Get Our Extension

Typhoon Gene

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Typhoon Gene (Oyang)
Typhoon (JMA scale)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Gene Sep 28 1990 0528Z.png
Typhoon Gene early on September 28
FormedSeptember 22, 1990 (September 22, 1990)
DissipatedOctober 1, 1990 (October 1, 1990)
(Extratropical after September 30)
Highest winds10-minute sustained: 150 km/h (90 mph)
1-minute sustained: 150 km/h (90 mph)
Lowest pressure950 hPa (mbar); 28.05 inHg
Fatalities6 direct
Damage$158 million (1990 USD)
Areas affectedJapan
Part of the 1990 Pacific typhoon season

Typhoon Gene, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Oyang, struck Japan during late September 1990. An area of disturbed weather formed several hundred kilometers south-southeast of Okinawa on September 18. Gradual development occurred as it tracked generally westward, and on September 22, the disturbance developed into a tropical depression. The depression intensified into a tropical storm the next day. Continuing to steadily intensify, Gene turned northwest and became a severe tropical storm on September 25. In the evening, Gene was declared a typhoon, and on September 26, attained its maximum intensity. Gene leveled off in intensity while recurving towards Japan. After brushing Kyushu and Shikoku on September 29 and Honshu on September 20, Gene weakened back to a tropical storm. On September 30, Gene transitioned into an extratropical cyclone, which was last noted on October 1.

The typhoon hit the Japanese archipelago ten days after Typhoon Flo, which killed 40 people. The southwestern portion of the country suffered the worst damage from the typhoon. Nationwide, six fatalities were reported and twenty others sustained injuries. In Miyazaki Prefecture, three people were killed and ten others were wounded. Throughout the prefecture, 4,688 houses were damaged and ninety-two others were destroyed, which led to 18,449 homeless. A total 210 houses were destroyed while 13,318 others were flooded. Elsewhere, 229 houses were damaged in Kagoshima Prefecture and seventy more were destroyed; consequently, 194 people lost their homes. There, almost 30,000 homes lost power. Overall, there were 340 landslides and roads were damaged at 182 locations. All Nippon Airways cancelled ninety domestic flights and Japan Airlines cancelled ten flights. Over 200,000 people were affected by cancellation of flights and train services. Thirty-one ships and 10,560 acres (4,273 ha) of farmland were damaged. Monetary damage estimates reached ¥22.9 billion yen or $158 million USD in 1990 values.

Discover more about Typhoon Gene related topics

Philippines

Philippines

The Philippines, officially the Republic of the Philippines, is an archipelagic country in Southeast Asia. It is situated in the western Pacific Ocean and consists of around 7,641 islands that are broadly categorized under three main geographical divisions from north to south: Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. The Philippines is bounded by the South China Sea to the west, the Philippine Sea to the east, and the Celebes Sea to the southwest. It shares maritime borders with Taiwan to the north, Japan to the northeast, Palau to the east and southeast, Indonesia to the south, Malaysia to the southwest, Vietnam to the west, and China to the northwest. The Philippines covers an area of 300,000 km2 (120,000 sq mi) and, as of 2021, it had a population of around 109 million people, making it the world's thirteenth-most populous country. The Philippines has diverse ethnicities and cultures throughout its islands. Manila is the country's capital, while the largest city is Quezon City; both lie within the urban area of Metro Manila.

Tropical cyclone scales

Tropical cyclone scales

Tropical cyclones are ranked on one of five tropical cyclone intensity scales, according to their maximum sustained winds and which tropical cyclone basins they are located in. Only a few scales of classifications are used officially by the meteorological agencies monitoring the tropical cyclones, but other scales also exist, such as accumulated cyclone energy, the Power Dissipation Index, the Integrated Kinetic Energy Index, and the Hurricane Severity Index.

Kyushu

Kyushu

Kyushu is the third-largest island of Japan's five main islands and the most southerly of the four largest islands. In the past, it has been known as Kyūkoku , Chinzei and Tsukushi-no-shima . The historical regional name Saikaidō referred to Kyushu and its surrounding islands. Kyushu has a land area of 36,782 square kilometres (14,202 sq mi) and a population of 14,311,224 in 2018.

Shikoku

Shikoku

Shikoku is the smallest of the four main islands of Japan. It is 225 km or 139.8 mi long and between 50 and 150 km or 31.1 and 93.2 mi wide. It has a population of 3.8 million. It is south of Honshu and northeast of Kyushu. Shikoku's ancient names include Iyo-no-futana-shima (伊予之二名島), Iyo-shima (伊予島), and Futana-shima (二名島), and its current name refers to the four former provinces that made up the island: Awa, Tosa, Sanuki, and Iyo.

Honshu

Honshu

Honshu , historically called Hondo , is the largest and most populous island of Japan. It is located south of Hokkaidō across the Tsugaru Strait, north of Shikoku across the Inland Sea, and northeast of Kyūshū across the Kanmon Straits. The island separates the Sea of Japan, which lies to its north and west, from the North Pacific Ocean to the south and east. It is the seventh-largest island in the world, and the second-most populous after the Indonesian island of Java.

Extratropical cyclone

Extratropical cyclone

Extratropical cyclones, sometimes called mid-latitude cyclones or wave cyclones, are low-pressure areas which, along with the anticyclones of high-pressure areas, drive the weather over much of the Earth. Extratropical cyclones are capable of producing anything from cloudiness and mild showers to severe gales, thunderstorms, blizzards, and tornadoes. These types of cyclones are defined as large scale (synoptic) low pressure weather systems that occur in the middle latitudes of the Earth. In contrast with tropical cyclones, extratropical cyclones produce rapid changes in temperature and dew point along broad lines, called weather fronts, about the center of the cyclone.

Typhoon Flo (1990)

Typhoon Flo (1990)

Typhoon Flo, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Norming, was a long-lived typhoon that brought destruction to much of Japan during September 1990. Flo originated from an area of convection that first formed to the southeast of the Marshall Islands on September 7. Five days later, the disturbance obtained tropical depression status, and on September 13, intensified into a tropical storm. Tracking west-northwest as it rounded a subtropical ridge, Flo slowly deepened, and on September 15, became a typhoon. After developing an eye, Flo began to rapidly intensify, and on September 17, Flo attained peak intensity. Shortly thereafter, the typhoon began to recurve to the northeast towards Honshu in response to deepening troughs to the northwest and north of the system, which resulted in a weakening trend due to increased vertical wind shear despite remaining over warm water. On September 19, Flo made landfall on southern Honshu, becoming the first typhoon to hit the Kii Peninsula in 11 years, and thereafter started to transition into an extratropical cyclone. The extratropical remnants of Flo were last noted on the morning of September 22.

Miyazaki Prefecture

Miyazaki Prefecture

Miyazaki Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Kyūshū. Miyazaki Prefecture has a population of 1,073,054 and has a geographic area of 7,735 km2. Miyazaki Prefecture borders Ōita Prefecture to the north, Kumamoto Prefecture to the northwest, and Kagoshima Prefecture to the southwest.

Kagoshima Prefecture

Kagoshima Prefecture

Kagoshima Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Kyushu and the Ryukyu Islands. Kagoshima Prefecture has a population of 1,599,779 and has a geographic area of 9,187 km2. Kagoshima Prefecture borders Kumamoto Prefecture to the north and Miyazaki Prefecture to the northeast.

All Nippon Airways

All Nippon Airways

The All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd. , also known as ANA (Ē-enu-ē) or Zennikkū (全日空) is an airline in Japan. Its headquarters are located in Shiodome City Center in the Shiodome area of Minato ward of Tokyo. It operates services to both domestic and international destinations and had more than 20,000 employees as of March 2016.

Japan Airlines

Japan Airlines

Japan Airlines Co., Ltd. , also known as JAL (Jaru) or Nikkō (日航), is an international airline and Japan's flag carrier and second largest airline as of 2021, headquartered in Shinagawa, Tokyo. Its main hubs are Tokyo's Narita International Airport and Haneda Airport, as well as Osaka's Kansai International Airport and Itami Airport. JAL group companies include Japan Airlines, J-Air, Japan Air Commuter, Japan Transocean Air, and Ryukyu Air Commuter for domestic feeder services, and JAL Cargo for cargo and mail services.

United States dollar

United States dollar

The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States and several other countries. The Coinage Act of 1792 introduced the U.S. dollar at par with the Spanish silver dollar, divided it into 100 cents, and authorized the minting of coins denominated in dollars and cents. U.S. banknotes are issued in the form of Federal Reserve Notes, popularly called greenbacks due to their predominantly green color.

Meteorological history

Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir–Simpson scaleMap key Saffir–Simpson scale .mw-parser-output .div-col{margin-top:0.3em;column-width:30em}.mw-parser-output .div-col-small{font-size:90%}.mw-parser-output .div-col-rules{column-rule:1px solid #aaa}.mw-parser-output .div-col dl,.mw-parser-output .div-col ol,.mw-parser-output .div-col ul{margin-top:0}.mw-parser-output .div-col li,.mw-parser-output .div-col dd{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column} .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Tropical depression (≤38 mph, ≤62 km/h)   Tropical storm (39–73 mph, 63–118 km/h)   Category 1 (74–95 mph, 119–153 km/h)   Category 2 (96–110 mph, 154–177 km/h)   Category 3 (111–129 mph, 178–208 km/h)   Category 4 (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h)   Category 5 (≥157 mph, ≥252 km/h)   Unknown    Storm type  Tropical cyclone  Subtropical cyclone  Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression
Map plotting the storm's track and intensity, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale
Map key
  Tropical depression (≤38 mph, ≤62 km/h)
  Tropical storm (39–73 mph, 63–118 km/h)
  Category 1 (74–95 mph, 119–153 km/h)
  Category 2 (96–110 mph, 154–177 km/h)
  Category 3 (111–129 mph, 178–208 km/h)
  Category 4 (130–156 mph, 209–251 km/h)
  Category 5 (≥157 mph, ≥252 km/h)
  Unknown
Storm type
▲ Extratropical cyclone / Remnant low / Tropical disturbance / Monsoon depression

The origins of Typhoon Gene, the fifth tropical cyclone of September 1990, can be traced back to an area of disturbed weather with a surface pressure of 1008 mbar (29.8 inHg) first noted by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) at 06:00 UTC early on September 18. Little development occurred over the next five days,[1] although the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) classified the disturbance as a tropical depression on the morning of September 22.[2][nb 1] A Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA) was issued at 06:00 UTC on September 23, followed by an increase in the disturbance's organization.[1] Around that time, the system was located roughly 1,170 km (725 mi) south-southeast of Okinawa.[4] Further development was aided by a tropical upper tropospheric trough to its west and the warm ocean waters of the Kuroshio Current. Initially, the disturbance tracked generally westward, south of a subtropical ridge. Shower activity steadily increased and a Dvorak estimate of T2.0/55 km/h (35 mph) prompted the JTWC to designate it a tropical depression midday on September 23.[1] Twelve hours later, the JMA reported that the depression had strengthened into a tropical storm,[5][nb 2] and after the system improved in organization and its outflow expanded,[1] the JTWC followed suit.[7] At this time, Tropical Storm Gene was situated 980 km (610 mi) south-southeast of Okinawa.[4]

Tropical Storm Gene intensified at the climatological rate of one T number per day as it tracked westward on a course initially resembling a straight runner.[1] At 00:00 UTC on September 25, the JMA classified Gene as a severe tropical storm.[2] The storm then turned northwest as it approached a break in the subtropical ridge. Although restricted upper-level outflow prevented rapid intensification, a Dvorak intensity estimate of T4.0/120 km/h (75 mph)[1] lead to both agencies to declare Gene a typhoon on the evening of September 25.[5] Around the time of the upgrade, Gene was located 380 km (235 mi) south-southwest of Okinawa.[4] At 00:00 UTC on September 26, the JMA raised its intensity to 130 km/h (80 mph) for its maximum sustained winds, while the agency also estimated a minimum pressure of 965 mbar (28.5 inHg).[2] However, the JTWC suggested that Gene was still slowly strengthening, and did not attain its maximum intensity of 90 mph (145 km/h) until 18:00 UTC that day.[7]

Gene recurved to the northeast on September 27 in response to a shortwave trough[1] while passing through the Ryukyu Islands.[4] According to the JTWC, Gene maintained its peak intensity until 06:00 UTC on September 29,[1] although the JMA estimated that a weakening trend had begun six hours earlier.[2] The typhoon continued to recurve and skirted Kyushu and Shikoku on September 29 before tracking just south of Honshu the following day.[4] Based on surface observations, the JTWC downgraded Gene into a tropical storm at 06:00 UTC that day,[1] with the JMA doing the same at around the same time. The JMA classified Gene as an extratropical cyclone at noon,[2] even though the JTWC did not follow suit until six hours later.[1] Finally, the JMA stopped tracking the extratropical remnants of Gene on October 1.[5]

Discover more about Meteorological history related topics

Saffir–Simpson scale

Saffir–Simpson scale

The Saffir–Simpson hurricane wind scale (SSHWS) classifies hurricanes—which in the Western Hemisphere are tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms—into five categories distinguished by the intensities of their sustained winds. This measuring system was formerly known as the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale, or SSHS.

Tropical cyclone

Tropical cyclone

A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain and squalls. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane, typhoon, tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, or simply cyclone. A hurricane is a strong tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean or northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. In the Indian Ocean, South Pacific, or (rarely) South Atlantic, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones", and such storms in the Indian Ocean can also be called "severe cyclonic storms".

Subtropical cyclone

Subtropical cyclone

A subtropical cyclone is a weather system that has some characteristics of both tropical and an extratropical cyclone.

Extratropical cyclone

Extratropical cyclone

Extratropical cyclones, sometimes called mid-latitude cyclones or wave cyclones, are low-pressure areas which, along with the anticyclones of high-pressure areas, drive the weather over much of the Earth. Extratropical cyclones are capable of producing anything from cloudiness and mild showers to severe gales, thunderstorms, blizzards, and tornadoes. These types of cyclones are defined as large scale (synoptic) low pressure weather systems that occur in the middle latitudes of the Earth. In contrast with tropical cyclones, extratropical cyclones produce rapid changes in temperature and dew point along broad lines, called weather fronts, about the center of the cyclone.

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

Joint Typhoon Warning Center

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is a joint United States Navy – United States Air Force command in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The JTWC is responsible for the issuing of tropical cyclone warnings in the North-West Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean, and Indian Ocean for all branches of the U.S. Department of Defense and other U.S. government agencies. Their warnings are intended for the protection of primarily military ships and aircraft as well as military installations jointly operated with other countries around the world.

Japan Meteorological Agency

Japan Meteorological Agency

The Japan Meteorological Agency , abbreviated JMA, is an agency of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism. It is charged with gathering and providing results for the public in Japan that are obtained from data based on daily scientific observation and research into natural phenomena in the fields of meteorology, hydrology, seismology and volcanology, among other related scientific fields. Its headquarters is located in Minato, Tokyo.

Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert

Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert

A Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA) is a bulletin released by the U.S. Navy-operated Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Honolulu, Hawaii or the Fleet Weather Center in Norfolk, Virginia, warning of the possibility of a tropical cyclone forming from a tropical disturbance that has been monitored. Such alerts are generally always issued when it is fairly certain that a tropical cyclone will form and are not always released before cyclone genesis, particularly if the cyclone appears suddenly. The TCFA consists of several different checks that are performed by the on-duty meteorologist of the system and its surroundings. If the condition being checked is met, a certain number of points are given to the system.

Kuroshio Current

Kuroshio Current

The Kuroshio Current , also known as the Black or Japan Current or the Black Stream, is a north-flowing, warm ocean current on the west side of the North Pacific Ocean basin. It was named for the deep blue appearance of its waters. Similar to the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic, the Kuroshio is a powerful western boundary current that transports warm equatorial water poleward and forms the western limb of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Off the East Coast of Japan, it merges with the Oyashio Current to form the North Pacific Current.

Dvorak technique

Dvorak technique

The Dvorak technique is a widely used system to estimate tropical cyclone intensity based solely on visible and infrared satellite images. Within the Dvorak satellite strength estimate for tropical cyclones, there are several visual patterns that a cyclone may take on which define the upper and lower bounds on its intensity. The primary patterns used are curved band pattern (T1.0-T4.5), shear pattern (T1.5–T3.5), central dense overcast (CDO) pattern (T2.5–T5.0), central cold cover (CCC) pattern, banding eye pattern (T4.0–T4.5), and eye pattern (T4.5–T8.0).

Outflow (meteorology)

Outflow (meteorology)

Outflow, in meteorology, is air that flows outwards from a storm system. It is associated with ridging, or anticyclonic flow. In the low levels of the troposphere, outflow radiates from thunderstorms in the form of a wedge of rain-cooled air, which is visible as a thin rope-like cloud on weather satellite imagery or a fine line on weather radar imagery. For observers on the ground, a thunderstorm outflow boundary often approaches in otherwise clear skies as a low, thick cloud that brings with it a gust front.

Maximum sustained wind

Maximum sustained wind

The maximum sustained wind associated with a tropical cyclone is a common indicator of the intensity of the storm. Within a mature tropical cyclone, it is found within the eyewall at a distance defined as the radius of maximum wind, or RMW. Unlike gusts, the value of these winds are determined via their sampling and averaging the sampled results over a period of time. Wind measuring has been standardized globally to reflect the winds at 10 metres (33 ft) above the Earth's surface, and the maximum sustained wind represents the highest average wind over either a one-minute (US) or ten-minute time span, anywhere within the tropical cyclone. Surface winds are highly variable due to friction between the atmosphere and the Earth's surface, as well as near hills and mountains over land.

Ryukyu Islands

Ryukyu Islands

The Ryukyu Islands , also known as the Nansei Islands or the Ryukyu Arc , are a chain of Japanese islands that stretch southwest from Kyushu to Taiwan: the Ōsumi, Tokara, Amami, Okinawa, and Sakishima Islands, with Yonaguni the westernmost. The larger are mostly high islands and the smaller mostly coral. The largest is Okinawa Island.

Impact

The typhoon dropped heavy rainfall across much of the Japanese archipelago.[8] A peak rainfall total occurred of 619 mm (24.4 in) in the city of Miyazaki, 563 mm (22.2 in) of which fell in a 24-hour time span.[9] A peak hourly rainfall total of 91 mm (3.6 in) was observed at Shimizu.[10] Moreover, a maximum wind gust of 159 km/h (99 mph) was recorded on Muroto.[11] In Tokushima Prefecture, a minimum central pressure of 970 mbar (28.6 inHg) was observed.[12]

In Okinawa Prefecture, one person was hurt and damage accumulated to ¥77.2 million yen.[13] On Shikoku Island, little damage was reported.[12] A total of 214 homes were damaged in Kōchi Prefecture and ten others were leveled. There were also eleven landslides. Damage in the prefecture totaled ¥1.2 billion yen.[14] Two people were killed in Miyazaki Prefecture because of landslides and another drowned into a river,[15] and an additional ten were wounded. Throughout the prefecture, 4,688 houses suffered damage, while an additional ninety-two dwellings were destroyed, which led to 18,449 homeless. Furthermore, 2,700 households lost power in the city Miyazaki while 8,339 households lost power in Nichinan. Prefecture-wide, damage totaled ¥10.8 billion yen, primarily from the western portion of the prefecture.[16] In Kagoshima Prefecture, five people suffered injuries, including two in a landslide. A total of 229 houses were damaged and seventy more were destroyed; consequently, 194 people lost their homes. In the town of Takayama, located in Kagoshima Prefecture, over 100,000 fish died. According to authorities, nearly 30,000 residencies were left without power. Across the prefecture, damage amounted to ¥15.3 billion yen.[17] Throughout the entire island of Kyushu, 150 national flights were cancelled.[18]

In Wakayama Prefecture, sixty-seven homes were damaged and damage was estimated at ¥187 million yen. Four buildings were destroyed in Shingu City, resulting in twenty homeless.[19] Three flights were cancelled and three others were delayed at the Okayama Airport.[20] Elsewhere, in Kanagawa Prefecture, heavy rains triggered fifty-nine landslides. A total of 1,713 homes were damaged and 915 others were destroyed, which resulted in 2,956 homeless individuals.[21] Ninety bullet trains were cancelled between Tokyo and Osaka.[15] In nearby Oshima Subprefecture, heavy rains forced the closure of nine roads. Throughout Tokyo, eight structures were damaged and twelve flights were delayed.[22] A 49-year-old man was killed in a landslide in Shizuoka.[15] Across Shizuoka prefecture, heavy rains caused 143 landslides. There, 1,697 homes were damaged, with 144 others destroyed. Roads were damaged in 162 locations. Nearly 900 ha (2,225 acres) of arable land was inundated.[23] In Mie Prefecture, two people were presumed dead after they drowned in a river and three others were hurt. A total of 1,079 homes were damaged and thirty-nine others were demolished, which resulted in 130 people homeless. Damage there was assessed at ¥2.62 billion yen.[24] At the Narita International Airport, sixty-eight flights were delayed. In Chiba Prefecture, there was one minor injury. A total of 213 houses were destroyed and eighteen others were damaged. Embankments were damaged at eighty-five sites across the prefecture.[25] Seventy-five individuals lost their homes in Yamanashi Prefecture, where damage totaled to ¥716 million yen.[26] Elsewhere, 304 dwellings were damaged and twenty-eight were demolished along coastal areas of Saitama Prefecture.[27] Damage in Gunma prefecture totaled ¥53.8 million yen.[28]

The typhoon hit the Japanese archipelago ten days after Typhoon Flo,[29] which claimed forty lives and caused over $4 billion in damage.[30] The storm also forced the cancellation of the final round of the Top Cup Tokai Classic.[31] Much of the southwestern portion of the country suffered the worst damage from the typhoon.[29] Nationwide, six fatalities were reported and twenty others sustained injuries. A total 210 houses were destroyed while 13,318 others were flooded.[8] Landslides triggered by heavy rain were reported at 340 places and roads were damaged at 182 locations.[4] All Nippon Airways cancelled ninety domestic flights and Japan Airlines cancelled ten flights.[15] More than 200,000 people were affected by cancellation of flights and train services.[4] Thirty-one ships and 10,560 acres (4,273 ha) of farmland were damaged. Monetary damage totaled ¥22.9 billion yen or US$158 million.[8][nb 3][nb 4]

Discover more about Impact related topics

Miyazaki (city)

Miyazaki (city)

Miyazaki is the capital city of Miyazaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city was founded on April 1, 1924. As of July 2022, the city had an estimated population of 399,788 and a population density of 621 persons per km2. The total area is 643.67 km2.

Muroto, Kōchi

Muroto, Kōchi

Muroto is a city located in Kōchi Prefecture, Japan. As of 30 June 2022, the city had an estimated population of 12,121 in 7079 households and a population density of 49 persons per km2. The total area of the city is 248.18 square kilometres (95.82 sq mi).

Okinawa Prefecture

Okinawa Prefecture

Okinawa Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan. Okinawa Prefecture is the southernmost and westernmost prefecture of Japan, has a population of 1,457,162 and a geographic area of 2,281 km2.

Kōchi Prefecture

Kōchi Prefecture

Kōchi Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Shikoku. Kōchi Prefecture has a population of 757,914 and has a geographic area of 7,103 km2. Kōchi Prefecture borders Ehime Prefecture to the northwest and Tokushima Prefecture to the northeast.

Miyazaki Prefecture

Miyazaki Prefecture

Miyazaki Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Kyūshū. Miyazaki Prefecture has a population of 1,073,054 and has a geographic area of 7,735 km2. Miyazaki Prefecture borders Ōita Prefecture to the north, Kumamoto Prefecture to the northwest, and Kagoshima Prefecture to the southwest.

Nichinan, Miyazaki

Nichinan, Miyazaki

Nichinan is a city in Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan. The city was founded on January 1, 1950. As of June 1, 2019, the city has an estimated population of 51,241 and a population density of 95.6 persons per km2. The total area is 536.11 km2.

Kagoshima Prefecture

Kagoshima Prefecture

Kagoshima Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Kyushu and the Ryukyu Islands. Kagoshima Prefecture has a population of 1,599,779 and has a geographic area of 9,187 km2. Kagoshima Prefecture borders Kumamoto Prefecture to the north and Miyazaki Prefecture to the northeast.

Okayama Airport

Okayama Airport

Okayama Airport is an airport in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. It is also known as Okayama Momotaro Airport.

Kanagawa Prefecture

Kanagawa Prefecture

Kanagawa Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region of Honshu. Kanagawa Prefecture is the second-most populous prefecture of Japan at 9,221,129 and third-densest at 3,800 inhabitants per square kilometre (9,800/sq mi). Its geographic area of 2,415 km2 (932 sq mi) makes it fifth-smallest. Kanagawa Prefecture borders Tokyo to the north, Yamanashi Prefecture to the northwest and Shizuoka Prefecture to the west.

Mie Prefecture

Mie Prefecture

Mie Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kansai region of Honshu. Mie Prefecture has a population of 1,781,948 and has a geographic area of 5,774 square kilometers (2,229 sq mi). Mie Prefecture is bordered by Gifu Prefecture to the north, Shiga Prefecture and Kyoto Prefecture to the northwest, Nara Prefecture to the west, Wakayama Prefecture to the southwest, and Aichi Prefecture to the east.

Narita International Airport

Narita International Airport

Narita International Airport, also known as Tokyo-Narita, formerly and originally known as New Tokyo International Airport , is one of two international airports serving the Greater Tokyo Area, the other one being Haneda Airport (HND). It is about 60 kilometers (37 mi) east of central Tokyo in Narita, Chiba.

Chiba Prefecture

Chiba Prefecture

Chiba Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region of Honshu. Chiba Prefecture has a population of 6,278,060 and has a geographic area of 5,157 km2 (1,991 sq mi). Chiba Prefecture borders Ibaraki Prefecture to the north, Saitama Prefecture to the northwest, and Tokyo to the west.

Source: "Typhoon Gene", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoon_Gene.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

See also
Notes
  1. ^ The Japan Meteorological Agency is the official Regional Specialized Meteorological Center for the western Pacific Ocean.[3]
  2. ^ Wind estimates from the JMA and most other basins throughout the world are sustained over 10 minutes, while estimates from the United States-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center are sustained over 1 minute. 10-minute winds are about 1.14 times the amount of 1-minute winds.[6]
  3. ^ All currencies are converted from Japanese yen to United States Dollars using this with an exchange rate of the year 1990.
  4. ^ All damage totals are in 1990 values of their respective currencies.
References
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Joint Typhoon Warning Center; Naval Pacific Meteorology and Oceanography Center (1992). Annual Tropical Cyclone Report: 1990 (PDF) (Report). United States Navy, United States Air Force. pp. 152, 153. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e Japan Meteorological Agency (October 10, 1992). RSMC Best Track Data – 1990–1999 (.TXT) (Report). Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  3. ^ "Annual Report on Activities of the RSMC Tokyo – Typhoon Center 2000" (PDF). Japan Meteorological Agency. February 2001. p. 3. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Hong Kong Observatory (1991). "Part III – Tropical Cyclone Summaries". Meteorological Results: 1990 (PDF). Meteorological Results (Report). Hong Kong Observatory. p. 15. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c Kenneth R. Knapp; Michael C. Kruk; David H. Levinson; Howard J. Diamond; Charles J. Neumann (2010). 1990 GENE (1990261N12141). The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS): Unifying tropical cyclone best track data (Report). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  6. ^ Christopher W Landsea; Hurricane Research Division (April 26, 2004). "Subject: D4) What does "maximum sustained wind" mean? How does it relate to gusts in tropical cyclones?". Frequently Asked Questions. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  7. ^ a b Typhoon 21W Best Track (TXT) (Report). Joint Typhoon Warning Center. December 17, 2002. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  8. ^ a b c Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 199020 (Gene). Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  9. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. AMeDAS MIYAZAKI (87376) @ Typhoon 199020. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  10. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. AMeDAS SHIMIZU (74516) @ Typhoon 199020. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  11. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. AMeDAS MUROTOMISAKI (74371) @ Typhoon 199020. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  12. ^ a b Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-895-12. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  13. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-927-03. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  14. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-893-10. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  15. ^ a b c d "Four Dead, 13 Injured In Storm". Associated Press. September 30, 1990.
  16. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-830-07. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  17. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-827-15. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  18. ^ "Japanese typhoon leaves 1 missing". Toronto Star. Reuters. September 30, 1990.
  19. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-777-06. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  20. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-768-14. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  21. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-670-11. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  22. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-662-11. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  23. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-656-18. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  24. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-651-11. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  25. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-648-16. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  26. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-638-10. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  27. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-626-14. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  28. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 1990-624-13. Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  29. ^ a b "Tokyo hit by weakened Typhoon Gene". United Press International. September 30, 1990.
  30. ^ Asanobu, Kitamoto. Typhoon 199019 (Flo). Digital Typhoon (Report). National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  31. ^ "Typhoon helps Marsh". The Advertiser. October 1, 1990.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.