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Tenleytown–AU station

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Tenleytown – AU
WMATA Red.svg
Tenleytown-AU station.jpg
General information
Location4501 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C.
Coordinates38°56′53.1″N 77°4′45.9″W / 38.948083°N 77.079417°W / 38.948083; -77.079417Coordinates: 38°56′53.1″N 77°4′45.9″W / 38.948083°N 77.079417°W / 38.948083; -77.079417
Owned byWMATA
Platforms1 island platform
Tracks2
ConnectionsBus transport Metrobus: 31, 33, 37, 96, D32, H2, H3, H4, M4, N2, W45, W47
Bus transport AU Shuttle
Construction
Structure typeUnderground
Parking17 spaces (parking meters)
Bicycle facilitiesCapital Bikeshare, 20 racks and 20 lockers
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeA07
History
OpenedAugust 25, 1984; 38 years ago (August 25, 1984)
Previous namesTenley Circle
Tenleytown
Passengers
20222,195 daily[1]
Rank33rd
Services
Preceding station WMATA Metro Logo.svg Washington Metro Following station
Friendship Heights Red Line Van Ness–UDC
toward Glenmont
Location

Tenleytown–AU is a subway station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro in Washington, D.C. Located in the Upper Northwest neighborhood, it is the last station on the Red Line heading outbound wholly within the District of Columbia; the next stop, Friendship Heights, lies within both the District and the state of Maryland.

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Red Line (Washington Metro)

Red Line (Washington Metro)

The Red Line is a rapid transit line of the Washington Metro system, consisting of 27 stations in Montgomery County, Maryland, and Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is a primary line through downtown Washington and the oldest and busiest line in the system. It forms a long, narrow "U", capped by its terminal stations at Shady Grove and Glenmont.

Washington Metro

Washington Metro

The Washington Metro, often abbreviated as the Metro and formally the Metrorail, is a rapid transit system serving the Washington metropolitan area of the United States. It is administered by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which also operates the Metrobus service under the Metro name. Opened in 1976, the network now includes six lines, 97 stations, and 129 miles (208 km) of route.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly known as Washington or D.C., is the capital city and federal district of the United States. The city is located on the east bank of the Potomac River, which forms its southwestern border with Virginia, and borders Maryland to its north and east. The city was named for George Washington, a Founding Father, commanding general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War, and the first president of the United States, and the district is named for Columbia, the female personification of the nation.

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights is a Washington Metro station straddling the border of Washington, D.C. and Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. The station was opened on August 25, 1984, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA).

Location

Platform-level faregate
Platform-level faregate

The southernmost station underneath the Wisconsin Avenue NW corridor, Tenleytown–AU station lies within the neighborhood of the same name in the Upper Northwest portion of the city. More specifically, it lies north of Tenley Circle, for which the area is named, below Wisconsin Avenue NW at its intersection with Albemarle Street NW. Nearby are several educational institutions, the most notable of which are: American University (AU, which has its law school on the circle, has its main campus a mile from the station, albeit connected by a shuttle); Sidwell Friends School (famous for being the school of choice of presidential children); Jackson-Reed High School; the high school of Georgetown Day School; and the affiliated National Cathedral School and St Albans Schools.[2] In addition, Fort Reno Park and the Washington National Cathedral are located close to the station.[2]

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Wisconsin Avenue

Wisconsin Avenue

Wisconsin Avenue is a major thoroughfare in Washington, D.C., and its Maryland suburbs. The southern terminus begins in Georgetown just north of the Potomac River, at an intersection with K Street under the elevated Whitehurst Freeway. The section of Wisconsin Avenue in Georgetown was called High Street before the street names in Georgetown were changed in 1895 to conform to those of the L'Enfant Plan for the federal city.

Tenleytown

Tenleytown

Tenleytown is a historic neighborhood in Northwest, Washington, D.C.

Tenley Circle

Tenley Circle

Tenley Circle is a traffic circle in the Northwest Washington, D.C. neighborhood of Tenleytown. Tenley Circle lies at the intersection of Nebraska Avenue, Wisconsin Avenue, and Yuma Street. Unlike many of the circles in Washington, Tenley's traffic pattern has evolved such that the dominant roadway, Wisconsin Avenue, can pass straight through the center instead of going around the outside circumference.

American University

American University

The American University is a private federally chartered research university in Washington, D.C. As of Fall 2022, American University’s acceptance rate was 31%. Its main campus spans 90 acres on Ward Circle, mostly in the Spring Valley neighborhood of Northwest D.C. AU was chartered by an Act of Congress in 1893 at the urging of Methodist bishop John Fletcher Hurst, who sought to create an institution that would promote public service, internationalism, and pragmatic idealism. AU broke ground in 1902, opened as a graduate education institution in 1914, and admitted its first undergraduates in 1925. Although affiliated with the United Methodist Church, religious affiliation is not a criterion for admission.

Sidwell Friends School

Sidwell Friends School

Sidwell Friends School is a Quaker school located in Bethesda, Maryland and Washington, D.C., offering pre-kindergarten through high school classes. Founded in 1883 by Thomas W. Sidwell, its motto is "Eluceat omnibus lux", alluding to the Quaker concept of inner light. All Sidwell Friends students attend Quaker meeting for worship weekly, and middle school students begin every day with five minutes of silence.

Jackson-Reed High School

Jackson-Reed High School

Jackson-Reed High School is a public high school in Washington, D.C. It serves grades 9 through 12 as part of the District of Columbia Public Schools. The school sits in the Tenleytown neighborhood, at the intersection of Chesapeake Street and Nebraska Avenue NW. It primarily serves students in Washington's Ward 3, but nearly 30% of the student body lives outside the school's boundaries.

Georgetown Day School

Georgetown Day School

Georgetown Day School (GDS) is an independent coeducational PK-12 school located in Washington, D.C. The school educates 1,075 elementary, middle, and high school students in northwestern Washington, D.C. Russell Shaw is the current Head of School.

National Cathedral School

National Cathedral School

National Cathedral School (NCS) is an independent Episcopal private day school for girls in grades 4–12 located on the grounds of the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., United States. Founded by philanthropist and suffragist Phoebe Apperson Hearst and Bishop Henry Yates Satterlee in 1900, NCS is the oldest of the institutions constituting the Protestant Episcopal Cathedral Foundation.

St. Albans School (Washington, D.C.)

St. Albans School (Washington, D.C.)

St. Albans School (STA) is an independent college preparatory day and boarding school for boys in grades 4–12, located in Washington, D.C. The school is named after Saint Alban, traditionally regarded as the first British martyr. Within the St. Albans community, the school is commonly referred to as "S-T-A." It enrolls approximately 590 day students in grades 4–12, and 30 additional boarding students in grades 9–12, and is affiliated with the National Cathedral School and the co-ed Beauvoir, the National Cathedral Elementary School, all of which are located on the grounds of the Washington National Cathedral. St. Albans, along with the affiliated schools and the Washington National Cathedral, are members of the Protestant Episcopal Cathedral Foundation. It is regarded among the most prestigious secondary schools in the United States.

Fort Reno Park

Fort Reno Park

Fort Reno Park is an urban park in the Tenleytown neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C. It is named after Fort Reno, one of the only locations in the District of Columbia to see combat during the American Civil War. The park was established in the 1920s to clear an African American neighborhood called Reno from the site, in what was becoming an affluent white suburban area.

Washington National Cathedral

Washington National Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the City and Diocese of Washington, commonly known as Washington National Cathedral or National Cathedral, is an American cathedral of the Episcopal Church. The cathedral is located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. The structure is of Neo-Gothic design closely modeled on English Gothic style of the late fourteenth century. It is the second-largest church building in the United States, and the third-tallest building in Washington, D.C. The cathedral is the seat of both the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Michael Bruce Curry, and the bishop of the Diocese of Washington, Mariann Edgar Budde. Over 270,000 people visit the structure annually.

History

Originally to be called Tenley Circle, in February 1980 the Metro Board officially changed its name to Tenleytown.[3] The station opened on August 25, 1984.[4][5] Its opening coincided with the completion of 6.8 miles (10.9 km) of rail northwest of the Van Ness–UDC station and the opening of the Bethesda, Friendship Heights, Grosvenor and Medical Center stations.[4][5][6] In May 1989, although objected to by several community groups, the Metro Board officially changed its name to Tenleytown–AU due to its proximity to American University.[7] The $63,500 cost of changing the names on signs, pylons and maps throughout the system was paid for by the District government.[7]

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Van Ness–UDC station

Van Ness–UDC station

Van Ness–UDC station is a Washington Metro station serving the Forest Hills and North Cleveland Park neighborhoods of Washington, D.C., United States. The island platformed station was opened on December 5, 1981, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). Providing service for the Red Line, the station is on the 4200 block of Connecticut Avenue NW, with exits on either side of the street. The station is also close to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), as well as to both Howard University School of Law and the Edmund Burke School.

Bethesda station

Bethesda station

Bethesda is a rapid transit station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro system in Bethesda, Maryland. It is one of the busiest suburban Metro stations, serving on average 9,142 passengers each weekday in 2017. The Purple Line, a light rail system currently under construction, will terminate at Bethesda, providing rail service to other inner Maryland suburbs such as Silver Spring and College Park, each of which has additional north-south connections by Washington Metro, and New Carrollton, which has Amtrak and MARC connections to both Washington, D.C. and Baltimore.

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights is a Washington Metro station straddling the border of Washington, D.C. and Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. The station was opened on August 25, 1984, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA).

Grosvenor–Strathmore station

Grosvenor–Strathmore station

Grosvenor–Strathmore is a rapid transit station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro in North Bethesda, Maryland. Grosvenor–Strathmore is the last above-ground station for Glenmont-bound Red Line trains until NoMa-Gallaudet U; south of the station, trains cross over the Capital Beltway before descending underground. It is one of a number of stations on the Rockville Pike corridor in Montgomery County.

Medical Center station (Washington Metro)

Medical Center station (Washington Metro)

Medical Center is a Washington Metro station in Bethesda, Maryland, United States. The island-platformed station was opened on August 25, 1984, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). Providing service for the Red Line, the station serves the National Institutes of Health campus and the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, and is located at Rockville Pike and South Drive. Since there is little retail in the area and no commuter parking lot, this station is used almost exclusively by employees and visitors to those two institutions.

American University

American University

The American University is a private federally chartered research university in Washington, D.C. As of Fall 2022, American University’s acceptance rate was 31%. Its main campus spans 90 acres on Ward Circle, mostly in the Spring Valley neighborhood of Northwest D.C. AU was chartered by an Act of Congress in 1893 at the urging of Methodist bishop John Fletcher Hurst, who sought to create an institution that would promote public service, internationalism, and pragmatic idealism. AU broke ground in 1902, opened as a graduate education institution in 1914, and admitted its first undergraduates in 1925. Although affiliated with the United Methodist Church, religious affiliation is not a criterion for admission.

Station layout

This station uses the four-coffer arch design found at most underground stations on the western side of the Red Line. It is one of 11 stations constructed using rock-tunneling methods, lying more than 100 feet (30 m) below the surface. [8][9]

Two entrances on either side of Wisconsin Avenue meet at an upper mezzanine, converging into a set of three long escalators that travel down to the fare control. An elevator adjacent to the eastern surface entrance travels down directly to the platform, with a single fare gate and ticket machine to access the platform proper.

G Street level Exit/entrance, buses
Upper mezzanine Escalator landing
M Mezzanine Fare gates, ticket machines, station agent
P
Platform level
Westbound WMATA Red.svg toward Grosvenor–Strathmore or Shady Grove (Friendship Heights)
Island platform
Eastbound WMATA Red.svg toward Silver Spring or Glenmont (Van Ness–UDC)

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Red Line (Washington Metro)

Red Line (Washington Metro)

The Red Line is a rapid transit line of the Washington Metro system, consisting of 27 stations in Montgomery County, Maryland, and Washington, D.C., in the United States. It is a primary line through downtown Washington and the oldest and busiest line in the system. It forms a long, narrow "U", capped by its terminal stations at Shady Grove and Glenmont.

Grosvenor–Strathmore station

Grosvenor–Strathmore station

Grosvenor–Strathmore is a rapid transit station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro in North Bethesda, Maryland. Grosvenor–Strathmore is the last above-ground station for Glenmont-bound Red Line trains until NoMa-Gallaudet U; south of the station, trains cross over the Capital Beltway before descending underground. It is one of a number of stations on the Rockville Pike corridor in Montgomery County.

Shady Grove station

Shady Grove station

Shady Grove is a Washington Metro station in Derwood in Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. The station was opened on December 15, 1984 as part of a four-stop extension of the line from Grosvenor–Strathmore station out to Shady Grove. The station is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA).

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights station

Friendship Heights is a Washington Metro station straddling the border of Washington, D.C. and Montgomery County, Maryland, United States. The station was opened on August 25, 1984, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA).

Island platform

Island platform

An island platform is a station layout arrangement where a single platform is positioned between two tracks within a railway station, tram stop or transitway interchange. Island platforms are popular on twin-track routes due to pragmatic and cost reasons. They are also useful within larger stations where local and express services for the same direction of travel can be provided from opposite sides of the same platform thereby simplifying transfers between the two tracks. An alternative arrangement is to position side platforms on either side of the tracks. The historical use of island platforms depends greatly upon the location. In the United Kingdom the use of island platforms is relatively common when the railway line is in a cutting or raised on an embankment, as this makes it easier to provide access to the platform without walking across the tracks.

Silver Spring station (Maryland)

Silver Spring station (Maryland)

Silver Spring is a Washington Metro and MARC Train station in Montgomery County, Maryland on the Red Line and Brunswick Line. On the Metro, Silver Spring is the first station in Maryland of the eastern end of the Red Line, and is the second-busiest Metro station in Maryland after Shady Grove. North of this station, it goes underground as it heads towards the underground terminus of Glenmont.

Glenmont station

Glenmont station

Glenmont is a Washington Metro station in Montgomery County, Maryland on the Red Line. It is the northern terminus of the Red Line.

Van Ness–UDC station

Van Ness–UDC station

Van Ness–UDC station is a Washington Metro station serving the Forest Hills and North Cleveland Park neighborhoods of Washington, D.C., United States. The island platformed station was opened on December 5, 1981, and is operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). Providing service for the Red Line, the station is on the 4200 block of Connecticut Avenue NW, with exits on either side of the street. The station is also close to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), as well as to both Howard University School of Law and the Edmund Burke School.

Source: "Tenleytown–AU station", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 11th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenleytown–AU_station.

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References
  1. ^ "Rail Ridership Data Viewer". WMATA. Retrieved February 11, 2023.
  2. ^ a b "Tenleytown–AU Station Vicinity Map" (PDF). WMATA. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  3. ^ Staff Reporters (February 15, 1980). "Metro station to be named Tenleytown". The Washington Post. p. A6.
  4. ^ a b Staff Reporters (August 25, 1984). "Red Line adds 6.8 miles; Opening ceremony for new segment set for today at Friendship Heights". The Washington Post. p. B1.
  5. ^ a b Brisbane, Arthur S. (August 26, 1984). "All aboard; Metro festivities welcome latest Red Line extension". The Washington Post. p. A1.
  6. ^ "Sequence of Metrorail openings" (PDF). Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. 2017. p. 3. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Staff Reporters (May 12, 1989). "Metro names change". The Washington Post. p. C4.
  8. ^ "See some of the reasons why Metrorail is hard to maintain". Washington Post. Retrieved 6 February 2021.
  9. ^ Hodge, Paul (26 January 1978). "Metro Begins New NW Stations". Washington Post. Retrieved 10 February 2021.
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