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Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset

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The Marquess of Dorset
Coat of arms of Sir Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset, KG.png
Arms of Thomas Grey,
2nd Marquess of Dorset, KG
Preceded byThomas Grey
Succeeded byHenry Grey
Personal details
Born22 June 1477[1]
Died10 October 1530(1530-10-10) (aged 53)[1]
Spouse(s)Eleanor St John
Margaret Wotton
ChildrenHenry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk
Edward Grey
Lord Thomas Grey
Lord John Grey
Mary Grey
Katherine Grey
Elizabeth Grey, Lady Audley
Anne Grey
Parent(s)Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset
Cecily Bonville, Baroness Harington and Bonville
Occupationpeer, courtier, soldier and landowner

Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset KG KB PC (22 June 1477 – 10 October 1530) was an English peer, courtier, soldier and landowner of the House of Grey.

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Early life

Grey was the third son and heir of Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset (1455–1501), at that time England's only marquess, and his wife, Cecily Bonville, the daughter and heiress of William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington of Aldingham. His mother was suo jure 7th Baroness Harington of Aldingham and 2nd Baroness Bonville, and the richest heiress in England. The first marquess was the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth Woodville, a stepson of King Edward IV and a half-brother of King Edward V.[1]

According to some reports, the young Grey attended Magdalen College School, Oxford, and he is uncertainly said to have been taught (either at the school or else privately tutored) by the future Cardinal Wolsey.[1]

Grey's father was opposed to King Richard III, and after the older Thomas joined Buckingham's failed rebellion of 1483, father and son fled to Brittany, joining Henry Tudor.[1] Five months after Richard lost the crown to Henry at the Battle of Bosworth Field on 22 August 1485, the new king married the first Dorset's half-sister Elizabeth of York, but Henry VII was also suspicious of Dorset, who was imprisoned during Lambert Simnel's rebellion of 1487.[2] In 1492, Dorset was required to give guarantees of loyalty to the crown and to make the young Thomas Grey a ward of the king.[2]

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Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset

Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset

Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, 1st Earl of Huntingdon, 7th Baron Ferrers of Groby, was an English nobleman, courtier and the eldest son of Elizabeth Woodville and her first husband Sir John Grey of Groby. Her second marriage to King Edward IV made her Queen of England, thus elevating Grey's status at court and in the realm as the stepson of the King. Through his mother's assiduous endeavours, he made two materially advantageous marriages to wealthy heiresses, the King's niece Anne Holland and Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington. By the latter, he had 14 children.

Marquess

Marquess

A marquess is a nobleman of high hereditary rank in various European peerages and in those of some of their former colonies. The German language equivalent is Markgraf (margrave). A woman with the rank of a marquess or the wife of a marquess is a marchioness or marquise. These titles are also used to translate equivalent Asian styles, as in Imperial China and Imperial Japan.

Suo jure

Suo jure

Suo jure is a Latin phrase, used in English to mean 'in his own right' or 'in her own right'. In most nobility-related contexts, it means 'in her own right', since in those situations the phrase is normally used of women; in practice, especially in England, a man rarely derives any style or title from his wife although this is seen in other countries when a woman is the last heir of her line. It can be used for a male when such male was initially a 'co-lord' with his father or other family member and upon the death of such family member became the sole ruler or holder of the title "in his own right" (Alone).

Baron Harington

Baron Harington

Baron Harington, of Aldingham, was a title in the Peerage of England. On 30 December 1324 John Harington was summoned to parliament. On the death of the 5th baron in 1458, the barony was inherited by the heir to the barony of Bonville, with which title it merged in 1461, until both baronies were forfeited in 1554.

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville was Queen of England from her marriage to King Edward IV on 1 May 1464 until Edward was deposed on 3 October 1470, and again from Edward's resumption of the throne on 11 April 1471 until his death on 9 April 1483.

Magdalen College School, Oxford

Magdalen College School, Oxford

Magdalen College School (MCS) is a public school in Oxford, England, for boys aged seven to eighteen and for girls in the sixth form. It was founded by William Waynflete about 1480 as part of Magdalen College, Oxford.

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, KG was an English nobleman known as the namesake of Buckingham's rebellion, a failed but significant collection of uprisings in England and parts of Wales against Richard III of England in October 1483. He was executed without trial for his role in the uprisings. Stafford is also one of the primary suspects in the disappearance of Richard's nephews, the Princes in the Tower.

Brittany

Brittany

Brittany is a peninsula, historical country, and cultural area in the west of modern France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica during the period of Roman occupation. It became an independent kingdom and then a duchy before being united with the Kingdom of France in 1532 as a province governed as a separate nation under the crown.

Henry VII of England

Henry VII of England

Henry VII was King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizure of the crown on 22 August 1485 until his death in 1509. He was the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

Battle of Bosworth Field

Battle of Bosworth Field

The Battle of Bosworth or Bosworth Field was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the houses of Lancaster and York that extended across England in the latter half of the 15th century. Fought on 22 August 1485, the battle was won by an alliance of Lancastrians and disaffected Yorkists. Their leader Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, became the first English monarch of the Tudor dynasty by his victory and subsequent marriage to a Yorkist princess. His opponent Richard III, the last king of the House of York, was killed during the battle, the last English monarch to die in combat. Historians consider Bosworth Field to mark the end of the Plantagenet dynasty, making it one of the defining moments of English history.

Elizabeth of York

Elizabeth of York

Elizabeth of York was Queen of England from her marriage to King Henry VII on 18 January 1486 until her death in 1503. Elizabeth married Henry after his victory at the Battle of Bosworth Field, which marked the end of the Wars of the Roses. They had seven children together.

Lambert Simnel

Lambert Simnel

Lambert Simnel was a pretender to the throne of England. In 1487, his claim to be Edward Plantagenet, 17th Earl of Warwick, threatened the newly established reign of Henry VII (1485–1509). Simnel became the figurehead of a Yorkist rebellion organised by John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln. The rebellion was crushed in 1487. Simnel was pardoned because of his tender years, and was thereafter employed by the Royal household as a scullion, and, later, as a falconer.

Courtier

The remains of Dorset's house at Bradgate Park
The remains of Dorset's house at Bradgate Park

Amongst the Queen of England's closest relations, Grey and his younger brothers Leonard and Edward were welcome at court and became courtiers and later soldiers.[1] In 1494, Grey was made a knight of the Bath and in 1501 a knight of the Garter.[1] Also in 1501, his father died and the younger Thomas inherited his titles and some of his estates. However, much of the first marquess's land went to his widow and not to his son, who did not come into his full inheritance until the death of his mother in 1529, shortly before his own death.[1]

Later in 1501, he was 'chief answerer' at the marriage of Arthur, Prince of Wales, and Catherine of Aragon and was presented with a diamond and ruby Tudor rose at a court tournament.[2] But in 1508 he was sent to the Tower of London, and later a gaol in Calais, under suspicion of conspiracy against Henry VII.[2] Although he was saved from execution in 1509 by the accession of King Henry VIII, Grey was attainted and lost his titles.[1] However, later in 1509 he was pardoned and returned to court, and was summoned to parliament as Baron Ferrers of Groby. In 1511, he was summoned as Marquess of Dorset.[1]

From 1509, Dorset was again an active courtier and took part with great distinction in many court tournaments, on one occasion in March 1524 nearly killing the king.[1][3]

In 1511, Dorset sold land near Althorp, Northamptonshire, to John Spencer. The sale included the villages of Little Brington and Great Brington, as well their parish church of St Mary the Virgin.[4]

In 1514, with Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk, Dorset escorted Henry VII's daughter Princess Mary to France for her wedding to King Louis XII.[3][5]

Dorset owned land in sixteen English counties and was a justice of the peace for several of them.[1] In 1516, during a rivalry in Leicestershire with George, Baron Hastings, and Sir Richard Sacheverell, Dorset unlawfully increased his retinue at court and was brought before the Star Chamber and the Court of King's Bench.[6] He was bound over for good behaviour.[7] As part of this rivalry, he greatly enlarged his ancestral home at Bradgate, Leicestershire.[6][8]

In 1520, at the Field of Cloth of Gold, Dorset carried the sword of state.[3] In 1521, he met the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at Gravelines on the coast of France and escorted him on a visit to England.[3] He helped with the entertainment of the court by maintaining a company of actors.[9]

In 1521, Dorset sat in judgment on the Duke of Buckingham, despite being related to him by blood and marriage.[1][3][10] Henry VIII rewarded Dorset with three of Buckingham's manors.[11]

From 17 June 1523 until his death in 1530, Dorset was Justice in Eyre south of Trent.[12] As such, he presided at the triennial Court of justice-seat, which dealt with matters of forest law.[12]

In 1524, Dorset's Leicestershire feud with Lord Hastings turned into a fight between hundreds of men, and Cardinal Wolsey took action.[1][13] Both rivals had to put up a bond for good behaviour of one thousand pounds, and Dorset was sent to Wales as Lord Master of Princess Mary's Council.[6]

In 1528, Dorset became constable of Warwick Castle, and in 1529 of Kenilworth Castle.[1]

In 1529, recalling his role as 'chief answerer' at the marriage of Arthur, Prince of Wales, Dorset was a critical witness in favour of Henry VIII's divorce of Catherine of Aragon. He strongly supported the King's contention that Arthur and Catherine's marriage had been consummated.[3]

In 1530, in the final months of his life, he assisted the King in the condemnation of Cardinal Wolsey.[3]

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Bradgate Park

Bradgate Park

Bradgate Park is a public park in Charnwood Forest, in Leicestershire, England, northwest of Leicester. It covers 850 acres. The park lies between the villages of Newtown Linford, Anstey, Cropston, Woodhouse Eaves and Swithland. The River Lin runs through the park, flowing into Cropston Reservoir which was constructed on part of the park. To the north-east lies Swithland Wood. The park's two well known landmarks, Old John and the war memorial, both lie just above the 210 m (690 ft) contour. The park is part of the 399.3 hectare Bradgate Park and Cropston Reservoir Site of Special Scientific Interest, which has been designated under both biological and geological criteria.

Leonard Grey, 1st Viscount Grane

Leonard Grey, 1st Viscount Grane

Leonard Grey, Lord Deputy of Ireland, known as Lord Leonard Grey prior to 1536, served as Lord Deputy of Ireland from 1536 to 1540.

Arthur, Prince of Wales

Arthur, Prince of Wales

Arthur, Prince of Wales, was the eldest son of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York. He was Duke of Cornwall from birth, and he was created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester in 1489. As the heir apparent of his father, Arthur was viewed by contemporaries as the great hope of the newly established House of Tudor. His mother, Elizabeth, was the daughter of Edward IV, and his birth cemented the union between the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon was Queen of England as the first wife of King Henry VIII from their marriage on 11 June 1509 until their annulment on 23 May 1533. She was previously Princess of Wales as the wife of Henry's elder brother, Arthur, Prince of Wales.

Calais

Calais

Calais is a port city in the Pas-de-Calais department, of which it is a subprefecture. Although Calais is by far the largest city in Pas-de-Calais, the department's prefecture is its third-largest city of Arras. The population of the city proper is 72,929; that of the urban area is 149,673 (2018). Calais overlooks the Strait of Dover, the narrowest point in the English Channel, which is only 34 km (21 mi) wide here, and is the closest French town to England. The White Cliffs of Dover can easily be seen on a clear day from Calais. Calais is a major port for ferries between France and England, and since 1994, the Channel Tunnel has linked nearby Coquelles to Folkestone by rail.

Henry VIII

Henry VIII

Henry VIII was King of England from 22 April 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry is best known for his six marriages, and for his efforts to have his first marriage annulled. His disagreement with Pope Clement VII about such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated by the pope. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy" as he invested heavily in the navy and increased its size from a few to more than 50 ships, and established the Navy Board.

Attainder

Attainder

In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime. It entailed losing not only one's life, property and hereditary titles, but typically also the right to pass them on to one's heirs. Both men and women condemned of capital crimes could be attainted.

Baron Ferrers of Groby

Baron Ferrers of Groby

Baron Ferrers of Groby was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ on 29 December 1299 when William Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Groby was summoned to parliament. He was the son of Sir William de Ferrers, Knt., of Groby, Leicestershire, (d.1287) by his first wife Anne Durward, 2nd daughter of Alan Durward and his wife Margery of Scotland, and grandson of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby. The first Baron was married to Ellen de Menteith, daughter of Alexander, Earl of Menteith. In 1475 the eighth baron was created the Marquess of Dorset, and the barony in effect merged with the marquessate. It was forfeited along with the marquessate when the third marquess was attainted in 1554.

Althorp

Althorp

Althorp is a Grade I listed stately home and estate in the civil parish of Althorp, in West Northamptonshire, England of about 13,000 acres (5,300 ha). By road it is about 6 miles (9.7 km) northwest of the county town of Northampton and about 75 miles (121 km) northwest of central London, situated between the villages of Great Brington and Harlestone. It has been held by the prominent aristocratic Spencer family for more than 500 years, and has been owned by Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer since 1992. It was also the home of Lady Diana Spencer from her parents' divorce until her marriage to Charles, Prince of Wales.

John Spencer (died 1522)

John Spencer (died 1522)

Sir John Spencer was an English nobleman, politician, sheriff, knight, merchant and landowner.

Great Brington

Great Brington

Great Brington is a village in Northamptonshire, England, in the civil parish of Brington, which at the 2011 Census had a population of about 200. St Mary the Virgin's church is the parish church.

Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk

Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk

Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk, 1st Viscount Lisle, PC was an English military leader and courtier. Through his third wife, Mary Tudor, he was brother-in-law to King Henry VIII.

Soldier

In 1512, during the War of the League of Cambrai, Dorset led an unsuccessful English military expedition to France to reconquer Aquitaine, which England had lost during the Hundred Years' War.[1] Ferdinand of Aragon gave none of the support he had promised. While Ferdinand delayed and tried to persuade Dorset to help him to attack Navarre instead of Aquitaine, the English army's food, beer and pay ran out, many took to wine and became ill, and the army mutinied. Back in England, Dorset had to face a trial.[14]

In 1513, he fought at the siege of Tournai and the Battle of Guinegate (also known as the Battle of the Spurs), and fought again in 1523 in the Scottish borders.[1] These all gave him chances to make amends for the debacle of Aquitaine. To help Dorset in dealing with the Scots, he was appointed Lord Warden of the Marches, restored to the Privy Council, and became a gentleman of the chamber.[1][14]

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War of the League of Cambrai

War of the League of Cambrai

The War of the League of Cambrai, sometimes known as the War of the Holy League and several other names, was fought from February 1508 to December 1516 as part of the Italian Wars of 1494–1559. The main participants of the war, who fought for its entire duration, were France, the Papal States, and the Republic of Venice; they were joined at various times by nearly every significant power in Western Europe, including Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, England, the Duchy of Milan, the Republic of Florence, the Duchy of Ferrara, and the Swiss.

Aquitaine

Aquitaine

Aquitaine, archaic Guyenne or Guienne, is a historical region of southwestern France and a former administrative region of the country. Since 1 January 2016 it has been part of the region of Nouvelle-Aquitaine. It is situated in the southwest corner of Metropolitan France, along the Atlantic Ocean and the Pyrenees mountain range on the border with Spain, and for most of its written history Bordeaux has been a vital port and administrative center. It is composed of the five departments of Dordogne, Lot-et-Garonne, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Landes and Gironde. Gallia Aquitania was established by the Romans in ancient times and in the Middle Ages, Aquitaine was a kingdom and a duchy, whose boundaries fluctuated considerably.

Hundred Years' War

Hundred Years' War

The Hundred Years' War was a series of armed conflicts between the kingdoms of England and France during the Late Middle Ages. It originated from disputed claims to the French throne between the English House of Plantagenet and the French royal House of Valois. Over time, the war grew into a broader power struggle involving factions from across Western Europe, fuelled by emerging nationalism on both sides.

Ferdinand II of Aragon

Ferdinand II of Aragon

Ferdinand II, also called Ferdinand the Catholic, was King of Aragon and Sardinia from 1479, King of Sicily from 1468, King of Naples from 1504 and King of Navarre from 1512 until his death in 1516. He was also the Duke (nominal) of the ancient Duchies of Athens and Neopatria. He was King of Castile and León from 1475 to 1504, alongside his wife Queen Isabella I. From 1506 to 1516, he was the Regent of the Crown of Castile, making him the effective ruler of Castile. From 1511 to 1516, he styled himself as Imperator totius Africa after having conquered Tlemcen and making the Zayyanid Sultan, Abu Abdallah V, his vassal. He was also the Grandmaster of the Spanish Military Orders of Santiago (1499-1516), Calatrava (1487-1516), Alcantara (1492-1516) and Montesa (1499-1516), after he permanently annexed them into the Spanish Crown. He reigned jointly with Isabella over a dynastically unified Spain; together they are known as the Catholic Monarchs. Ferdinand is considered the de facto first King of Spain, and was described as such during his reign.

Navarre

Navarre

Navarre, officially the Chartered Community of Navarre, is a foral autonomous community and province in northern Spain, bordering the Basque Autonomous Community, La Rioja, and Aragon in Spain and Nouvelle-Aquitaine in France. The capital city is Pamplona. The present-day province makes up the majority of the territory of the medieval Kingdom of Navarre, a long-standing Pyrenean kingdom that occupied lands on both sides of the western Pyrenees, with its northernmost part, Lower Navarre, located in the southwest corner of France.

Tournai

Tournai

Tournai or Tournay is a city and municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium. It lies 85 km (53 mi) southwest of Brussels on the river Scheldt. Tournai is part of Eurometropolis Lille–Kortrijk–Tournai, which had 2,155,161 residents in 2008.

Battle of the Spurs

Battle of the Spurs

The Battle of the Spurs or (Second) Battle of Guinegate took place on 16 August 1513. It formed a part of the War of the League of Cambrai, during the ongoing Italian Wars. Henry VIII and Emperor Maximilian I were besieging the town of Thérouanne in Artois. Henry's camp was at Guinegate, now called Enguinegatte. A large body of French heavy cavalry under Jacques de La Palice was covering an attempt by light cavalry to bring supplies to the besieged garrison. English and Imperial troops surprised and routed this force. The battle was characterised by the precipitate flight and extensive pursuit of the French. During the pursuit a number of notable French leaders and knights were captured. After the fall of Thérouanne, Henry VIII besieged and took Tournai.

Lord Warden of the Marches

Lord Warden of the Marches

The Lord Warden of the Marches was an office in the governments of Scotland and England. The holders were responsible for the security of the border between the two nations, and often took part in military action. They were also responsible, along with 'Conservators of the truce', for administering the special type of border law known as March law.

Privy Council (United Kingdom)

Privy Council (United Kingdom)

The Privy Council (PC), officially His Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Family

Grey was the son and heir of Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset (c. 1456–1501), and his wife, Cecily Bonville, daughter and heiress of William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington of Aldingham and of Lady Katherine Neville (1442–1503) and granddaughter of Alice Neville, 5th Countess of Salisbury (1407–1462). Cecily Bonville's maternal uncles included Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (called 'Warwick the Kingmaker'), John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu and George Neville, archbishop of York and Chancellor of England, while her aunts had married Henry de Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick, William FitzAlan, 16th Earl of Arundel, Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby, and John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford. Cecily Bonville succeeded her father as Baroness Harington in 1460, and two months later succeeded her great-grandfather William Bonville as Baron Bonville.[15][16] After the death of her first husband, Cecily Bonville married her late husband's first cousin Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, the younger son of Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham and of Catherine Woodville, Dorset's aunt.[17]

The younger Thomas Grey's paternal grandparents were Queen Elizabeth Woodville (c. 1437–1492) and her first husband Sir John Grey of Groby (c. 1432–1461), son and heir of Elizabeth Ferrers, Lady Ferrers of Groby,[18] so his father the first marquess was a stepson of King Edward IV and a half-brother of King Edward V.[1] His grandfather Sir John Grey was killed at the Second Battle of St Albans (1461), fighting on the Lancastrian side.[18] His grandmother Elizabeth Woodville was the eldest daughter of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, and Jacquetta of Luxembourg, widow of John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford.[19] Following his grandmother's marriage to Edward IV, members of her family gained advantages and made prosperous marriages.[18] Elizabeth's brother John Woodville, at the age of twenty, married Catherine Neville, dowager Duchess of Norfolk, then in her late sixties.[20]

Through Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Dorset was descended from Eleanor of England (1215–1275), the daughter of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, and from several other European royal families.[21]

Marriages and descendants

Thomas Grey was contracted in 1483 to marry Anne St Leger (1476–1526), the daughter of Anne of York, Duchess of Exeter and her second husband Sir Thomas St Leger. Remarkably, Anne St Leger had been declared the heiress to the Exeter estates, but the marriage did not take place.[22]

In the event, the young Thomas Grey's first marriage was to Eleanor St John, a daughter of Oliver St John of Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire[1] and of his wife Elizabeth Scrope, daughter of Henry le Scrope, 4th Baron Scrope of Bolton (1418–1459).[23] Grey's father-in-law Oliver St John (died in 1497) (also known as Oliver of Ewell[24]) was the son of Margaret Beauchamp (c. 1411–1482), the great-great-granddaughter of Roger Beauchamp, 1st Lord Beauchamp of Bletso, Keeper of Devizes Castle, and heiress to the Beauchamp estates. After the death of her first husband, another Oliver St John (died 1437), she married John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset (1404–1444), producing Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond. Eleanor St John was therefore the first cousin of Henry VII.[25]

Margaret Grey, Marchioness of Dorset, by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1532–35
Margaret Grey, Marchioness of Dorset, by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1532–35

In 1509, Thomas Grey (now known as Lord Ferrers of Groby) married secondly Margaret Wotton (1487–1541), daughter of Sir Robert Wotton (c. 1463–1524) of Boughton Malherbe, Kent, and the widow of William Medley. She had two notable brothers, Sir Edward Wotton (1489–1551), Treasurer of Calais,[26] and Nicholas Wotton (c. 1497–1567), a diplomat who, in 1539, arranged the marriage between Henry VIII and Anne of Cleves.[27] With Margaret, the younger Thomas Grey had four sons and four daughters, including Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk (1517–1554).[28] Their daughter Elizabeth married Thomas Audley, 1st Baron Audley of Walden and was the grandmother of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Suffolk. His second wife survived him and died in or after 1535.[1]

His younger brother Leonard Grey, 1st Viscount Grane (c. 1479 – 1541) served as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1536 to 1540.

Dorset's son Henry succeeded him as Marquess of Dorset, married Lady Frances Brandon, a granddaughter of King Henry VII, and in 1551 (on the death of his brother-in-law Charles Brandon, 3rd Duke of Suffolk) become Duke of Suffolk, by way of a new creation.[28] Dorset's granddaughter Lady Jane Grey was the designated successor of King Edward VI by his will, and for nine days in July 1553 briefly sat on the throne of England. In 1554, together with Dorset's other surviving sons, Lord John Grey and Lord Thomas Grey, Suffolk took part in Wyatt's rebellion against Mary I's marriage to Philip of Spain and in support of Lady Jane Grey.[29] When this rebellion failed, all three were arrested, and Suffolk and his brother Thomas were executed,[29] as were Lady Jane herself and her husband Lord Guildford Dudley. Lord John Grey survived, and in July 1603 his youngest son, Henry Grey, was restored to the House of Lords by King James I as Baron Grey of Groby.[29]

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Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings, was a noblewoman and a member of the powerful Neville family of northern England. She was one of the six daughters of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and the sister of military commander Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, known to history as Warwick the Kingmaker.

Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick

Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick

Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, known as Warwick the Kingmaker, was an English nobleman, administrator, and military commander. The eldest son of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, he became Earl of Warwick through marriage, and was the wealthiest and most powerful English peer of his age, with political connections that went beyond the country's borders. One of the leaders in the Wars of the Roses, originally on the Yorkist side but later switching to the Lancastrian side, he was instrumental in the deposition of two kings, which led to his epithet of "Kingmaker".

John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu

John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu

John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu was a major magnate of fifteenth-century England. He was a younger son of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and the younger brother of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, the "Kingmaker".

George Neville (bishop)

George Neville (bishop)

George Neville was Archbishop of York from 1465 until 1476 and Chancellor of England from 1460 until 1467 and again from 1470 until 1471.

John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford

John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford

John de Vere, 13th Earl of Oxford, the second son of John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford, and Elizabeth Howard, a first cousin of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, was one of the principal Lancastrian commanders during the English Wars of the Roses.

Baron Bonville

Baron Bonville

The title of Baron Bonville was created once in the Peerage of England. On 10 March 1449, Sir William Bonville II was summoned to Parliament. On his death in 1461, the barony was inherited by his great-granddaughter Cecily Bonville, who two months before succeeded as Baroness Harington, with which title the barony merged until 1554, when both baronies were forfeited. From her death in 1529 to the forfeiture in 1554, the baronies were merged with the title of Marquess of Dorset.

Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire

Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire

Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire was an English peer.

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham

Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham, KG was an English nobleman known as the namesake of Buckingham's rebellion, a failed but significant collection of uprisings in England and parts of Wales against Richard III of England in October 1483. He was executed without trial for his role in the uprisings. Stafford is also one of the primary suspects in the disappearance of Richard's nephews, the Princes in the Tower.

Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham

Catherine Woodville, Duchess of Buckingham

Catherine Woodville was the Duchess of Buckingham and a medieval English noblewoman.

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville was Queen of England from her marriage to King Edward IV on 1 May 1464 until Edward was deposed on 3 October 1470, and again from Edward's resumption of the throne on 11 April 1471 until his death on 9 April 1483.

John Grey of Groby

John Grey of Groby

Sir John Grey, of Groby, Leicestershire was a Lancastrian knight, the first husband of Elizabeth Woodville who later married King Edward IV of England, and great-great-grandfather of Lady Jane Grey.

Baron Ferrers of Groby

Baron Ferrers of Groby

Baron Ferrers of Groby was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ on 29 December 1299 when William Ferrers, 1st Baron Ferrers of Groby was summoned to parliament. He was the son of Sir William de Ferrers, Knt., of Groby, Leicestershire, (d.1287) by his first wife Anne Durward, 2nd daughter of Alan Durward and his wife Margery of Scotland, and grandson of William de Ferrers, 5th Earl of Derby. The first Baron was married to Ellen de Menteith, daughter of Alexander, Earl of Menteith. In 1475 the eighth baron was created the Marquess of Dorset, and the barony in effect merged with the marquessate. It was forfeited along with the marquessate when the third marquess was attainted in 1554.

Death

Dorset died on 10 October 1530, and was buried in the collegiate church at Astley in Warwickshire. When he died he held estates in London and in sixteen counties, amounting to over one hundred manors, and was one of the richest men in England.[30] His grave was opened in the early seventeenth century and measurement of his skeleton suggested a height of 5 feet 8 inches (173 cm).[1]

Ancestry

Discover more about Ancestry related topics

John Grey of Groby

John Grey of Groby

Sir John Grey, of Groby, Leicestershire was a Lancastrian knight, the first husband of Elizabeth Woodville who later married King Edward IV of England, and great-great-grandfather of Lady Jane Grey.

Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset

Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset

Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, 1st Earl of Huntingdon, 7th Baron Ferrers of Groby, was an English nobleman, courtier and the eldest son of Elizabeth Woodville and her first husband Sir John Grey of Groby. Her second marriage to King Edward IV made her Queen of England, thus elevating Grey's status at court and in the realm as the stepson of the King. Through his mother's assiduous endeavours, he made two materially advantageous marriages to wealthy heiresses, the King's niece Anne Holland and Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington. By the latter, he had 14 children.

Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers

Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers

Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers, also Wydeville, was the father of Elizabeth Woodville and father-in-law of Edward IV.

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville

Elizabeth Woodville was Queen of England from her marriage to King Edward IV on 1 May 1464 until Edward was deposed on 3 October 1470, and again from Edward's resumption of the throne on 11 April 1471 until his death on 9 April 1483.

Jacquetta of Luxembourg

Jacquetta of Luxembourg

Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Dowager Duchess of Bedford and Countess Rivers was a prominent, though often overlooked, figure in the Wars of the Roses. Through her short-lived first marriage to the Duke of Bedford, brother of King Henry V, she was firmly allied to the House of Lancaster. However, following the emphatic Lancastrian defeat at the Battle of Towton, she and her second husband Richard Woodville sided closely with the House of York. Three years after the battle and the accession of Edward IV of England, Jacquetta's eldest daughter Elizabeth Woodville married him and became Queen consort of England. Jacquetta bore Woodville 14 children and stood trial on charges of witchcraft, of which she was exonerated.

William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington

William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington

William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington was an English nobleman who was a loyal adherent of the House of York during the dynastic conflict in England in the 15th century now known as the Wars of the Roses. He was slain and left dead on the field during the Yorkist defeat at the Battle of Wakefield, leaving his baby daughter, Cecily Bonville heiress to his barony.

Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington

Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington

Cecily Bonville, 7th Baroness Harington, 2nd Baroness Bonville was an English peer, who was also Marchioness of Dorset by her first marriage to Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, and Countess of Wiltshire by her second marriage to Henry Stafford, 1st Earl of Wiltshire.

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury

Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury was an English nobleman and magnate based in northern England who became a key supporter of the House of York during the early years of the Wars of the Roses. He was the father of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, the "Kingmaker".

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings

Katherine Neville, Baroness Hastings, was a noblewoman and a member of the powerful Neville family of northern England. She was one of the six daughters of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, and the sister of military commander Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, known to history as Warwick the Kingmaker.

Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury

Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury

Alice Montagu was an English noblewoman and the suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury, 6th Baroness Monthermer, and 7th and 4th Baroness Montagu, having succeeded to the titles in 1428.

Source: "Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Grey,_2nd_Marquess_of_Dorset.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Grey, Thomas, second marquess of Dorset (1477–1530), magnate and courtier (login required) by Robert C. Braddock in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  2. ^ a b c d T. B. Pugh, Henry VII and the English nobility, in The Tudor nobility, ed. G. W. Bernard (Manchester, 1992), 49–110
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Edward Hall, The triumphant reigne of kyng Henry the VIII, ed. C. Whibley, 2 vols. (1904)
  4. ^ H. Gawthorne/S. Mattingly/G. W. Shaeffer/M. Avery/B. Thomas/R. Barnard/M. Young, Revd. N.V. Knibbs/R. Horne: "The Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Great Brington. 800 Years of English History", published as "Brington Church: A Popular History" in 1989 and printed by Peerless Press.
  5. ^ Gunn, S. J., Charles Brandon, duke of Suffolk, c.1484–1545 (Basil Blackwell, Oxford & New York, 1988)
  6. ^ a b c Nichols, John, The history and antiquities of the county of Leicester, 4 vols. (1795–1815)
  7. ^ Guy, John A., The Cardinal's Court: The Impact of Thomas Wolsey in Star Chamber (Harvester Press, England, 1977)
  8. ^ John Leland's Itinerary: travels in Tudor England, ed. John Chandler (Sutton Publishing, 1993)
  9. ^ Walker, Greg, Plays of persuasion: drama and politics at the court of Henry VIII (Cambridge University Press, 1991)
  10. ^ Buckingham's mother, Katherine Woodville, was the elder sister of Dorset's grandmother Queen Elizabeth Woodville, making the two men first cousins once removed. After his father's death, Dorset's mother created further ties between the two families by marrying a brother of the Duke.
  11. ^ Miller, Helen, Henry VIII and the English nobility (Basil Blackwell, Oxford, 1986)
  12. ^ a b Turner, G.J., The Justices of the Forest South of Trent in The English Historical Review 18 (1903) pp. 112–116
  13. ^ Robertson, M. L., Court careers and county quarrels: George Lord Hastings and Leicestershire unrest, 1509–1529 in State, sovereigns and society: essays in early modern English history, ed. Charles Carleton (Sutton Publishing, 1998), pp. 153–169
  14. ^ a b Vergil, Polydore, The Anglica Historia of Polydore Vergil, AD 1485–1537 (translated by Denys Hay), Office of the Royal Historical Society, Camden Series, London, 1950.
  15. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "Cecily Bonville, Baroness Bonville and Harington". The Peerage. at thepeerage.com (accessed 25 November 2007)
  16. ^ On Cecily's death in 1530, her son Thomas inherited both of her baronies.
  17. ^ Stafford, Henry, earl of Wiltshire (c. 1479–1523), nobleman and courtier by Keith Dockray in Dictionary of National Biography online (accessed 26 November 2007)
  18. ^ a b c Sir John Grey (c.1432–1461), knight in Grey, Sir Richard (d. 1483), nobleman by Rosemary Horrox in Dictionary of National Biography online (accessed 26 November 2007)
  19. ^ Douglas Richardson & Kimball G. Everingham, Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, p. 359
  20. ^ Neville (married names Mowbray, Strangways, Beaumont, Woodville), Katherine, duchess of Norfolk (c. 1400–1483), noblewoman by Rowena E. Archer in Dictionary of National Biography online (accessed 26 November 2007)
  21. ^ Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, The Bodley Head, 1999)
  22. ^ Holland, Henry, second duke of Exeter (1430–1475), magnate, including Anne of York (1439–1476) by Michael Hicks in Dictionary of National Biography online at oxforddnb.com (accessed 25 November 2007)
  23. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "Eleanor St John". The Peerage. at thepeerage.com (accessed 25 November 2007)
  24. ^ Alison Weir, Britain's Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (London, The Bodley Head, 1999), page 103
  25. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "Margaret Beauchamp". The Peerage. at thepeerage.com (accessed 25 November 2007)
  26. ^ Wotton, Sir Edward (c. 1489–1551), administrator by Luke MacMahon in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  27. ^ Wotton, Nicholas (c. 1497–1567), diplomat and dean of Canterbury and York by Michael Zell in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  28. ^ a b Grey, Henry, duke of Suffolk (1517–1554), magnate by Robert C. Braddock in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  29. ^ a b c Grey, Lord John (d. 1564), nobleman by Stanford Lehmberg in Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  30. ^ Prerogative court of Canterbury, wills, Public Record Office, PROB 11/24, fols. 72v–76r
Peerage of England
Preceded by Marquess of Dorset
1501–1530
Succeeded by
Baron Ferrers of Groby
1501–1530
Preceded by Baron Harington, Baron Bonville
1529–1530

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