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University of Belgrade

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University of Belgrade
Универзитет у Београду
Univerzitet u Beogradu
Belgrade University coa.svg
Latin: Universitas Belgradiensis
Former name
Visoka škola or Grande école
1808–1905[1]
TypePublic
Established1808; 214 years ago (1808)[2]
Academic affiliation
European University Association
Erasmus
DAAD
AUF
DRC
Budget159.15 million (2020, planned; public funding)[3]
RectorIvanka Popović
Academic staff
4,834 (2018–19)[4]
Administrative staff
3,724 (2016–17)[2]
Students97,696 (2018–19)[5][4]
Undergraduates76,414 (2018–19)[4]
Postgraduates14,591 (2018–19)[4]
6,691 (2018–19)[4]
Location,
CampusUrban
Colors 
 
Websitewww.bg.ac.rs
University of Belgrade logo.png

Coordinates: 44°49′07″N 20°27′27″E / 44.81861°N 20.45750°E / 44.81861; 20.45750

The University of Belgrade (Serbian: Универзитет у Београду / Univerzitet u Beogradu) is a public university in Serbia. It is the oldest and largest modern university in Serbia.

Founded in 1808 as the Belgrade Higher School in revolutionary Serbia, by 1838 it merged with the Kragujevac-based departments into a single university. The university has around 97,700 enrolled students and over 4,800 academic staff members.[4] Since its founding, the university has educated more than 378,000 bachelors, around 25,100 magisters, 29,000 specialists and 14,670 doctors.[2] The university comprises 31 faculties, 12 research institutes, the university library, and 9 university centres. The faculties are organized into four groups: social sciences and humanities; medical sciences; natural sciences and mathematics; and technological sciences.

On the prestigious Shanghai Ranking (ARWU), the University of Belgrade ranks between 401st and 500th place, according to the most recent (2018) global ranking. In 2014, it ranked 151–200, specifically in the areas of mathematics and physics.

Discover more about University of Belgrade related topics

Geographic coordinate system

Geographic coordinate system

The geographic coordinate system (GCS) is a spherical or ellipsoidal coordinate system for measuring and communicating positions directly on the Earth as latitude and longitude. It is the simplest, oldest and most widely used of the various spatial reference systems that are in use, and forms the basis for most others. Although latitude and longitude form a coordinate tuple like a cartesian coordinate system, the geographic coordinate system is not cartesian because the measurements are angles and are not on a planar surface.

Serbian language

Serbian language

Serbian is the standardized variety of the Serbo-Croatian language mainly used by Serbs. It is the official and national language of Serbia, one of the three official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina and co-official in Montenegro and Kosovo. It is a recognized minority language in Croatia, North Macedonia, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic.

List of universities in Serbia

List of universities in Serbia

This is a list of universities in Serbia.

Serbia

Serbia

Serbia, officially the Republic of Serbia, is a landlocked country in Southeastern and Central Europe, situated at the crossroads of the Pannonian Plain and the Balkans. It shares land borders with Hungary to the north, Romania to the northeast, Bulgaria to the southeast, North Macedonia to the south, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the west, and Montenegro to the southwest, and claims a border with Albania through the disputed territory of Kosovo. Serbia with Kosovo has about 8.6 million inhabitants. Its capital Belgrade is also the largest city.

Revolutionary Serbia

Revolutionary Serbia

Revolutionary Serbia, or Karađorđe's Serbia, refers to the state established by the Serbian revolutionaries in Ottoman Serbia after the start of the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire in 1804. The Sublime Porte first officially recognized the state as autonomous in January 1807, however, the Serbian revolutionaries rejected the treaty and continued fighting the Ottomans until 1813. Although the first uprising was crushed, it was followed by the Second Serbian Uprising in 1815, which resulted in the creation of the Principality of Serbia, as it gained semi-independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1817.

Kragujevac

Kragujevac

Kragujevac is the fourth largest city in Serbia and the administrative centre of the Šumadija District. It is the historical centre of the geographical region of Šumadija in central Serbia, and is situated on the banks of the Lepenica River. According to the 2011 census, the city proper has a population of 150,835, while its administrative area comprises a total of 179,417 inhabitants.

Bachelor's degree

Bachelor's degree

A bachelor's degree or baccalaureate is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to six years. The two most common bachelor's degrees are the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and the Bachelor of Science. In some institutions and educational systems, certain bachelor's degrees can only be taken as graduate or postgraduate educations after a first degree has been completed, although more commonly the successful completion of a bachelor's degree is a prerequisite for further courses such as a master's or a doctorate.

Specialist degree

Specialist degree

The specialist degree is an academic degree conferred by a college or university. The degree is formatted differently worldwide and may be either a five-year program or a doctoral level graduate program that occurs after a master's degree but before a doctoral degree.

Doctorate

Doctorate

A doctorate, doctor's degree, or doctoral degree is an academic degree awarded by universities and some other educational institutions, derived from the ancient formalism licentia docendi. In most countries, a research degree qualifies the holder to teach at university level in the degree's field or work in a specific profession. There are a number of doctoral degrees; the most common is the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), awarded in many different fields, ranging from the humanities to scientific disciplines.

Belgrade University Library

Belgrade University Library

The University Library Svetozar Marković is the main library in the University of Belgrade system, named after Svetozar Marković, a Serbian political activist in the 19th century. It is located on King Alexander Boulevard, close to the Faculty of Law and adjacent to the Faculties of Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Architecture. Serves the educational and scientific needs of students, academics, and scientists. Library Day is 24 May, a day commemorating Slavic educators St. Cyril and Methodius. At the founding of the library, the collection contained 57,254 publications consisting of monographs and serials. Today, the library contains roughly 1,700,000 publications.

Academic Ranking of World Universities

Academic Ranking of World Universities

The Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU), also known as the Shanghai Ranking, is one of the annual publications of world university rankings. The league table was originally compiled and issued by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2003, making it the first global university ranking with multifarious indicators.

History

19th century

University of Belgrade in 1890
University of Belgrade in 1890

The University of Belgrade was established in 1808 as the Belgrade Higher School (Serbian: Београдска Велика школа, romanizedBeogradska Velika škola; a Grandes écoles) by Dositej Obradović, Serbian key figure in the Age of Enlightenment. It was the highest ranking educational institution in Serbia between 1808 and 1905, as the first Higher School (1808–1813), the Belgrade Lyceum (Serbian: Београдски Лицеј / Beogradski Licej; 1838–1863), and the second Higher School (1863–1905). It was initially located at the Princess Ljubica's Residence building and then moved to another significant site in Belgrade, the Captain Miša’s Mansion, today's seat of the university.[1]

The second Higher School (also known as the Great School or Great Academy of Belgrade) was established as the successor of the Lyceum and was a combination of a classical gymnasium and a college, and as such developed into the University of Belgrade. Under the law, it was defined as a "scientific institute for higher and professional education". The minister of education had control over this institution and it was managed by the rector (elected by the monarch) and Academic Council.

During its early history it had three departments: Philosophy, Engineering and Law. The Higher School formally became the University of Belgrade through the Law on the University from February 27, 1905. In addition to the Philosophy, Law and Electrical Engineering departments, this law introduced the Orthodox Theology and Medical schools.

In the early 19th century, the studies of law lasted three years and the curriculum included comparative and state (constitutional) law, international law, criminal law and judicial procedure, as well as general subjects. This is how the modern legal education in Serbia emerged in the year 1808. Before enrolling the legal department, it was compulsory to graduate at the philosophy department where the studies lasted two years, so the legal studies lasted a total of five years. Since 1853, the legal education became independent from the studies of philosophy and from 1863 the legal education in Serbia lasted four years.

The lectures were held by well-known professors who had earned their diplomas in Austria, Germany and France (Jovan Sterija Popović, Josif Pančić, Đura Daničić, and others).

During the 1850s, the Philosophy (General) Department developed into a particular college. The University of Belgrade's Faculty of Philosophy is today's continuation of this department.

The first academic lecture on electrical engineering in Serbia was held in 1894. Professor Stevan Marković was the first lecturer and founder of the Engineering Department at the Higher School. Only four years later, Professor Marković also established the first Serbian electrical engineering laboratory. Since then, this academic discipline has been studied at the Higher School and the University of Belgrade. The first diplomas in this field were given in 1922.

Dositej Obradović, founder of the university
Dositej Obradović, founder of the university

20th century

First professors of the University of Belgrade (1905).
First professors of the University of Belgrade (1905).

The University of Belgrade witnessed a massive growth and expansion in the years before the Second World War and especially after the founding of the second Yugoslavia. The first woman graduated from the University of Belgrade's Law School in 1914.[10]

In the 1960s and 70s, the university developed into a remarkable regional and international educational institution. Many students from other countries were trained there. Up to 40,000 students from Africa alone studied at the University of Belgrade during the existence of the SFR Yugoslavia.[11] In the socialist Yugoslavia, the university was expanded, but it was also exposed to state and ideological influence. It has also been the driving force for the establishment of almost all other universities in today's Serbia, Montenegro, North Macedonia and several universities in Bosnia and Herzegovina.[10]

In 1968, its students organized the first mass protest in post-World War II Yugoslavia.

In the early 1990s the quality of university programs deteriorated as a consequence of the political instability in the country and the subsequent wars of Yugoslavia. There was a lack of financial resources and the quality dropped significantly. During the Milošević government in Serbia, the university had to face external political pressure and the lack of academic and administrative autonomy.[12]

In the mid-1990s, the University of Belgrade became an internationally recognized center of the political opposition in Serbia. Massive anti-government protests were staged by the Belgrade students and professors. The university's student organizations (especially "Otpor!") significantly contributed to overthrowing the government.[13]

21st century

Since 2000, the University of Belgrade has taken important steps and has revitalized and improved the facilities and its teaching quality. There have been many reforms in higher education of the country. The university has made great efforts since then to improve the internal structure and has become a signatory of the Bologna declaration. Being one of Europe's largest universities with an enrollment of nearly 90,000 students, the university broadly cooperates with international academic institutions and is involved in countless bilateral and multilateral academic projects.

Ranking

The University of Belgrade has found its place amongst the top 300 universities in the world, according to the most recent (2017) ranking carried out by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University, better known as the Shanghai List. In the area of mathematics, it is ranked among the top 150 universities in the world.[14]

Discover more about History related topics

Romanization of Serbian

Romanization of Serbian

The romanization of Serbian or latinization of Serbian is the representation of the Serbian language using Latin letters. Serbian is written in two alphabets, Serbian Cyrillic, a variation of the Cyrillic alphabet, and Gaj's Latin, or latinica, a variation of the Latin alphabet. The Serbian language is an example of digraphia.

Dositej Obradović

Dositej Obradović

Dositej Obradović was a Serbian writer, biographer, diarist, philosopher, pedagogue, educational reformer, linguist, polyglot and the first minister of education of Serbia. An influential protagonist of the Serbian national and cultural renaissance, he advocated Enlightenment and rationalist ideas, while remaining a Serbian patriot and an adherent of the Serbian Orthodox Church.

Age of Enlightenment

Age of Enlightenment

The Age of Enlightenment or the Enlightenment was an intellectual and philosophical movement that dominated Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries with global influences and effects. The Enlightenment included a range of ideas centered on the value of human happiness, the pursuit of knowledge obtained by means of reason and the evidence of the senses, and ideals such as liberty, progress, toleration, fraternity, and constitutional government.

Lyceum of the Principality of Serbia

Lyceum of the Principality of Serbia

The Lyceum of the Principality of Serbia was the first higher education school in Serbia in which education was taught in Serbian.

Princess Ljubica's Residence

Princess Ljubica's Residence

Princess Ljubica's Residence is a palace located in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. Because of its cultural and architectural importance the residence has been designated a Monument of Culture of Exceptional Importance.

Gymnasium (school)

Gymnasium (school)

Gymnasium is a term in various European languages for a secondary school that prepares students for higher education at a university. It is comparable to the US English term preparatory high school. Before the 20th century, the gymnasium system was a widespread feature of educational systems throughout many European countries.

College

College

A college is an educational institution or a constituent part of one. A college may be a degree-awarding tertiary educational institution, a part of a collegiate or federal university, an institution offering vocational education, or a secondary school.

Rector (academia)

Rector (academia)

A rector is a senior official in an educational institution, and can refer to an official in either a university or a secondary school. Outside the English-speaking world the rector is often the most senior official in a university, whilst in the United States the most senior official is often referred to as president and in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth of Nations the most senior official is the chancellor, whose office is primarily ceremonial and titular. The term and office of a rector can be referred to as a rectorate. The title is used widely in universities in Europe and is very common in Latin American countries. It is also used in Brunei, Macau, Turkey, Russia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Israel and the Middle East. In the ancient universities of Scotland the office is sometimes referred to as Lord Rector, is the third most senior official, and is usually responsible for chairing the University Court.

Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy is the systematized study of general and fundamental questions, such as those about existence, reason, knowledge, values, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. Some sources claim the term was coined by Pythagoras, although this theory is disputed by some. Philosophical methods include questioning, critical discussion, rational argument, and systematic presentation.

Engineering

Engineering

Engineering is the use of scientific principles to design and build machines, structures, and other items, including bridges, tunnels, roads, vehicles, and buildings. The discipline of engineering encompasses a broad range of more specialized fields of engineering, each with a more specific emphasis on particular areas of applied mathematics, applied science, and types of application. See glossary of engineering.

Law

Law

Law is a set of rules that are created and are enforceable by social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior, with its precise definition a matter of longstanding debate. It has been variously described as a science and as the art of justice. State-enforced laws can be made by a group legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes; by the executive through decrees and regulations; or established by judges through precedent, usually in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals may create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that adopt alternative ways of resolving disputes to standard court litigation. The creation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein. The law shapes politics, economics, history and society in various ways and serves as a mediator of relations between people.

Eastern Orthodox Church

Eastern Orthodox Church

The Eastern Orthodox Church, also called the Orthodox Church, is the second-largest Christian church, with approximately 220 million baptized members. It operates as a communion of autocephalous churches, each governed by its bishops via local synods. The church has no central doctrinal or governmental authority analogous to the head of the Roman Catholic Church—the Pope—but the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople is recognized by them as primus inter pares, which may be explained as a representative of the church. As one of the oldest surviving religious institutions in the world, the Eastern Orthodox Church has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern and Southeastern Europe. The Eastern Orthodox Church officially calls itself the Orthodox Catholic Church.

Campus

Administration and governance building (included in Serbia's register of most important historic buildings)
Administration and governance building (included in Serbia's register of most important historic buildings)

Having developed with the city in the 19th century, a number of the university buildings are an important part of Belgrade’s architecture and cultural heritage. Former sites include today's Museum of Vuk and Dositej and Princess Ljubica's Residence buildings, both of them being recognized as Belgrade's topmost historic buildings.[15] The historical Subotica Law School (1920-1941) was also a part of the University of Belgrade. Some of the post-World War II facilities were built in the brutalist style. The university has sites throughout the city, with the two major campuses, one next to the Prince Michael Street at Studentski Trg and the other on King Alexandar Boulevard. It has eleven dormitories scattered throughout the city's urban neighborhoods for 11,340 students, including one dormitory complex in New Belgrade. Many of the schools have separate buildings at various locations in Belgrade. The university also owns several endowment buildings in the downtown district, most of them being built in the 19th and early 20th century.

The Belgrade University Library, a Carnegie library, with over 1.5 million items
The Belgrade University Library, a Carnegie library, with over 1.5 million items

The central administrative building, Faculty of Philology and Faculty of Philosophy are located at Studentski Trg. The Faculty of Biology, Faculty of Geography, Faculty of Mathematics, Faculty for Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Physics and Faculty of Chemistry are situated in one building at Studentski Trg as well. The University Library, Law School, Faculty of Architecture, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering are situated at the King Alexandar Boulevard campus.

Other major academic sites include the School of Economics building near the downtown district, the Faculty of Orthodox Theology building at Bogoslovija (Palilula neighborhood), the Teachers’ Training Faculty building in the Savski Venac municipality, the Faculty of Security Studies building in the Vračar neighborhood, and the Faculty for Special Education and Rehabilitation building in the Dorćol neighborhood. The School of Medicine and School of Dental Medicine share a building near the Karađorđev Park, next to several hospitals. Medical teaching facilities, such as the University Hospital Center or Institute of Mental Health are on other locations within the city. The Faculty of Agriculture is situated alongside the Zemun City Park and it operates the Radmilovac experimental farm in Grocka. The Faculty of Political Sciences and Faculty of Organizational Sciences are situated close to each other in the same street of the Voždovac neighborhood.

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Captain Miša's Mansion

Captain Miša's Mansion

The Mansion of Miša Anastasijević is one of the most notable buildings in Belgrade, Serbia. It is the University of Belgrade's administration and governance building.

Belgrade

Belgrade

Belgrade is the capital and largest city in Serbia. It is located at the confluence of the Sava and Danube rivers and the crossroads of the Pannonian Plain and the Balkan Peninsula. Nearly 2.5 million people live within the administrative limits of the City of Belgrade. It is the third largest of all cities on the Danube river.

Museum of Vuk and Dositej

Museum of Vuk and Dositej

The Museum of Vuk and Dositej is one of the most important memorial museums in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. Founded in 1949, it depicts the life, work and legacy of Vuk Stefanović Karadžić (1787–1864), the reformer of the Serbian language, and Dositej Obradović (1742–1811), a writer who was the country's first Minister of Education. The museum is a crucial site for understanding the revival of Serbian culture at the time of the First Serbian Uprising against the Ottoman Empire. Since 1979, this institution has been governed by the National Museum of Serbia.

Princess Ljubica's Residence

Princess Ljubica's Residence

Princess Ljubica's Residence is a palace located in Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. Because of its cultural and architectural importance the residence has been designated a Monument of Culture of Exceptional Importance.

Subotica Law School

Subotica Law School

The University of Belgrade School of Law at Subotica was an institution providing legal education in Subotica, Kingdom of Yugoslavia from 1920 to 1941.

Brutalist architecture

Brutalist architecture

Brutalist architecture is an architectural style that emerged during the 1950s in the United Kingdom, among the reconstruction projects of the post-war era. Brutalist buildings are characterised by minimalist constructions that showcase the bare building materials and structural elements over decorative design. The style commonly makes use of exposed, unpainted concrete or brick, angular geometric shapes and a predominantly monochrome colour palette; other materials, such as steel, timber, and glass, are also featured.

Studentski Trg

Studentski Trg

Studentski Trg, or Students Square, is one of the central town squares and an urban neighborhood of Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. It is located in Belgrade's municipality of Stari Grad. In the Classical Antiquity, area of the modern square was the center of Singidunum, Roman precursor of modern Belgrade.

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra is the longest street entirely within the urban limits of Serbian capital Belgrade, with length of 7.5 kilometers. Known for decades after World War II as Bulevar Revolucije, it is so distinct in the Belgraders' hearts and minds that they simply refer to it as the Bulevar, although there are 20 boulevards in Belgrade.

New Belgrade

New Belgrade

New Belgrade is a municipality of the city of Belgrade. It is a planned city, built since 1948 in a previously uninhabited area on the left bank of the Sava river, opposite old Belgrade. In recent years, it has become the central business district of Belgrade and its fastest developing area, with many businesses moving to the new part of the city, due to more modern infrastructure and larger available space. With 214,506 inhabitants, it is the second most populous municipality of Serbia after Novi Sad.

Belgrade University Library

Belgrade University Library

The University Library Svetozar Marković is the main library in the University of Belgrade system, named after Svetozar Marković, a Serbian political activist in the 19th century. It is located on King Alexander Boulevard, close to the Faculty of Law and adjacent to the Faculties of Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Architecture. Serves the educational and scientific needs of students, academics, and scientists. Library Day is 24 May, a day commemorating Slavic educators St. Cyril and Methodius. At the founding of the library, the collection contained 57,254 publications consisting of monographs and serials. Today, the library contains roughly 1,700,000 publications.

Carnegie library

Carnegie library

A Carnegie library is a library built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. A total of 2,509 Carnegie libraries were built between 1883 and 1929, including some belonging to public and university library systems. 1,689 were built in the United States, 660 in the United Kingdom and Ireland, 125 in Canada, and others in Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Serbia, Belgium, France, the Caribbean, Mauritius, Malaysia, and Fiji.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Architecture

University of Belgrade Faculty of Architecture

The Faculty of Architecture is one of the 31 schools of the University of Belgrade. It shares the building with Faculties of Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The Faculty of Architecture is made up of three Departments: Architecture, Urban Planning and Architectural Technologies.

Organization and administration

The University of Belgrade is governed by the 44-member University Senate elected for a three-year term. The senate is composed of the rector, 4 vice-rectors, 31 deans, 4 presidents of the faculty Group Councils and 4 directors of scientific institutes. 8 student-representatives with a one-year term elected by the university's Student Parliament participate in the work of the Senate. The rector provides governance and represents the university externally.[16]

The University Council is a 31-member managing body. The university entrusts 21 members, 5 are appointed by the Serbian government and 5 elected by the university's Student Parliament. The University Council has its president (chairperson) and vice president. In addition to these bodies, the university has advisory academic councils and professional boards, appointed to adopt decisions and state their opinion on the election of teaching staff.[17]

Faculty of Technical Sciences
Faculty of Technical Sciences
Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy
Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy
Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering

Faculties

The university is divided into 31 faculties, including (with data about academic staff and number of students as of 2018–19 school year):[4]

Faculty Location Academic staff Students
Law Belgrade 103 8,786
Philology Belgrade 303 8,359
Economics Belgrade 120 8,033
Organizational Sciences Belgrade 161 6,210
Medicine Belgrade 660 5,628
Philosophy Belgrade 244 4,699
Electrical Engineering Belgrade 163 4,690
Agriculture Belgrade 297 4,646
Political Sciences Belgrade 119 4,113
Mechanical Engineering Belgrade 231 3,894
Civil Engineering Belgrade 146 2,884
Pharmacy Belgrade 183 2,666
Pedagogy Belgrade 99 2,587
Security Studies Belgrade 42 2,535
Mathematics Belgrade 157 2,474
Transport and Traffic Engineering Belgrade 147 2,273
Special Education and Rehabilitation Belgrade 93 2,233
Technology and Metallurgy Belgrade 147 2,199
Biology Belgrade 184 1,928
Geography Belgrade 97 1,919
Forestry Belgrade 114 1,717
Architecture Belgrade 134 1,659
Mining and Geology Belgrade 246 1,621
Dentistry Belgrade 141 1,610
Eastern Orthodox Theology Belgrade 42 1,586
Sport and Physical Education Belgrade 57 1,520
Veterinary Medicine Belgrade 127 1,507
Chemistry Belgrade 95 1,044
Technical Bor 87 888
Physics Belgrade 56 738
Physical Chemistry Belgrade 39 594
Total 4,834 97,696
University of Belgrade's Law School at Subotica that existed from 1920 - 1941
University of Belgrade's Law School at Subotica that existed from 1920 - 1941

Research institutes

  • Institute for Applied Nuclear Energy
  • Institute for Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy
  • Building of Rectorate of University of Belgrade.
    Building of Rectorate of University of Belgrade.
    Institute of History
  • Institute for Medical Research
  • Institute for Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering
  • Institute for Multidisciplinary Research
  • Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory
  • Institute of Physics
  • Mihajlo Pupin Institute
  • Nikola Tesla Institute of Electrical Engineering
  • Siniša Stanković Institute for Biological Research
  • Vinča Nuclear Institute

Centers

  • Information Center
  • Computer Center
  • Serbian-Japanese Center for Scientific Simulations
  • Center for Career Development
  • Center for Strategic Management
  • Center for Technology Transfer
  • Center for Students with Disabilities
  • Center for Quality Assurance
  • Center for Lifelong Learning

Discover more about Organization and administration related topics

Rector (academia)

Rector (academia)

A rector is a senior official in an educational institution, and can refer to an official in either a university or a secondary school. Outside the English-speaking world the rector is often the most senior official in a university, whilst in the United States the most senior official is often referred to as president and in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth of Nations the most senior official is the chancellor, whose office is primarily ceremonial and titular. The term and office of a rector can be referred to as a rectorate. The title is used widely in universities in Europe and is very common in Latin American countries. It is also used in Brunei, Macau, Turkey, Russia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Indonesia, Israel and the Middle East. In the ancient universities of Scotland the office is sometimes referred to as Lord Rector, is the third most senior official, and is usually responsible for chairing the University Court.

Students' union

Students' union

A students' union, also known by many other names, is a student organization present in many colleges, universities, and high schools. In higher education, the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social, organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Philology

University of Belgrade Faculty of Philology

The Faculty of Philology is one of the constituent schools of the University of Belgrade. The school's purpose is to train and educate its students in the academic study or practice in linguistics and philology.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Law

University of Belgrade Faculty of Law

The Faculty of Law of the University in Belgrade, also known as the Belgrade Law School, is one of the first-tier educational institutions of the University of Belgrade, Serbia. The building is located in the heart of the old part of Belgrade, in the urban neighborhood of Palilula, contiguously to the city park Tašmajdan, on Bulevar kralja Aleksandra.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Economics

University of Belgrade Faculty of Economics

The University of Belgrade Faculty of Economics is one of the educational institutions of the University of Belgrade, Serbia. The building is located in the city center of Belgrade, in the Savski Venac municipality. The Belgrade's School of Economics is Serbia's leading educational institution in business and economics.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Organizational Sciences

University of Belgrade Faculty of Organizational Sciences

The Faculty of Organisational Sciences of the University in Belgrade is one of the first-tier educational institutions of the University of Belgrade, Serbia.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Security Studies

University of Belgrade Faculty of Security Studies

The Faculty of Security Studies is an independent faculty of the University of Belgrade. The Faculty’s programs cover philosophical, sociological, political, legal, economic, psychological, ethical, humanitarian, civilian-military, and other aspects of the security studies, human and social resources, defense, civil defense and environment protection.

University of Belgrade Faculty of Architecture

University of Belgrade Faculty of Architecture

The Faculty of Architecture is one of the 31 schools of the University of Belgrade. It shares the building with Faculties of Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The Faculty of Architecture is made up of three Departments: Architecture, Urban Planning and Architectural Technologies.

Bor, Serbia

Bor, Serbia

Bor is a city and the administrative center of the Bor District in eastern Serbia. According to the 2011 census, the city administrative area has a population of 48,615 inhabitants.

Mihajlo Pupin Institute

Mihajlo Pupin Institute

Mihajlo Pupin Institute is an institute based in Belgrade, Serbia. It is named after Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin and is part of the University of Belgrade.

Vinča Nuclear Institute

Vinča Nuclear Institute

The Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences is a nuclear physics research institution near Belgrade, Serbia. Since its founding, the institute has also conducted research in the fields in physics, chemistry and biology. The scholarly institute is part of the University of Belgrade.

Academics

The Belgrade Law School, established in 1808, is a regional leader in legal education and one of the largest law schools in the Balkans. Its law education prepares students for working in law practice, business, public service and teaching. The Residence of Countess Ljubica as well as Captain Miša's Mansion once used to be home to this educational institution when it was within the Belgrade Higher School. Since its founding, it has educated almost 50,000 law graduates, around 1,200 magistri iuris and 830 doctores iuris, as well as hundreds of specialists in various areas. Many Faculty of Law alumni have become recognized experts and scholars in all branches of law, law professors and high ranking government officials.

The Law School's historic building, constructed by Serbian architect Petar Bajalović in 1941, comprises about 12,000 square metres (130,000 sq ft) of space. All the law schools established subsequently in Serbia (Subotica, Novi Sad, Pristina, Niš, Kragujevac), Montenegro (Podgorica), and in other parts of the former Yugoslavia (Sarajevo, Skopje) were formed from the University of Belgrade Faculty of Law as a core.[18]

Initially established in 1937, the Faculty of Economics was the first centre of higher education dedicated to the study of economics in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Its curriculum includes courses in economic analysis and policy; marketing; accounting, auditing and financial management; trade and commerce; finance, banking and insurance; tourism and hotel industry; statistics and informatics; management and international economics and foreign trade.[19]

The Faculty of Philosophy is one of the oldest institutions of higher education in Serbia, founded in the early 19th century. It employs a staff of 255 teachers and has approximately 6,000 undergraduate and graduate students within nine departments.[20]

The Faculty of Philology trains and educates its students in the academic study or practice in linguistics and philology. The study of philology was established in Belgrade within the Belgrade Higher School's Department of Philosophy in 1808. Today, the school offers courses in philology, linguistics and literature in dozens of languages. The school is divided into departments, which possess their own libraries, it operates several research centers and publishes a number of periodical publications.[21]

Moot Court at the Belgrade Law School
Moot Court at the Belgrade Law School

The Faculty of Electrical Engineering is also an important part of the university. The first lecture on electrical engineering was held in 1894. Professor Stevan Marković was the first lecturer and founder of the Engineering Department within the Belgrade Higher School. Marković also established the first Serbian electrical engineering laboratory in 1898. Today, the school is divided into a number of departments, offering a wide range of electrical engineering programs.[22]

The Belgrade Medical School was established in 1920 and more than 30,000 students graduated from this institution, including circa 850 international students. The School of Medicine is composed of 40 departments with over 200 professorships. The school offers an extensive number of academic courses, including specialization practice within a network of hospitals, institutes and medical clinics.[23]

The Faculty of Stomatology (Belgrade Dental School) was established in 1948. The first head of the newly founded faculty was Dr. Aleksandar Djordjevic, Professor of the Faculty of Medicine at that time. In organizing and teaching the students of dentistry after its establishment, and long after, many teachers of the Faculty of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine and Faculty of Pharmacy have contributed a lot. The Faculty of Stomatology is composed of 8 teaching and scientific and healthcare organizational units.[24]

Under the umbrella of the humanities faculty, the Faculty of Security Studies has its roots in the Institute for National Defense of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics Faculty, University of Belgrade. In 1978, this institute evolved into the free-standing Faculty of People's Defense, which was renamed several times before becoming the Faculty of Security Studies in May 2006. The Faculty of Security Studies focuses on all aspects of security studies, human and social resources, defense, civil defense and environmental protection, offering professional training, undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.[25]

Discover more about Academics related topics

Jevremovac

Jevremovac

The Jevremovac Botanical Garden is the botanical garden of the University of Belgrade and also a surrounding urban neighborhood of Belgrade, Serbia. The garden is located in Belgrade's municipality of Stari Grad and is an administered by the University of Belgrade's Biology School.

Captain Miša's Mansion

Captain Miša's Mansion

The Mansion of Miša Anastasijević is one of the most notable buildings in Belgrade, Serbia. It is the University of Belgrade's administration and governance building.

Magister Juris

Magister Juris

MJur is an academic degree in law awarded by some universities.

Serbia

Serbia

Serbia, officially the Republic of Serbia, is a landlocked country in Southeastern and Central Europe, situated at the crossroads of the Pannonian Plain and the Balkans. It shares land borders with Hungary to the north, Romania to the northeast, Bulgaria to the southeast, North Macedonia to the south, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the west, and Montenegro to the southwest, and claims a border with Albania through the disputed territory of Kosovo. Serbia with Kosovo has about 8.6 million inhabitants. Its capital Belgrade is also the largest city.

Novi Sad

Novi Sad

Novi Sad is the second largest city in Serbia and the capital of the autonomous province of Vojvodina. It is located in the southern portion of the Pannonian Plain on the border of the Bačka and Syrmia geographical regions. Lying on the banks of the Danube river, the city faces the northern slopes of Fruška Gora.

Pristina

Pristina

Pristina is the capital and largest city of Kosovo. The city's municipal boundaries in Pristina District form the largest urban center in Kosovo. After Tirana, Pristina has the second largest population of ethnic Albanians and speakers of the Albanian language.

Niš

Niš

Niš is the third largest city in Serbia and the administrative center of the Nišava District. It is located in southern part of Serbia. According to the 2011 census, the city proper has a population of 183,164, while its administrative area has a population of 260,237 inhabitants.

Kragujevac

Kragujevac

Kragujevac is the fourth largest city in Serbia and the administrative centre of the Šumadija District. It is the historical centre of the geographical region of Šumadija in central Serbia, and is situated on the banks of the Lepenica River. According to the 2011 census, the city proper has a population of 150,835, while its administrative area comprises a total of 179,417 inhabitants.

Montenegro

Montenegro

Montenegro is a country in Southeastern Europe. It is located a part of the Balkans and is bordered by Serbia to the northeast, Bosnia and Herzegovina to the north, Kosovo to the east, Albania to the southeast, Croatia to the northwest, and the Adriatic Sea to the west with a coastline of 293.5 km. Podgorica, the capital and largest city, covers 10.4% of Montenegro's territory of 13,812 square kilometres (5,333 sq mi), and is home to roughly 30% of its total population of 621,000.

Podgorica

Podgorica

Podgorica is the capital and largest city of Montenegro. The city was formerly known as Titograd between 1946 and 1992—in the period that Montenegro formed, as the Socialist Republic of Montenegro in honour of Marshal Josip Broz Tito. The city was largely destroyed during the bombing of Podgorica in World War II and accordingly the city is now dominated by architecture from the following decades of communism. Further but less substantial damage was caused by the 1999 bombing by NATO forces.

Sarajevo

Sarajevo

Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, with a population of 275,524 in its administrative limits. The Sarajevo metropolitan area including Sarajevo Canton, East Sarajevo and nearby municipalities is home to 555,210 inhabitants. Located within the greater Sarajevo valley of Bosnia, it is surrounded by the Dinaric Alps and situated along the Miljacka River in the heart of the Balkans, a region of Southern Europe.

Kingdom of Yugoslavia

Kingdom of Yugoslavia

The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a state in Southeast and Central Europe that existed from 1918 until 1941. From 1918 to 1929, it was officially called the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, but the term "Yugoslavia" was its colloquial name due to its origins. The official name of the state was changed to "Kingdom of Yugoslavia" by King Alexander I on 3 October 1929.

Student life

King Alexandar I Dormitory, established in 1927
King Alexandar I Dormitory, established in 1927

Residential life

The University of Belgrade offers housing options within 11 student dormitories and it has the largest student housing system in Serbia, accommodating up to 10,154 students at various locations throughout the city.[2][26]

Dormitories

  • ''Studentski grad'' (4,406)
  • ''Karaburma'' (1,170)
  • ''Patris Lumumba'' (1,021)
  • ''4. April'' (863)
  • ''Slobodan Penezić'' (756)
  • ''Kralj Aleksandar I'' (525)
  • ''Košutnjak'' (413)
  • ''Rifat Burdžević'' (367)
  • ''Vera Blagojević I'' and ''Vera Blagojević II'' (313)
  • ''Žarko Marinović'' (188)
  • ''Mika Mitrović'' (162)

The university's "Studentski grad" in New Belgrade is a dormitory complex organized into 4 blocks. It has a theater building, movie theater, facilities for athletics, two libraries, reading rooms and open stage for summer concerts.[27]

The other dormitories are smaller by capacity and scattered throughout the city's urban neighbourhoods. ''Kralj Aleksandar I'' Dormitory (also known as "Lola") at the King Alexandar Boulevard campus is the oldest dormitory in the Balkans, founded in 1927 by King Alexander I of Yugoslavia. It has 190 rooms and provides accommodation for the university's successful students, based on their grade point average.[28] Some of the dormitories got their names after political leaders. As an example, the Patrice Lumumba Hall of Residence at Belgrade University built in 1961 today continues to carry the name of Lumumba, the first legally elected Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo after he helped win its independence from Belgium.[29]

Discover more about Student life related topics

Studentski Grad, Belgrade

Studentski Grad, Belgrade

Studentski Grad, or colloquially Studenjak (Студењак), is an urban neighborhood of Belgrade, the capital of Serbia. It is located in Belgrade's municipality of New Belgrade. Studentski Grad, as its name points out is actually the campus of the University of Belgrade. It is the largest dormitory in Belgrade, originally constructed to accommodate nearly 5,000 students.

New Belgrade

New Belgrade

New Belgrade is a municipality of the city of Belgrade. It is a planned city, built since 1948 in a previously uninhabited area on the left bank of the Sava river, opposite old Belgrade. In recent years, it has become the central business district of Belgrade and its fastest developing area, with many businesses moving to the new part of the city, due to more modern infrastructure and larger available space. With 214,506 inhabitants, it is the second most populous municipality of Serbia after Novi Sad.

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra

Bulevar kralja Aleksandra is the longest street entirely within the urban limits of Serbian capital Belgrade, with length of 7.5 kilometers. Known for decades after World War II as Bulevar Revolucije, it is so distinct in the Belgraders' hearts and minds that they simply refer to it as the Bulevar, although there are 20 boulevards in Belgrade.

Alexander I of Yugoslavia

Alexander I of Yugoslavia

Alexander I, also known as Alexander the Unifier, was the prince regent of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1914 and later the King of Yugoslavia from 1921 to 1934. He was assassinated by the Bulgarian Vlado Chernozemski of the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization, during a 1934 state visit to France. Having sat on the throne for 13 years, he is the longest-reigning monarch of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

Patrice Lumumba

Patrice Lumumba

Patrice Émery Lumumba was a Congolese politician and independence leader who served as the first prime minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from June until September 1960. A member of the Congolese National Movement (MNC), he led the MNC from 1958 until his execution in January 1961. Ideologically an African nationalist and pan-Africanist, he played a significant role in the transformation of the Congo from a colony of Belgium into an independent republic.

Notable alumni

Discover more about Notable alumni related topics

David Albahari

David Albahari

David Albahari is a Serbian writer, residing in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Albahari writes mainly novels and short stories in the Serbian language. He is also an established translator from English into Serbian. He is a member of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts and a University of Belgrade graduate.

Athanasios Angelopoulos

Athanasios Angelopoulos

Athanasios Angelopoulos is a Professor of Pastoral Theology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; founder and in-honour president of the Institute for National and Religious Studies . He has studied at the Theology School of the University of Athens as well as in University of Belgrade's Theology School. From 1973 to 1981 he was instructor of theology at Aristotle University; in 1982 he became an assistant professor and in 1984, full professor of Ecclesiastic (Church) History at the Department of Pastoral Theology of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Branka Arsić

Branka Arsić

Branka Arsić is the Charles and Lynn Zhang Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

Larisa Blazic

Larisa Blazic

Larisa Blazic is a British video installation artist and a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Media, Arts and Design, University of Westminster' with an interdisciplinary approach towards architecture and art.

Martin Camaj

Martin Camaj

Martin Camaj was an Albanian folklorist, linguist, and writer. He is regarded as one of the major authors of modern Albanian prose. His novel Rrathë is considered to be the first psychological novel written in Albanian.

Branko Ćopić

Branko Ćopić

Branko Ćopić was a Serbian, Bosnian and Yugoslavian writer. He wrote poetry, short stories and novels, and became famous for his stories for children and young adults, often set during World War II in revolutionary Yugoslavia, written with characteristic Ćopić's humor in the form of ridicule, satire and irony.

Araldo Cossutta

Araldo Cossutta

Araldo Cossutta was an architect who worked primarily in the United States. He worked at the firm I. M. Pei & Partners from 1956 to 1973. I. M. Pei has been among the most honored architects in the world. Cossutta was Pei's associate and ultimately his partner in the first phase of Pei's career. He was responsible for some of the firm's best-known designs from that era, including three that have received "landmark" designations in recent years. In 1973 he and Vincent Ponte left Pei's firm to form Cossutta & Ponte, which ultimately became Cossutta and Associates. The new firm designed the Credit Lyonnais Tower in Lyon, France (1977) and the Tower at Cityplace (1988) in Dallas, Texas, among other commissions.

Jovan Cvijić

Jovan Cvijić

Jovan Cvijić was a Serbian geographer and ethnologist, president of the Serbian Royal Academy of Sciences and rector of the University of Belgrade. Cvijić is considered the founder of geography in Serbia. He began his scientific career as a geographer and geologist, and continued his activity as a human geographer and sociologist.

Kiro Gligorov

Kiro Gligorov

Kiro Gligorov was a Macedonian politician who served as the first President of the Republic of Macedonia from 1991 to 1999.

Ilijas Farah

Ilijas Farah

Ilijas Farah is a Canadian-Serbian mathematician and a professor of mathematics at York University in Toronto and at the Mathematical Institute of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Belgrade, Serbia. His research focuses on applications of logic to operator algebras.

John of Shanghai and San Francisco

John of Shanghai and San Francisco

Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco was a prominent Eastern Orthodox ascetic and hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia (ROCOR) who was active in the mid-20th century. He was a pastor and spiritual father of high reputation and a reputed wonderworker to whom were attributed powers of prophecy, clairvoyance and healing. He is often referred to as "St. John the Wonderworker".

Danilo Kiš

Danilo Kiš

Danilo Kiš was a Yugoslav novelist, short story writer, essayist and translator. His best known works include Hourglass, A Tomb for Boris Davidovich and The Encyclopedia of the Dead.

Source: "University of Belgrade", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Belgrade.

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References
  1. ^ a b "History of the University". University of Belgrade. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  2. ^ a b c d Лична карта. bg.ac.rs (in Serbian). University of Belgrade. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  3. ^ "ЗАКОН О БУЏЕТУ РЕПУБЛИКЕ СРБИЈЕ ЗА 2020. ГОДИНУ" (PDF). parlament.gov.rs. Народна скупштина Републике Србије. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Високо образовање 2018/2019" (PDF). stat.gov.rs (in Serbian). Statistical Office of Serbia. Retrieved 24 December 2019.
  5. ^ "Уписани студенти, 2018/2019. школска година" (PDF). stat.gov.rs (in Serbian). Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia. 25 June 2019. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  6. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities 2019
  7. ^ QS World University Rankings 2019
  8. ^ THE World University Rankings 2019
  9. ^ U.S. News Education: Best Global Universities 2020
  10. ^ a b Kandić Ljubica, Istorija Pravnog fakulteta 1905-1941, Zavod za udžbenike Beograd (Belgrade, 2002), ISBN 86-17-09760-4
  11. ^ Teja Merhar (2019). "International Collaborations in Culture between Yugoslavia and the Countries of the Non-Aligned Movement". In Tamara Soban (ed.). Southern Constellations: The Poetics of the Non-Aligned (PDF). Museum of Modern Art (Ljubljana). pp. 43–70. ISBN 978-961-206-138-8.
  12. ^ Gross Jan, Banac Ivo et al., Fired in Belgrade, The New York Review of Books (1990). Retrieved 2010-05-10.
  13. ^ Šušak Bojana, An Alternative to War, In The Road to War in Serbia: Trauma and Catharsis, ed. Neboiša Popov (Budapest 2000), pp. 479–508, p. 500.
  14. ^ "Belgrade University Improves Ranking on Shanghai List - English - on B92.net". b92.net. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  15. ^ Register, Sites of Outstanding Value Archived 2010-05-14 at the Wayback Machine, Cultural Heritage Preservation Institute of Serbia. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  16. ^ The University Senate Archived 2010-04-17 at the Wayback Machine, University of Belgrade website. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  17. ^ The University Council Archived 2010-04-17 at the Wayback Machine, University of Belgrade website. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  18. ^ "University of Belgrade - The Seedbed of University Education", Belgrade Law School homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  19. ^ About section Archived 2010-04-18 at the Wayback Machine, University of Belgrade Faculty of Economics homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  20. ^ University of Belgrade Faculty of Philosophy homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  21. ^ History section Archived 2010-07-19 at the Wayback Machine, University of Belgrade Faculty of Philology homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  22. ^ History section Archived 2010-04-19 at the Wayback Machine, University of Belgrade Faculty of Electrical Engineering homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  23. ^ Belgrade Medical School homepage. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  24. ^ "Univerzitet u Beogradu Stomatološki fakultet | Dobrodošli". Stomf.bg.ac.rs. 2012-10-30. Retrieved 2012-12-30.
  25. ^ About section, University of Belgrade Faculty of Security Studies. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  26. ^ Београду, Универзитет у. "Appartments [sic] and Dormitories". bg.ac.rs. Retrieved 16 March 2018.
  27. ^ Belgrade Student Center: The Student City, Infostud portal. Retrieved 2010-05-11.
  28. ^ The Oldest Dormitory in the Balkans Archived 2010-11-08 at the Wayback Machine, Studentskisvet.com
  29. ^ ".: Studentski Centar Beograd". Archived from the original on 2009-04-13. Retrieved 2012-05-27.
Further reading
  • University of Belgrade: A Centennial of the First Serbian University Law, 2005, ISBN 86-7522-024-3
  • The Benefactors of Belgrade University: Gallery of SASA, October - November 2005: [exhibition], 2005, ISBN 86-7025-384-4
External links

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