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Tornado outbreak of January 12, 2023

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Tornado outbreak of January 12, 2023
Tornado outbreak of January 12, 2023.png
Map of tornado warnings and confirmed tornadoes from the outbreak.
TypeTornado outbreak
DurationJanuary 12, 2023
Highest winds
Tornadoes
confirmed
39
Max. rating1EF3 tornado
Duration of
tornado outbreak2
15 hours, 24 minutes
Largest hail2 in (5.1 cm) in Elm Park, Arkansas on January 11
Fatalities8 fatalities (+1 indirect), 53 injuries
Power outages115,000[1]
Areas affectedSoutheastern United States

1Most severe tornado damage; see Enhanced Fujita scale
2Time from first tornado to last tornado

An early-season tornado outbreak impacted the Southeastern United States on January 12, 2023, the result of a mid-level trough moving through, with moisture and the presence of a strong low-level jet aiding in the development of multiple severe thunderstorms. A strong EF2 tornado caused considerable damage in Winston County, Alabama, while another EF2 tornado struck Greensboro. A destructive high-end EF2 tornado struck Selma, causing widespread damage.[2] The same storm produced a long-lived EF3 tornado that moved through Old Kingston, Titus, Equality, and Lake Martin, resulting in seven fatalities and several injuries in Autauga County alone.[3] Another EF2 tornado from the storm struck Five Points, Stroud, and Standing Rock before crossing into Georgia. After the dissipation of that tornado, seven more tornadoes, four of which were strong, caused heavy damage across west-central Georgia, especially in LaGrange, Griffin, and Experiment, the latter two of which were struck by an EF3 tornado. Another EF2 tornado from the storm caused major damage and another fatality in the Jackson Lake area as well; an indirect death from the tornado also occurred the following day. Elsewhere, other tornadoes caused damage in Sumter and Mobile counties in Alabama, as well as parts of Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and the Carolinas.[4] In all, 39 tornadoes were confirmed.

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Jet stream

Jet stream

Jet streams are fast flowing, narrow, meandering air currents in the atmospheres of some planets, including Earth. On Earth, the main jet streams are located near the altitude of the tropopause and are westerly winds. Jet streams may start, stop, split into two or more parts, combine into one stream, or flow in various directions including opposite to the direction of the remainder of the jet.

Greensboro, Alabama

Greensboro, Alabama

Greensboro is a city in Hale County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 2,497, down from 2,731 at the 2000 census. The city is the county seat of Hale County, Alabama, which was not organized until 1867. It is part of the Tuscaloosa, Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Kingston, Autauga County, Alabama

Kingston, Autauga County, Alabama

Kingston, also known as Old Kingston, is an unincorporated community in Autauga County, Alabama. Kingston served as the county seat of Autauga County from 1830 to 1868, when it was moved to Prattville. Kingston became a ghost town, until a new community was formed around the home of Edmund Meredith Shackelford, an officer who served in the War of 1812. A post office was operated in Kingston from 1830 to 1908.

Equality, Alabama

Equality, Alabama

Equality is a census-designated place in Coosa County, Alabama, United States. It was first named as a CDP in the 2020 Census which listed a population of 150. The Equality post office serves the ZIP Code of 36026, and its delivery area includes rural land to the south in Elmore County.

Five Points, Alabama

Five Points, Alabama

Five Points is a town in Chambers County, Alabama, United States. At the 2020 census, the population was 114.

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina; to the northeast by South Carolina; to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean; to the south by Florida; and to the west by Alabama. Georgia is the 24th-largest state in area and 8th most populous of the 50 United States. Its 2020 population was 10,711,908, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Atlanta, a "beta(+)" global city, is both the state's capital and its largest city. The Atlanta metropolitan area, with a population of more than 6 million people in 2021, is the 8th most populous metropolitan area in the United States and contains about 57% of Georgia's entire population.

Griffin, Georgia

Griffin, Georgia

Griffin is a city in and the county seat of Spalding County, Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta metropolitan area. As of the 2020 census, the city had a population of 23,478.

Experiment, Georgia

Experiment, Georgia

Experiment is a census-designated place (CDP) in Spalding County, Georgia, United States. The population was 3,233 at the 2000 census.

Jackson Lake (Georgia)

Jackson Lake (Georgia)

Jackson Lake is one of the oldest reservoirs in Georgia, United States, 44 miles (71 km) southeast of Atlanta in a rural area situated within parts of three counties. The Lloyd Shoals Dam was built in 1910 by Central Georgia Power Company, and electricity was originally generated for the city of Macon. Relative to others in the state, it is a smaller lake, which still generates electricity and provides a location for water sports, boating, wakeboarding and fishing. Jackson Lake is formed by the confluence of the Yellow, Alcovy and South rivers. Tussahaw Creek is also a significant tributary. Below the Lloyd Shoals Dam, the lake's outlet is the Ocmulgee River.

Kentucky

Kentucky

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South. It borders Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north, West Virginia to the northeast, Virginia to the east, Tennessee to the south, and Missouri to the west. Its northern border is defined by the Ohio River. Its capital is Frankfort, and its two largest cities are Louisville and Lexington. Its population was approximately 4.5 million in 2020.

Illinois

Illinois

Illinois is a state in the Midwestern United States. Its largest metropolitan areas include the Chicago metropolitan area, and the Metro East section, of Greater St. Louis. Other metropolitan areas include Peoria and Rockford, as well as Springfield, its capital. Of the fifty U.S. states, Illinois has the fifth-largest gross domestic product (GDP), the sixth-largest population, and the 25th-largest land area.

Carolinas

Carolinas

The Carolinas are the U.S. states of North Carolina and South Carolina, considered collectively. They are bordered by Virginia to the north, Tennessee to the west, and Georgia to the southwest. The Atlantic Ocean is to the east.

Meteorological synopsis

SPC tornado outlook for the morning of January 12 (13:00 UTC)Afternoon outlook update for the evening of January 12 (20:00 UTC)
SPC tornado outlook for the morning of January 12 (13:00 UTC)
SPC tornado outlook for the morning of January 12 (13:00 UTC)Afternoon outlook update for the evening of January 12 (20:00 UTC)
Afternoon outlook update for the evening of January 12 (20:00 UTC)

On January 11, the Storm Prediction Center outlined a level 1/Marginal risk across the Mid-South valid for the overnight and early morning hours. Although the environment was initially capped, conditions were expected to become more conducive for severe weather given the approach of a mid-level trough and a gradually moistening airmass.[5] A more substantive threat for organized severe weather evolved on January 12, when the organization issued a level 3/Enhanced risk centered along central and eastern Alabama and northwestern portions of Georgia. Here, numerical weather prediction models indicated the presence of 6.5 C/km mid-level lapse rates and 500-1000 J/kg convective available potential energy (CAPE) values supportive of transient supercells and bowing segments. As such, a large 5% risk for tornadoes was introduced for most of the lower Tennessee Valley, including portions of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, southern Tennessee, and northwestern South Carolina.[6]

Radar loop of a QLCS and supercells along with severe warnings in the Southeast during the afternoon of January 12.
Radar loop of a QLCS and supercells along with severe warnings in the Southeast during the afternoon of January 12.

As the day advanced, a more focused corridor for enhanced tornado potential became evident across central Alabama and northwestern Georgia, where effective storm-relative helicity – a measure of the potential for updrafts in supercells – topped 300 m2/s2 and CAPE values rose into the 1,000-1,500 J/kg range. Despite these favorable parameters, the possibility for strong tornadoes, above EF2 intensity, was not included in this outlook.[7] However, as the morning advanced, a defined line of severe thunderstorms with embedded supercell structures and multiple discrete supercells developed across the highlighted area. Multiple tornadoes, some of which were significant, touched down and caused extensive damage. Numerous PDS tornado warnings were issued for the towns of Heiberger, Selma, and Movico in Alabama as large and destructive tornadoes were reported. The same storm that hit Selma prompted tornado emergencies for Autauga,[8] Elmore, Chilton, Coosa,[9] and Tallapoosa[10] counties before crossing the Alabama–Georgia border to continue northeast into Georgia. As the event unfolded, the SPC introduced a 10% hatched risk for tornadoes in their 20:00 UTC outlook across east-central Alabama and western Georgia.[11] The long-tracked supercell (originating in Louisiana)[12] that produced the Selma tornado, as well as the deadly Autauga County tornado, produced more tornadoes as it progressed to the northeast; these included one that crossed from Chambers County, Alabama into Troup County, Georgia, another that caused severe damage to the city of LaGrange, and one that caused further damage in Griffin.[13] In total, the National Weather Service issued 221 severe thunderstorm warnings, 68 tornado warnings, and three tornado emergencies during the severe weather outbreak.[14]

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Storm Prediction Center

Storm Prediction Center

The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is a US government agency that is part of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), operating under the control of the National Weather Service (NWS), which in turn is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States Department of Commerce (DoC).

Capping inversion

Capping inversion

A capping inversion is an elevated inversion layer that caps a convective planetary boundary layer.

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered by Tennessee to the north; Georgia to the east; Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the south; and Mississippi to the west. Alabama is the 30th largest by area and the 24th-most populous of the U.S. states. With a total of 1,500 miles (2,400 km) of inland waterways, Alabama has among the most of any state.

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia (U.S. state)

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee and North Carolina; to the northeast by South Carolina; to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean; to the south by Florida; and to the west by Alabama. Georgia is the 24th-largest state in area and 8th most populous of the 50 United States. Its 2020 population was 10,711,908, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Atlanta, a "beta(+)" global city, is both the state's capital and its largest city. The Atlanta metropolitan area, with a population of more than 6 million people in 2021, is the 8th most populous metropolitan area in the United States and contains about 57% of Georgia's entire population.

Numerical weather prediction

Numerical weather prediction

Numerical weather prediction (NWP) uses mathematical models of the atmosphere and oceans to predict the weather based on current weather conditions. Though first attempted in the 1920s, it was not until the advent of computer simulation in the 1950s that numerical weather predictions produced realistic results. A number of global and regional forecast models are run in different countries worldwide, using current weather observations relayed from radiosondes, weather satellites and other observing systems as inputs.

Lapse rate

Lapse rate

The lapse rate is the rate at which an atmospheric variable, normally temperature in Earth's atmosphere, falls with altitude. Lapse rate arises from the word lapse, in the sense of a gradual fall. In dry air, the adiabatic lapse rate is 9.8 °C/km.

Convective available potential energy

Convective available potential energy

In meteorology, convective available potential energy, is the integrated amount of work that the upward (positive) buoyancy force would perform on a given mass of air if it rose vertically through the entire atmosphere. Positive CAPE will cause the air parcel to rise, while negative CAPE will cause the air parcel to sink. Nonzero CAPE is an indicator of atmospheric instability in any given atmospheric sounding, a necessary condition for the development of cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds with attendant severe weather hazards.

Mississippi

Mississippi

Mississippi is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered to the north by Tennessee; to the east by Alabama; to the south by the Gulf of Mexico; to the southwest by Louisiana; and to the northwest by Arkansas. Mississippi's western boundary is largely defined by the Mississippi River. Mississippi is the 32nd largest and 35th-most populous of the 50 U.S. states and has the lowest per-capita income in the United States. Jackson is both the state's capital and largest city. Greater Jackson is the state's most populous metropolitan area, with a population of 591,978 in 2020.

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina is a state in the coastal Southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River. South Carolina is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state with a recorded population of 5,124,712 according to the 2020 census. In 2019, its GDP was $213.45 billion. South Carolina is composed of 46 counties. The capital is Columbia with a population of 137,300 in 2020; while its largest city is Charleston with a 2020 population of 150,277. The Greenville–Spartanburg-Anderson metropolitan area is the most populous in the state, with a 2020 population estimate of 1,455,892.

Heiberger, Alabama

Heiberger, Alabama

Heiberger is a small unincorporated community located about 10 miles north of Marion in Perry County, Alabama, United States. It is best known for being the birthplace of civil rights leader Coretta Scott King.

Selma, Alabama

Selma, Alabama

Selma is a city in and the county seat of Dallas County, in the Black Belt region of south central Alabama and extending to the west. Located on the banks of the Alabama River, the city has a population of 17,971 as of the 2020 census. About 80% of the population is African-American.

Movico, Alabama

Movico, Alabama

Movico is a census-designated place and unincorporated community in Mobile County, Alabama, United States. Its population was 291 as of the 2020 census. The town was heavily damaged by an EF2 tornado on January 12, 2023.

Confirmed tornadoes

Confirmed tornadoes by Enhanced Fujita rating
EFU EF0 EF1 EF2 EF3 EF4 EF5 Total
0 8 19 10 2 0 0 39

January 12 event

List of confirmed tornadoes – Thursday, January 12, 2023[note 1]
EF# Location County / Parish State Start Coord. Time (UTC) Path length Max width Summary
EF1 SE of Monkey's Eyebrow, KY to W of Joppa, IL Ballard (KY), McCracken (KY), Massac (IL) KY, IL 37°11′N 88°59′W / 37.18°N 88.99°W / 37.18; -88.99 (Monkey's Eyebrow (Jan. 12, EF1)) 08:03–08:10 6.7 mi (10.8 km) 200 yd (180 m) Roofing and siding were ripped from a few homes, and multiple metal roof panels were blown off two large barns by this low-end EF1 tornado. A church sustained damage to its fencing, and the top half of a clay tile silo was destroyed.[15]
EF1 S of Muldon Monroe MS 33°43′06″N 88°40′18″W / 33.7182°N 88.6716°W / 33.7182; -88.6716 (Muldon (Jan. 12, EF1)) 12:29–12:33 2.44 mi (3.93 km) 50 yd (46 m) A home had its porch removed, several windows broken, and a substantial portion of its roof removed. An adjacent, large workshop was demolished. Two power poles were snapped.[16]
EF1 Northern Pleasureville Henry KY 38°21′10″N 85°07′58″W / 38.3529°N 85.1327°W / 38.3529; -85.1327 (Pleasureville (Jan. 12, EF1)) 13:47–13:49 1.27 mi (2.04 km) 100 yd (91 m) A brief high-end EF1 tornado caused significant damage or destroyed several barns. In northern Pleasureville, some homes sustained significant roof damage. A mobile home suffered similar damage and was also moved from its concrete foundational blocks. Power lines were damaged, and trees were snapped or uprooted.[17]
EF1 N of Rose Hill to Northern Harrodsburg Mercer KY 37°46′N 84°55′W / 37.77°N 84.91°W / 37.77; -84.91 (Rose Hill (Jan. 12, EF1)) 14:01–14:05 3.6 mi (5.8 km) 80 yd (73 m) One barn was demolished, with its roofing material thrown 200 yards (180 m) downstream, while a second barn sustained significant roof and side panel damage. Two homes also sustained significant roof and gutter damage; pieces of roofing were impaled into the ground. Two bleachers were flipped at Kenneth D. King Middle School. Numerous trees were snapped, topped, or twisted.[17]
EF2 E of Delmar to N of Double Springs Winston AL 34°09′57″N 87°35′11″W / 34.1658°N 87.5864°W / 34.1658; -87.5864 (Delmar (Jan. 12, EF2)) 14:05–14:18 9.18 mi (14.77 km) 425 yd (389 m) A strong tornado destroyed two large chicken coops and three other small buildings on a farm. Five homes were damaged, an RV was overturned, and hundreds of trees were downed.[2][18]
EF1 Moulton to Western Decatur to NNW of Mooresville Lawrence, Morgan, Limestone AL 34°26′58″N 87°21′49″W / 34.4494°N 87.3637°W / 34.4494; -87.3637 (Moulton (Jan. 12, EF1)) 14:09–14:45 30.4 mi (48.9 km) 325 yd (297 m) This long-tracked tornado began over a ridge, causing widespread tree damage. Several residences along the track sustained roof damage. One home in particular had an associated large metal workshop almost completely destroyed. In downtown Moulton, damage occurred to the city's high school baseball fields, as well as to Lawrence Medical Center.[19] The tornado lifted at times while tracking through Morgan County. It caused occasional damage to the roof of a mobile home, power lines, and a law enforcement marina. Several large campers were flipped or displaced. After crossing the Tennessee River, it caused additional damage to the campus of Calhoun Community College and its baseball complex before lifting. One person was injured.[18][20]
EF1 NE of Danville Boyle KY 37°41′16″N 84°44′12″W / 37.6878°N 84.7367°W / 37.6878; -84.7367 (Danville (Jan. 12, EF1)) 14:10–14:11 0.84 mi (1.35 km) 125 yd (114 m) A large, well-built garage sustained significant damage to its roof and side wall, with debris thrown 150 yards (140 m) to the east and impaled into the ground. Another well-built barn lost several of its roof panels. Many trees were topped, snapped, or uprooted. Widespread straight-line wind damage occurred on either side of the tornado.[17]
EF0 NW of Williamstown Grant KY 38°39′29″N 84°34′47″W / 38.6581°N 84.5797°W / 38.6581; -84.5797 (Williamstown (Jan. 12, EF0)) 14:23–14:24 0.3 mi (0.48 km) 50 yd (46 m) Part of the roof was ripped off a house by this high-end EF0 tornado. A street sign was bent to the ground, and several trees were downed. A steel warehouse building had part of its roof lifted and damaged, and two door frames on opposite sides of the building were blown in.[21]
EF2 Emelle to S of Gainesville Sumter AL 32°43′44″N 88°20′47″W / 32.7288°N 88.3463°W / 32.7288; -88.3463 (Emelle (Jan. 12, EF2)) 15:24–15:40 12.87 mi (20.71 km) 440 yd (400 m) This strong tornado touched down just west of Emelle before moving eastward through the town. An outbuilding was destroyed, and several homes suffered roof damage, including one home that had its roof completely ripped off, which was the basis for the EF2 rating along with the destroyed outbuilding. Elsewhere along the path, a mobile home and a grain bin were destroyed. Dozens of trees were snapped or uprooted as well. One person was injured.[2][18]
EF1 NE of Richmond Madison KY 37°46′19″N 84°14′45″W / 37.7719°N 84.2458°W / 37.7719; -84.2458 (Richmond (Jan. 12, EF1)) 15:42–15:45 1.2 mi (1.9 km) 80 yd (73 m) A hay barn was severely damaged with damage also being inflicted to a chicken coop and dog run, and the roofs of houses. A travel trailer was lifted and tossed over a red sports car, which resulted in the travel trailer being flipped on its side and rotated 90 degrees from its original orientation. Many trees were damaged as well.[17]
EF2 Western Eutaw to Stewart to SSE of Duncanville Greene, Hale, Tuscaloosa, Bibb AL 32°50′31″N 87°54′57″W / 32.8420°N 87.9158°W / 32.8420; -87.9158 (Eutaw (Jan. 12, EF2)) 15:54–16:43 38.76 mi (62.38 km) 600 yd (550 m) This long-lived tornado (which came from the same storm that produced the EF2 Emelle tornado) first destroyed a shed, caused roof damage, and snapped and uprooted trees. It then moved through the northern portions of the town of Eutaw at EF1 strength, snapping and uprooting numerous trees and inflicting minor roof damage to several homes. A rooftop observation deck was taken off of one home and thrown across the street. The tornado continued east-northeast along the Black Warrior River and struck Oak Village. A home in the area was significantly damaged when its garage collapsed, pulling down the adjacent walls and tearing off a large portion of the roof, with most of debris being blown into the river; this damage was rated low-end EF2. Other structures were also damaged, and many trees were snapped or uprooted. The tornado then weakened significantly, causing only intermittent tree damage as it passed near Stewart and over SR 69 before reintensifying slightly as it entered the Talladega National Forest. After crossing into Tuscaloosa County, the tornado rapidly intensified to its peak intensity of high-end EF2, snapping or uprooting dozens of trees, many of which were snapped at their base in the center of the tornado's path. The tornado then weakened as it approached and then crossed US 82. Additional tree damage was observed, and two homes suffered minor structural damage before the tornado dissipated. The path of the tornado moved over the entire track of an EF1 tornado that struck the same area on November 29, 2022, as well as an EF3 tornado that passed through the Talladega National Forest on March 25, 2021.[2][18]
EF0 SSW of Decatur Meigs TN 35°30′N 84°48′W / 35.50°N 84.80°W / 35.50; -84.80 (Decatur (Jan. 12, EF0)) 16:50–16:51 0.57 mi (0.92 km) 150 yd (140 m) A brief, weak tornado embedded within an area of damaging straight-line winds uprooted trees and inflicted considerable roof damage to multiple homes. One person was injured.[22]
EF2 SSE of Forkland to Southern Greensboro to SW of Marion Hale, Perry AL 32°37′20″N 87°45′15″W / 32.6221°N 87.7543°W / 32.6221; -87.7543 (Greensboro (Jan. 12, EF2)) 16:47–17:15 21.22 mi (34.15 km) 500 yd (460 m) This tornado first touched down near the Greene-Hale County line before moving across County Road 35 and downing numerous trees. It then caused considerable damage to the roof of a house before intensifying to low-end EF2 strength as it approached southern Greensboro. It uprooted numerous trees, rolled and destroyed a single-wide manufactured home, and caused lighter damage to several other structures. The tornado then weakened as it moved into Perry County, causing to high-end EF0 to low-end EF1 strength damage before dissipating shortly after.[2][18]
EF1 NNE of Heiberger to NNW of Lawley Perry, Bibb AL 32°48′35″N 87°14′11″W / 32.8096°N 87.2363°W / 32.8096; -87.2363 (Ellards (Jan. 12, EF1)) 17:30–17:51 16.8 mi (27.0 km) 500 yd (460 m) After the previous tornado dissipated, the supercell produced this tornado soon after. It reached EF1 intensity as it snapped and uprooted trees along a ridge. As it neared SR 219 after crossing into Bibb County, it weakened before dissipating after it crossed US 82.[2][18]
EF2 NE of Orrville to Selma to SE of Burnsville Dallas AL 32°19′02″N 87°13′40″W / 32.3173°N 87.2278°W / 32.3173; -87.2278 (Selma (Jan. 12, EF2)) 18:04–18:31 22.72 mi (36.56 km) 950 yd (870 m) See section on this tornado – Two people were injured.
EF0 SW of Dandridge Jefferson TN 35°59′N 83°31′W / 35.98°N 83.51°W / 35.98; -83.51 (Dandridge (Jan. 12, EF0)) 18:14–18:15 0.42 mi (0.68 km) 30 yd (27 m) A brief, weak tornado caused minor tree damage.[22]
EF2 SSE of Citronelle to Movico Mobile AL 31°01′11″N 88°12′11″W / 31.0196°N 88.203°W / 31.0196; -88.203 (Lambert (Jan. 12, EF2)) 18:15–18:33 11.4 mi (18.3 km) 200 yd (180 m) Two mobile homes were completely destroyed, and hundreds of trees were downed.[23]
EF0 E of Baneberry Jefferson TN 36°03′04″N 83°16′24″W / 36.0511°N 83.2732°W / 36.0511; -83.2732 (Baneberry (Jan. 12, EF0)) 18:26–18:28 1.1 mi (1.8 km) 100 yd (91 m) Trees and power lines were downed.[13][22]
EF3 SW of Old Kingston to Equality to E of Penton Autauga, Elmore, Coosa, Tallapoosa, Chambers AL 32°31′16″N 86°43′52″W / 32.5212°N 86.7312°W / 32.5212; -86.7312 (Autauga County (Jan. 12, EF3)) 18:40–20:08 82.31 mi (132.47 km) 1,500 yd (1,400 m) 7 deaths – See section on this tornado – 16 people were injured.
EF0 E of Nymph Conecuh AL 31°21′42″N 86°56′05″W / 31.3616°N 86.9346°W / 31.3616; -86.9346 (Nymph (Jan. 12, EF0)) 19:54–19:55 0.94 mi (1.51 km) 100 yd (91 m) Several trees were uprooted, and several tree limbs were downed.[23]
EF2 SW of Five Points, AL to NW of LaGrange Chambers (AL), Troup (GA) AL, GA 32°59′14″N 85°24′47″W / 32.9871°N 85.4131°W / 32.9871; -85.4131 (Five Points (Jan. 12, EF2)) 20:08–20:24 20.9 mi (33.6 km) 1,600 yd (1,500 m) This large and strong tornado touched down as the long-tracked EF3 tornado was dissipating and moved northeastward from White Plains into Five Points. Along this segment of the path, many trees were snapped and uprooted and barns sustained roof damage. Northeast of Five Points, the tornado widened and strengthened, snapping and uprooting a large swath of trees and causing roof damage to a house just south of Standing Rock. It then destroyed a mobile home, blowing the debris downwind. The tornado then reached EF2 intensity as it neared West Point Lake along the state line. A couple homes suffered significant shingle damage, one had siding damage, and a mobile home had its porch ripped off, impacting its walls. Another mobile home was blown off its footings and destroyed. After crossing into Georgia, the tornado steadily weakened inflicting damage to trees and some shingles and gutters of a few homes. The tornado continued east through mostly wooded areas, inflicting damage to pine trees before the tornado dissipated.[2][18][24]
EF1 SSW of Mableton Cobb GA 33°46′59″N 84°36′26″W / 33.7830°N 84.6071°W / 33.7830; -84.6071 (Mableton (Jan. 12, EF1)) 20:30–20:33 1.5 mi (2.4 km) 150 yd (140 m) A high-end EF1 tornado quickly spun up within a line of severe storms in the western suburbs of Atlanta. An 18 Wheeler Truck Parts & Chrome building lost a portion of its exterior wall. Dozens of trees were knocked down onto homes, which sustained severe roof and structural damage.[24]
EF2 Southern LaGrange to Mountville Troup GA 32°59′34″N 85°04′25″W / 32.9927°N 85.0735°W / 32.9927; -85.0735 (LaGrange (Jan. 12, EF2)) 20:34–20:47 12.3 mi (19.8 km) 1,060 yd (970 m) A large and strong tornado (which formed after the West Point Lake EF2 tornado dissipated) severely damaged a large warehouse building, destroying about a quarter of the structure and stretching or ripping several metal anchor bolts out of the concrete pad. More than 30 homes sustained significant damage in southern LaGrange, with large portions of their roofs or upper floors destroyed. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted, including in the town of Mountville. Four people were injured.[18][24]
EF2 NE of Mountville to Alps to SW of Zetella Meriwether, Spalding, Pike GA 33°03′06″N 84°51′10″W / 33.0517°N 84.8527°W / 33.0517; -84.8527 (Mountville (Jan. 12, EF2)) 20:45–21:17 27.6 mi (44.4 km) 1,500 yd (1,400 m) This large, long-tracked tornado touched down as the previous EF2 tornado was dissipating. A double-wide mobile home had its roof blown off and was shifted 20 yards (18 m) off its foundation, breaking the structure in half, while two single-wide mobile home were completely obliterated. A home had its entire roof blown off and a large, recently constructed two-story barn was destroyed. Thousands of trees were blown down and several homes were damaged or destroyed by some of the downed trees.[18][24]
EF1 WNW of Pine Level Crenshaw AL 31°30′18″N 86°14′34″W / 31.505°N 86.2428°W / 31.505; -86.2428 (Pine Level (Jan. 12, EF1)) 20:46–20:47 0.36 mi (0.58 km) 80 yd (73 m) A brief tornado snapped or uprooted dozens of trees.[23]
EF3 W of Hollonville to Experiment to NNE of Locust Grove Pike, Spalding, Henry GA 33°09′51″N 84°29′10″W / 33.1643°N 84.4861°W / 33.1643; -84.4861 (Experiment (Jan. 12, EF3)) 21:11–21:44 31.9 mi (51.3 km) See section on this tornado – 18 people were injured.
EF1 Mayfield to Camak to W of Thomson Warren, McDuffie GA 33°21′44″N 82°48′12″W / 33.3622°N 82.8032°W / 33.3622; -82.8032 (Mayfield (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:15–21:39 16.4 mi (26.4 km) 150 yd (140 m) A couple of homes sustained roof and fascia damage from this high-end EF1 tornado. A metal work shed, and outdoor kitchen were destroyed. Numerous healthy pine trees were snapped or uprooted, one of which fell onto a house.[24][25]
EF1 SW of Experiment Spalding GA 33°12′32″N 84°24′55″W / 33.2089°N 84.4154°W / 33.2089; -84.4154 (Experiment (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:19–21:22 3.7 mi (6.0 km) 200 yd (180 m) This tornado formed as a satellite on the northwest side of the larger Experiment EF3 tornado near the Pike–Spalding county line. Many trees were either snapped or uprooted along the path before the tornado was absorbed by the EF3 tornado to its southeast. As the tornado circulation came together with the other circulation, the intensity of the larger tornado peaked, resulting in EF3 damage southwest of Experiment.[18][24]
EF2 ESE of East Griffin to Jenkinsburg to S of Mansfield Spalding, Butts, Newton, Jasper GA 33°14′N 84°12′W / 33.23°N 84.20°W / 33.23; -84.20 (East Griffin (Jan. 12, EF2)) 21:27–22:01 31.98 mi (51.47 km) 1,400 yd (1,300 m) 1 death – See section on this tornado – 10 people were injured.
EF1 NE of Ariton to Blue Springs Barbour AL 31°37′30″N 85°40′21″W / 31.6251°N 85.6726°W / 31.6251; -85.6726 (Bethel (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:25–21:38 10.96 mi (17.64 km) 900 yd (820 m) A large tornado damaged hundreds of trees, including one that fell on a home. Farm structures were damaged as well.[2]
EF1 SSW of Jenkinsburg Butts GA 33°15′01″N 84°06′34″W / 33.2502°N 84.1095°W / 33.2502; -84.1095 (Jenkinsburg (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:35–21:38 5.16 mi (8.30 km) 150 yd (140 m) This low-end EF1 tornado was on the ground simultaneously with the EF3 Experiment tornado and the EF2 Jenkinsburg tornado. It formed south of SR 16 before crossing I-75 and tracking along SR 16 for the rest of its path. A large warehouse had sections of its roof torn off and thrown northeastward into the parking lot and nearby woods and many trees were snapped or uprooted.[18][24]
EF0 NE of Pisgah Jackson AL 34°42′30″N 85°48′45″W / 34.7083°N 85.8125°W / 34.7083; -85.8125 (Pisgah (Jan. 12, EF0)) 21:38–21:41 2.34 mi (3.77 km) 70 yd (64 m) A brief and weak tornado caused roof damage to a farm building and a home. Trees were uprooted.[26]
EF1 W of Edwin to N of Lawrenceville Henry AL 31°40′40″N 85°23′14″W / 31.6778°N 85.3872°W / 31.6778; -85.3872 (Edwin (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:45–21:56 7.14 mi (11.49 km) 150 yd (140 m) A low-end EF1 tornado inflicted heavy roof and structural damage to several barns and outbuildings and removed some shingles from a home. Many trees were downed as well.[27]
EF1 NE of Jenkinsburg to Worthville to Stewart Butts, Newton GA 33°21′54″N 83°58′39″W / 33.3649°N 83.9775°W / 33.3649; -83.9775 (Jenkinsburg (Jan. 12, EF1)) 21:49–21:57 9.93 mi (15.98 km) 500 yd (460 m) This tornado formed from the remnant circulation of the EF3 Experiment tornado and tracked just to the west of the EF2 Jenkinsburg tornado. A barn was destroyed, a car wash was partially unroofed, and a greenhouse and a few homes were damaged. Many trees were snapped and uprooted along the path as well.[18][24]
EF1 Joanna to W of Whitmire Laurens SC 34°24′44″N 81°48′55″W / 34.4123°N 81.8154°W / 34.4123; -81.8154 (Joanna (Jan. 12, EF1)) 22:42–22:52 8.98 mi (14.45 km) 100 yd (91 m) A weak tornado touched down in Joanna, damaging a car wash and fire station garage door. Northeast of town, the tornado strengthened to EF1 strength, snapping or uprooting numerous trees, including some that fell on houses. The tornado then knocked down some more large trees as it crossed SC 72 before dissipating in the Sumter National Forest.[28]
EF1 E of Pineview (1st tornado) Wilcox GA 32°03′58″N 83°22′52″W / 32.0660°N 83.3810°W / 32.0660; -83.3810 (Pineview (Jan. 12, EF0)) 23:00–23:05 3.1 mi (5.0 km) 100 yd (91 m) This tornado struck a homestead. Several large trees were uprooted, a silo was moved and twisted off its foundation straining several metal bracers, a barn and two sheds were destroyed, and the home suffered moderate structural damage with several structural pillars and columns displaced. The tornado, which was accompanied by the tornado below, moved into inaccessible areas and dissipated.[24]
EF0 E of Pineview (2nd tornado) Wilcox GA 32°05′10″N 83°23′31″W / 32.0860°N 83.3920°W / 32.0860; -83.3920 (Pineview (Jan. 12, EF0)) 23:03–23:07 2.3 mi (3.7 km) 200 yd (180 m) This tornado was a northern twin to the tornado above. Dozens of trees were snapped along the path before the tornado moved into inaccessible areas and dissipated.[24]
EF0 Southern Stanley Gaston NC 35°20′30″N 81°08′24″W / 35.3416°N 81.1399°W / 35.3416; -81.1399 (Stanley (Jan. 12, EF0)) 23:10–23:18 6.09 mi (9.80 km) 25 yd (23 m) A weak tornado caused scattered tree damage along its path.[28]
EF1 N of Greenwood Greenwood SC 34°14′48″N 82°11′12″W / 34.2467°N 82.1867°W / 34.2467; -82.1867 (Greenwood (Jan. 12, EF1)) 23:24–23:27 2.03 mi (3.27 km) 90 yd (82 m) Many trees were downed in neighborhoods near and at the Greenwood County Airport. Some trees fell on homes, two of which were significantly damaged.[28]

Selma, Alabama

This destructive high-end EF2 tornado caused major damage in the city of Selma. The tornado first touched just northeast of Orrville near the intersection of SR 22 and County Road 999 at 12:04 p.m. CST (18:04 UTC). Moving northeastward along SR 22, the tornado damaged several mobile homes and pushed them off their foundations. A frame home sustained minor damage, some trees and power poles were downed in this area as well, and damage along this initial segment of the path was rated EF1. EF1 damage continued as the tornado impacted Beloit, where a church had its steeple and part of its roof blown off, homes sustained roof damage, and trees were snapped. After causing additional tree damage along SR 22, the tornado began to rapidly intensify as it approached the southwestern city limits of Selma, and many large hardwood and softwood trees were snapped at EF2 intensity in this area. The now strong tornado then crossed SR 219 as it entered the southwest side of Selma, causing significant damage along Old Orville Road. Multiple houses were heavily damaged and had their roofs torn off along this corridor, and a few sustained some loss of exterior walls. Severe tree damage occurred as well, as many large trees were snapped or uprooted in residential areas. Reaching high-end EF2 strength, the tornado struck the Crosspoint Christian Daycare along Cooper Drive, inflicting severe structural damage to the building, which sustained collapse of its roof and several brick exterior walls. At the time of the tornado, 70 children were inside the daycare along with staff workers. One baby received a minor cut from the tornado, with no other injuries occurring at that location. The nearby Crosspoint Christian Church had a substantial amount of metal roofing torn off, and debris was scattered throughout the area.[29] EF2 damage continued beyond this point as the tornado moved northeastward along West Dallas Avenue, inflicting significant structural damage to homes. An ophthalmologist office near Office Park Circle was severely damaged and had much of its roof torn off, while many large trees were snapped or uprooted, some of which landed on houses.[2][18]

NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado as it was hitting Selma.
NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado as it was hitting Selma.

Further to the northeast, high-end EF2 damage occurred at the Selma Country Club, where the clubhouse building suffered major damage to its roof and exterior walls, a few other buildings on the property also had extensive damage, several extremely large hardwood trees were blown down, and many softwood trees were snapped. Maintaining high-end EF2 intensity, the tornado then struck the northern part of downtown Selma. Damage here mainly consisted of numerous of trees being snapped or uprooted, some of which fell on homes, and many homes and other buildings that had their roofs and some exterior walls removed. A couple of older residences that were built on brick piling foundations collapsed, cars were flipped, signs were destroyed, and numerous power poles were snapped. The historic Reformed Presbyterian Church was badly damaged, and its adjacent church school was almost completely destroyed. As the tornado crossed over Broad St (US 80/SR 22), a strip mall had much of its roof torn off, and a nearby metal warehouse building sustained major damage, with metal framing being twisted and failure of x-braces observed. Apartment buildings were also badly damaged, and debris from structures was strewn across streets, or left tangled in power lines or wrapped around trees. Past the downtown area, the tornado weakened slightly to mid-range EF2 strength as it crossed Marie Foster Street and moved through neighborhoods in the northeastern part of Selma, where many homes and apartment buildings had roofs and exterior walls torn off, and many trees and power lines were downed. Crossing SR 41, the tornado moved out of Selma and maintained EF2 intensity as it moved to the northeast, though damage in this area was limited to downed trees. As it crossed SR 14, an outbuilding was completely destroyed and a metal free-standing pole was bent to the ground, with damage in this area being rated EF2. Some re-intensification was observed as the tornado then impacted a small residential area along Parkway Drive, where a few houses had roofs torn off with some collapse of exterior walls noted. Another outbuilding in this area was completley destroyed, trees were downed, and damage was rated high-end EF2. Just past this area, the tornado weakened to EF1 strength as it impacted a FEMA trailer storage facility along Selfield Road, where multiple unanchored trailers were damaged, flipped, or destroyed. A final area of EF2 damage occurred nearby, where the Dallas County Jail suffered extensive damage to its roof and fencing. Weakening back to EF1 intensity, the tornado then crossed SR 14 again, snapping trees and damaging some outbuildings. The tornado weakened further as it passed south of Manila, causing minor EF0 tree damage along this segment of the path. It inflicted EF0 damage to a house and dissipated as it crossed SR 140 to the southeast of Burnsville at 12:31 p.m. CST (18:31 UTC), just before reaching the Autauga County line. The tornado was on the ground for 22.72 mi (36.56 km), resulting in two injuries.[2][18]

Old Kingston–Titus–Equality–Lake Martin–Penton, Alabama

A long-tracked and intense EF3 tornado began in Autauga County, Alabama, nine minutes after the Selma EF2 tornado dissipated. The large multiple-vortex tornado prompted the issuance of three tornado emergencies just north of areas struck by tornadoes 10 days earlier.[30] The tornado first touched down near Independence at 12:40 p.m. CST (18:40 UTC). It initially only caused very minor EF0 tree limb damage as it moved northeastward through sparsely-populated areas. After crossing US 82, the tornado quickly intensified to EF1 strength as it moved northeastward along County Road 40, heavily damaging a home, rolling a shed across the road, and causing tree damage. Continuing northeastward into the Old Kingston community, the tornado rapidly intensified to EF3 strength as it crossed County Road 43. Several mobile homes were obliterated and swept away, with debris being scattered long distances across fields. A frame from one mobile home was thrown 250 yards (230 m) into an open field. The tornado threw multiple vehicles, tossing one truck 120 yards (110 m) through the air and leaving a crater where it impacted the ground. Many large trees were snapped and denuded as well, with some debarked observed. Just to the northeast, the tornado crossed Sandy Ridge Road, where numerous double-wide and single-wide mobile homes were completely obliterated, more vehicles were tossed, and many trees were shredded and partially debarked. Five people were killed in this area in different manufactured homes that were swept away.[31] EF3 damage continued just northeast of this area, as a large metal power pole was bent to the ground near County Road 21. Two nearby frame homes had much of their roofs torn off, with the damage to those residences rated EF2. Next encountering County Road 140, EF3 damage continued as more mobile homes were completely swept away. The contents of at least four homes were blown over 100 yards (91 m) to the north, leaving only empty foundations behind. Two more fatalities occurred in separate homes that were obliterated. The tornado continued to throw vehicles considerable distances, including one pickup truck that had its cab separated from the bed, while many trees were snapped or sheared off. This included entire stands of pine trees that were mowed down east of County Road 140 and along County Road 42. Based on the damage scene and contextual evidence, it was acknowledged that the tornado may have had stronger winds here. However, as the only structures that were destroyed in this area were mobile homes, the highest rating that could be applied was mid-range EF3. [2][18]

A pick-up truck in Old Kingston that was thrown and had its cab violently ripped out.
A pick-up truck in Old Kingston that was thrown and had its cab violently ripped out.

Beyond this point, the tornado maintained low-end EF3 intensity as it moved northeastward, snapping and debarking dozens of hardwood trees. A two-story home on the west side of County Road 57 had much of its second floor destroyed, with multiple exterior walls knocked down on both the first and second floors. The tornado weakened slightly to high-end EF2 intensity after crossing the road, tearing the roofs off of two site-built homes and destroying a large outbuilding structure. A few other homes were damaged to a lesser degree in this area, and large trees were snapped. After downing additional trees, the tornado continued at high-end EF2 strength as it crossed over County Road 62. A house in this area sustained major structural damage, losing its roof and some exterior walls, with several walls from the central part of the house being destroyed and strewn into the back yard. A nearby mobile home was destroyed at high-end EF1 strength, and some other site-built homes sustained less severe damage. The tornado then briefly weakened to high-end EF1 intensity, with damage being limited to downed trees, but reached EF2 intensity again and grew in size as it crossed I-65 and US 31 in the Pine Level community south of Marbury. Several homes sustained roof damage, outbuildings were damaged or destroyed, a mobile home was rolled off its foundation and destroyed, and numerous trees were snapped or uprooted in this area. Continuing to the northeast, the tornado produced additional EF2 damage as it moved through the Pine Flat community. Multiple site-built homes had their roofs partially or completely removed, and a mobile home was swept away and destroyed. The Wadsworth Baptist Church, housed in a large metal building, sustained considerable damage as well. Additional EF2 damage continued beyond Pine Flat as a house had its roof torn off and another home sustained roof and exterior wall loss. Numerous trees were snapped or uprooted in this area, and two mobile homes were destroyed.[2][18]

NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado at peak intensity in Old Kingston.
NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado at peak intensity in Old Kingston.

Continuing at EF2 strength, the tornado crossed into northwestern Elmore County and passed near Lightwood, where more homes were mostly or entirely unroofed, mobile homes were destroyed, and many trees were downed. The tornado briefly weakened to EF1 strength as it crossed the Coosa River, downing multiple trees in a wooded area before it reached EF2 intensity again north of Titus, snapping countless pine trees and unroofing another home as it crossed County Road 29 and Grays Ferry Road. The tornado again weakened to EF1 intensity, downing more trees as it crossed into Coosa County. The tornado then re-intensified back to EF2 strength as it crossed over US 231, snapping many large trees and inflicting heavy roof damage to a home along County Road 304. Just past this point, the tornado rapidly intensified again as it approached Equality, and a large swath of trees was completely mowed down along McKissick Road. All trees in the center of the path were snapped close to their bases, and some debarking was noted. This area of intense tree damage was given a low-end EF3 rating. The tornado then widened as it continued northeastward, causing EF2-level tree damage before strengthening back to EF3 intensity along County Roads 14 and 18 northwest of Equality. Several vehicles were moved or flipped, numerous trees were snapped, and site-built homes sustained major damage, including a poorly anchored house that was completely leveled.[2][18]

Intense EF3-rated tree damage west of Equality.
Intense EF3-rated tree damage west of Equality.

The tornado then quickly narrowed and weakened back to EF1 intensity as it crossed over SR 9 to the north of Equality, where a mobile home and a site-built home suffered roof damage. The tornado continued into Tallapoosa County as it maintained EF1 strength. Damage along this portion of the path was almost entirely limited to downed trees, though at least one home sustained minor roof damage. The tornado then caused additional EF1 damage as it moved through Wind Creek State Park and over Elkahatchee Creeek just south of Alexander City, snapping more trees before re-strengthening back to EF2 intensity as it crossed the Tallapoosa River along the north side of Lake Martin near the US 280 bridge. Many homes were damaged at this location, including several that had their roofs ripped off, and a few that had some loss of exterior walls as well. Boat houses were also destroyed, and dozens of large hardwood trees were snapped and uprooted. The heavy damage in this area was partly attributed to the tornado's interaction with the lake surface, as well as the exposed nature of the homes, since most of the structures inland seemed to be "sheltered" by adjacent heavily wooded areas. This was also the last area of EF2 damage from the tornado. After crossing US 280 near Sturdivant, the tornado weakened significantly to EF0 strength, snapping tree branches and uprooting softwood trees. South of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park near Sessions, the tornado reached EF1 intensity again, snapping or uprooting several trees, damaging outbuildings, and inflicting minor damage to homes. The tornado then weakened back to EF0 intensity, inflicting minor damage to trees and mobile homes several miles south of Daviston, before restrengthening back to EF1 intensity for the last time as it moved into Chambers County, snapping or uprooting several trees. The tornado then weakened to high-end EF0 strength south of Union Hill. It continued to inflict minor damage to outbuildings and downed more trees before striking Penton, where some EF0 tree damage occurred. The tornado then dissipated just east of Penton, 3.5 miles (5.6 km) west-northwest of White Plains at 2:08 p.m. CST (20:08 UTC) after traveling 82.31 miles (132.47 km). A total of seven people were killed by this tornado, and at least 16 others were injured. Another EF2 tornado formed immediately just a few miles to the southeast, at White Plains, moving northeast through Five Points before crossing the state line into Georgia.[2][18]

Hollonville–Griffin–Experiment–Locust Grove, Georgia

This large, intense rain-wrapped tornado touched down just a mile west of the community of Hollonville in Pike County along SR 362 at 4:11 p.m. EST (21:11 UTC). After causing EF0 tree and roof damage at the beginning of its path, the tornado strengthened to EF1 intensity as it continued to the northeast, snapping and uprooting numerous trees. A couple of homes had roof shingle damage, an RV camper was tipped over, and some outbuildings were destroyed in this area as well. A small area of EF2 damage was noted along Bethany Road, where large trees were snapped and some structures were severely damaged. EF1 tree and structure damage occurred beyond this point as the tornado approached and crossed into Spalding County, before reaching EF2 strength once again as it crossed West Williamson Road. Trees were snapped, an outbuilding was completely destroyed, and a house was heavily damaged in this area. The tornado then crossed Rover-Zatella Road, widening dramatically as it weakened back to EF1 strength once again. Around this time, a small low-end EF1 satellite tornado that had formed along the northern flank of this tornado began to merge with the larger circulation. A combination of the main tornado, the satellite tornado, and rear-flank downdraft winds produced a nearly 2 mi (3.2 km)-wide swath of wind damage to trees and homes in this vicinity. The merging tornadoes then continued northeast for a few miles before the satellite was fully absorbed into the larger tornado in a subdivision along Kendall Drive, located at the west edge of Griffin. At the point where the two tornadoes fully merged, the main tornado produced a small area of EF3 damage, with several homes either heavily damaged or completely destroyed in the subdivision. This included two poorly anchored homes that were leveled and swept off their foundations. A resident inside one of the homes took shelter in a bathtub which, along with all the plumbing, was ripped off the foundation and thrown into nearby woods, though he was not injured. Intense tree damage was also noted in this area, and winds were estimated to have reached 150 mph (240 km/h).[32] The tornado then weakened to EF2 strength and crossed SR 16 as it moved through residential areas in the western part of Griffin. Many trees were downed, and homes in neighborhoods in The Club at Shoal Creek area and along North Pine Hill Drive sustained EF1 to EF2 damage. Maintaining its strength, the tornado then moved into Experiment, an unincorporated community located on the north side of Griffin near the University of Georgia campus.[18][24]

NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado at peak intensity at the west edge of Griffin. The tornado was absorbing an EF1 satellite tornado at the time.
NEXRAD radar scan of the tornado at peak intensity at the west edge of Griffin. The tornado was absorbing an EF1 satellite tornado at the time.

Multiple homes and some businesses in Experiment suffered extensive damage, with the damage in this area being rated EF1 to EF2. Many power lines and trees were downed, and several large trees fell onto homes, causing major structural damage. A Hobby Lobby had a large portion of its roof torn off, and also sustained partial collapse of masonry exterior walls on the northeast side of the building. Debris was strewn throughout the area, and multiple vehicles were flipped and tossed. Damage to the Hobby Lobby building was rated high-end EF2, with winds estimated at 130 mph (210 km/h). The UGA campus suffered EF0 damage, and a weather station in the area recorded a 73.9 mph (118.9 km/h) wind gust as the storm passed by, while another at the UGA Dempsey Farm recorded a wind gust of 81.1 mph (130.5 km/h) before the anemometer instrument blew off the tower. To the northeast of Experiment, the tornado produced high-end EF1 damage as it moved through the northeastern fringes of Griffin, downing many trees and inflicting moderate to severe damage to homes and other structures near East McIntosh Road. Damage then became less severe and more sporadic as the tornado exited the Griffin area, and the damage path narrowed as it crossed North McDonough Road and Amelia Road. The tornado continued at EF1 intensity as it moved into Henry County. Crossing I-75, the tornado strengthened back to high-end EF1 intensity as it struck two neighborhoods on the south side of Locust Grove. Numerous homes were damaged by tornadic winds or falling trees in this area. The tornado crossed over US 23 and entered neighborhoods in the eastern part of Locust Grove, where more trees were downed and additional homes were damaged. The tornado exited Locust Grove and continued to the northeast, causing more EF1 damage along Peeksville Road before weakening to EF0 strength as it crossed Wolf Creek Road. The damage path of the tornado became less defined and dissipated near Collins Way at 4:44 p.m. EST (21:44 UTC). Based on damage assessments, approximately 1,465 homes were affected in the city of Griffin and 754 were affected in the rest of Spalding County, with at least 250 that sustained major damage or were destroyed. The tornado was on the ground for a total of 31.9 mi (51.3 km) and injured 18 people.[18][24]

East Griffin–Jenkinsburg–Jackson Lake, Georgia

This large and strong tornado was spawned by a secondary circulation within the same parent supercell that produced the EF3 Experiment tornado to its north, paralleling the path of the stronger tornado. It first touched down just southeast of East Griffin in Spalding County at 4:27 pm EST (21:27 UTC) and moved northeastward. It immediately reached EF1 strength and first snapped or uprooted multiple trees along Crouch Road and Wild Plum Road before striking a Rinnai Corporation building, damaging the roof and exterior walls, and blowing out several windows. The tornado then quickly intensified to high-end EF2 intensity as it crossed SR 16, and a well-built home in this area had severe roof and structural damage, while many large trees were snapped or uprooted as well. As the tornado continued northeastward, it weakened back to EF1 intensity, downing numerous trees as it approached I-75. As it crossed I-75, the tornado became the dominant circulation within the parent supercell as the EF3 Experiment tornado to the north began to occlude and weaken. As a result, its wind field grew in size as the tornado moved into Butts County, producing high-end EF1 to low-end EF2 damage near Dean Patrick Road and England Chapel Road, as numerous trees were snapped or uprooted in this area. Maintaining its strength, the tornado continued to the northeast and inflicted considerable damage to several homes along Shiloah Road, Plaza Drive, and Smith Drive. The tornado then impacted Jenkinsburg, where trees were downed and a large warehouse building was significantly damaged along US 23. The roof and exterior walls of the structure were severely damaged, with debris strewn across the roadway. Adjacent to the highway on the Norfolk Southern Railway line, three rail cars on a train were derailed. Damage in the area was rated high-end EF1 to low-end EF2. The tornado then weakened to EF1 strength as it continued to the northeast of town. The Experiment EF3 tornado to its north then dissipated at 4:44 p.m. EST (21:44 UTC), but another tornado, rated EF1, quickly formed from the remnant circulation five minutes later and paralleled this tornado for nearly 10 miles (16 km) to the Jackson Lake area. The damage paths of the two tornadoes were right next to each other at times, and covered a combined width of 2.5 miles (4.0 km). As this tornado passed south of Worthville, it quickly intensified back to EF2 strength, causing widespread significant damage to trees and homes in several neighborhoods along SR 36 west of Jackson Lake. One tree fell on a car on Haley Road, killing the passenger and critically injuring the driver. Maintaining EF2 intensity, the tornado then moved through the southern part Newton County and caused additional major damage to houses in several neighborhoods along the shore of Jackson Lake, both west of and along SR 212. The EF1 tornado to the north of this tornado then dissipated after the latter had entered Jasper County at 4:57 p.m. EST (21:57 UTC). This tornado then caused intermittent EF1 to low-end EF2 damage after crossing the county line. The Bear Creek Marina and several campers were destroyed along this segment of the path. The tornado then became weak, damaging more trees at EF0 intensity as it approached and crossed SR 11, before dissipating near Margery Lake at 5:01 pm EST (22:01 UTC). The tornado was on the ground for 31.98 mi (51.47 km). In addition to the fatality, ten other people were injured. An indirect fatality was attributed to this tornado the following day when a state transportation worker was knocked out of a bucket truck by a falling tree limbs while trying to restore powerlines after the storm in Jasper County.[18][24][32]

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Delmar is a small, rural, community in west-central Winston County, United States. Delmar is located six miles north of Natural Bridge, five miles south of Haleyville and 15 miles west of Double Springs, the county seat of what was once the "Free State of Winston." Delmar has an elevation of 881 feet above sea level.

Impacts

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey declared a state of emergency in Autauga, Chambers, Coosa, Dallas, Elmore and Tallapoosa counties, as did Georgia Governor Brian Kemp for the whole state.[1] These declarations were followed on January 15 by a major disaster declaration in Alabama by President Biden, making federal funds available to victims of the storms (as well as affected local governments, organizations, and businesses) in Autauga and Dallas counties.[33]

Casualties

At least nine fatalities resulted, eight of which were direct. Seven occurred in mobile homes in Old Kingston, Alabama from an EF3 tornado; the other occurred in Butts County, Georgia when an EF2 tornado knocked a tree down on a car, killing a five-year old passenger and critically injuring the parent driving. This tornado was also responsible for an indirect fatality the following day when a lineman was knocked out of a bucket truck after being struck by a large tree branch while attempting to restore powerlines in Jasper County.[34] A Georgia Department of Transportation worker was killed in the aftermath of the storm.[35] Multiple injuries also occurred. An Alabama state trooper was hospitalized when his patrol vehicle was struck by a falling tree.[1][36]

Closures

In anticipation of severe weather, multiple school districts closed early in Alabama and Georgia.[37][38] The University of Georgia's Griffin campus closed because of damage to buildings and trees on campus from an EF3 tornado.[39]

Damage

Approximately 37,000 people in Alabama and more than 78,000 in Georgia were without power by the evening of January 12, figures which included but were not limited to severe weather outages.[1]

Discover more about Impacts related topics

Kay Ivey

Kay Ivey

Kay Ellen Ivey is an American politician serving as the 54th and incumbent governor of Alabama since 2017. Originally a conservative Southern Democrat, Ivey became a member of the Republican Party in 2002. She was the 38th Alabama state treasurer from 2003 to 2011 and the 30th lieutenant governor of Alabama from 2011 to 2017.

Brian Kemp

Brian Kemp

Brian Porter Kemp is an American businessman and politician serving as the 83rd governor of Georgia since January 2019. A member of the Republican Party, Kemp served as the 27th secretary of state of Georgia from 2010 to 2018, and as a member of the Georgia State Senate from 2003 to 2007.

Joe Biden

Joe Biden

Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. is an American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 47th vice president from 2009 to 2017 under President Barack Obama, and represented Delaware in the United States Senate from 1973 to 2009.

Kingston, Autauga County, Alabama

Kingston, Autauga County, Alabama

Kingston, also known as Old Kingston, is an unincorporated community in Autauga County, Alabama. Kingston served as the county seat of Autauga County from 1830 to 1868, when it was moved to Prattville. Kingston became a ghost town, until a new community was formed around the home of Edmund Meredith Shackelford, an officer who served in the War of 1812. A post office was operated in Kingston from 1830 to 1908.

Butts County, Georgia

Butts County, Georgia

Butts County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 25,434, up from 23,655 in 2010. The county seat is Jackson. The county was created on December 24, 1825.

Jasper County, Georgia

Jasper County, Georgia

Jasper County is a county located in the central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 14,588, up from 13,900 in 2010. The county seat is Monticello. Jasper County is part of the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Georgia Department of Transportation

Georgia Department of Transportation

The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) is the organization in charge of developing and maintaining all state and federal roadways in the U.S. state of Georgia. In addition to highways, the department also has a limited role in developing public transportation and general aviation programs. GDOT is headquartered in downtown Atlanta and is part of the executive branch of state government.

University of Georgia

University of Georgia

The University of Georgia is a public land-grant research university with its main campus in Athens, Georgia. Founded in 1785, it is one of the oldest public universities in the United States. The flagship school of the University System of Georgia, it has been ranked by major institutional rankings among the best public universities in the United States.

Griffin, Georgia

Griffin, Georgia

Griffin is a city in and the county seat of Spalding County, Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta metropolitan area. As of the 2020 census, the city had a population of 23,478.

Source: "Tornado outbreak of January 12, 2023", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 30th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_outbreak_of_January_12,_2023.

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Notes
  1. ^ All dates are based on the local time zone where the tornado touched down; however, all times are in Coordinated Universal Time for consistency.
References
  1. ^ a b c d Oden, Bryant K.; Albeck-Ripka, Livia; Jiménez, Jesus; Ives, Mike (January 12, 2023). "At Least 8 Are Killed as Severe Weather Sweeps the South". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Tornado Outbreak of January 12, 2023". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 19, 2023.
  3. ^ "TIMELINE: Seven dead, dozen missing in Autauga County after tornado hits central Alabama". Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  4. ^ "Tornado hits Selma, Alabama; 7 deaths reported across South". Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  5. ^ Jared Guyer; Emily Thornton (January 11, 2023). "Jan 11, 2023 1630 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook". Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  6. ^ Brian Squitieri; Tim Supinie (January 12, 2023). "Jan 12, 2023 0100 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook". Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  7. ^ Rich Thompson; Ryan Jewell (January 12, 2023). "Jan 12, 2023 1300 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook". Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  8. ^ "BMX Tornado Warning #28". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  9. ^ "BMX Tornado Warning #29". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  10. ^ "BMX Tornado Warning #30". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  11. ^ Steve Goss (January 12, 2023). "Jan 12, 2023 2000 UTC Day 1 Convective Outlook". Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  12. ^ "Great storm-centered timelapse of Thursday's prolific tornado-producing supercell which lasted from Louisiana to Georgia. @JoshJohnsWx @BradNitzWSB @spann". Twitter. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  13. ^ a b "Storm Prediction Center 230112's Storm Reports". www.spc.noaa.gov. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  14. ^ Wulfeck, Andrew; Donegan, Brian; Yablonski, Steven (January 16, 2023). "Severe weather outbreak turns deadly after violent storms tear through South leaving widespread destruction". Fox Weather. Archived from the original on January 16, 2023. Retrieved January 17, 2023.
  15. ^ "Overview of the Jan. 11-12 thunderstorms and a tornado". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Paducah, KY. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  16. ^ "Latest Damage Survey information from the January 12, 2023 Tornado". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Memphis TN. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  17. ^ a b c d "Jan 12, 2023 Central KY Tornado Event". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service in Louisville, Kentucky. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "ArcGIS Web Application". apps.dat.noaa.gov. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  19. ^ Montgomery, Charles (January 12, 2023). "Lawrence Co. Medical Center sustains significant roof damage in severe weather". WSFA. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  20. ^ "NWS Damage Survey for 01/12/2023 Tornado Event". Iowa Environmental Mesonet. National Weather Service in Huntsville, Alabama. January 12, 2023. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  21. ^ "...TORNADO CONFIRMED NEAR WILLIAMSTOWN IN GRANT COUNTY KENTUCKY..." www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Wilmington OH. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  22. ^ a b c "Event Summary: January 12th Damaging Winds and Tornadoes". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Morristown TN. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  23. ^ a b c "January 12th, 2023 Tornado Event". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Mobile AL. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "January 12, 2023 Tornado Outbreak". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Peachtree City GA. Retrieved January 21, 2023.
  25. ^ "...NWS Damage Survey for 01/12/23 Tornado Event..." mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Columbia SC. Retrieved January 19, 2023.
  26. ^ National Weather Service in Huntsville, Alabama (January 25, 2023). NWS Damage Survey for 01/12/2023 Tornado Event- Update #1 (Report). Iowa Environmental Mesonet. Retrieved January 25, 2023.
  27. ^ "...NWS Damage Survey for 1/12/2023 Tornado Event..." Iowa Environment Mesonet. National Weather Service Tallahassee FL. Retrieved January 16, 2023.
  28. ^ a b c "Damage Survey Results". www.weather.gov. National Weather Service Greenville-Spartanburg SC. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  29. ^ Spann, James. "This is Crosspoint Christian Daycare in Selma hit by the tornado today. Approximately 70 children from six weeks to five years were inside when the tornado struck. One baby had a small cut on her cheek and forehead; nothing serious… No other injuries. Photos from Amanda McCloud". Twitter. @Spann.
  30. ^ "BMX Tornado Warning #28". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023."BMX Tornado Warning #29". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023."BMX Tornado Warning #30". mesonet.agron.iastate.edu. National Weather Service Birmingham AL. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  31. ^ "Autauga Sheriff's Office Confirms Seven Deaths following Strong Tornado". Elmore-Autauga News. January 14, 2023. Retrieved January 16, 2023.
  32. ^ a b West, Jordan; Forbes, Alex (January 13, 2023). "NWS confirms an EF-3 tornado in Griffin Thursday night". WMAZ-TV. Retrieved January 16, 2023.
  33. ^ "President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. Approves Alabama Disaster Declaration". The White House. January 15, 2023. Archived from the original on January 16, 2023. Retrieved January 17, 2023.
  34. ^ "At least 7 dead after storms and tornado ripped through Alabama and Georgia". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  35. ^ Childs, Jan Wesner; Brackett, Ron (January 13, 2023). "Tornadoes, Storms Leave At Least 9 Dead In Alabama, Georgia". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  36. ^ James Spann [@spann] (January 12, 2023). "From ALEA: At approximately 1:35 today a Trooper was injured after the his patrol vehicle was struck by a falling tree on Elkahatchee Road near Wind Creek State Park. The Trooper was transported to a local area hospital for medical treatment and is currently recovering" (Tweet). Retrieved January 12, 2023 – via Twitter.
  37. ^ Koplowitz, Howard; Crain, Trisha Powell; Gore, Leada; Dunkins, Kalyn (January 11, 2023). "School closings, early dismissals for Alabama's severe weather on Thursday, Jan. 12". AL.com. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  38. ^ McGouirk, Brandon (January 12, 2023). "Many Middle Georgia schools closing early in anticipation of severe weather". WGXA. Retrieved January 12, 2023.
  39. ^ University of Georgia Griffin Campus [@UGAGriffin] (January 12, 2023). "With significant damage to many large trees and several buildings on campus, UGA Griffin will be closed tomorrow, January 13, to all but essential personnel" (Tweet). Retrieved January 12, 2023 – via Twitter.
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