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Terrell Glenn (attorney)

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Terrell L. Glenn Sr.
United States Attorney for the Eastern District of South Carolina
In office
September 18, 1961 – January 31, 1968
PresidentJohn F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson
Preceded byN. Welch Morrisette Jr.
Personal details
BornJune 3, 1930
DiedApril 24, 1993(1993-04-24) (aged 62)
Political partyDemocratic
EducationUniversity of South Carolina School of Law (J.D.)

Terrell Lyles Glenn Sr. (June 3, 1930–April 24, 1993) was an American lawyer. He served as the United States attorney for the Eastern District of South Carolina from 1961 to 1968.

Early life

Glenn was the younger son of John Lyles Glenn Jr.,[1] who served as a federal judge in South Carolina from 1929 until his death in 1938. He graduated from the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1953 and served as a U.S. Army judge advocate general after graduation.[1]

Legal career

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy named Glenn U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of South Carolina. At the time of his confirmation and commissioning in September 1961,[2] Glenn was at age 31 the youngest U.S. attorney in the country.[1][3]

Glenn continued as U.S. attorney under Lyndon B. Johnson and resigned in January 1968.[4] He returned to private practice and later served as president of the South Carolina Bar and the Richland County Bar Association. Glenn and his father are the namesakes of the USC Law mock trial competition.[1]

Support for integration

During his service as U.S. attorney and his later career in private practice, Glenn was recognized for his advocacy for and support of integration in South Carolina. For example, Glenn used his position in law enforcement to lean on movie theater owners in Columbia to desegregate over the objection of local officials.[5] I. S. Leevy Johnson, the first black graduate of USC Law, described Glenn as "a major advocate of integration in South Carolina in his capacity as a former U. S. Attorney, and in his private life. Terrell Glenn and some others who are unknown were pushing to open up the positions at the South Carolina Bar."[6] (Leevy Johnson later became the first black president of the South Carolina Bar Association.)

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy stayed overnight in Glenn's home when he made a controversial visit to South Carolina in April 1963 to advocate integration. “We must recognize, as responsible citizens and as responsible government officials, that the Negroes in this country cannot be expected indefinitely to tolerate the injustices which flow from official and private racial discrimination in the United States,” Kennedy said during his visit.[7]

Discover more about Legal career related topics

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, often referred to by his initials JFK and the nickname Jack, was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from 1961 until his assassination near the end of his third year in office. Kennedy was the youngest person to assume the presidency by election. He was also the youngest president at the end of his tenure. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president concerned relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, he represented Massachusetts in both houses of the U.S. Congress prior to his presidency.

United States Attorney

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Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969. He had previously served as the 37th vice president from 1961 to 1963 under President John F. Kennedy, and was sworn in shortly after Kennedy's assassination. A Democrat from Texas, Johnson also served as a U.S. representative, U.S. senator and the Senate's majority leader. He holds the distinction of being one of the few presidents who served in all elected offices at the federal level.

South Carolina Bar

South Carolina Bar

The South Carolina Bar is the integrated (mandatory) bar association of the U.S. state of South Carolina.

Mock trial

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Desegregation in the United States

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I. S. Leevy Johnson

I. S. Leevy Johnson

Isaac Samuel Leevy Johnson is an American politician in the state of South Carolina. He served in the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1970 to 1980, representing Richland County, South Carolina. An alumnus of the University of Minnesota, Benedict College, and the University of South Carolina School of Law, he is a lawyer and owner of Leevy's Funeral Home. In 1985, he became the first black president of the South Carolina Bar Association.

Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy

Robert Francis Kennedy, also known by his initials RFK and by the nickname Bobby, was an American lawyer and politician who served as the 64th United States Attorney General from January 1961 to September 1964, and as a U.S. Senator from New York from January 1965 until his assassination in June 1968. He was, like his brothers John and Edward, a prominent member of the Democratic Party and has come to be viewed by some historians as an icon of modern American liberalism.

Personal life

Glenn was married to Louise Owens, the daughter of Columbia mayor Frank Owens.[8] They were active and lifelong members of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral.[9] The Glenns had four children; their son Terrell L. Glenn Jr. became an Episcopal priest and eventually a bishop in the Anglican Church in North America.[8] The Glenns were patrons of the arts and Glenn received the 1976 Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Award for support of the arts.[3]

Terrell Glenn Sr. died in Columbia on April 24, 1993.[3]

Source: "Terrell Glenn (attorney)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrell_Glenn_(attorney).

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References
  1. ^ a b c d "Ninth Annual Mock Trial Competition hosted in Judge Williams Courtroom". University of South Carolina School of Law. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  2. ^ "POST ELECTION MATERIAL: BOOK III, DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES: STATE-POST OFFICE -- LOBPP-018-009-p0041". John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Bill 4152: A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION EXPRESSING THE SORROW OF THE MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AT THE DEATH OF TERRELL L. GLENN OF COLUMBIA, AND EXTENDING SYMPATHY TO HIS FAMILY AND MANY FRIENDS". South Carolina General Assembly, 110th Session, 1993-1994.
  4. ^ "President's Daily Diary entry, 1/16/1968, President's Daily Diary Collection". LBJ Presidential Library. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  5. ^ "Oberdorfer file on Southern business: Memos to the Attorney General, 1963: August-October". John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. 1963. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  6. ^ Leevy Johnson, I.S.; Lare, Marvin (June 17, 2005). "A Vote-less People Is a Hopeless People". University of South Carolina Library. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  7. ^ Holleman, Joey (April 13, 2013). "50 years ago: Malcolm X, RFK brought heated rhetoric of civil rights fight to Columbia". The State. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  8. ^ a b "Louise Owens Glenn". The State. January 22, 2013. Retrieved 24 November 2022.
  9. ^ Terrell L. Glenn (2015). "A Unity Greater Than Doctrine". In Arten, Isaac; Glass, William (eds.). A House Divided? Ways Forward for North American Anglicans. Wipf and Stock. p. 58.

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