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The Indianapolis Star

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The Indianapolis Star
IndyStar logo.svg
The Indianapolis Star front page.jpg
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)Gannett
EditorKatrice Hardy
FoundedJune 6, 1903; 119 years ago (1903-06-06)
Headquarters130 South Meridian Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46225
 United States
Circulation
  • 35,127 Weekday
  • 50,192 Sunday
(as of Q3 2022)[1][2]
ISSN1930-2533
Websitewww.indystar.com

The Indianapolis Star (also known as IndyStar) is a morning daily newspaper that began publishing on June 6, 1903, in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. It has been the only major daily paper in the city since 1999, when the Indianapolis News ceased publication. It won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2021 and the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting twice, in 1975 and 1991. It is currently owned by Gannett.[3]

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Newspaper

Newspaper

A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events and is often typed in black ink with a white or gray background.

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis, colloquially known as Indy, is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Indiana and the seat of Marion County. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the consolidated population of Indianapolis and Marion County was 977,203 in 2020. The "balance" population, which excludes semi-autonomous municipalities in Marion County, was 887,642. It is the 15th most populous city in the U.S., the third-most populous city in the Midwest, after Chicago and Columbus, Ohio, and the fourth-most populous state capital after Phoenix, Arizona, Austin, Texas, and Columbus. The Indianapolis metropolitan area is the 33rd most populous metropolitan statistical area in the U.S., with 2,111,040 residents. Its combined statistical area ranks 28th, with a population of 2,431,361. Indianapolis covers 368 square miles (950 km2), making it the 18th largest city by land area in the U.S.

Indianapolis News

Indianapolis News

The Indianapolis News was an evening newspaper published for 130 years, beginning December 7, 1869, and ending on October 1, 1999. The "Great Hoosier Daily," as it was known, at one time held the largest circulation in the state of Indiana. It was also the oldest Indianapolis newspaper until it closed and was housed in the Indianapolis News Building from 1910 to 1949. After Eugene C. Pulliam, the founder and president of Central Newspapers acquired the News in 1948, he became its publisher, while his son, Eugene S. Pulliam, served as the newspaper's managing editor. Eugene S. Pulliam succeeded his father as publisher of the News in 1975.

Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting

Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting

The Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting has been awarded since 1953, under one name or another, for a distinguished example of investigative reporting by an individual or team, presented as a single article or series in a U.S. news publication. It is administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City.

Gannett

Gannett

Gannett Co., Inc. is an American mass media holding company headquartered in Tysons, Virginia, in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation.

History

The Star marquee at Circle Centre in downtown Indianapolis.
The Star marquee at Circle Centre in downtown Indianapolis.

The Indianapolis Star was founded on June 6, 1903,[4] by Muncie industrialist George F. McCulloch as competition to two other Indianapolis dailies, the Indianapolis Journal and the Indianapolis Sentinel. It acquired the Journal a year and two days later, and bought the Sentinel in 1906. Daniel G. Reid purchased the Star in 1904 and hired John Shaffer as publisher, later replacing him. In the ensuing court proceedings, Shaffer emerged as the majority owner of the paper in 1911 and served as publisher and editor until his death in 1943.[5]

Central Newspapers, Inc. and its owner, Eugene C. Pulliam—maternal grandfather of future Vice President Dan Quayle—purchased the Star from Shaffer's estate on April 25, 1944, and adopted initiatives to increase the paper's circulation. In 1944, the Star had trailed the evening Indianapolis News but by 1948 had become Indiana's largest newspaper.[5]

In 1948, Pulliam purchased the News and combined the business, mechanical, advertising, and circulation operations of the two papers, with the News moving into the Star's building in 1950. The editorial and news operations remained separate. Eugene S. Pulliam took over as publisher upon the death of his father in 1975, a role he retained until his own death in 1999.[5]

In September 1995, the newsroom staffs of the Star and the News merged.[4] In 1999, the News ceased publication, leaving the Star as the only major daily paper in Indianapolis. Soon thereafter the trustees of Central Newspapers, Inc., the owner of the Star and other newspapers in Indiana and Arizona, began investigating the sale of the small chain to a larger entity.[5] In 2000, the Gannett Company acquired the paper, amongst others when it purchased the firm "Central Newspapers" for $2.6 billion,[4][6][7] leaving Indianapolis with no locally owned newspaper other than the Indianapolis Recorder, a weekly mainly circulated in the African-American community.

On July 27, 2012, it was announced that The Indianapolis Star would relocate from its headquarters at 307 North Pennsylvania Street. It was later announced that the new location would be the former Nordstrom department store in Circle Centre Mall. This move took place from the summer to fall of 2014. The former location had been used since 1907.[8]

After Larry Nassar, USA Gymnastics national team osteopathic physician, was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison in January 2018 for sexually abusing female athletes, the prosecutor in the case specifically praised The Indianapolis Star for uncovering Nassar's decades-long history of abuse.[9] The Star began its investigative reporting into Nassar and USA Gymnastics in 2016 and published its first related article in August 2016 when it shed light on USA Gymnastics' failure to properly investigate credible complaints of sexual abuse or pass the complaints on to police. After the August 2016 story, one of Nassar's victims, Rachael Denhollander, approached the Star about Nassar and USA Gymnastics' failure to investigate her complaint about him. This resulted in a September 2016 story on Nassar specifically. After the Nassar story, the Star was approached by many of Nassar's victims who shared similar stories of abuse. Nassar was charged with criminal sexual conduct in November 2016.[9]

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Muncie, Indiana

Muncie, Indiana

Muncie is an incorporated city and the seat of Delaware County, Indiana. Previously known as Buckongahelas Town, named after the legendary Delaware Chief. It is located in East Central Indiana, about 50 miles (80 km) northeast of Indianapolis. The United States Census for 2020 reported the city's population was 65,194. It is the principal city of the Muncie metropolitan statistical area, which has a population of 117,671.

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis, colloquially known as Indy, is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Indiana and the seat of Marion County. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the consolidated population of Indianapolis and Marion County was 977,203 in 2020. The "balance" population, which excludes semi-autonomous municipalities in Marion County, was 887,642. It is the 15th most populous city in the U.S., the third-most populous city in the Midwest, after Chicago and Columbus, Ohio, and the fourth-most populous state capital after Phoenix, Arizona, Austin, Texas, and Columbus. The Indianapolis metropolitan area is the 33rd most populous metropolitan statistical area in the U.S., with 2,111,040 residents. Its combined statistical area ranks 28th, with a population of 2,431,361. Indianapolis covers 368 square miles (950 km2), making it the 18th largest city by land area in the U.S.

Indianapolis Journal

Indianapolis Journal

The Indianapolis Journal was a newspaper published in Indianapolis, Indiana, during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The paper published daily editions every evening except on Sundays, when it published a morning edition.

Eugene C. Pulliam

Eugene C. Pulliam

Eugene Collins Pulliam was an American newspaper publisher and businessman who was the founder and president of Central Newspapers Inc., a media holding company. During his sixty-three years as a newspaper publisher, Pulliam acquired forty-six newspapers across the United States. Major holdings of Central Newspapers, which he founded in 1934, included the Indianapolis Star, the Indianapolis News, the Arizona Republic, and the Phoenix Gazette, as well as newspapers in smaller cities in Indiana, Arizona, and other states. Pulliam's early career included work as a reporter for the Kansas City Star and as editor and publisher of the Atchison (Kansas) Daily Champion. Prior to 1960 Pulliam also operated radio stations WAOV and WIRE in Indiana and KTAR in Arizona. The Kansas native, a graduate from DePauw University in 1910, founded the DePauw Daily, an independent student newspaper, and in 1909 was one of ten DePauw students who cofounded Sigma Delta Chi, a journalism fraternity that was later renamed the Society of Professional Journalists. In August 2000, the Gannett Company acquired Central Newspapers for US$2.6 billion, with the Eugene C. Pulliam Trust as the principal beneficiary of the sale.

Dan Quayle

Dan Quayle

James Danforth Quayle is an American politician who served as the 44th vice president of the United States from 1989 to 1993 under President George H. W. Bush. A member of the Republican Party, Quayle previously represented Indiana in the House of Representatives from 1977 to 1981 and in the Senate from 1981 to 1989.

Indianapolis News

Indianapolis News

The Indianapolis News was an evening newspaper published for 130 years, beginning December 7, 1869, and ending on October 1, 1999. The "Great Hoosier Daily," as it was known, at one time held the largest circulation in the state of Indiana. It was also the oldest Indianapolis newspaper until it closed and was housed in the Indianapolis News Building from 1910 to 1949. After Eugene C. Pulliam, the founder and president of Central Newspapers acquired the News in 1948, he became its publisher, while his son, Eugene S. Pulliam, served as the newspaper's managing editor. Eugene S. Pulliam succeeded his father as publisher of the News in 1975.

Eugene S. Pulliam

Eugene S. Pulliam

Eugene Smith Pulliam was the publisher of the Indianapolis Star and the Indianapolis News from 1975 until his death. He was also a supporter of First Amendment rights, an advocate of press freedom, and opposed McCarthyism. The Kansas native, DePauw University graduate, and World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Naval Reserve pursued a six-decade-long career in journalism that included work for the United Press new agency, as news director of WIRE-AM in Indianapolis, and in various editorial and publishing positions at the Star and News before he succeeded his father, Eugene C. Pulliam, as publisher of the two newspapers. During Eugene S. Pulliam's tenure as publisher of the Star, it received two Pulitzer Prizes; one in 1975 for a series of articles on police corruption in Indianapolis and Marion County, Indiana, and another in 1991 for investigation of medical malpractice in Indiana. Pulliam also became executive vice president of Central Newspapers, Inc., the media holding company his father founded in 1934. Dan Quayle, Eugene C. Pulliam's grandson and Eugene S. Pulliam's half nephew, served as the 44th Vice President of the United States from 1989 to 1993.

Gannett

Gannett

Gannett Co., Inc. is an American mass media holding company headquartered in Tysons, Virginia, in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation.

Indianapolis Recorder

Indianapolis Recorder

The Indianapolis Recorder is an American weekly newspaper based in Indianapolis, Indiana. First published in 1895, the Recorder is the longest-running African-American newspaper in Indiana and fourth in the U.S.

Nordstrom

Nordstrom

Nordstrom, Inc. is an American luxury department store chain headquartered in Seattle, Washington, and founded by John W. Nordstrom and Carl F. Wallin in 1901. The original Wallin & Nordstrom store operated exclusively as a shoe store, and a second Nordstrom's shoe store opened in 1923. The growing Nordstrom Best chain began selling clothing in 1963, and became the Nordstrom full-line retailer that presently exists by 1971. The company founded its off-price Nordstrom Rack division in 1973, and grew both full-line and off-price divisions throughout the United States in the following years before expanding into Canada in 2014. In the American market, it competes with department stores including Bloomingdale's, Macy's, Neiman Marcus, and Saks Fifth Avenue.

Circle Centre Mall

Circle Centre Mall

Circle Centre Mall is an indoor shopping mall located in Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. Circle Centre Mall was opened to the public on September 8, 1995, and incorporates existing downtown structures such as the former L. S. Ayres flagship store. The mall is anchored by Regal Cinemas and the offices for The Indianapolis Star. The space occupied by former anchor Carson Pirie Scott is vacant.

Larry Nassar

Larry Nassar

Lawrence Gerard Nassar is an American convicted serial child rapist and former sports medicine physician. For 18 years, he was the team doctor of the United States women's national gymnastics team, where he used his position to exploit, deceive, and sexually assault hundreds of children and young women.

Pulitzer Prizes

The Star has won the Pulitzer Prize once for national reporting and twice for investigative reporting. In 1975, the Star was honored for its 1974 series on corruption within the Indianapolis Police Department. It was cited again in 1991 for its 1990 series on medical malpractice.[10] In 2021, the Star was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for an investigation into attacks by police K-9 units.[11]

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Pulitzer Prize

Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prize is an award administered by Columbia University for achievements in newspaper, magazine, online journalism, literature, and musical composition within the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of Joseph Pulitzer, who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher. Prizes are awarded annually in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a US$15,000 cash award. The winner in the public service category is awarded a gold medal.

Police corruption

Police corruption

Police corruption is a form of police misconduct in which law enforcement officers end up breaking their political contract and abuse their power for personal gain. This type of corruption may involve one or a group of officers. Internal police corruption is a challenge to public trust, cohesion of departmental policies, human rights and legal violations involving serious consequences. Police corruption can take many forms, such as bribery.

Indianapolis Police Department

Indianapolis Police Department

The Indianapolis Police Department (IPD) was the principal law enforcement agency of Indianapolis, Indiana, under the jurisdiction of the Mayor of Indianapolis and Director of Public Safety. Prior to the consolidation with the Law Enforcement Division of the Marion County Sheriff's Department to form the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, 1,230 sworn police officers and 250 non-sworn personnel were employed by the department.

Medical malpractice

Medical malpractice

Medical malpractice is a legal cause of action that occurs when a medical or health care professional, through a negligent act or omission, deviates from standards in their profession, thereby causing injury or death to a patient. The negligence might arise from errors in diagnosis, treatment, aftercare or health management.

Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting

This Pulitzer Prize has been awarded since 1942 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs in the United States. In its first six years (1942–1947), it was called the Pulitzer Prize for Telegraphic Reporting – National.

Police dog

Police dog

A police dog is a dog that is trained to assist police and other law enforcement officers. Their duties may include searching for drugs and explosives, locating missing people, finding crime scene evidence, protecting officers and other people, and attacking suspects who flee from or attack police officers. The most commonly used breeds are the German Shepherd, Belgian Malinois, Bloodhound, Dutch Shepherd, and the retriever family. In recent years, the Belgian Malinois has become the leading choice for police and military work due to their intense drive, focus, agility, and smaller size, though German Shepherds remain the breed most associated with law enforcement.

Production facilities

The Indianapolis Star has the largest and most advanced printing presses in the nation.[12] The Pulliam Production Center at 8278 N. Georgetown Road on the northwest side of Indianapolis cost $72 million and covers 200,000 square feet (19,000 m2); printing of the Star at the facility began in 2002. The press hall that houses the four MAN Roland Geoman presses has 30,672 square feet (2,850 m2) on two levels. Each of the presses weighs 2,100 short tons (1,900 t), stands seven stories tall, and can print 75,000 papers an hour.[13] With all four presses running, 300,000 papers can be printed in just one hour. The Pulliam Production Center allows tours of the facility.

Sections

Former headquarters at 307 North Pennsylvania Street.
Former headquarters at 307 North Pennsylvania Street.

Part of the newspaper's masthead displays the text of 2 Corinthians 3:17: "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty."

Monday through Saturday

  • Section A – National and world news, business, editorial
  • Section B - USA TODAY
  • Section C – Metro+State - metro and state news, obituaries, classified ads (except on Wednesdays), weather
  • Section D - Sports (with 1 sports columnist Gregg Doyel)
  • Section E - (Wednesday) Classified ads, with none in section C; (Friday) Taste, which also includes movie listings
  • Section F – Extra (puzzles, advice, comics, television)
  • Local Living - (Thursdays only) things to do, community content

The Sunday Star

  • Section A – National and world news, job classifieds
  • Section B - USA TODAY
  • Section C – Metro+State - metro and state news, obituaries, editorial, weather
  • Section D – Sports
  • Section E – Business, classified ads
  • Section F - Home+Garden powered by Home Finder
  • Section G - Indy Living (arts and entertainment, health, puzzles, etc.)
  • Section U - USA TODAY Life Sunday
  • Comics – Sunday comics

Source: "The Indianapolis Star", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 10th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Indianapolis_Star.

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See also
References
  1. ^ Benton, Joshua (March 9, 2023). "The scale of local news destruction in Gannett's markets is astonishing". Nieman Lab.
  2. ^ Gannett. "Form 10-K". Securities & Exchange Commission. Retrieved March 10, 2023.
  3. ^ Verderame, Jyoti A. (July 5, 2021). "Indianapolis Star". Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Retrieved January 17, 2023.
  4. ^ a b c "About Gannett: The Indianapolis Star". Gannett Co., Inc. Archived from the original on June 13, 2006. Retrieved May 29, 2007.
  5. ^ a b c d "A History of The Indianapolis Star". Library Fact File. The Indianapolis Star. July 1, 2003. Archived from the original on December 11, 2001. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  6. ^ "The Star joins Gannett chain". The Indianapolis Star. August 1, 2000. Archived from the original on June 20, 2001. Retrieved May 29, 2007.
  7. ^ Henriques, Diana B. (June 29, 2000). "Gannett to Acquire Chain Tied to the Pulliam Family". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 25, 2023.
  8. ^ "Karen Ferguson: New IndyStar home, same news values". The Indianapolis Star. September 17, 2014. Retrieved September 28, 2014.
  9. ^ a b Eric Levenson. "How the Indy Star and Rachael Denhollander took down Larry Nassar". CNN. Retrieved January 27, 2018.
  10. ^ Indianapolis Star - About Us Archived March 7, 2018, at the Wayback Machine Retrieved September 20, 2016.
  11. ^ Times, The New York (June 11, 2021). "Pulitzer Prize: 2021 Winners List". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 11, 2021.
  12. ^ "World's Biggest Machines", Modern Marvels, History Channel
  13. ^ "Indianapolis Star Starts Production with First of Four Geoman Presses". What They Think. April 19, 2002. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
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