: "Winnersh Triangle railway station", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winnersh_Triangle_railway_station.

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References
  1. ^ a b Yonge 2008, map 25B
  2. ^ a b c "Winnersh Triangle" (Map). Google Maps. Meta. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  3. ^ Butt 1995, p. 252.
  4. ^ Mitchell & Smith 2008, fig. 28
  5. ^ a b c Abbott, James, ed. (December 1985). "New station for Winnersh". Modern Railways. 42 (445): 609.
  6. ^ "New park and ride for Reading in operation". BBC News. BBC. 26 October 2015. Archived from the original on 2 November 2021. Retrieved 2 November 2021.
  7. ^ a b c "Winnersh Triangle Parkway - Full Business Case" (PDF). Wokingham Borough Council. March 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 November 2021. Retrieved 2 November 2021.
  8. ^ Mitchell & Smith 2008, fig. 29
  9. ^ a b "Station facilities for Winnersh Triangle". National Rail Enquiries. Archived from the original on 1 November 2021. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  10. ^ "Park & Ride". Reading Buses. Archived from the original on 1 November 2021. Retrieved 1 November 2021.
  11. ^ GB eNRT May 2016 Edition, Table 149 (Network Rail)
  12. ^ Riccio, Leon (26 April 2021). "£6.8 million works begin at Winnersh Triangle park and ride". Bracknell News. Archived from the original on 2 November 2021. Retrieved 2 November 2021.
Bibliography
  • Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Yeovil: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. R508.
  • Mitchell, Victor E.; Smith, Keith (September 2008) [1988]. Country Railway Routes: Reading to Guildford. Midhurst: Middleton Press. ISBN 978-0-906520-47-5.
  • Yonge, John (November 2008) [1994]. Jacobs, Gerald (ed.). Railway Track Diagrams 5: Southern & TfL (3rd ed.). Bradford on Avon: Trackmaps. ISBN 978-0-9549866-4-3.
External links

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