Get Our Extension

Willie Mosconi

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Willie Mosconi
Mosconi&Moore.png
Mosconi (left) with "Cowboy Jimmy" Moore at the 1953 World's Invitational[1]
Born
William Joseph Mosconi

June 27, 1913
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US[2]
DiedSeptember 17, 1993(1993-09-17) (aged 80)
Other names"Mr. Pocket Billiards"

William Joseph Mosconi (/mɒˈskni/; June 27, 1913 – September 17, 1993) was an American professional pool player from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mosconi is widely considered one of the greatest pool players of all time. Between the years of 1941 and 1957, he won the World Straight Pool Championship nineteen times. For most of the 20th century, his name was essentially synonymous with pool in North America – he was nicknamed "Mr. Pocket Billiards" – and he was among the first Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame inductees.[3] Mosconi pioneered and regularly employed numerous trick shots, set many records, and helped to popularize pool as a national recreation activity.

During the 1940s and 1950s, the pocket billiards game most often played in competition was called straight pool, or 14.1 continuous, a form of pool considered by most top players to be more difficult than today's fast tournament game nine-ball. Mosconi set the officially-recognized straight pool high run world record of 526 consecutive balls in 1954.[4]

Discover more about Willie Mosconi related topics

Pool (cue sports)

Pool (cue sports)

Pool is a classification of cue sports played on a table with six pockets along the rails, into which balls are deposited. Each specific pool game has its own name; some of the better-known include eight-ball, blackball, nine-ball, ten-ball, seven-ball, straight pool, one-pocket, and bank pool.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, often called Philly, is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the second largest city in both the Northeast megalopolis and Mid-Atlantic regions after New York City. It is one of the most historically significant cities in the United States, and once served as the nation's capital city until 1800. The city's population at the 2020 census was 1,603,797, and over 56 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of Philadelphia. Since 1854, the city has been coextensive with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the Delaware Valley, the nation's seventh-largest and one of the world's largest metropolitan regions with 6.245 million residents in 2020. Philadelphia is known both for its extensive contributions to American history and for its role in the life sciences, business and industry, art, literature, and music.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, Appalachian, and Great Lakes regions of the United States. It borders Delaware to its southeast, Maryland to its south, West Virginia to its southwest, Ohio to its west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to its northwest, New York state to its north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to its east.

World Straight Pool Championship

World Straight Pool Championship

The World Straight Pool Championship is a pool competition, that was held up until the game of Nine-ball became popularized in America. It was the most prestigious straight pool tournament up until the 2010s, when tournaments like the American 14.1 Straight Pool Championship and the European Pool Championship 14.1 that are still held annually, have gained prominence in recent years. During the tournament's early years, it was the only global professional title for straight pool. The event was revived in 2006, in part to restore the game's popularity in the United States. The World Straight Pool Championship was held in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2010 and was sanctioned by the World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA), until ending in 2010, and with it the tournament's history of nearly 100 years. Ralph Greenleaf & Willie Mosconi are the most successful players having both won the tournament on 19 occasions. The oldest player to win the tournament is Irving Crane at 59 years old at the time of his victory. The youngest player to win the tournament is Ralph Greenleaf at 20 years old at the time of his first victory.

Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame

Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame

This is the list of people inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's hall of fame to honour outstanding people who, through their competitive skills and dedication, have enriched the sport and industry. Two categories have been established in the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame. The "Greatest Player" category is awarded for outstanding players who must be 40 years of age or older, have been active professionals for at least 10 years and have recorded significant achievements in national or international competition recognized by the BCA. The "Meritorious Service" category (•) is awarded for those who have made lasting, memorable and important contributions to the game or the billiards industry.

Trick shot

Trick shot

A trick shot is a shot played on a billiards table, which seems unlikely or impossible or requires significant skill. Trick shots frequently involve the balls organized in ways that are unlikely or impossible to appear in normal play, such as balls being in a straight line, or use props such as extra cues or a triangle that would not be allowed on the table during a game. As an organized cue sports discipline, trick shot competition is known as artistic pool.

Straight pool

Straight pool

Straight pool, which is also called 14.1 continuous and 14.1 rack, is a cue sport in which two competing players attempt to pot as many billiard balls as possible without playing a foul. The game was the primary version of pool played in professional competition until it was superseded by faster-playing games like nine-ball and eight-ball in the 1980s.

Nine-ball

Nine-ball

Nine-ball is a discipline of the cue sport pool. The game's origins are traceable to the 1920s in the United States. It is played on a rectangular billiard table with pockets at each of the four corners and in the middle of each long side. Using a cue stick, players must strike the white cue ball to pocket nine colored billiard balls, hitting them in ascending numerical order. An individual game is won by the player pocketing the 9-ball. Matches are usually played as a race to a set number of racks, with the player who reaches the set number winning the match.

Early life

Mosconi's family lived above a pool hall William's father, Joseph Mosconi, owned. Despite that, Joseph was strongly opposed to his son playing pocket billiards, preferring he become a Vaudeville performer. He tried to keeping his young son away from the game by hiding the billiard balls, but Willie improvised by practicing with an old broomstick and small potatoes from his mother's kitchen.[5]

The young Mosconi was a prodigy and his father soon realized that he could use his son's talent to help earn money for their growing family. Joseph Mosconi began advertising challenge matches, and though Willie had to stand on a box in order to reach the table, he beat experienced players many years his senior.[6]

In 1919, an exhibition match was arranged between six-year-old Mosconi and the reigning World Champion, Ralph Greenleaf. The hall was packed, and though Greenleaf won that match, Mosconi played well enough to draw considerable attention and launch his professional career.[6]

Tournaments and exhibitions

In 1924, at the age of 11, Mosconi was the juvenile straight pool champion and was regularly holding trick shot exhibitions.[7] By the early 1930s, Mosconi had taken a brief hiatus from the game, but returned a few years later in the hopes of earning some money.[6]

Upon his return, Mosconi entered one local tournament after another and according to his autobiography, "Willie's Game",[8] he won them all. After a short while, Mosconi was making a living as a professional pool player. Willie claimed he never hustled anyone, beating everyone honestly: "I played everyone straight".[6]

In 1933, Mosconi competed in the Billiard Congress of America (BCA) World Straight Pool Championship. Erwin Rudolph won the title and Willie came in 5th place.[9]

His performance garnered the attention of the president of Brunswick Corporation who immediately hired the young phenom. That same year, Mosconi embarked on a hectic cross-country exhibition tour promoting Brunswick products. Mosconi was joined by his idol and then World Champion Ralph Greenleaf, who was at the top of his game. In the end the scoreline read 57 wins for Greenleaf and a close 50 for the 20-year-old Mosconi.[3]

From 1940 to 1941, a round-robin tournament series was sponsored by billiard halls, with eight invitational players. Mosconi was sponsored by a hall in New York City called McGirr's. He dominated this series, and ran 125 balls from the break five times when only two other players in history had ever done the same.

In 1944, Mosconi enlisted in the United States Army, having already spent several years working within the defense industry. When World War II ended, he returned to a successful tournament career and renewed his affiliation with Brunswick.[6]

After suffering a stroke in 1956, Mosconi slowed down on his tournament appearances in order to recover.[6] In 1958 Mosconi made a return and won the National Invitational Tournament defeating Jimmy Moore.

Mosconi retired from tournament play in 1966, after once again making it to the final of the World Straight Pool Championship but losing to Joe Balsis. He remained active in promoting the game and consulted and appeared in several movies dealing with billiards, made game show appearances and wrote many articles on billiards, as well as co-authored some books. A feud with pool hustler Rudolf "Minnesota Fats" Wanderone (concocted mainly by Wanderone himself) kept Mosconi in the spotlight well into the 1970s and 1980s.

In 1974, Mosconi competed against Rex Williams in the Black Velvet Challenge Cup, where both players competed in Snooker and in various Pocket Billiards games in a 17 day competition, to conclude the winner. The 60 year old Mosconi won the Challenge, winning 7 out of the 18 games in Snooker, while dominating in Straight Pool, Nine-Ball, Eight-Ball, One Pocket and Bank Pool. Mosconi earned $15,000 for winning the challenge match, which was the largest first place prize in pool at the time.

Discover more about Tournaments and exhibitions related topics

Hustling

Hustling

Hustling is the deceptive act of disguising one's skill in a sport or game with the intent of luring someone of probably lesser skill into gambling with the hustler, as a form of both a confidence trick and match fixing. It is most commonly associated with, and originated in pocket billiards (pool), but also can be performed with regard to other sports and gambling activities. Hustlers may also engage in "sharking"—distracting, disheartening, enraging, or even threatening their opponents—to throw them off. Hustlers are thus often called "pool sharks". Professional and semi-pro hustlers sometimes work with a "stakehorse"—a person who provides the money for the hustler to bet with —in exchange for a substantial portion of all winnings. Another form of hustling is challenging "marks" to bet on trick shots that seem nearly impossible but at which the hustler is exceptionally skilled. Chess hustlers are quite common in urban areas in the United States and elsewhere, often offering speed chess against any takers. Unlike most hustlers however, chess hustlers are often assumed to be skilled and are seen as a challenge.

Billiard Congress of America

Billiard Congress of America

The Billiard Congress of America (BCA) is the governing body for cue sports in the United States and Canada, and the regional member organization of the World Pool-Billiard Association (WPA). It was established under this name in 1948 as a non-profit trade organization in order to promote the sport and organize its players via tournaments at various levels. The BCA is headquartered in Broomfield, Colorado. The voting members of the organization are mostly equipment manufacturers.

Erwin Rudolph

Erwin Rudolph

Erwin Rudolph was an American pocket billiards player from Cleveland, Ohio and a five-time world champion. One of his great feats was running 125 points in 32 minutes.

Brunswick Corporation

Brunswick Corporation

Brunswick Corporation, formerly known as the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, is an American corporation that has been developing, manufacturing and marketing a wide variety of products since 1845. Today, Brunswick has more than 13,000 employees operating in 24 countries. Brunswick owns major boating brands, including Sea Ray, Boston Whaler, Bayliner, Mercury Marine, Attwood, Lund, Crestliner, Mastervolt, MotorGuide, Harris Pontoons, Freedom Boat Club, Princecraft, Heyday, Lowe, Uttern, Quicksilver and CZone, among many others. In 2021, Brunswick reported sales of US$5.8 billion. Brunswick's global headquarters is in the northern Chicago suburb of Mettawa, Illinois. On October 4, 2021, Brunswick Corporation announced that it has completed its acquisition of Navico, a global leader in marine electronics and sensors for $1.05 billion, adding to Brunswick the industry leading Navico brands of Lowrance, Simrad, B&G, and C-MAP.

Ralph Greenleaf

Ralph Greenleaf

Ralph Greenleaf was an American professional pool and carom billiards player. Greenleaf is widely considered one of the greatest pool players of all time. Between the years 1919 and 1938, he won the World Straight Pool Championship nineteen times.

Round-robin tournament

Round-robin tournament

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets every other participant, usually in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants/teams are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

Cowboy Jimmy Moore

Cowboy Jimmy Moore

James William Moore, known as Cowboy Jimmy Moore, was a world-class American pocket billiards (pool) player originally from Troup County, Georgia, and for most of his life a resident of Albuquerque, New Mexico, best known for his mastery in the game of straight pool.

Joe Balsis

Joe Balsis

Joseph (Joe) Balsis, nicknamed "the Meatman", was an American professional pool player, who was inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame in 1982.

Rudolf Wanderone

Rudolf Wanderone

Rudolf Walter Wanderone, commonly known as Minnesota Fats, was an American professional billiards player. Although he never won a major pool tournament as "Fats", he was at one time perhaps the most publicly recognized pool player in the United States—not only as a player, but also as an entertainer. Wanderone was inducted in 1984 into the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame for his decades-long public promotion of pool.

Rex Williams

Rex Williams

Desmond Rex Williams is a retired English professional snooker and billiards player. He was the second player to make an official maximum break, achieving this in an exhibition match in December 1965. Williams won the World Professional Billiards Championship from Clark McConachy in 1968, the first time that the title had been contested since 1951. Williams retained the title in several challenge matches in the 1970s, and, after losing it to Fred Davis in 1980, regained it from 1982 to 1983.

Black Velvet (whisky)

Black Velvet (whisky)

Black Velvet Whisky is a Canadian whisky brand owned by Heaven Hill and produced in the Black Velvet Distillery in Lethbridge, Alberta. It has a smooth taste and is known for its black labeling.

Pool (cue sports)

Pool (cue sports)

Pool is a classification of cue sports played on a table with six pockets along the rails, into which balls are deposited. Each specific pool game has its own name; some of the better-known include eight-ball, blackball, nine-ball, ten-ball, seven-ball, straight pool, one-pocket, and bank pool.

As an author

Mosconi authored an autobiography titled Willie's Game, published in 1993.[8]

He and a ghost writer authored an instructional book on pocket billiards entitled Willie Mosconi on Pocket Billiards.[10] In the book he offers advice on fundamentals, includes photographs and diagrams on shotmaking and provides straight pool strategies. The book was published originally [number 121 in the Little Sports Library series] by Ziff-Davis Publishing Company of Chicago & New York in July 1948. It was reissued by Crown Publishers of New York in 1959. A second ghost-written book (which on some finer points contradicts On Pocket Billiards) was also published under his name.

526 high run

Mosconi set the world record by running 526 consecutive balls without a miss during a straight pool exhibition in Springfield, Ohio on March 19–20, 1954.[11] A handwritten and notarized affidavit[12] with the signatures of more than 35 eyewitnesses exists as proof of this feat. The record has been surpassed, with 626 consecutive balls run by John Schmidt on May 27, 2019, recorded on a videotape.[13] Critics have argued that Mosconi's record was made in competition while Schmidt simply set up break shots for himself, and that his video was never released.[14][15] In similar fashion to Schmidt, on January 18, 2022 as part of the "Legends of Pocket Billiards" high run series, Jayson Shaw completed a 51-rack record-breaking run of 669.[16]

Mosconi's record was set on a 4 × 8 foot Brunswick table with 5 1/4 inch corner pockets at the East High Billiard Club. Schmidt's run was on a 4 1/2 by 9 foot table which is more difficult in the sense that longer shots are required but which is easier to play on in the sense that there is more room for the balls to spread, creating unfettered shots. Mosconi competed successfully on 4 1/2 × 9 and even 5 x 10 ft tables.

Discover more about 526 high run related topics

Springfield, Ohio

Springfield, Ohio

Springfield is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Clark County. The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio and is situated on the Mad River, Buck Creek, and Beaver Creek, approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Columbus and 25 miles (40 km) northeast of Dayton. Springfield is home to Wittenberg University, a liberal arts college.

Notary public

Notary public

A notary public of the common law is a public officer constituted by law to serve the public in non-contentious matters usually concerned with general financial transactions, estates, deeds, powers-of-attorney, and foreign and international business. A notary's main functions are to validate the signature of a person ; administer oaths and affirmations; take affidavits and statutory declarations, including from witnesses; authenticate the execution of certain classes of documents; take acknowledgments ; protest notes and bills of exchange; provide notice of foreign drafts; prepare marine or ship's protests in cases of damage; provide exemplifications and notarial copies; and, to perform certain other official acts depending on the jurisdiction. Such transactions are known as notarial acts, or more commonly, notarizations. The term notary public only refers to common-law notaries and should not be confused with civil-law notaries.

Affidavit

Affidavit

An affidavit is a written statement voluntarily made by an affiant or deponent under an oath or affirmation which is administered by a person who is authorized to do so by law. Such a statement is witnessed as to the authenticity of the affiant's signature by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public or commissioner of oaths. An affidavit is a type of verified statement or showing, or in other words, it contains a verification, which means that it is made under oath on penalty of perjury, and this serves as evidence for its veracity and is required in court proceedings.

John Schmidt (pool player)

John Schmidt (pool player)

John Schmidt is an American pool player, born in Keokuk, Iowa. Specialising in straight pool, Schmidt held the record for the highest run ever made (626), until Jayson Shaw broke that record with a high run of 714 in January 2022. Schmidt won the U.S. Open 9-Ball Championships in 2006 defeating Rodolfo Luat in the final. He was also part of the American team at two Mosconi Cups in 2006 and 2014.

Jayson Shaw

Jayson Shaw

Jayson Shaw is a Scottish pool player. In 2010, Shaw was a WPA World Blackball Champion. In 2016, Shaw won the 25th International Challenge of Champions event.

Brunswick Corporation

Brunswick Corporation

Brunswick Corporation, formerly known as the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, is an American corporation that has been developing, manufacturing and marketing a wide variety of products since 1845. Today, Brunswick has more than 13,000 employees operating in 24 countries. Brunswick owns major boating brands, including Sea Ray, Boston Whaler, Bayliner, Mercury Marine, Attwood, Lund, Crestliner, Mastervolt, MotorGuide, Harris Pontoons, Freedom Boat Club, Princecraft, Heyday, Lowe, Uttern, Quicksilver and CZone, among many others. In 2021, Brunswick reported sales of US$5.8 billion. Brunswick's global headquarters is in the northern Chicago suburb of Mettawa, Illinois. On October 4, 2021, Brunswick Corporation announced that it has completed its acquisition of Navico, a global leader in marine electronics and sensors for $1.05 billion, adding to Brunswick the industry leading Navico brands of Lowrance, Simrad, B&G, and C-MAP.

The Hustler (1961)

Mosconi was the technical advisor on the 1961 film The Hustler, starring Paul Newman, Jackie Gleason, George C. Scott, and Piper Laurie. The movie played a major part in the boom in the popularity of pool. Mosconi's job was to teach Newman how to walk, talk, and shoot like a real pool hustler. Newman had never even picked up a pool cue before filming, but Mosconi's instruction helped to hide Newman's inexperience. According to Mosconi, Gleason was already skilled at billiards, and Mosconi recommended Gleason for the role of the original "Minnesota Fats".[6]

Mosconi also had a cameo role as himself, acting as a stakes holder during the first match-up between the film's characters "Fast Eddie" Felson and "Minnesota Fats". Gleason can be heard saying "Willie, hang on to that" when the match commences. At various points in the extended scene, Mosconi can be seen in the audience watching the match.

Mosconi also had a cameo role as himself in George Thorogood's official video for his song "Bad to the Bone".

Discover more about The Hustler (1961) related topics

Technical advisor

Technical advisor

In film production, a technical advisor is someone who advises the director on the convincing portrayal of a subject. The advisor's expertise adds realism both to the acting and to the setting of a movie.

The Hustler

The Hustler

The Hustler is a 1961 American sports romantic drama film directed by Robert Rossen from Walter Tevis's 1959 novel of the same name, adapted by Rossen and Sidney Carroll. It tells the story of small-time pool hustler "Fast Eddie" Felson and his desire to break into the "major league" of professional hustling and high-stakes wagering that follows it. He throws his raw talent and ambition up against the best player in the country, seeking to best the legendary pool player "Minnesota Fats".

Paul Newman

Paul Newman

Paul Leonard Newman was an American actor, film director, race car driver, philanthropist, and entrepreneur. He was the recipient of numerous awards, including an Academy Award, a BAFTA Award, three Golden Globe Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a Primetime Emmy Award, a Silver Bear, a Cannes Film Festival Award, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

Jackie Gleason

Jackie Gleason

John Herbert Gleason was an American actor, comedian, writer, composer, and conductor known affectionately as "The Great One." Developing a style and characters from growing up in Brooklyn, New York, he was known for his brash visual and verbal comedy, exemplified by his city-bus-driver character Ralph Kramden in the television series The Honeymooners. He also developed The Jackie Gleason Show, which maintained high ratings from the mid-1950s through 1970. After originating in New York City, filming moved to Miami Beach, Florida, in 1964 after Gleason took up permanent residence there.

George C. Scott

George C. Scott

George Campbell Scott was an American actor, director, and producer who had a celebrated career on both stage and screen. With a gruff demeanor and commanding presence, Scott became known for his portrayal of stern, but complex, authority figures such as prosecutor Claude Dancer in Anatomy of a Murder, General Buck Turgidson in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove, Herbert Bock in The Hospital, Ebenezer Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, Lt. Kinderman in The Exorcist III, and General George S. Patton in the biopic Patton, which won him the Academy Award for Best Actor. Described by The Guardian as "a battler and an actor of rare courage", his performances won him widespread recognition and numerous other accolades, including a Golden Globe, a Genie Award, and two Primetime Emmys.

Piper Laurie

Piper Laurie

Piper Laurie is an American actress. She is known for her roles in the films The Hustler (1961), Carrie (1976), and Children of a Lesser God (1986), all of which brought her Academy Award nominations. She is also known for her performances as Kirsten Arnesen in the original TV production of Days of Wine and Roses, and as Catherine Martell in the television series Twin Peaks, for which she won a Golden Globe Award in 1991.

Filmography

1937: Super Cue Men, a short feature starring Mosconi, Jimmy Caras and Joi Lansing.

1945: Columbia World of Sports: "Champion of the Cue", an eight-minute "sports reel" in which Mosconi demonstrates his cueing expertise in slow motion.

1953: Columbia World of Sports: "Billiard and Bowling Champs", another short documentary starring Willie Mosconi and carom billiards great Willie Hoppe (as well as bowlers), once again in slow motion.

1950–57: Mosconi appeared on Toast of the Town later known as The Ed Sullivan Show on three occasions: April 23, 1950, January 6, 1952,

September 25, 1961: Theatrical release of The Hustler (see above).

February 5, 1962: Mosconi was a contestant on the television game show I've Got a Secret.

September 2, 1962: Mosconi was a contestant on the television game show What's My Line?.

1966: An episode of Get Smart, "The Dead Spy Scrawls" {1/18}, featured actor Harry Bartell in the role of "Willie Marconi," trying to teach Maxwell Smart how to play pool. While some have erroneously believed this is a cameo of Willie Mosconi playing himself, the Marconi character is a fictitious but obvious tribute to Mosconi, who is acknowledged by The Chief as "the greatest pool player in the world."

February 25, 1978: "The Great Pool Shoot-Out", a US$15,000 match between Rudolf "Minnesota Fats" Wanderone, Jr. and Mosconi at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City. Mosconi won all three sets of the competition, which included nine-ball, eight ball, and rotation, 5–2, 5–3 and 5–2 respectively. Aired on ABC's Wide World of Sports[17] with commentator Howard Cosell and referee Charles Ursitti.

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s: Mosconi made several other television appearances competing in challenge matches with other legends such as Jimmy Caras, Luther Lassiter, Irving Crane, Joe Balsis and "Fats" Wanderone. Many of these shows aired on ABC and the fledgling ESPN network.

May 9, 1980: Mosconi played a sportscaster in the film The Baltimore Bullet starring James Coburn and Omar Sharif.

1982: He appeared in the music video for George Thorogood's "Bad to the Bone", as a spectator and betting on Bo Diddley's character.

October 1984:In the Resorts International Shoot-Out—Mosconi lost to his rival "Minnesota Fats" Wanderone.

August 10, 1991: Mosconi played his last challenge match, against Jimmy Caras at the Valley Billiards Hall of Fame tribute dinner show. The event was hosted by billiard artists the Birkbeck Twins at the Williamson Restaurant in Horsham, Pennsylvania. Both players were stopped every couple of racks for interviews.

His story was also featured in an episode of Mysteries at the Museum.

Discover more about Filmography related topics

Joi Lansing

Joi Lansing

Joi Lansing was an American model, film and television actress, and nightclub singer. She was noted for her pin-up photos and roles in B-movies, as well as a prominent role in the famous opening "tracking shot" in Orson Welles' 1958 crime drama Touch of Evil.

Carom billiards

Carom billiards

Carom billiards, sometimes called carambole billiards, is the overarching title of a family of cue sports generally played on cloth-covered, pocketless billiard tables. In its simplest form, the object of the game is to score points or "counts" by caroming one's own cue ball off both the opponent's cue ball and the object ball on a single shot. The invention as well as the exact date of origin of carom billiards is somewhat obscure but is thought to be traceable to 18th-century France.

I've Got a Secret

I've Got a Secret

I've Got a Secret is an American panel game show produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman for CBS television. Created by comedy writers Allan Sherman and Howard Merrill, it was a derivative of Goodson-Todman's own panel show, What's My Line? Instead of celebrity panelists trying to determine a contestant's occupation, as in What's My Line, the panel tried to determine a contestant's secret: something that is unusual, amazing, embarrassing, or humorous about that person.

Get Smart

Get Smart

Get Smart is an American comedy television series parodying the secret agent genre that had become widely popular in the first half of the 1960s, with the release of the James Bond films. It was created by Mel Brooks and Buck Henry, and had its television premiere on NBC on September 18, 1965. It stars Don Adams as agent Maxwell Smart, Barbara Feldon as Agent 99, and Edward Platt as The Chief. Henry said that they created the show at the request of Daniel Melnick to capitalize on James Bond and Inspector Clouseau, "the two biggest things in the entertainment world today". Brooks described it as "an insane combination of James Bond and Mel Brooks comedy".

American Broadcasting Company

American Broadcasting Company

The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American commercial broadcast television network. It is the flagship property of the ABC Entertainment Group division of The Walt Disney Company. The network is headquartered in Burbank, California, on Riverside Drive, directly across the street from Walt Disney Studios and adjacent to the Roy E. Disney Animation Building. The network's secondary offices, and headquarters of its news division, are in New York City, at its broadcast center at 77 West 66th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Howard Cosell

Howard Cosell

Howard William Cosell was an American sports journalist, broadcaster and author. Cosell became prominent and influential during his tenure with ABC Sports from 1953 until 1985.

Exhibition game

Exhibition game

An exhibition game is a sporting event whose prize money and impact on the player's or the team's rankings is either zero or otherwise greatly reduced. In team sports, matches of this type are often used to help coaches and managers select and condition players for the competitive matches of a league season or tournament. If the players usually play in different teams in other leagues, exhibition games offer an opportunity for the players to learn to work with each other. The games can be held between separate teams or between parts of the same team.

Luther Lassiter

Luther Lassiter

Luther Clement Lassiter, Jr., nicknamed Wimpy, was an American pool player from Elizabeth City, North Carolina. The winner of 7 world pocket billiard championships and numerous other titles, Lassiter is most well known for his wizardry in the game of nine-ball and is widely considered one of the greatest players in history, He was inducted into the Billiards Congress of America's Hall of Fame in 1983. That same year, he was also inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame. He was ranked number 9 on the Billiards Digest 50 Greatest Players of the Century.

Irving Crane

Irving Crane

Irving Crane, nicknamed "the Deacon", was an American pool player from Livonia, New York, and ranks among the stellar players in the history of the sport. Widely considered one of the greatest pool players of all time, and a member of the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame, he is best known for his mastery in the game of straight pool at which he won numerous championships, including six World Straight Pool Championship titles.

Joe Balsis

Joe Balsis

Joseph (Joe) Balsis, nicknamed "the Meatman", was an American professional pool player, who was inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame in 1982.

ESPN

ESPN

ESPN is an American international basic cable sports channel owned by ESPN Inc., owned jointly by The Walt Disney Company (80%) and Hearst Communications (20%). The company was founded in 1979 by Bill Rasmussen along with his son Scott Rasmussen and Ed Eagan.

James Coburn

James Coburn

James Harrison Coburn III was an American film and television actor who was featured in more than 70 films, largely action roles, and made 100 television appearances during a 45-year career.

Legacy

In 1968, at the age of 55, Mosconi was inducted into the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame.[3]

In 1994, the Mosconi Cup, an annual pool competition between American and European players, was founded in his honor. The event has been held every year since then.

In 2006, Mosconi was posthumously honored with membership in the Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame.[18]

Discover more about Legacy related topics

Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame

Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame

This is the list of people inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's hall of fame to honour outstanding people who, through their competitive skills and dedication, have enriched the sport and industry. Two categories have been established in the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame. The "Greatest Player" category is awarded for outstanding players who must be 40 years of age or older, have been active professionals for at least 10 years and have recorded significant achievements in national or international competition recognized by the BCA. The "Meritorious Service" category (•) is awarded for those who have made lasting, memorable and important contributions to the game or the billiards industry.

1994 Mosconi Cup

1994 Mosconi Cup

The 1994 Miller Pilsner Mosconi Cup, the inaugural edition of the annual nine-ball pool competition between teams representing Europe and the United States, took place 15–18 December 1994 at the Roller Bowl in Romford, London, England.

Mosconi Cup

Mosconi Cup

The Mosconi Cup is an annual nine-ball pool tournament contested since 1994 between teams representing Europe and the United States. Named after American pool player Willie Mosconi, the event is comparable to the Ryder Cup in golf and the Weber Cup in bowling.

Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame

Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame

The Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame is a nonprofit organization in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that was established in May 2002 to honor individuals and groups who are either area natives who became prominent in the field of sports or who became prominent in the field of sports in the region.

Personal life

Shortly before winning his first World Straight Pool Championship in 1941, Mosconi married Ann Harrison, his first wife. Shortly thereafter the first of his three children was born, William, Jr., who attended St. Joseph's Prep in Philadelphia and graduated with the class of 1959. Willie's and Ann's daughter, Candace, followed soon after William, Jr. The marriage ended in divorce.

Mosconi married his second wife, Flora Marchini, in 1953. Their daughter Gloria was born in 1954. Flora remained married to Willie until his death in 1993.

Death

Willie Mosconi died of a heart attack[4] on September 17, 1993, at his home in Haddon Heights, New Jersey.[2] He is interred at New Saint Marys Cemetery, in Bellmawr, New Jersey.

Source: "Willie Mosconi", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willie_Mosconi.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

See also
Notes
  • Billiards: The Official Rules and Records Book 1992
  • Billiard Digest, Vol 16, No. 2
  • Keen, Cathy (June 5, 2002). "Willie Mosconi Papers, 1924–2000 #744". National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
References
  1. ^ Mizerak, Steve; Panozzo, Michael E. (1990). Steve Mizerak's Complete Book of Pool. Chicago, IL: Contemporary Books. p. 43. ISBN 0-8092-4255-9.
  2. ^ a b "Willie Mosconi, 80; Was Champion Billiards Player". Seattle Times. September 18, 1993. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  3. ^ a b c "Hall of Fame Inductees: 1966-1968". Billiard Congress of America. Archived from the original on July 4, 2013. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Willie Mosconi, 80, Who Ruled The World of Billiards With Style". The New York Times. September 18, 1993. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  5. ^ "Mosconi, "Willie" (William J.)". Sports Biographies. Ralph Hickok. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Keen, Cathy (2002). "Biography". Willie Mosconi Papers, 1924–2000. National Museum of American History. Archived from the original on February 6, 2008. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  7. ^ ""Boy Wonder" poster". National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution. c. 1924. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  8. ^ a b Mosconi, Willie; Stanley Cohen (1993). Willie's Game. NY: Macmillan. p. 264. ISBN 0-02-587495-0.
  9. ^ Dyer, R.A. "Untold Stories: Mosconi Made World Debut by Weird Fluke". Billiards Digest. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  10. ^ Willie Mosconi on Pocket Billiards, Amazon.com
  11. ^ "Mosconi Claims Record For Billiard Run of 526" (PDF). The New York Times. March 21, 1954. Retrieved January 30, 2021.
  12. ^ "Willie Mosconi Papers, Affidavits attesting to records set by Mosconi 1954-54". NMAH.AC.0744, Box 1, Folder 15, Image AC0744-0000004-01.tif, UAN = NMAH-AC0744-0000004-01: Smithsonian. Retrieved January 30, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
  13. ^ Mather, Victor (May 28, 2019). "After Much Effort, an 'Unbreakable' Record in Straight Pool Is Topped". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  14. ^ "Billiards Digest". Billiardsdigest.com. Retrieved June 11, 2022.
  15. ^ Panazzo, Mike. "For the record..." Billiards Digest. Archived from the original on September 16, 2020. Retrieved October 29, 2020.
  16. ^ "JAYSON SHAW ACHIEVES RECORD STRAIGHT POOL HIGH RUN". AZ Billiards. Retrieved July 2, 2022.
  17. ^ 1970s Sports Milestones via ESPN
  18. ^ "Inductees". Philadelphia Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 10, 2013.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.