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Unstoppable (2010 film)

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Unstoppable
Unstoppable Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byTony Scott
Written byMark Bomback
Produced by
Starring
CinematographyBen Seresin
Edited by
Music byHarry Gregson-Williams
Production
companies
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release dates
  • October 26, 2010 (2010-10-26) (Westwood)
  • November 12, 2010 (2010-11-12) (United States)
Running time
98 minutes[2]
CountryUnited States[3][2][4]
LanguageEnglish
Budget$85–100 million[5][6][7]
Box office$167.8 million[7]

Unstoppable is a 2010 American disaster action thriller film directed and produced by Tony Scott and starring Denzel Washington and Chris Pine. It is based on the real-life CSX 8888 incident, telling the story of a runaway freight train and the two men who attempt to stop it. It was the last film Tony Scott directed before his death in 2012.

The film was released in the United States and Canada on November 12, 2010. It received generally positive reviews from critics and grossed $167 million against a production budget between $85–100 million. It was nominated for an Oscar for Best Sound Editing at the 83rd Academy Awards, but lost to Inception.

Discover more about Unstoppable (2010 film) related topics

Disaster film

Disaster film

A disaster film or disaster movie is a film genre that has an impending or ongoing disaster as its subject and primary plot device. Such disasters may include natural disasters, accidents, military/terrorist attacks or global catastrophes such as a pandemic. A subgenre of action films, these films usually feature some degree of build-up, the disaster itself, and sometimes the aftermath, usually from the point of view of specific individual characters or their families or portraying the survival tactics of different people.

Tony Scott

Tony Scott

Anthony David Leighton Scott was an English film director and producer. He was known for directing highly successful action and thriller films such as Top Gun (1986), Beverly Hills Cop II (1987), Days of Thunder (1990), The Last Boy Scout (1991), True Romance (1993), Crimson Tide (1995), Enemy of the State (1998), Man on Fire (2004), Déjà Vu (2006), and Unstoppable (2010).

Denzel Washington

Denzel Washington

Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been described as an actor who reconfigured "the concept of classic movie stardom". Throughout his career spanning over four decades, Washington has received numerous accolades, including a Tony Award, two Academy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards and two Silver Bears. In 2016, he received the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award, and in 2020, The New York Times named him the greatest actor of the 21st century. In 2022, Washington received the Presidential Medal of Freedom bestowed upon him by President Joe Biden.

Chris Pine

Chris Pine

Chris Pine is an American actor. He is best known for his roles as James T. Kirk in the Star Trek reboot film series (2009–present), Steve Trevor in the DC Extended Universe films Wonder Woman (2017) and Wonder Woman 1984 (2020), Will Colson in Unstoppable (2010), and Toby Howard in Hell or High Water (2016).

CSX 8888 incident

CSX 8888 incident

The CSX 8888 incident, also known as the Crazy Eights incident, was a runaway train event involving a CSX Transportation freight train in the U.S. state of Ohio on May 15, 2001. Locomotive #8888, an EMD SD40-2, was pulling a train of 47 cars, including some loaded with hazardous chemicals, and ran uncontrolled for just under two hours at up to 51 miles per hour (82 km/h). It was finally halted by a railroad crew in a second locomotive, which caught up with the runaway train and coupled their locomotive to the rear car.

Runaway train

Runaway train

A runaway train is a type of railroad incident in which unattended rolling stock is accidentally allowed to roll onto the main line, a moving train loses enough braking power to be unable to stop in safety, or a train operates at unsafe speeds due to loss of operator control. If the uncontrolled rolling stock derails or hits another train, it will result in a train wreck.

Rail freight transport

Rail freight transport

Rail freight transport is the use of railroads and trains to transport cargo as opposed to human passengers.

Academy Awards

Academy Awards

The Academy Awards, better known as the Oscars, are awards for artistic and technical merit for the American film industry. The awards are regarded by many as the most prestigious, significant awards in the entertainment industry in the United States. Given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), the awards are a recognition of excellence in cinematic achievements of primarily American films, as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette as a trophy, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit," although more commonly referred to by its nickname, the "Oscar." The statuette, depicting a knight rendered in the Art Deco style, was originally sculpted by Los Angeles artist George Stanley from a design sketch by art director Cedric Gibbons.

Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

The Academy Award for Best Sound Editing was an Academy Award granted yearly to a film exhibiting the finest or most aesthetic sound design or sound editing. Sound editing is the creation of sound effects. The award was usually received by the Supervising Sound Editors of the film, sometimes accompanied by the Sound Designers. Beginning with the 93rd Academy Awards, Best Sound Editing was combined with Best Sound Mixing into a single award for Best Sound.

83rd Academy Awards

83rd Academy Awards

The 83rd Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2010 in the United States and took place on February 27, 2011, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST. During the ceremony, Academy Awards were presented in 24 competitive categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer, with Mischer also serving as director. Actors James Franco and Anne Hathaway co-hosted the ceremony, marking the first time for each.

Inception

Inception

Inception is a 2010 science fiction action film written and directed by Christopher Nolan, who also produced the film with Emma Thomas, his wife. The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a professional thief who steals information by infiltrating the subconscious of his targets. He is offered a chance to have his criminal history erased as payment for the implantation of another person's idea into a target's subconscious. The ensemble cast includes Ken Watanabe, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Elliot Page, Tom Hardy, Dileep Rao, Cillian Murphy, Tom Berenger, and Michael Caine.

Plot

While two yard hostlers are moving a mixed-freight Allegheny and West Virginia Railroad (AWVR) train at Fuller Yard in northern Pennsylvania, Dewey, the engineer, realizes that a trailing-point switch ahead is not correctly aligned and leaves the cab of lead locomotive 777 to change it, setting the throttle to idle. However, the throttle pops into full throttle before he can get back on, leaving the train unattended going south at full speed down the mainline.

Believing the train is coasting, Dewey calls yardmaster Connie Hooper, who orders lead welder Ned Oldham to get ahead of the train in his pickup truck and switch it off the main track, but when he arrives to find that the train has already passed, they realize it is running on full power. Connie alerts Oscar Galvin, VP of Train Operations, and contacts local, county, and state police, asking them to block all level crossings, while Ned continues to chase 777 in his truck. Federal Railroad Administration inspector Scott Werner, while visiting Fuller Yard to meet with students on the Railroad Safety Campaign excursion train (RSC 2002), warns that eight of 777's 39 freight cars contain highly toxic and flammable molten phenol, which would cause a major disaster if the train should derail in a populated area.

Connie suggests they purposely derail the train while it passes through unpopulated farmland. Galvin dismisses her opinion, believing he can save the railroad money by lashing the train behind two locomotives 7375+7346 helmed by veteran engineer Judd Stewart, slowing it down enough for employee and former U.S. Marine Ryan Scott to descend from a helicopter to the control cab of 777. However, Ryan is knocked unconscious during the attempt when 777 suddenly lunges forward as he touches down. Stewart attempts to divert 777 to a siding but fails, he is killed when his locomotives derail at a switch and the diesel fuel ignites, destroying the lash-up locomotives. Galvin Realizes that 777 will derail on the Stanton Curve, near the heavily-populated Southern Pennsylvania town of Stanton, and decides to derail the runaway just north of the smaller town of Arklow.

Meanwhile, veteran AWVR railroad engineer Frank Barnes and conductor Will Colson, a new hire preoccupied with a restraining order from his wife Darcy, are pulling 25 cars with locomotive 1206 on the same line going north. Ordered onto a siding off the mainline, they narrowly pull into a RIP track before 777 races by, smashing through their last boxcar. Frank observes that 777's last car has an open coupler and proposes that they travel in reverse and attempt to couple their engine to the runaway, using 1206's brakes to slow down 777 before it reaches the Stanton Curve. Will uncouples their own cars while Frank reports his plan to Connie and Galvin, warning that Galvin's idea of using portable derailers will not work given 777's momentum. Galvin threatens to fire Frank, who informs Galvin that he is already being forced into early retirement. Galvin threatens to fire Will as well, but the men ignore him and pursue 777.

As Frank predicted, the train barrels through the portable derailers unhindered, to Galvin's dumbfounded shock and disbelief. Knowing that Frank's plan is their only chance at preventing disaster, Connie and Werner take control of the situation from Galvin. Meanwhile, Darcy learns from her sister about Will's involvement in the chase, while Frank's daughters learn of their father's involvement from television news coverage at the Hooters where they both work.

Frank and Will catch up to 777's trailing hopper car and attempt to engage the coupler. When the locking pin will not engage, Will kicks it into place, but his foot gets crushed in the process. Will hobbles back to 1206's cab, and Frank tries to slow 777 with the independent brakes, but makes little headway with 777 still under power. Will stays in the cab to work the dynamic brakes and throttle while Frank works his way along the top of 777's cars in a risky attempt to engage the handbrakes on each car. Eventually, 1206's brakes burn out and the train starts gaining speed again. Using the independent air brake, Will coordinates brake timing with Frank and they manage to reduce speed enough to clear the Stanton Curve (B & O Railroad Viaduct). As 777 picks up speed, Frank finds the path to 777's cab blocked. Ned arrives in his truck on a road parallel to the tracks, and Will jumps onto the bed of Ned's truck. Ned races to the front of 777 where Will leaps onto the locomotive, reduces the throttle to idle, and applies the brakes, finally bringing the runaway train to a safe stop. Darcy arrives with Will's son and reunites with him and Connie comes to congratulate the men, who are hailed as heroes.

Before the closing credits, it's revealed that Frank was promoted and later retires with full benefits. Will is happily married to Darcy (who is currently expecting their second child), recovers from his injuries, and continues working with AWVR. Connie is promoted to Galvin's VP position, while it’s implied Galvin was fired for his poor handling of the incident, costing the railroad money and equipment and causing Stewart’s death due to his own stupidity trying to avoid that scenario. Ryan makes a full recovery, and Dewey, who is held responsible for causing the situation, is fired from his job and goes on to work in the fast-food industry.

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Classification yard

Classification yard

A classification yard, marshalling yard or shunting yard is a railway yard found at some freight train stations, used to separate railway cars onto one of several tracks. First the cars are taken to a track, sometimes called a lead or a drill. From there the cars are sent through a series of switches called a ladder onto the classification tracks. Larger yards tend to put the lead on an artificially built hill called a hump to use the force of gravity to propel the cars through the ladder.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, Appalachian, and Great Lakes regions of the United States. It borders Delaware to its southeast, Maryland to its south, West Virginia to its southwest, Ohio to its west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to its northwest, New York state to its north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to its east.

Facing and trailing

Facing and trailing

Facing or trailing are railway turnouts in respect to whether they are divergent or convergent. When a train traverses a turnout in a facing direction, it may diverge onto either of the two routes. When travelled in a trailing direction, the two routes converge onto each other.

Federal Railroad Administration

Federal Railroad Administration

The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is an agency in the United States Department of Transportation (DOT). The agency was created by the Department of Transportation Act of 1966. The purpose of the FRA is to promulgate and enforce rail safety regulations, administer railroad assistance programs, conduct research and development in support of improved railroad safety and national rail transportation policy, provide for the rehabilitation of Northeast Corridor rail passenger service, and consolidate government support of rail transportation activities.

Phenol

Phenol

Phenol is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH. It is a white crystalline solid that is volatile. The molecule consists of a phenyl group bonded to a hydroxy group. Mildly acidic, it requires careful handling because it can cause chemical burns.

Conductor (rail)

Conductor (rail)

A conductor or guard is a train crew member responsible for operational and safety duties that do not involve actual operation of the train/locomotive. The conductor title is most common in North American railway operations, but the role is common worldwide under various job titles. In Commonwealth English, a conductor is also known as guard or train manager.

Boxcar

Boxcar

A boxcar is the North American (AAR) term for a railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to carry freight. The boxcar, while not the simplest freight car design, is considered one of the most versatile since it can carry most loads. Boxcars have side sliding doors of varying size and operation, and some include end doors and adjustable bulkheads to load very large items.

Derail

Derail

A derail or derailer is a device used to prevent fouling of a rail track by unauthorized movements of trains or unattended rolling stock. The device works by derailing the equipment as it rolls over or through it.

Hooters

Hooters

Hooters is the registered trademark used by two American restaurant chains: Hooters, Inc., based in Clearwater, Florida, and Hooters of America, Inc. based in Atlanta, Georgia, and owned by the private investment firm Nord Bay Capital. The Hooters name is a double entendre referring to both a North American slang term for women's breasts and the logo.

Hopper car

Hopper car

A hopper car (US) or hopper wagon (UIC) is a type of railroad freight car used to transport loose bulk commodities such as coal, ore, grain, and track ballast. Two main types of hopper car exist: covered hopper cars, which are equipped with a roof, and open hopper cars, which do not have a roof.

Dynamic braking

Dynamic braking

Dynamic braking is the use of an electric traction motor as a generator when slowing a vehicle such as an electric or diesel-electric locomotive. It is termed "rheostatic" if the generated electrical power is dissipated as heat in brake grid resistors, and "regenerative" if the power is returned to the supply line. Dynamic braking reduces wear on friction-based braking components, and regeneration lowers net energy consumption. Dynamic braking may also be used on railcars with multiple units, light rail vehicles, electric trams, trolleybuses, and electric and hybrid electric automobiles.

B & O Railroad Viaduct

B & O Railroad Viaduct

B & O Railroad Viaduct is a historic structure in Bellaire, Ohio, listed in the National Register of Historic Places on June 22, 1976.

Cast

  • Denzel Washington as Frank Barnes, a veteran railroad engineer.
  • Chris Pine as Will Colson, a young train conductor.
  • Rosario Dawson as Connie Hooper, the yardmaster of Fuller Yard.
  • Ethan Suplee as Dewey, a hostler who accidentally instigates the disaster.
  • Kevin Dunn as Oscar Galvin, vice-president of AWVR train operations.
  • Kevin Corrigan as Inspector Scott Werner, an FRA inspector who helps Frank, Will, and Connie.
  • Kevin Chapman as Bunny, a railroad operations dispatcher for Fuller Yard.
  • Lew Temple as Ned Oldham, a railroad lead welder.
  • T. J. Miller as Gilleece, Dewey's conductor, also a hostler.
  • Jessy Schram as Darcy Colson, Will's estranged wife.
  • David Warshofsky as Judd Stewart, a veteran engineer who is friends with Frank & dies in an attempt to slow the runaway train.
  • Andy Umberger as Janeway, the president of AWVR.
  • Elizabeth Mathis as Nicole Barnes, Frank's daughter who works as a waitress at Hooters.
  • Meagan Tandy as Maya Barnes, Frank's daughter who works as a waitress at Hooters.
  • Aisha Hinds as a Railroad Safety Campaign coordinator in an excursion train to Fuller Yard for a field trip designed to teach schoolchildren about railroad safety.
  • Ryan Ahern as Ryan Scott, a railway employee and US Marine veteran of the war in Afghanistan who is injured in an attempt to stop the runaway.
  • Jeff Wincott as Jesse Colson, Will's brother whom Will is living with at the start of the film.

Discover more about Cast related topics

Denzel Washington

Denzel Washington

Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. is an American actor and filmmaker. He has been described as an actor who reconfigured "the concept of classic movie stardom". Throughout his career spanning over four decades, Washington has received numerous accolades, including a Tony Award, two Academy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards and two Silver Bears. In 2016, he received the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award, and in 2020, The New York Times named him the greatest actor of the 21st century. In 2022, Washington received the Presidential Medal of Freedom bestowed upon him by President Joe Biden.

Chris Pine

Chris Pine

Chris Pine is an American actor. He is best known for his roles as James T. Kirk in the Star Trek reboot film series (2009–present), Steve Trevor in the DC Extended Universe films Wonder Woman (2017) and Wonder Woman 1984 (2020), Will Colson in Unstoppable (2010), and Toby Howard in Hell or High Water (2016).

Ethan Suplee

Ethan Suplee

Ethan Suplee is an American film and television actor. He is best known for his roles in the films American History X, Remember the Titans, John Q, The Wolf of Wall Street, Without a Paddle, and several of Kevin Smith's films as well as Frankie in Boy Meets World and Randy Hickey in My Name Is Earl.

Federal Railroad Administration

Federal Railroad Administration

The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is an agency in the United States Department of Transportation (DOT). The agency was created by the Department of Transportation Act of 1966. The purpose of the FRA is to promulgate and enforce rail safety regulations, administer railroad assistance programs, conduct research and development in support of improved railroad safety and national rail transportation policy, provide for the rehabilitation of Northeast Corridor rail passenger service, and consolidate government support of rail transportation activities.

Kevin Chapman

Kevin Chapman

Kevin Chapman is an American actor known for playing an assortment of characters ranging from the obnoxious brother Terrence Garrity in FX's Rescue Me to street enforcer Val Savage in Clint Eastwood's Mystic River and Sunshine Cleaning (2008). He also portrayed Detective Lionel Fusco on the CBS crime drama Person of Interest, Freddie Cork on Brotherhood (2006-2008), and guest starred in 24 (2002-2003).

Jessy Schram

Jessy Schram

Jessica Schram is an American actress, model and singer. Her most notable roles include Hannah Griffith in Veronica Mars, Rachel Seybolt in Life, Karen Nadler in Falling Skies and Cinderella/Ashley Boyd in Once Upon a Time.

David Warshofsky

David Warshofsky

David Warshofsky is an American film, television and stage actor.

Andy Umberger

Andy Umberger

Andy Umberger is an American actor who spent the early part of his career in New York City, where he was primarily a stage actor and appeared in three Broadway shows: City of Angels, Passion and Company. Since moving to Los Angeles in the late 90s, he has had supporting roles in over 15 films and has guest starred on over 60 television shows, with recurring roles on 10 different series, including: Mad Men, Weeds, Boston Legal, The West Wing, Desperate Housewives, ER, and as D'Hoffryn on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. He is one of only five actors to appear in three series created by Joss Whedon.

Elizabeth Mathis

Elizabeth Mathis

Elizabeth Mathis is an American actress from Detroit. She played Pushy in Blue Crush 2 and Nicole Barnes in Unstoppable.

Hooters

Hooters

Hooters is the registered trademark used by two American restaurant chains: Hooters, Inc., based in Clearwater, Florida, and Hooters of America, Inc. based in Atlanta, Georgia, and owned by the private investment firm Nord Bay Capital. The Hooters name is a double entendre referring to both a North American slang term for women's breasts and the logo.

Aisha Hinds

Aisha Hinds

Aisha Jamila Hinds is an American television, stage and film actress. She had supporting roles in a number of television series, including The Shield, Invasion, True Blood, Detroit 1-8-7 and Under the Dome. In 2016, she played Fannie Lou Hamer in biographical drama film All the Way. She has also appeared in Assault on Precinct 13 (2005) and was cast as Harriet Tubman in WGN America period drama Underground. Beginning in 2018, Hinds stars in the Fox procedural drama series 9-1-1.

Jeff Wincott

Jeff Wincott

Jeffrey Wincott is a Canadian actor and martial artist best known for his lead role in the television series Night Heat.

Production

Unstoppable suffered various production challenges before filming could commence, including casting, schedule, location, and budgetary concerns.[8][9]

In August 2004, Mark Bomback was hired by 20th Century Fox to write the screenplay Runaway Train.[10] Robert Schwentke signed on to direct Runaway Train in August 2005, with plans to begin shooting in early 2006.[11] In June 2007, Martin Campbell was in negotiations to replace Schwentke as director of the film, now titled Unstoppable.[12][13] Campbell was attached until March 2009, when Tony Scott came on board as director.[14] In April, both Denzel Washington and Chris Pine were attached to the project.[15]

The original budget had been trimmed from $107 million to $100 million, but Fox wanted to reduce it to the low $90 million range, asking Scott to cut his salary from $9 million to $6 million and wanting Washington to shave $4 million off his $20 million fee.[16] Washington declined and, although attached since April,[17] formally withdrew from the project in July, citing lost patience with the film's lack of a start date.[9] Fox made a modified offer as enticement, and he returned to the project two weeks later.[17][18][19]

Production was headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where the fictional "Allegheny and West Virginia Railroad" depicted in the movie is headquartered. Filming took place in a broad area around there including the Ohio cities of Martins Ferry, Bellaire, Mingo Junction, Steubenville, and Brewster,[20] and in the Pennsylvania cities of Pittsburgh,[21] Emporium, Milesburg, Tyrone, Julian, Unionville, Port Matilda, Bradford, Monaca, Eldred, Mill Hall, Turtlepoint, Port Allegany, and Carnegie,[22] and also in Portville, New York and Olean, New York.[23] The film is the most expensive ever to be shot in Western Pennsylvania.[24]

The Western New York and Pennsylvania Railroad's Buffalo Line was used for two months during daylight, while the railroad ran its regular freight service at night.[25] The real-life bridge and elevated curve in the climactic scene is the B & O Railroad Viaduct between Bellaire, Ohio and Benwood, West Virginia.[26]

A two-day filming session took place at the Hooters restaurant in Wilkins Township, a Pittsburgh suburb, featuring 10 Hooters Girls from across the United States. Other interior scenes were shot at 31st Street Studios (then the Mogul Media Studios) on 31st Street in Pittsburgh. Principal photography began on August 31, 2009,[27] for a release on November 12, 2010.

Filming was delayed for one day when part of the train accidentally derailed on November 21, 2009.[28]

CP #9777, a GE AC4400CW locomotive, was used to film early scenes. Photographed in 2010 after the locomotive was repainted.
CP #9777, a GE AC4400CW locomotive, was used to film early scenes. Photographed in 2010 after the locomotive was repainted.

Locomotives

The locomotives used in the movie were borrowed from three railroads: the Canadian Pacific Railway (CP), the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway (W&LE), and the Southwest Pennsylvania Railroad (SWP).[29][30]

Four GE AC4400CWs leased from CP were used to depict the locomotives used on the runaway train, 777 and trailing unit 767. CP 9777 and 9758 played 777 and 767 in early scenes, and CP 9782 and 9751 were given a damaged look for later scenes.[31] These four locomotives were repainted to standard colors in early 2010 by Canadian Pacific following the filming, but the black and yellow warning stripes from the AWVR livery painted on the plows of each locomotive were left untouched (except for 9777's plow) and remained visible on the locomotives.[32][33]

Most of the other AWVR locomotives seen in the film, including chase locomotive 1206, and the locomotive consist used in an attempt to stop the train, 7375 and 7346, were played by EMD SD40-2s leased from W&LE. 1206 was depicted by three different SD40-2s: W&LE 6353 and 6354, and a third unit that was bought from scrap and modified for cab shots. 6353 and 6354 were returned to the W&LE and painted black to resume service, but 6354's windshield remains jutted forward from the AWVR livery.[34] Judd Stewart's locomotive consist 7375 and 7346 were played by W&LE 6352 and 6351, which also played two locomotive "extras" (5624 and 5580), wearing the same grey livery with different running numbers.[31] The Railroad Safety Campaign excursion train locomotive (RSC 2002) was played by a SWP EMD GP11 rebuilt from an EMD GP9. The two passenger coaches carrying schoolchildren were provided by the Orrville Railroad Heritage Society in Orrville, Ohio.[35]

Locomotive type Real life owner Real life numberboards Featured
AC4400CW CP CP 9777[36] & 9782[37] AWVR 777
CP 9758[38] & 9751[39] AWVR 767
EMD SD40-2 W&LE W&LE 6353[40] & 6354[34] AWVR 1206
W&LE 6352[41] AWVR 7375 & 5624
W&LE 6351[42] AWVR 7346, 5607, & 5580
EMD GP11 SWP SWP 2002[43] RSC 2002

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Mark Bomback

Mark Bomback

Mark Bomback is an American screenwriter, originally from New Rochelle, New York. Bomback is a graduate of Wesleyan University, where he studied English Literature and Film Studies.

Martin Campbell

Martin Campbell

Martin Campbell is a New Zealand film and television director based in the United Kingdom. He is known for having directed The Mask of Zorro as well as the James Bond films GoldenEye and Casino Royale. He won a BAFTA for his direction of the 1985 television serial Edge of Darkness.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, Appalachian, and Great Lakes regions of the United States. It borders Delaware to its southeast, Maryland to its south, West Virginia to its southwest, Ohio to its west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to its northwest, New York state to its north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to its east.

Ohio

Ohio

Ohio is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. Of the fifty U.S. states, it is the 34th-largest by area, and with a population of nearly 11.8 million, is the seventh-most populous and tenth-most densely populated. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus, with the Columbus metro area, Greater Cincinnati, and Greater Cleveland being the largest metropolitan areas. Ohio is bordered by Lake Erie to the north, Pennsylvania to the east, West Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Indiana to the west, and Michigan to the northwest. Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" after its Ohio buckeye trees, and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes". Its state flag is the only non-rectangular flag of all the U.S. states.

Martins Ferry, Ohio

Martins Ferry, Ohio

Martins Ferry is a city in Belmont County, Ohio, United States, along the Ohio River across from Wheeling, West Virginia. It is the largest city in Belmont County. The population was 6,260 as of the 2020 census. It is part of the Wheeling metropolitan area.

Bellaire, Ohio

Bellaire, Ohio

Bellaire is a village in Belmont County, Ohio, United States, along the Ohio River. The population was 3,870 at the 2020 census, having had its peak in 1920. It is part of the Wheeling metropolitan area.

Mingo Junction, Ohio

Mingo Junction, Ohio

Mingo Junction is a village in eastern Jefferson County, Ohio, United States, along the Ohio River. The population was 3,347 at the 2020 census. It is part of the Weirton–Steubenville metropolitan area.

Brewster, Ohio

Brewster, Ohio

Brewster is a village in Stark County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,112 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Canton-Massillon, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. A post office called Brewster has been in operation since 1910.

Emporium, Pennsylvania

Emporium, Pennsylvania

Emporium is a borough and the county seat of Cameron County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It is located 100 miles (160 km) west-northwest of Williamsport. Early in the twentieth century, there were large power plants and manufacturers of radio tubes and incandescent lamps, paving brick, flour, iron, lumber, and sole leather. In 1900, 2,463 people lived in Emporium, and in 1910, the population was 2,916. By 2010 the population had dropped to 2,073, and at the 2020 census, the population was 1,961.

Milesburg, Pennsylvania

Milesburg, Pennsylvania

Milesburg is a borough in Centre County, Pennsylvania. It is part of the State College, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,123 at the 2010 census.

Julian, Pennsylvania

Julian, Pennsylvania

Julian is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Centre County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is part of the State College, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 152 at the 2010 census. Most locals pronounce the name "Joo-lee-ānn".

Bradford, Pennsylvania

Bradford, Pennsylvania

Bradford is a city in McKean County, Pennsylvania. It is located close to the border with New York state and approximately 78 miles (126 km) south of Buffalo, New York. Bradford is the principal city in the Bradford, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 7,825 at the 2020 United States Census.

Inspiration

EMD SD40-2 controls show how one can mistake power and dynamic brake settings.
EMD SD40-2 controls show how one can mistake power and dynamic brake settings.

Unstoppable was inspired by the 2001 CSX 8888 incident, in which a runaway train ultimately traveled 66 miles (106 km) through northwest Ohio. Led by CSX Transportation SD40-2 #8888, the train left Stanley Yard in Walbridge, Ohio with no one at the controls, after the hostler got out of the slow-moving train to correct a misaligned switch, mistakenly believing he had properly set the train's dynamic braking system, much as his counterpart (Dewey) in the film mistakenly believed he had properly set the locomotive's throttle (in the CSX incident, the locomotive had an older-style throttle stand where the same lever controlled both the throttle and the dynamic brakes; in fact, putting on "full throttle" and "full brakes" both involved advancing the same lever to the highest position after switching to a different operating mode. Thus if the engineer failed to properly switch modes, it was easy to accidentally apply full throttle instead of full brake, or vice-versa.)

Two of the train's tank cars contained thousands of gallons of molten phenol, a toxic ingredient used in glues, paints, and dyes. The chemical is very dangerous; it is highly corrosive to the skin, eyes, lungs, and nasal tract. Attempts to derail it using a portable derailer failed, and police had tried to engage the red fuel cutoff button by shooting at it; after having three shots mistakenly hit the red fuel cap, this ultimately had no effect because the button must be pressed for several seconds before the engine would be starved of fuel and shut down. For two hours, the train traveled at speeds up to 51 miles per hour (82 km/h) until the crew of a second locomotive, CSX #8392, coupled onto the runaway and slowly applied its brakes. Once the runaway was slowed down to 11 miles per hour (18 km/h), CSX trainmaster Jon Hosfeld ran alongside the train, and climbed aboard, shutting down the locomotive. The train was stopped at the Ohio State Route 31 crossing, just south-southeast of Kenton, Ohio. No one was seriously injured in the incident.[44]

RSC 2002 was inspired by a CSX Operation Lifesaver passenger train, which was turning around at Stanley Yard and was preparing to head back south after having traveled north from Columbus to Walbridge using the same track CSX 8888 was now on. CSX ended up having to bus the safety train's 120 passengers back to the cities at which they had boarded, including Bowling Green, Findlay, and Kenton.[45]

When the film was released, the Toledo Blade compared the events of the film to the real-life incident. "It's predictably exaggerated and dramatized to make it more entertaining," wrote David Patch, "but close enough to the real thing to support the 'Inspired by True Events' announcement that flashes across the screen at its start." He notes that the dead man switch would probably have worked in real life despite the unconnected brake hoses, unless the locomotive, or independent brakes, were already applied. As explained in the movie, the dead man's switch failed because the only available brakes were the independent brakes, which were quickly worn through, similar to CSX 8888. The film exaggerates the possible damage the phenol could have caused in a fire, and he found it incredible that the fictional AWVR freely disseminated information such as employees' names and images and the cause of the runaway to the media. In the real instance, he writes, the cause of the runaway was not disclosed until months later when the National Transportation Safety Board released its report, and CSX never made public the name of the engineer whose error caused the runaway, nor what disciplinary action was taken.[46]

Discover more about Inspiration related topics

CSX 8888 incident

CSX 8888 incident

The CSX 8888 incident, also known as the Crazy Eights incident, was a runaway train event involving a CSX Transportation freight train in the U.S. state of Ohio on May 15, 2001. Locomotive #8888, an EMD SD40-2, was pulling a train of 47 cars, including some loaded with hazardous chemicals, and ran uncontrolled for just under two hours at up to 51 miles per hour (82 km/h). It was finally halted by a railroad crew in a second locomotive, which caught up with the runaway train and coupled their locomotive to the rear car.

CSX Transportation

CSX Transportation

CSX Transportation, known colloquially as simply CSX, is a Class I freight railroad company operating in the Eastern United States and the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec. The railroad operates on approximately 21,000 route miles (34,000 km) of track. The company operates as the leading subsidiary of CSX Corporation, a Fortune 500 company headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida.

EMD SD40-2

EMD SD40-2

The EMD SD40-2 is a 3,000-horsepower (2,200 kW) C-C diesel-electric locomotive built by EMD from 1972 to 1989.

Walbridge, Ohio

Walbridge, Ohio

Walbridge is a village in Wood County, Ohio, United States, within the Toledo metropolitan area. The population was 3,019 at the 2010 census.

Dynamic braking

Dynamic braking

Dynamic braking is the use of an electric traction motor as a generator when slowing a vehicle such as an electric or diesel-electric locomotive. It is termed "rheostatic" if the generated electrical power is dissipated as heat in brake grid resistors, and "regenerative" if the power is returned to the supply line. Dynamic braking reduces wear on friction-based braking components, and regeneration lowers net energy consumption. Dynamic braking may also be used on railcars with multiple units, light rail vehicles, electric trams, trolleybuses, and electric and hybrid electric automobiles.

Phenol

Phenol

Phenol is an aromatic organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH. It is a white crystalline solid that is volatile. The molecule consists of a phenyl group bonded to a hydroxy group. Mildly acidic, it requires careful handling because it can cause chemical burns.

Railway coupling

Railway coupling

A coupling is a mechanism typically placed at each end of a railway vehicle that connects them together to form a train. A variety of coupler types have been developed over the course of railway history. Key issues in their design include strength, reliability, ease of making connections and operator safety.

Ohio State Route 31

Ohio State Route 31

State Route 31 (SR 31) is a 32.12-mile-long (51.69 km) Ohio State Route that runs between Marysville and Kenton in the US state of Ohio. The southern terminus of SR 31 is at an intersection with SR 38 in downtown Marysville and the northern terminus is at an intersection with U.S. Route 68 (US 68), in downtown Kenton. None of the highway is listed on the National Highway System. Most of the route is a rural two-lane highway and passes through both farmland and residential properties.

Kenton, Ohio

Kenton, Ohio

Kenton is a city in and the county seat of Hardin County, Ohio, United States, located in the west-central part of Ohio about 57 mi (92 km) northwest of Columbus and 70 mi (113 km) south of Toledo. Its population was 7,947 at the 2020 census. The city was named for frontiersman Simon Kenton of Kentucky and Ohio.

Operation Lifesaver

Operation Lifesaver

Operation Lifesaver is the largest rail safety organization in the United States. It was founded by the Union Pacific Railroad in the early 1970s.

The Blade (Toledo, Ohio)

The Blade (Toledo, Ohio)

The Blade, also known as the Toledo Blade, is a newspaper in Toledo, Ohio published daily online and printed Thursday and Sunday by Block Communications. The newspaper was first published on December 19, 1835.

National Transportation Safety Board

National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent U.S. government investigative agency responsible for civil transportation accident investigation. In this role, the NTSB investigates and reports on aviation accidents and incidents, certain types of highway crashes, ship and marine accidents, pipeline incidents, bridge failures, and railroad accidents. The NTSB is also in charge of investigating cases of hazardous materials releases that occur during transportation. The agency is based in Washington, D.C. It has four regional offices, located in Anchorage, Alaska; Denver, Colorado; Ashburn, Virginia; and Seattle, Washington. The agency also operates a national training center at its Ashburn facility.

Soundtrack

The film score was composed by Harry Gregson-Williams and the soundtrack album was released on December 7, 2010.

Release

The film was scheduled on November 12, 2010 in the United States and Canada.

Marketing

A trailer was released online on August 6, 2010.[47] The film went on general release on November 12, 2010.

Home media

Unstoppable was released on DVD and Blu-ray on February 15, 2011.[48]

Reception

Critical response

On Rotten Tomatoes the film holds an approval rating of 87% certified fresh based on 193 reviews, with an average rating of 6.92/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "As fast, loud, and relentless as the train at the center of the story, Unstoppable is perfect popcorn entertainment—and director Tony Scott's best movie in years."[49] Metacritic gives the film a weighted average score of 69 out of 100, based on 32 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[50]

Film critic Roger Ebert rated the film three and a half stars out of four, remarking in his review, "In terms of sheer craftsmanship, this is a superb film."[51] In The New York Times, Manohla Dargis praised the film's visual style, saying that Scott "creates an unexpectedly rich world of chugging, rushing trains slicing across equally beautiful industrial and natural landscapes."[52]

The Globe and Mail in Toronto was more measured. While the film's action scenes "have the greasy punch of a three-minute heavy-metal guitar solo", its critic felt the characters were weak. It called the film "an opportunistic political allegory about an economy that's out of control and industries that are weakened by layoffs, under-staffing, and corporate callousness."[53]

Director Quentin Tarantino highlighted the film in a January 2020 episode of the Rewatchables podcast, and included it in his list of the ten best of the decade.[54] In June 2021, he named it one of his favorite "Director's Final Films".[55] Christopher Nolan also praised the film (particularly its use of suspense), citing it as an influence for his film Dunkirk.[56]

Box office

Unstoppable was expected to take in about the same amount of money as the previous year's The Taking of Pelham 123, another Tony Scott film involving an out-of-control train starring Denzel Washington. Pelham took in $23.4 million during its opening weekend in the United States and Canada.[5] Unstoppable had a strong opening night on Friday November 12, 2010, coming in ahead of Megamind with a gross of $8.1 million. However, Megamind won the weekend, earning $30 million to Unstoppable's $23.9 million.[57] Unstoppable performed slightly better than The Taking of Pelham 123 did in its opening weekend. As of April 2011, the film had earned $167,805,466 worldwide.[7][58]

Awards

The film was nominated in the Best Sound Editing (Mark Stoeckinger) category at the 83rd Academy Awards and nominated for Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie – Action.[59][60]

Discover more about Reception related topics

Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes is an American review-aggregation website for film and television. The company was launched in August 1998 by three undergraduate students at the University of California, Berkeley: Senh Duong, Patrick Y. Lee, and Stephen Wang. Although the name "Rotten Tomatoes" connects to the practice of audiences throwing rotten tomatoes in disapproval of a poor stage performance, the original inspiration comes from a scene featuring tomatoes in the Canadian film Léolo (1992).

Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, television shows, music albums, video games, and formerly books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999, and is owned by Fandom, Inc. as of 2023.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Joseph Ebert was an American film critic, film historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Neil Steinberg of the Chicago Sun-Times said Ebert "was without question the nation's most prominent and influential film critic," and Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times called him "the best-known film critic in America."

Manohla Dargis

Manohla Dargis

Manohla June Dargis is an American film critic. She is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times. She is a five-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.

Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Jerome Tarantino is an American film director, writer, producer, and actor. His films are characterized by frequent references to popular culture and film genres, non-linear storylines, dark humor, stylized violence, extended dialogue, pervasive use of profanity, cameos and ensemble casts.

Christopher Nolan

Christopher Nolan

Christopher Edward Nolan is a British-American filmmaker. Known for his Hollywood blockbusters with complex storytelling, Nolan is considered a leading filmmaker of the 21st century. His films have grossed $5 billion worldwide. The recipient of many accolades, he has been nominated for five Academy Awards, five British Academy Film Awards and six Golden Globe Awards. In 2015, he was listed as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time, and in 2019, he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his contributions to film.

Dunkirk (2017 film)

Dunkirk (2017 film)

Dunkirk is a 2017 war film written, directed and produced by Christopher Nolan that depicts the Dunkirk evacuation of World War II through the perspectives of the land, sea and air. It is produced by Syncopy Inc. and distributed by Warner Bros. Its ensemble cast includes Fionn Whitehead, Tom Glynn-Carney, Jack Lowden, Harry Styles in his film debut, Aneurin Barnard, James D'Arcy, Barry Keoghan, Kenneth Branagh, Cillian Murphy, Mark Rylance and Tom Hardy.

Megamind

Megamind

Megamind is a 2010 American computer-animated superhero comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and Pacific Data Images and distributed by Paramount Pictures. Directed by Tom McGrath from a screenplay by Alan Schoolcraft and Brent Simons, the film stars the voices of Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, Jonah Hill, David Cross, and Brad Pitt. It tells the story of Megamind, a highly intelligent alien supervillain; after defeating his long-time nemesis Metro Man, Megamind creates a new hero to fight, but must act to save the city when his "creation" becomes an even worse villain than he was.

Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

Academy Award for Best Sound Editing

The Academy Award for Best Sound Editing was an Academy Award granted yearly to a film exhibiting the finest or most aesthetic sound design or sound editing. Sound editing is the creation of sound effects. The award was usually received by the Supervising Sound Editors of the film, sometimes accompanied by the Sound Designers. Beginning with the 93rd Academy Awards, Best Sound Editing was combined with Best Sound Mixing into a single award for Best Sound.

Mark Stoeckinger

Mark Stoeckinger

Mark Stoeckinger is an American sound editor. He has over 80 film credits. In addition to 3 Oscar nominations, he has been nominated for the Motion Picture Sound Editors a total of 10 times, winning once with Gladiator.

83rd Academy Awards

83rd Academy Awards

The 83rd Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 2010 in the United States and took place on February 27, 2011, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST. During the ceremony, Academy Awards were presented in 24 competitive categories. The ceremony was televised in the United States by ABC, and produced by Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer, with Mischer also serving as director. Actors James Franco and Anne Hathaway co-hosted the ceremony, marking the first time for each.

Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie – Action

Teen Choice Award for Choice Movie – Action

The following is a list of the Teen Choice Award winners and nominees for Choice Action Movie.

Source: "Unstoppable (2010 film)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unstoppable_(2010_film).

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See also
References
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