Get Our Extension

Tarzan (1999 film)

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Tarzan
Tarzan (1999 film) - theatrical poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by
Screenplay by
Story by
Based onTarzan of the Apes
by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Produced byBonnie Arnold
Starring
Edited byGregory Perler
Music byMark Mancina
Production
companies
Distributed byBuena Vista Pictures Distribution
Release dates
Running time
88 minutes[2]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$130 million[1]
Box office$448.2 million[1]

Tarzan is a 1999 American animated adventure film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 37th film produced by the studio, and the tenth and last released during the Disney Renaissance era, it is based on the 1912 story Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, being the first animated major motion picture version of the story. The film was directed by Kevin Lima and Chris Buck (in his feature directorial debut) and produced by Bonnie Arnold from a screenplay by Tab Murphy, Bob Tzudiker, and Noni White. The film stars the voices of Tony Goldwyn, Minnie Driver, Glenn Close, Rosie O'Donnell, Brian Blessed, Lance Henriksen, Wayne Knight, and Nigel Hawthorne.

Pre-production of Tarzan began in 1995, with Lima selected as director[3] and Buck joining him the same year. Following Murphy's first draft, Tzudiker, White, and Dave Reynolds were brought in to reconstruct the third act and add additional material to the screenplay. English recording artist Phil Collins was recruited to compose and record songs integrated with a score by Mark Mancina. Meanwhile, the production team embarked on a research trip to Uganda and Kenya to study the gorillas. The animation of the film combines 2D hand-drawn animation with the extensive use of computer-generated imagery, and it was done in California, Orlando, and Paris, with the pioneering computer animation software system Deep Canvas being predominantly used to create three-dimensional backgrounds.

Tarzan premiered at the El Capitan Theatre in Los Angeles on June 12, 1999, and was released in the United States on June 16. It received positive reviews from critics, who praised its voice performances, music, animation, and action sequences. Against a production budget of $130 million (then the most expensive traditionally animated film ever made until Treasure Planet in 2002), the film grossed $448.2 million worldwide, becoming the fifth highest-grossing film of 1999, the second highest-grossing animated film of 1999 behind Toy Story 2, and the first Disney animated feature to open at first place at the North American box office since Pocahontas (1995). It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song ("You'll Be in My Heart" by Phil Collins). The film has led to many derived works, such as a Broadway adaptation, a television series, and two direct-to-video followups, Tarzan & Jane (2002) and Tarzan II (2005).

Discover more about Tarzan (1999 film) related topics

Adventure film

Adventure film

An adventure film is a form of adventure fiction, and is a genre of film. Subgenres of adventure films include swashbuckler films, pirate films, and survival films. Adventure films may also be combined with other film genres such as action, animation, comedy, drama, fantasy, science fiction, family, horror, or war.

Disney Renaissance

Disney Renaissance

The Disney Renaissance was the period from 1989 to 1999 during which Walt Disney Feature Animation returned to producing critically and commercially successful animated films that were mostly musical adaptations of well-known stories, much as the studio did during the era of Walt Disney during the 1930s to 1960s. The resurgence allowed Disney's animated films to become a powerhouse of successes at the domestic and foreign box office, earning much greater profits than most of the Disney films of previous eras.

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs was an American author, best known for his prolific output in the adventure, science fiction, and fantasy genres. Best-known for creating the characters Tarzan and John Carter, he also wrote the Pellucidar series, the Amtor series, and the Caspak trilogy.

Chris Buck

Chris Buck

Christopher James Buck is an American film director, animator, and screenwriter known for co-directing Tarzan (1999), Surf's Up (2007), Frozen (2013), which won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature in 2014, and Frozen II (2019). He also worked as a supervising animator and story artist on Pocahontas (1995) and Home on the Range (2004).

Bonnie Arnold

Bonnie Arnold

Bonnie Arnold is an American film producer and executive who has worked at Walt Disney Feature Animation, Pixar Animation Studios and DreamWorks Animation. Arnold was born in Atlanta, Georgia and rose to prominence in Hollywood during the initial wave of computer-animation.

Bob Tzudiker

Bob Tzudiker

Robert "Bob" Tzudiker is an American writer and actor. Tzudiker is best known for co-creating and writing the screenplay for Newsies along with his wife Noni White, which was based on the real-life Newsboys' strike of 1899. Newsies began as a "classic underdog story ripped from the history books", with writers White and Tzudiker approaching producer Michael Finnell with an idea for a nonmusical drama; however, Disney studio head Jeffrey Katzenberg redirected the project to become a musical.

Brian Blessed

Brian Blessed

Brian Blessed is an English actor, presenter, writer and mountaineer.

Computer-generated imagery

Computer-generated imagery

Computer-Generated Imagery (CGI) is a specific technology or application of computer graphics for creating or improving images in art, printed media, simulators, videos and video games. These images are either static or dynamic. CGI both refers to 2D computer graphics and 3D computer graphics with the purpose of designing characters, virtual worlds, or scenes and special effects. The application of CGI for creating/improving animations is called computer animation, or CGI animation.

California

California

California is a state in the Western United States, located along the Pacific Coast. With nearly 39.2 million residents across a total area of approximately 163,696 square miles (423,970 km2), it is the most populous U.S. state and the third-largest by area. It is also the most populated subnational entity in North America and the 34th most populous in the world. The Greater Los Angeles and San Francisco Bay areas are the nation's second and fifth most populous urban regions respectively, with the former having more than 18.7 million residents and the latter having over 9.6 million. Sacramento is the state's capital, while Los Angeles is the most populous city in the state and the second most populous city in the country. San Francisco is the second most densely populated major city in the country. Los Angeles County is the country's most populous, while San Bernardino County is the largest county by area in the country. California borders Oregon to the north, Nevada and Arizona to the east, the Mexican state of Baja California to the south; and has a coastline along the Pacific Ocean to the west.

Computer animation

Computer animation

Computer animation is the process used for digitally generating animations. The more general term computer-generated imagery (CGI) encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only refers to moving images. Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics to generate a three-dimensional picture. The target of the animation is sometimes the computer itself, while other times it is film.

Academy Award for Best Original Song

Academy Award for Best Original Song

The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is presented to the songwriters who have composed the best original song written specifically for a film. The performers of a song are not credited with the Academy Award unless they contributed either to music, lyrics, or both in their own right. The songs that are nominated for this award are typically performed during the ceremony and before this award is presented.

Direct-to-video

Direct-to-video

Direct-to-video or straight-to-video refers to the release of a film, television series, short or special to the public immediately on home video formats rather than an initial theatrical release or television premiere. This distribution strategy was prevalent before streaming platforms came to dominate the TV and movie distribution markets.

Plot

In the 1880s, a British couple and their infant son are shipwrecked in Equatorial Africa. The adults build a treehouse but are killed by Sabor, an African leopard. Kala, a gorilla who lost her son to Sabor, adopts the human infant and names him Tarzan; although Kerchak, her mate and the gorilla leader, objects.

Years later, Tarzan begins to befriend other animals, including Kala’s niece Terk and the paranoid elephant, Tantor. Tarzan finds himself treated differently because of his different physique, so he makes valiant efforts to improve himself. As an adult, Tarzan manages to kill Sabor with a spear, gaining Kerchak's reluctant approval.

Meanwhile, a team of human explorers from England, consisting of Professor Archimedes Q. Porter, his daughter Jane, and their hunter escort Clayton, are looking to study the gorillas. Jane accidentally becomes separated from the group and is chased by a baboon troop, until Tarzan rescues her out of sheer curiosity. After comparing her to himself, he realizes they are similar. Jane leads Tarzan back to their camp, where Porter and Clayton both take interest in him; the former in terms of scientific progress, while the latter hopes to have Tarzan lead the group to the gorillas. Despite Kerchak's warnings to avoid the strangers, Tarzan repeatedly returns to the camp. Porter, Clayton, and Jane teach him how to speak English properly, and tell him what the human world is like. Tarzan and Jane begin to fall in love; however, she has difficulty convincing Tarzan to lead the humans to the gorillas, as Tarzan fears Kerchak's fury.

The explorers' ship soon returns to retrieve them. Jane asks Tarzan to return with them to England, but Tarzan, in turn, asks Jane to stay with him when Jane says it is unlikely that they will ever return. Clayton convinces Tarzan that Jane will stay with him forever as long as he leads them to the gorillas; Tarzan agrees, and leads the trio to the nesting grounds while Terk and Tantor lure Kerchak. Porter and Jane are excited to mingle with the gorillas, but Kerchak returns and attacks the humans on sight. Tarzan restrains Kerchak while the humans escape; afterward, Kerchak accuses Tarzan of betraying his family, causing Tarzan to flee in shame. Kala takes Tarzan to the treehouse where she found him, reveals his true past, and says that she wants him to be happy whatever he decides. Tarzan puts on his late father's suit, signifying his decision to go to England.

When Tarzan boards the ship with Jane and Porter the next day, they are ambushed by Clayton and his traitorous band of stowaway thugs. Now aware of the location of the nesting grounds, Clayton reveals his plans to capture and sell the gorillas for a fortune, and imprisons Tarzan, Jane, and Porter to prevent them from interfering. Tarzan manages to escape with the help of Terk and Tantor, and he returns to the jungle, rallying the animals to come to the aid of the gorillas and scare off the thugs. Clayton then mortally wounds Kerchak and battles Tarzan across the treetops. Although Tarzan spares Clayton's life and breaks his rifle, Clayton tries to kill him with his machete. Their battle comes to a cluster of vines, and Clayton tries to cut free when a vine becomes tangled around his neck, hanging him to death. Kerchak, with his dying breath, finally accepts Tarzan as his son, and names him the leader of the gorilla troop.

The next day, Porter and Jane prepare to leave on the ship, while Tarzan stays behind with the gorillas. As the ship's rowboat leaves shore, Porter encourages his daughter to stay with the man she loves, and Jane jumps overboard, followed soon after by her father. The Porters reunite with Tarzan and his family, and embark on their new life together.

Discover more about Plot related topics

Equatorial Africa

Equatorial Africa

Equatorial Africa is an ambiguous term that sometimes is used to refer either to the equatorial region of Sub-Saharan Africa traversed by the Equator, more broadly to tropical Africa or in a biological and geo-environmental sense to the intra-tropical African rainforest region.

African leopard

African leopard

The African leopard is the nominate subspecies of the leopard, native to many countries in Africa. It is widely distributed in most of sub-Saharan Africa, but the historical range has been fragmented in the course of habitat conversion. Leopards have also been recorded in North Africa as well.

Kala (Tarzan)

Kala (Tarzan)

Kala is a fictional ape character in Edgar Rice Burroughs's original Tarzan novel, Tarzan of the Apes, and in movies and other media based on it. She is the ape mother of Tarzan who raises him.

Gorilla

Gorilla

Gorillas are herbivorous, predominantly ground-dwelling great apes that inhabit the tropical forests of equatorial Africa. The genus Gorilla is divided into two species: the eastern gorilla and the western gorilla, and either four or five subspecies. The DNA of gorillas is highly similar to that of humans, from 95 to 99% depending on what is included, and they are the next closest living relatives to humans after chimpanzees and bonobos.

African bush elephant

African bush elephant

The African bush elephant is one of two extant African elephant species and one of three extant elephant species. It is the largest living terrestrial animal, with bulls reaching a shoulder height of up to 3.96 m and a body mass of up to 10.4 t.

Spear

Spear

A spear is a pole weapon consisting of a shaft, usually of wood, with a pointed head. The head may be simply the sharpened end of the shaft itself, as is the case with fire hardened spears, or it may be made of a more durable material fastened to the shaft, such as bone, flint, obsidian, iron, steel, or bronze. The most common design for hunting or combat spears since ancient times has incorporated a metal spearhead shaped like a triangle, lozenge, or leaf. The heads of fishing spears usually feature barbs or serrated edges.

Baboon

Baboon

Baboons are primates comprising the genus Papio, one of the 23 genera of Old World monkeys. There are six species of baboon: the hamadryas baboon, the Guinea baboon, the olive baboon, the yellow baboon, the Kinda baboon and the chacma baboon. Each species is native to one of six areas of Africa and the hamadryas baboon is also native to part of the Arabian Peninsula. Baboons are among the largest non-hominoid primates and have existed for at least two million years.

Hooliganism

Hooliganism

Hooliganism is disruptive or unlawful behavior such as rioting, bullying and vandalism, usually in connection with crowds at sporting events.

Machete

Machete

A machete is a broad blade used either as an agricultural implement similar to an axe, or in combat like a long-bladed knife. The blade is typically 30 to 45 centimetres long and usually under 3 millimetres thick. In the Spanish language, the word is possibly a diminutive form of the word macho, which was used to refer to sledgehammers. Alternatively, its origin may be machaera, the name given by the Romans to the falcata. It is the origin of the English language equivalent term matchet, though it is less commonly used. In much of the English-speaking Caribbean, such as Jamaica, Barbados, Guyana, Grenada, and Trinidad and Tobago, the term cutlass is used for these agricultural tools.

Hanging

Hanging

Hanging is killing a person by suspending them from the neck with a noose or ligature. Hanging has been a common method of capital punishment since medieval times, and is the primary execution method in numerous countries and regions. The first known account of execution by hanging is in Homer's Odyssey. Hanging is also a method of suicide.

Voice cast

  • Tony Goldwyn as Tarzan, a 20-year-old man raised by gorillas who finds his human roots. Glen Keane served as the supervising animator for Tarzan as an adult, while John Ripa animated Tarzan as an infant and child. John Ripa studied the movements of young chimpanzees to use for young Tarzan's animation, while Glen Keane used movements of a gibbon and used it for the animation of adult Tarzan, he also watched his son Max Keane do his skateboarding and snowboarding and used surfers moves in the scenes where Tarzan is sliding through the trees.[4] Goldwyn provided adult Tarzan's speaking voice, but his co-star Brian Blessed (the voice of Clayton) provided the Tarzan yell.[5]
  • Minnie Driver as Jane Porter, the eccentric, feisty, benevolent, and intelligent daughter of Professor Porter. She is the first of the group to encounter Tarzan and becomes his love interest. Ken Duncan served as the supervising animator for Jane. Many of Driver's mannerisms and characteristics were incorporated into Jane's animation. The scene where Jane describes meeting Tarzan for the first time to her father and Clayton was improvised by Driver, resulting in Ken Duncan animating one of the longest animated scenes on record. The scene took 7 weeks to animate and 73 feet of film.[4]
  • Glenn Close as Kala, Tarzan's adoptive mother, who found and raised him after losing her biological son to Sabor. She is also Kerchak's mate. Russ Edmonds served as the supervising animator for Kala.
  • Lance Henriksen as Kerchak, Kala's mate and Tarzan's (reluctant) adoptive father, a silverback and leader of the gorilla troop, who struggles to accept Tarzan since he is a human. Bruce W. Smith served as the supervising animator for Kerchak.
  • Brian Blessed as William Cecil Clayton, an intelligent and suave yet arrogant and treacherous hunter, who assists the Porters on their quest. Randy Haycock served as the supervising animator for Clayton, basing his design on Clark Gable and other film stars of the 1930s and 40s.[4] Blessed also stepped up to provide the famous Tarzan yell.
  • Nigel Hawthorne as Professor Archimedes Q. Porter, an eccentric, short-statured scientist and Jane's father. Dave Burgess served as the supervising animator for Porter. This was one of Hawthorne's two final acting roles before he died in 2001.
  • Rosie O'Donnell as Terk (short for Terkina, a feminization of Terkoz merged with Teeka), Tarzan's best friend, a wisecracking gorilla. She is also Kala and Kerchak's niece, making her and Tarzan adoptive cousins. Michael Surrey served as the supervising animator for Terk.
  • Wayne Knight as Tantor, a paranoid and submissive elephant, and Tarzan and Terk's close friend. Sergio Pablos served as the supervising animator for Tantor. Woody Allen was initially cast as Tantor, but Jeffrey Katzenberg persuaded Allen to leave the project and join DreamWorks' Antz (1998).[6]
  • Taylor Dempsey as young Tantor.

Discover more about Voice cast related topics

Glen Keane

Glen Keane

Glen Keane is an American animator, author and illustrator. He was a character animator at Walt Disney Animation Studios for feature films including The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Pocahontas, Tarzan and Tangled. He received the 1992 Annie Award for character animation and the 2007 Winsor McCay Award for lifetime contribution to the field of animation. He was named a Disney Legend in 2013.

Brian Blessed

Brian Blessed

Brian Blessed is an English actor, presenter, writer and mountaineer.

Tarzan yell

Tarzan yell

The Tarzan yell or Tarzan's jungle call is the distinctive, ululating yell of the character Tarzan as portrayed by actor Johnny Weissmuller in the films based on the character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs starting with Tarzan the Ape Man (1932). The yell was a creation of the movies based on what Burroughs described in his books as simply "the victory cry of the bull ape."

Alex D. Linz

Alex D. Linz

Alexander David Linz is an American former child actor who starred in several late 1990s and early 2000s films and television series. His film roles include Home Alone 3 (1997) and Max Keeble's Big Move (2001). He retired from acting in 2007.

Minnie Driver

Minnie Driver

Amelia Fiona Jessica "Minnie" Driver is a British and American actress. She rose to prominence with her break-out role in 1995's Circle of Friends. She went on to star in a wide range of films including the cult classic Grosse Pointe Blank, Gus Van Sant's Good Will Hunting for which she was nominated for both the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and a Screen Actors Guild Award, the musical The Phantom of the Opera, Owning Mahowny, and providing the voice of Lady Eboshi in Hayao Miyazaki's Princess Mononoke.

Glenn Close

Glenn Close

Glenn Close is an American actress. Throughout her career spanning over four decades, Close has garnered numerous accolades, including two Screen Actors Guild Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, three Primetime Emmy Awards, and three Tony Awards. Additionally, she has been nominated eight times for an Academy Award, holding the record for the most nominations in an acting category without a win. In 2016, she was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame, and in 2019, Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Russ Edmonds

Russ Edmonds

Russell H. "Russ" Edmonds is an American Disney animator who has worked as a character animator, an animator, a supervising animator, a lead animator and a final line animator at Walt Disney Animation Studios. He worked on several Disney feature films, including Oliver & Company, The Little Mermaid, The Rescuers Down Under, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, The Lion King, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Tarzan, Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Home on the Range, The Princess and the Frog, and Winnie the Pooh. He studied at the Program in Character Animation at the California Institute of the Arts. Along with his wife, Angela, Edmonds owns and directs the Edmonds Studios, an independent animation production studio in Red Bluff, California.

Lance Henriksen

Lance Henriksen

Lance Henriksen is an American actor. He is known for his works in various science fiction, action and horror films, such as that of Bishop in the Alien film franchise, and Frank Black in Fox television series Millennium (1996–1999) and The X-Files (1999). He has also done extensive voice work, as Kerchak the gorilla in the 1999 Disney film Tarzan (1999), General Shepherd in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (2009) and Fleet Admiral Steven Hackett in BioWare's Mass Effect video game trilogy (2007–2012). He also appeared as Vukovich in The Terminator, Chains Cooper in Stone Cold, and starred as Ed Harley in the cult horror film Pumpkinhead (1988).

Bruce W. Smith

Bruce W. Smith

Bruce Wayne Smith is an African-American animator, character designer, film director and television producer. He is best known as the creator of Disney Channel's The Proud Family and The Proud Family: Louder and Prouder, as well as the supervising animator of Kerchak and Baboons & Baby Baboon in Tarzan, Pacha in The Emperor's New Groove, Dr. Facilier in The Princess and the Frog and Piglet, Kanga and Roo in Winnie the Pooh.

Clark Gable

Clark Gable

William Clark Gable was an American film actor, often referred to as "The King of Hollywood". He had roles in more than 60 motion pictures in multiple genres during a career that lasted 37 years, three decades of which was as a leading man. Gable died of a heart attack at the age of 59; his final on-screen appearance was as an aging cowboy in The Misfits, released posthumously in 1961.

Nigel Hawthorne

Nigel Hawthorne

Sir Nigel Barnard Hawthorne was an English actor. He is known for his stage acting and his portrayal of Sir Humphrey Appleby, the permanent secretary in the 1980s sitcom Yes Minister and the Cabinet Secretary in its sequel, Yes, Prime Minister. For this role, he won four BAFTA TV Awards for Best Light Entertainment Performance.

Rosie O'Donnell

Rosie O'Donnell

Roseann O'Donnell is an American comedian, television producer, actress, author, and television personality. She began her comedy career as a teenager and received her breakthrough on the television series Star Search in 1984. After a series of television and film roles that introduced her to a larger national audience, O'Donnell hosted her own syndicated daytime talk show, The Rosie O'Donnell Show, between 1996 and 2002, which won several Daytime Emmy Awards. During this period, she developed the nickname "Queen of Nice", as well as a reputation for philanthropic efforts.

Production

Development

Disney's Tarzan was the first Tarzan film to be animated.[7] Thomas Schumacher, then-president of Walt Disney Feature Animation, expressed surprise there hadn't been any previous attempts to animate a Tarzan film, saying, "Here is a book that cries out to be animated. Yet we're the first filmmakers to have ever taken Tarzan from page to screen and presented the character as Burroughs intended."[4] He noted that in animated form, Tarzan can connect to the animals on a deeper level than he can in live-action versions.[4]

In 1994, when A Goofy Movie (1995) was nearly finished, Kevin Lima was approached to direct Tarzan by then-studio chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg. He had desired to have the film animated through the Disney Television Animation division with a new animation studio established in Canada. Lima was reluctant to the idea because of the animation complexities being done by inexperienced animators. Following Katzenberg's resignation from the Walt Disney Company, Lima was again contacted about the project by Michael Eisner, who decided to have the film produced through the Feature Animation division, by which Lima signed on.[8]

Following this, Lima decided to read Tarzan of the Apes where he began to visualize the theme of two hands being held up against each other.[9] That image became an important symbol of the relationships between characters in the film, and a metaphor of Tarzan's search for identity. "I was looking for something that would underscore Tarzan's sense of being alike, yet different from his ape family", Lima said, "The image of touching hands was first conceived as an idea for how Tarzan realizes he and Jane are physically the same."[4]

Following his two-month study of the book, Lima approached his friend, Chris Buck, who had just wrapped up work as a supervising animator on Pocahontas (1995), to ask if he would be interested in serving as co-director. Buck was initially skeptical but accepted after hearing Lima's ideas for the film.[10] By April 1995, the Los Angeles Times reported that the film was in its preliminary stages with Lima and Buck directing after Disney had obtained the story rights from the estate of Edgar Rice Burroughs.[11]

Writing

Tab Murphy, who had just finished work on The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), was attracted to the theme of man-versus-nature in Tarzan, and began developing a treatment in January 1995. For the third act, Murphy suggested that Tarzan should leave for England, as he did in the book, but the directors felt that it was incompatible with their central theme of what defines a family. In order to keep Tarzan in the jungle, the third act needed to be restructured by redefining the role of the villain and inventing a way to endanger the gorillas.[4] In this departure from Burroughs' novel, a villain named Clayton was created to serve as a guide for Professor Archimedes Q. Porter and his daughter, Jane. In addition to this, Kerchak was re-characterized from a savage silverback into the protector of the gorilla tribe. Also the Mangani, the apes that raised Tarzan in the original book were changed and portrayed as gorillas which were called Bolgani in the original story. Originally Sabor was portrayed as a lioness but was changed to a leopard due to the fact the film takes place in the jungle a place where leopards hunt rather than lions who roam in open grasslands, also leopards in the original novel where called Sheeta.[9]

In January 1997, husband-and-wife screenwriting duo Bob Tzudiker and Noni White were hired to help refocus and add humor to the script as a way to balance the emotional weight of the film.[9] Comedy writer Dave Reynolds was also brought on to write humorous dialogue for the film.[12] "I was initially hired on for six weeks of rewriting and punch-up", Reynolds said, "A year and a half later, I finished. Either they liked my work, or I was very bad at time management."[4] One challenge the writers faced was how Tarzan should learn about his past. "When Kala takes Tarzan back to the tree house, she is essentially telling him that he was adopted", Bonnie Arnold, the producer for Tarzan, said, "This is necessitated by him encountering humans and recognizing he is one of them."[4] As a way to explore the feelings in that scene, Arnold brought in adoptive parents to talk with the story team.[4] Another issue was the inherent and overt racism in the original Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan. The writers consciously chose to not include any African characters in order to avoid this topic.

Casting

Brendan Fraser auditioned twice for the title character before portraying the lead role in George of the Jungle (1997).[13] Tony Goldwyn auditioned for the title role as well, and according to co-director Kevin Lima, Goldwyn landed it because of "the animal sense" in his readings, along with some "killer baboon imitations".[14] For the signature Tarzan yell, Lima and Buck desired the traditional yell, although Goldwyn faced difficulties with providing the yell stating, "It's really hard to do, physically." His co-star Brian Blessed who does the voice of Clayton in the film ultimately provided the yell.[5] Terk was originally written as a male gorilla, but following Rosie O'Donnell's audition, Terk was re-characterized as a female.[15] Furthermore, Woody Allen was initially cast as the neurotic elephant Tantor. However, Katzenberg persuaded Allen to leave the project for DreamWorks' Antz (1998) and in exchange, the studio would distribute his next four films. Agreeing to the deal, Allen departed from Tarzan in 1996 and was replaced by Wayne Knight.[6]

Animation

The animators were split into two teams, one in Paris and one in Burbank. The 6000-mile distance and difference in time zones posed challenges for collaboration, especially for scenes with Tarzan and Jane. Glen Keane was the supervising animator for Tarzan at the Paris studio, while Ken Duncan was the supervising animator for Jane at the studio in Burbank. To make coordinating scenes with multiple characters easier, the animators used a system called a "scene machine" that could send rough drawings between the two animation studios.[4] Meanwhile, following production on Mulan (1998), two hundred animators at the Feature Animation Florida satellite studio provided character animation and special effects animation where the filmmakers had to discuss their work through daily video conferences among the three studios.[16]

Keane was inspired to make Tarzan "surf" through the trees because of his son's interest in extreme sports, and he began working on a test scene. The directors expressed concern that Tarzan would be made into a "surfer dude", but when Keane revealed the test animation to them they liked it enough to use it in the film during the "Son of Man" sequence, with movements inspired by skateboarder Tony Hawk. Although Keane initially thought that Tarzan would be easy to animate because he only wears a loincloth, he realized that he would need a fully working human musculature while still being able to move like an animal. To figure out Tarzan's movements, the Paris animation team studied different animals in order to transpose their movements onto him. They also consulted with a professor of anatomy. This resulted in Tarzan being the first Disney character to accurately display working muscles.[4]

To prepare for animating the gorillas, the animation team attended lectures on primates, made trips to zoos, and studied nature documentaries, with a group of animators also witnessing a gorilla dissection to learn about their musculature. In 1996, the animation team went on a two-week safari in Kenya to take reference photographs and observe the animals. On the trip, they visited Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda to view mountain gorillas in the wild, and get inspiration for the setting.[4] In 2000, Chris Buck repeated the journey accompanied by journalists to promote the film's home video release.[17]

To create the sweeping 3D backgrounds, Tarzan's production team developed a 3D painting and rendering technique known as Deep Canvas (a term coined by artist/engineer Eric Daniels).[18] This technique allows artists to produce CGI backgrounds that look like a traditional painting, according to art director Daniel St. Pierre.[18] (The software keeps track of brushstrokes applied in 3D space.)[18] For this advancement, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences awarded the creators of Deep Canvas a Technical Achievement Award in 2003. After Tarzan, Deep Canvas was used for a number of sequences in Atlantis: The Lost Empire (2001), particularly large panoramic shots of the island and several action sequences. Expanded to support moving objects as part of the background, Deep Canvas was used to create about 75 percent of the environments in Disney's next major animated action film, Treasure Planet (2002).

Discover more about Production related topics

A Goofy Movie

A Goofy Movie

A Goofy Movie is a 1995 American animated musical comedy-adventure film produced by Disney MovieToons and Walt Disney Television Animation. Directed by Kevin Lima, the film is based on The Disney Afternoon television series Goof Troop created by Robert Taylor and Michael Peraza Jr., and serves as a standalone follow-up to the show. It features the voices of Bill Farmer, Jason Marsden, Jim Cummings, Kellie Martin, Rob Paulsen, Pauly Shore, Jenna von Oÿ, and Wallace Shawn. Taking place three years after the events of Goof Troop, the film follows Goofy and his son, Max, who is now in high school, and revolves around the father-son relationship between the two as Goofy embarks on a misguided mission to bond with his son by taking him on a cross-country fishing trip.

Kevin Lima

Kevin Lima

Kevin Rupert Lima is an American film director who has directed A Goofy Movie (1995), Tarzan (1999), 102 Dalmatians (2000), and Enchanted (2007). He is married to Brenda Chapman, the head of story for The Lion King (1994) and the co-director of The Prince of Egypt (1998) and Brave (2012).

Jeffrey Katzenberg

Jeffrey Katzenberg

Jeffrey Katzenberg is an American filmmaker, animator, and media proprietor. He became well known for his tenure as chairman of Walt Disney Studios from 1984 to 1994. After departing Disney, he was a co-founder and CEO of DreamWorks Animation, where he oversaw the production of such animated franchises as Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, and How to Train Your Dragon. He has since founded a new media and technology company called WndrCo and was the founder of Quibi, a defunct short-form mobile video platform.

Disney Television Animation

Disney Television Animation

Disney Television Animation (DTVA), formerly known as Walt Disney Pictures Television Animation Group and Walt Disney Television Animation, is the television animation production arm of Disney Branded Television, a sub-division of the Disney General Entertainment Content division of The Walt Disney Company established on December 5, 1984, by Gary Krisel during the reorganization and subsequent re-incorporation of The Walt Disney Company following the arrival of then-Disney CEO Michael Eisner.

Canada

Canada

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering over 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern and western border with the United States, stretching 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest binational land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Chris Buck

Chris Buck

Christopher James Buck is an American film director, animator, and screenwriter known for co-directing Tarzan (1999), Surf's Up (2007), Frozen (2013), which won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature in 2014, and Frozen II (2019). He also worked as a supervising animator and story artist on Pocahontas (1995) and Home on the Range (2004).

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper that started publishing in Los Angeles in 1881. Based in the LA-adjacent suburb of El Segundo since 2018, it is the sixth-largest newspaper by circulation in the United States. The publication has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes. It is owned by Patrick Soon-Shiong and published by the Times Mirror Company. The newspaper’s coverage emphasizes California and especially Southern California stories.

Film treatment

Film treatment

A film treatment is a piece of prose, typically the step between scene cards and the first draft of a screenplay for a motion picture, television program, or radio play. It is generally longer and more detailed than an outline, and it may include details of directorial style that an outline omits. Treatments read like a short story, but are told in the present tense and describe events as they happen. A treatment may also be created in the process of adapting a novel, play, or other pre-existing work into a screenplay.

Mangani

Mangani

Mangani is the name of a fictional species of great apes in the Tarzan novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs, and of the invented language used by these apes. In the invented language, Mangani is the apes' word for their own kind, although the term is also applied to humans. The Mangani are represented as the apes who foster and raise Tarzan.

Lion

Lion

The lion is a large cat of the genus Panthera native to Africa and India. It has a muscular, broad-chested body; short, rounded head; round ears; and a hairy tuft at the end of its tail. It is sexually dimorphic; adult male lions are larger than females and have a prominent mane. It is a social species, forming groups called prides. A lion's pride consists of a few adult males, related females, and cubs. Groups of female lions usually hunt together, preying mostly on large ungulates. The lion is an apex and keystone predator; although some lions scavenge when opportunities occur and have been known to hunt humans, lions typically do not actively seek out and prey on humans.

Bob Tzudiker

Bob Tzudiker

Robert "Bob" Tzudiker is an American writer and actor. Tzudiker is best known for co-creating and writing the screenplay for Newsies along with his wife Noni White, which was based on the real-life Newsboys' strike of 1899. Newsies began as a "classic underdog story ripped from the history books", with writers White and Tzudiker approaching producer Michael Finnell with an idea for a nonmusical drama; however, Disney studio head Jeffrey Katzenberg redirected the project to become a musical.

David Reynolds (screenwriter)

David Reynolds (screenwriter)

David Reynolds is an American screenwriter for television and film. His credits include the Disney animated films The Emperor's New Groove and Finding Nemo.

Music

In 1995, Phil Collins was initially brought onto the project as a songwriter following a recommendation by Disney music executive Chris Montan. Early into production, directors Kevin Lima and Chris Buck decided not to follow Disney's musical tradition by having the characters sing. "I did not want Tarzan to sing", Lima stated, "I just couldn't see this half-naked man sitting on a branch breaking out in song. I thought it would be ridiculous."[13] Instead, Collins would perform the songs in the film serving as the narrator.[19][20] The choice of Collins, a popular and well established adult contemporary artist, led to comparisons with Elton John's earlier music for The Lion King (1994).[21] Tarzan was dubbed in thirty-five languages—the most for any Disney movie at the time,[22] and Collins recorded his songs in French, Italian, German, and Spanish for the dubbed versions of the film's soundtrack.[22][23] According to Collins, most of the songs he wrote for Tarzan came from improvisation sessions and his reactions while reading the treatment.[4] Three of the songs he wrote, "Son of Man", "Trashin' the Camp", and "Strangers Like Me", were based on his initial impressions after he read the source material. The other two songs were "You'll Be in My Heart", a lullaby sung to Tarzan by Kala (voiced by Glenn Close), and "Two Worlds", a song Collins wrote to serve as the anthem for Tarzan.[4]

The instrumental scoring for the film was composed by Mark Mancina, who had previously produced music for The Lion King, and the musical of the same name. Mancina and Collins worked closely to create music that would complement the film's setting and used many obscure instruments from Mancina's personal collection in the score.[4] "The idea of score and song arrangement came together as one entity, as Phil and I worked in tandem to create what's heard in the film", Mancina said.[4]

Discover more about Music related topics

Tarzan (1999 soundtrack)

Tarzan (1999 soundtrack)

Tarzan: An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack is the soundtrack for the 1999 Disney animated film, Tarzan. The songs on the soundtrack were composed by Phil Collins, and the instrumental score by Mark Mancina. The song "You'll Be in My Heart" won both the Academy Award for Best Original Song and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media, while the soundtrack album won a Grammy Award for Best Soundtrack Album. For his contribution to the soundtrack, Collins received an American Music Award for Favorite Adult Contemporary Artist.

Phil Collins

Phil Collins

Philip David Charles Collins is an English singer, musician, songwriter, record producer and actor. He was the drummer and later lead singer of the rock band Genesis and also has a career as a solo performer. Between 1982 and 1990, Collins achieved three UK and seven US number-one singles as a solo artist. When his work with Genesis, his work with other artists, as well as his solo career is totalled, he had more US top 40 singles than any other artist during the 1980s. His most successful singles from the period include "In the Air Tonight", "Against All Odds ", "One More Night", and "Another Day in Paradise".

Adult contemporary music

Adult contemporary music

Adult contemporary music (AC) is a form of radio-played popular music, ranging from 1960s vocal and 1970s soft rock music to predominantly ballad-heavy music of the present day, with varying degrees of easy listening, pop, soul, R&B, quiet storm and rock influence. Adult contemporary is generally a continuation of the easy listening and soft rock style that became popular in the 1960s and 1970s with some adjustments that reflect the evolution of pop/rock music.

Elton John

Elton John

Sir Elton Hercules John is a British singer, pianist and composer. Collaborating with lyricist Bernie Taupin since 1967, John is one of the most successful artists of all time, having sold over 300 million records worldwide in a six decade career in music. He is acclaimed by critics and musicians, particularly for his work during the 1970s, and his lasting impact on the music industry. John's music and showmanship have had a significant impact on popular music. His songwriting partnership with Taupin is one of the most successful in history.

The Lion King

The Lion King

The Lion King is a 1994 American animated musical drama film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 32nd Disney animated feature film and the fifth produced during the Disney Renaissance, it is inspired by William Shakespeare's Hamlet with elements from the Biblical stories of Joseph and Moses and Disney's 1942 film Bambi. The film was directed by Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff and produced by Don Hahn, from a screenplay written by Irene Mecchi, Jonathan Roberts, and Linda Woolverton. The film features an ensemble voice cast that includes Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella, Rowan Atkinson and Robert Guillaume. Its original songs were written by composer Elton John and lyricist Tim Rice, with a score by Hans Zimmer.

Son of Man (song)

Son of Man (song)

"Son of Man" is a song by Phil Collins for the soundtrack of Disney's Tarzan. In the 1999 animated film, the song accompanies a montage in which Tarzan learns how to be an ape and progresses from childhood to adulthood. Along the way, he picks up skills from fellow jungle inhabitants--including a rhino, john monkeys, and hippopotamuses--and duels with an African rock python. The song peaked at number 68 on the German Media Control Charts as well as at number 96 on the French Singles Chart.

Strangers Like Me

Strangers Like Me

"Strangers Like Me" is a song by the English drummer Phil Collins for the soundtrack of Disney's 1999 animated film Tarzan. The song peaked at number ten on the U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart and received highly positive reviews. Collins also recorded the song in Spanish, Italian, French and German. The song was later covered by the all-female pop rock band Everlife in 2004.

You'll Be in My Heart

You'll Be in My Heart

"You'll Be in My Heart" is a song by English drummer and singer Phil Collins from the 1999 Disney animated feature Tarzan. It appeared on Tarzan: An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack as well as various other Disney compilations. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, and became Collins' last US top 40 single, peaking at number 21.

Mark Mancina

Mark Mancina

Mark Mancina is an American film composer. A veteran of Hans Zimmer's Media Ventures, Mancina has scored over sixty films and television series including Speed, Bad Boys, Twister, Tarzan, Training Day, Brother Bear, Criminal Minds, Blood+, and Moana.

The Lion King (musical)

The Lion King (musical)

The Lion King is a stage musical with music by Elton John, lyrics by Tim Rice, and a book by Roger Allers and Irene Mecchi, with additional music and lyrics by Lebo M, Mark Mancina, Jay Rifkin, Julie Taymor, and Hans Zimmer. It is based on the 1994 Walt Disney Animation Studios' film of the same name. Directed by Taymor, the musical features actors in animal costumes as well as giant, hollow puppets. The show is produced by Disney Theatrical Productions.

Release

On June 12, 1999, the film premiered at the El Capitan Theater with the cast and filmmakers as attendees followed by a forty-minute concert with Phil Collins performing songs from the film.[24] On July 23, 1999, Disney launched a digital projection release of Tarzan released only in three theatrical venues including Walt Disney World's Pleasure Island multiplex for three weeks. Although Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace and An Ideal Husband had been given earlier digital projection releases despite being shot on photographic film, Tarzan was notable for being the first major feature release to have been produced, mastered, and projected digitally.[25][26]

Marketing

Disney Consumer Products released a series of toys, books, and stuffed animals for Tarzan, partnering with Mattel to produce a line of plush toys and action figures.[27] Mattel also produced the Rad Repeatin' Tarzan action figure, but discontinued it after complaints regarding the toy's onanistic arm motions.[28] Continuing its advertising alliance with McDonald's, its promotional campaign began on the film's opening day with several toys accompanied with Happy Meals and soda straws that replicated the Tarzan yell.[29] Disney also worked with Nestle to create Tarzan themed candies, including a banana-flavored chocolate bar.[30] In early 2000, Disney partnered again with McDonald's to release a set of eight Happy Meal toys as a tie-in for the film's home video.[31] They also offered Tarzan themed food options, such as banana sundaes and jungle burgers.[32]

Home media

On February 1, 2000, the film was released on VHS and DVD, as well as on LaserDisc on June 23, 2000 only in Japan, making Tarzan the last Disney animated feature to be released on the latter format.[33] The DVD version contained bonus material, including the "Strangers Like Me" music video, the making of "Trashin' the Camp" featuring Collins and 'N Sync, and an interactive trivia game.[34] A 2-Disc Collector's Edition was released on April 18, 2000. It included an audio commentary track recorded by the filmmakers, behind-the-scenes footage, and supplements that detailed the legacy of Tarzan and the film's development.[35] These THX certified DVD releases featured the same bonus features, a sneak peek for Dinosaur and DVD-ROM.[36] Both editions were placed in moratorium on January 31, 2002 and placed back into the Disney Vault.[37] By January 2001, the film was the most successful home video release of 2000, earning retail revenues of $268 million.[38]

On October 15, 2005, Disney released the Tarzan Special Edition on DVD. Tarzan's first Blu-ray edition was released throughout Europe in early 2012, and on August 12, 2014, Disney released the Tarzan Special Edition on Blu-ray, DVD, and Digital HD.[39][40]

Discover more about Release related topics

Digital cinema

Digital cinema

Digital cinema refers to adoption of digital technology within the film industry to distribute or project motion pictures as opposed to the historical use of reels of motion picture film, such as 35 mm film. Whereas film reels have to be shipped to movie theaters, a digital movie can be distributed to cinemas in a number of ways: over the Internet or dedicated satellite links, or by sending hard drives or optical discs such as Blu-ray discs.

An Ideal Husband (1999 film)

An Ideal Husband (1999 film)

An Ideal Husband is a 1999 British film based on the 1895 play An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde. The film stars Cate Blanchett, Minnie Driver, Rupert Everett, Julianne Moore and Jeremy Northam. It was directed by Oliver Parker.

Disney Consumer Products

Disney Consumer Products

Disney Consumer Products, Inc. is the retailing and licensing subsidiary of the Disney Parks, Experiences and Products segment of The Walt Disney Company. Previously, Consumer Products was a segment of Disney until 2016, then a unit of Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media (2016–2018).

Mattel

Mattel

Mattel, Inc. is an American multinational toy manufacturing and entertainment company founded in January 1945 and headquartered in El Segundo, California. The company has presence in 35 countries and territories and sells products in more than 150 countries. The company operates through three business segments: North America, International, and American Girl.

McDonald's

McDonald's

McDonald's Corporation is an American multinational fast food chain, founded in 1940 as a restaurant operated by Richard and Maurice McDonald, in San Bernardino, California, United States. They rechristened their business as a hamburger stand, and later turned the company into a franchise, with the Golden Arches logo being introduced in 1953 at a location in Phoenix, Arizona. In 1955, Ray Kroc, a businessman, joined the company as a franchise agent and proceeded to purchase the chain from the McDonald brothers. McDonald's had its previous headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois, but moved its global headquarters to Chicago in June 2018.

DVD

DVD

The DVD is a digital optical disc data storage format. It was invented and developed in 1995 and first released on November 1, 1996, in Japan. The medium can store any kind of digital data and has been widely used for video programs or formerly for storing software and other computer files as well. DVDs offer significantly higher storage capacity than compact discs (CD) while having the same dimensions. A standard DVD can store up to 4.7 GB of storage, while variants can store up to a maximum of 17.08 GB.

LaserDisc

LaserDisc

The LaserDisc (LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978. Its diameter typically spans 30 cm (12 in). Unlike most optical disc standards, LaserDisc is not fully digital, and instead requires the use of analog video signals.

NSYNC

NSYNC

NSYNC was an American boy band formed by Chris Kirkpatrick in Orlando, Florida, in 1995 and launched in Germany by BMG Ariola Munich. Their self-titled debut album was successfully released to European countries in 1997, and later debuted in the U.S. market with the single "I Want You Back".

Dinosaur (2000 film)

Dinosaur (2000 film)

Dinosaur is a 2000 American live-action/computer-animated adventure film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation, The Secret Lab and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 39th Disney animated feature film, the film was directed by Ralph Zondag and Eric Leighton, it features the voices of D.B. Sweeney, Alfre Woodard, Ossie Davis, Max Casella, Hayden Panettiere, Samuel E. Wright, Julianna Margulies, Peter Siragusa, Joan Plowright and Della Reese, it follows a young Iguanodon who was adopted and raised by a family of lemurs on a tropical island. After surviving a devastating meteor shower, the family moves out for their new home and befriends a herd of dinosaurs along the way while on a journey to the "Nesting Grounds". However, they face harsh circumstances with its Darwinistic leader while being hunted down by numerous predators, such as Carnotaurus.

Moratorium (entertainment)

Moratorium (entertainment)

A moratorium is the practice of suspending the sales of films on home video DVD, VHS, and Blu-ray and boxed sets after a certain period of time. Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment was famous for this practice, known as the "Disney Vault," in which it would only sporadically sell home videos of animated films in the Disney catalogue, until 2019 when a programme of undeletions and re-releases ultimately restored all Disney titles into simultaneous print on home entertainment for the first time and on Disney+ streaming service. The 20th Century Fox film library was placed into moratorium and removed from theaters following Disney's acquisition of 21st Century Fox in 2019 according to a Vulture article; the decision noted the different policies between Fox, which had made most of its film archive available to theaters at all times, and Disney, which did not.

Disney Vault

Disney Vault

The "Disney Vault" was a term formerly used by The Walt Disney Company for its policy of regularly placing sales moratoria on home video releases of specific animated feature films. Each Walt Disney Animation Studios film was available for purchase for a limited time, and then placed "in the vault", unavailable for retail sales, pending some future re-release.

Blu-ray

Blu-ray

The Blu-ray Disc (BD), often known simply as Blu-ray, is a digital optical disc data storage format. It was invented and developed in 2005 and released on June 20, 2006 worldwide. It is designed to supersede the DVD format, and capable of storing several hours of high-definition video. The main application of Blu-ray is as a medium for video material such as feature films and for the physical distribution of video games for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X. The name "Blu-ray" refers to the blue laser used to read the disc, which allows information to be stored at a greater density than is possible with the longer-wavelength red laser used for DVDs.

Reception

Box office

Pre-release box office tracking indicated that Tarzan was appealing to all four major demographics noticeably for the first time for a Disney animated film since The Lion King (1994).[41] The film was given a limited release on June 16, 1999,[1] and its wide release followed two days later in 3,005 screens. During the weekend of June 18–21, Tarzan grossed $34.1 million ranking first at the box office, beating out Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999).[42] At the time, it also ranked second behind The Lion King (1994), which had earned $40.9 million, as the highest-earning box office opening for a Disney animated film.[43] By August 1999, the domestic gross was projected to approach $170 million.[44] Ultimately, the film closed its box office run earning $448.2 million worldwide.[1]

Critical reaction

Rotten Tomatoes reported that 89% of critics gave the film a positive review based on 105 reviews, with an average score of 7.6/10. The critical consensus reads that "Disney's Tarzan takes the well-known story to a new level with spirited animation, a brisk pace, and some thrilling action set-pieces."[45] Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 from top reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 79 based on 27 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[46] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A" on an A+ to F scale.[47]

Entertainment Weekly compared the film's advancement in visual effects to that of The Matrix, stating that it had "the neatest computer-generated background work since Keanu Reeves did the backstroke in slow motion". They elaborate by describing how the characters moved seamlessly through the backgrounds themselves, giving the film a unique three-dimensional feel that far surpassed the quality of previous live-action attempts.[48] Roger Ebert gave the film his highest rating of four stars, and he had similar comments about the film, describing it as representing "another attempt by Disney to push the envelope of animation", with scenes that "move through space with a freedom undreamed of in older animated films, and unattainable by any live-action process".[49] Awarding the film three stars, James Berardinelli wrote: "From a purely visual standpoint, this may be the most impressive of all of Disney's traditionally animated features. The backdrops are lush, the characters are well realized, and the action sequences are dizzying, with frequent changes of perspectives and camera angles. No conventional animated film has been this ambitious before."[50] Desson Howe, writing for The Washington Post, claimed the film "isn't up there with Aladdin, The Lion King and The Little Mermaid, but it's easily above the riffraff ranks of Hercules and Pocahontas".[51] Todd McCarthy of Variety proved to be less amused by the animation, claiming it was "richly detailed and colorfully conceived, but the computer animation and graphics are often intermingled and combined in ways that are more distracting in their differences than helpful in their vividness".[52]

Lisa Schwarzbaum, who graded the film an A−, applauded the film as "a thrilling saga about a natural man, untainted by the complications of 'civilized' life, who can anticipate changes in the air by sniffing the wind — swings because the Disney team, having sniffed the wind, went out on a limb and kept things simple".[53] Peter Stack of the San Francisco Chronicle admired the film for tackling "meanings of family relationships and ideas about society, guardianship and compassion" and "cunning and greed and the ultimate evil", as well as remaining faithful to Burroughs's original novel.[54] Kenneth Turan of Los Angeles Times wrote that the "story unfolds with dangers as well as warm humor; a jungle jam session called 'Trashin' the Camp' is especially hard to resist. We may have seen it all before, but when it's done up like this, experiencing it all over again is a pleasure."[55] Janet Maslin, reviewing for The New York Times, similarly opined that "Tarzan initially looks and sounds like more of the same, to the point where Phil Collins is singing the words 'trust your heart' by the third line of his opening song. But it proves to be one of the more exotic blooms in the Disney hothouse, what with voluptuous flora, hordes of fauna, charming characters and excitingly kinetic animation that gracefully incorporates computer-generated motion."[56]

The Radio Times review was not positive, stating the film "falls way short of Disney's best output" and featured "weak comic relief". The review concluded, "Lacking the epic sweep of Mulan or The Lion King, and laced with feeble background songs from Phil Collins (inexplicably awarded an Oscar), this King of the Swingers may be merchandise-friendly, but it's no jungle VIP."[57] Michael Wilmington of the Chicago Tribune, while giving the film three stars, wrote that Tarzan "lacks that special pizazz that the string of Disney cartoon features from The Little Mermaid through The Lion King all had". He found faults in the film's removal of all African characters, lack of romantic tension between Tarzan and Jane, and the songs by Phil Collins, comparing them unfavorably with Elton John's "showstoppers" for The Lion King. He wrote "depriving the characters of big numbers weakens the movie".[58]

Ty Burr of Entertainment Weekly gave the soundtrack a B−, stating that it was awkwardly split between Collins's songs and the traditional score, was burdened by too many alternate versions of the tracks, and in some instances bore similarities to the scores of The Lion King and Star Wars.[59]

Accolades

List of awards and nominations
Award Category Recipient(s) Result Ref.
Academy Awards Best Original Song "You'll Be in My Heart"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Won [60]
Annie Awards Best Animated Feature Bonnie Arnold Nominated [61]
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Character Animation Ken Duncan Nominated
Glen Keane Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production Kevin Lima and Chris Buck Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Effects Animation Peter De Mund Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production "Two Worlds"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Production Design in an Animated Feature Production Daniel St. Pierre Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production Brian Pimental Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production Minnie Driver Nominated
Outstanding Individual Achievement for Writing in an Animated Feature Production Tab Murphy, Bob Tzudiker, and Noni White Nominated
Technical Achievement in the Field of Animation Eric Daniels Won
Artios Awards Animated Voice-Over Feature Casting Ruth Lambert Won [62]
Golden Globe Awards Best Original Song "You'll Be in My Heart"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Won [63]
Golden Reel Awards Best Sound Editing – Animated Feature Per Hallberg, Curt Schulkey, Craig S. Jaeger, Christopher Assells,
Scott Martin Gershin, Lou Kleinman, Geoffrey G. Rubay, and
Peter Michael Sullivan
Nominated
Best Sound Editing – Music – Animated Feature Earl Ghaffari Nominated
Grammy Awards Best Soundtrack Album Tarzan: An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack
Phil Collins and Mark Mancina
Won [64]
Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media "You'll Be in My Heart" – Phil Collins Nominated
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Awards Best Animated Film Kevin Lima and Chris Buck Nominated [65]
Best Song "You'll Be in My Heart"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Nominated
Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Voice from an Animated Movie Rosie O'Donnell Won [66]
Favorite Song from a Movie "Two Worlds"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Nominated
Online Film & Television Association Awards Best Original Song "You'll Be in My Heart"
Music and Lyrics by Phil Collins
Nominated [67]
Satellite Awards Best Animated or Mixed Media Feature Nominated [68]
Saturn Awards Best Fantasy Film Nominated [69]
Young Artist Awards Best Family Feature Film – Animated Nominated [70]
Best Performance in a Voice-Over (TV or Feature Film) – Young Actor Alex D. Linz Nominated

The film is recognized by American Film Institute in these lists:

Discover more about Reception related topics

Four-quadrant movie

Four-quadrant movie

In the Hollywood movie industry, a four-quadrant movie is one which appeals to all four major demographic "quadrants" of the moviegoing audience: both male and female, and both over- and under-25s.

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me

Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me is a 1999 American spy comedy film directed by Jay Roach. It is the second installment in the Austin Powers film series, after International Man of Mystery. It stars franchise co-producer and writer Mike Myers as Austin Powers, Dr. Evil and Fat Bastard. The film also stars Heather Graham, Michael York, Robert Wagner, Seth Green, and Elizabeth Hurley. The film's title is a play on the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). The film centers on Dr. Evil returning again from cryostasis to strike at Powers from the past, using a time machine to remove Powers' charisma ("mojo") and deprive him of whatever qualities made him an effective secret agent so he can no longer interfere with Evil's plans.

Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, television shows, music albums, video games, and formerly books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999, and is owned by Fandom, Inc. as of 2023.

Normalization (statistics)

Normalization (statistics)

In statistics and applications of statistics, normalization can have a range of meanings. In the simplest cases, normalization of ratings means adjusting values measured on different scales to a notionally common scale, often prior to averaging. In more complicated cases, normalization may refer to more sophisticated adjustments where the intention is to bring the entire probability distributions of adjusted values into alignment. In the case of normalization of scores in educational assessment, there may be an intention to align distributions to a normal distribution. A different approach to normalization of probability distributions is quantile normalization, where the quantiles of the different measures are brought into alignment.

CinemaScore

CinemaScore

CinemaScore is a market research firm based in Las Vegas. It surveys film audiences to rate their viewing experiences with letter grades, reports the results, and forecasts box office receipts based on the data.

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly is an American digital-only entertainment magazine based in New York City, published by Dotdash Meredith, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books, and popular culture. The magazine debuted on February 16, 1990, in New York City.

James Berardinelli

James Berardinelli

James Berardinelli is an American film critic and former engineer. His reviews are mainly published on his blog ReelViews. Approved as a critic by the aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, he has published two collections of reviews of movies on DVD and video. He is also a fantasy novelist, publishing a trilogy from 2015 through 2016 known as The Last Whisper of the Gods.

Desson Thomson

Desson Thomson

Desson Patrick Thomson is a former speechwriter for the Obama administration and former film critic for The Washington Post. He was known as Desson Howe until 2003 when he changed his name after reuniting with his birth father.

Aladdin (1992 Disney film)

Aladdin (1992 Disney film)

Aladdin is a 1992 American animated musical fantasy comedy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The 31st Disney animated feature film and the fourth produced during the Disney Renaissance, it is based on the Arabic folktale of the same name from the One Thousand and One Nights. The film was produced and directed by John Musker and Ron Clements from a screenplay they co-wrote with the writing team of Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. Featuring the voices of Scott Weinger, Robin Williams, Linda Larkin, and Jonathan Freeman, the film follows the titular Aladdin, an Arabian street urchin, who finds a magic lamp containing a genie. With the genie's help, Aladdin disguises himself as a wealthy prince and tries to impress the Sultan in order to win the heart of his free-spirited daughter, Princess Jasmine, while the Sultan's evil vizier Jafar plots to steal the magic lamp for his own uses.

Hercules (1997 film)

Hercules (1997 film)

Hercules is a 1997 American animated musical fantasy comedy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation for Walt Disney Pictures. The 35th Disney animated feature film and the eighth animated film produced during the Disney Renaissance, it is loosely based on the legendary hero Heracles, the son of Zeus, in Greek mythology. The film was directed by John Musker and Ron Clements, both of whom also produced the film with Alice Dewey Goldstone. The screenplay was written by Musker, Clements, Donald McEnery, Bob Shaw, and Irene Mecchi. Featuring the voices of Tate Donovan, Danny DeVito, James Woods, and Susan Egan, the film follows the titular Hercules, a demigod with super-strength raised among mortals, who must learn to become a true hero in order to earn back his godhood and place in Mount Olympus, while his evil uncle Hades plots his downfall.

Lisa Schwarzbaum

Lisa Schwarzbaum

Lisa Schwarzbaum is an American film critic. She joined Entertainment Weekly as a film critic in the 1990s and remained there until February 2013.

Kenneth Turan

Kenneth Turan

Kenneth Turan is an American retired film critic, author, and lecturer in the Master of Professional Writing Program at the University of Southern California. He was a film critic for the Los Angeles Times from 1991 until 2020 and was described by The Hollywood Reporter as "arguably the most widely read film critic in the town most associated with the making of movies".

Adaptations

A spin-off animated series, The Legend of Tarzan, ran from 2001 to 2003. The series picks up where the film left off, with Tarzan adjusting to his new role as leader of the apes following Kerchak's death, and Jane (whom he has since married) adjusting to life in the jungle. In July 1999, Disney announced that they were planning a sequel for Tarzan.[73] In 2002, Tarzan & Jane was released as a direct-to-video sequel, with Michael T. Weiss replacing Goldwyn as the voice of Tarzan. Tarzan II, a direct-to-video follow-up, was released in 2005.

A Broadway musical produced by Disney Theatrical, also titled Tarzan, began previews on March 24, 2006. It had an official opening night on May 10 of the same year. After running for over a year on Broadway, the show closed on July 8, 2007.[74]

Five Tarzan video games have been released on various platforms. Tarzan's home is also featured as a playable world, "Deep Jungle", in the 2002 game Kingdom Hearts, and in the 2013 HD remaster Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix, in which Goldwyn and Blessed were the only actors from the film to reprise their roles, while Jane was voiced by Naia Kelly and Audrey Wasilewski reprised her role as Terk from the 1999 video game based on the film; Kerchak and Kala appeared, but were silent, while Tantor and Professor Porter were absent. The world was originally meant to return in Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories, but ultimately did not appear and has not appeared in any subsequent Kingdom Hearts games.

Discover more about Adaptations related topics

Tarzan (franchise)

Tarzan (franchise)

Tarzan is a Disney media franchise that commenced in 1999 with the theatrical release of the film Tarzan.

Animated series

Animated series

An animated series is a set of animated works with a common series title, usually related to one another. These episodes should typically share the same main characters, some different secondary characters and a basic theme. Series can have either a finite number of episodes like a miniseries, a definite end, or be open-ended, without a predetermined number of episodes. They can be broadcast on television, shown in movie theatres, released direct-to-video or on the internet. Like other television series, films, including animated films, animated series can be of a wide variety of genres and can also have different demographic target audiences, from males to females ranging children to adults.

The Legend of Tarzan (TV series)

The Legend of Tarzan (TV series)

The Legend of Tarzan is an American animated television series produced by Walt Disney Television Animation, based on Tarzan from the novels written by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the character's original creator who appears in one episode of the series. The series is also based on the film Tarzan by Walt Disney Pictures and aired initially on the Disney's One Too block on UPN. However, reruns were broadcast shortly after on Disney Channel.

Tarzan & Jane

Tarzan & Jane

Tarzan & Jane is a 2002 American animated adventure comedy film produced by Walt Disney Television Animation, Released on July 23, 2002, it is a direct-to-video sequel to the Disney's 1999 animated feature Tarzan, and uses three then-unaired episodes of the film's corresponding television series, The Legend of Tarzan. Tarzan II, a followup to the original film, was released in 2005. The film is set one year after the events of the first film and Tarzan and Jane are married.

Direct-to-video

Direct-to-video

Direct-to-video or straight-to-video refers to the release of a film, television series, short or special to the public immediately on home video formats rather than an initial theatrical release or television premiere. This distribution strategy was prevalent before streaming platforms came to dominate the TV and movie distribution markets.

Michael T. Weiss

Michael T. Weiss

Michael Terry Weiss is an American actor known for his role as Jarod in the television series The Pretender.

Tarzan II

Tarzan II

Tarzan II is a 2005 American direct-to-video musical animated film, and the third and final Disney Tarzan film after Tarzan and Jane, though it chronologically takes place during the events of the original film set during Tarzan's childhood, years before he met Jane. It was produced by Walt Disney Pictures and DisneyToon Studios Australia, with animation outsourced to Toon City Animation. The film tells the story between the young Tarzan is raised by apes and become an adult Tarzan, where he becomes the leader of his gorillas. It follows Tarzan's adventure to discover who he really is. Glenn Close and Lance Henriksen reprise their roles as Kala and Kerchak from the first film while Harrison Chad, Brenda Grate, and Harrison Fahn are the new voices for the younger versions of Tarzan, Terk, and Tantor, replacing Alex D. Linz, Rosie O'Donnell, and Taylor Dempsey. They are joined by new characters voiced by George Carlin, Estelle Harris, Brad Garrett, and Ron Perlman.

Tarzan (musical)

Tarzan (musical)

Tarzan is a musical based on the Walt Disney Animation Studios 1999 film of the same name. The songs are written by Phil Collins with a book by David Henry Hwang. The musical follows Tarzan, who is raised by gorillas in West Africa. He meets Jane, a young English naturalist, and falls in love, unknowing that Jane's entourage plans to kill the gorillas.

Kingdom Hearts (video game)

Kingdom Hearts (video game)

Kingdom Hearts is a 2002 action role-playing video game developed by Square for the PlayStation 2 video game console. It is the first game in the Kingdom Hearts series and is the result of a collaboration between Square and The Walt Disney Company. An expanded re-release of the game featuring new and additional content, Kingdom Hearts Final Mix, was released exclusively in Japan in December 2002. The Final Mix version of the game was later remastered in high definition and released globally as a part of the Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix collection for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Windows, and Nintendo Switch.

Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix

Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix

Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix is an HD remastered collection of the Kingdom Hearts series, developed by Square Enix originally for the PlayStation 3. It was revealed in September 2012 and released in Japan in March 2013, and North America, Australia and Europe in September 2013.

Audrey Wasilewski

Audrey Wasilewski

Audrey Wasilewski is an American television, film and voice actress.

Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories

Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories

Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories is an action role-playing video game co-developed by Square Enix and Jupiter, and published by Square Enix in collaboration with Disney Interactive in 2004 for the Game Boy Advance. The game serves as an intermediary between the two larger-scale PlayStation 2 games in the Kingdom Hearts series. It was one of the first GBA games to incorporate full motion video (FMV).

Source: "Tarzan (1999 film)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 30th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarzan_(1999_film).

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b c d e "Tarzan (1999)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  2. ^ "Tarzan". British Board of Film Classification. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
  3. ^ Fulton, Rick (September 17, 1999). "Back to Basics: Disney Finally Makes the Ape Man the Kind". The Daily Record. Retrieved November 8, 2015 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Green, Howard (1999). The Tarzan Chronicles. New York: Hyperion. ISBN 978-0-7868-6403-4.
  5. ^ a b Leigh Miller, Victoria. "#ThrowbackThursday: Welcome to Tony Goldwyn's Jungle". Yahoo! TV. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  6. ^ a b Hill, Jim (September 22, 2016). "Would Woody Allen have been a better fit for LeFou in Disney's "Beauty and the Beast"?". The Huffington Post. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  7. ^ Whipp, Glenn (June 16, 1999). "With Tarzan, It's A Disney Jungle Out There". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on April 7, 2014. Retrieved September 29, 2014 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  8. ^ "Get Enchanted! Chapter Six: Director Kevin Lima and exec producer Chris Chase" (Interview). Interviewed by Jérémie Noyer. Animated Views. March 21, 2008. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  9. ^ a b c Wannamaker, Annette; Anate, Michelle Ann (April 18, 2012). Global Perspectives on Tarzan: From King of the Jungle to International Icon. Routledge. pp. 42–43. ISBN 978-0-415-89724-2. Retrieved October 16, 2014.
  10. ^ Strickler, Jeff (June 13, 1999). "Tarzan swings by Disney; Not aping earlier 'King of the Jungle' films, it's animated". Star Tribune. p. F16. Retrieved February 15, 2020 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ "New Disney Jungle King". Los Angeles Times. April 22, 1995. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  12. ^ Tracy, Joe. "Disney's Tarzan Adventure: Two Worlds Merge". Animation Artist. Retrieved October 16, 2014.
  13. ^ a b Lawson, Terry (June 16, 1999). "'Tarzan' Yell". Knight-Ridder. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  14. ^ Ascher-Walsh, Rebecca (April 30, 1999). "Summer Movie Preview: June, 1999". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  15. ^ Hischak, Thomas (2011). Disney Voice Actors: A Biographical Dictionary. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. p. 148. ISBN 978-0-7864-6271-1. Retrieved September 11, 2015 – via Google Books.
  16. ^ Abbott, Jim (June 7, 1999). "A Fresh Tarzan". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  17. ^ Falk, Quentin (September 3, 2000). "Holidays: Close encounter of the hairy kind". Sunday Mirror. p. 53. Retrieved August 30, 2014 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  18. ^ a b c Essman, Scott (July 5, 1999). "State of the Art of F/X". MovieMaker Magazine. Archived from the original on January 4, 2013. Retrieved April 6, 2009.
  19. ^ Fleeman, Michael (June 17, 1999). "Phil Collins goes out on a limb, scores 'Tarzan' soundtrack". The Daily Gazette. Associated Press. Retrieved September 11, 2015 – via Google News Archive.
  20. ^ Naughton, John (May 2, 1999). "Against All Odds". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  21. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Tarzan". AllMusic. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  22. ^ a b Raugust, Karen (2004). The Animation Business Handbook. Macmillan. p. 86. ISBN 978-0-312-28428-2.
  23. ^ Keegan, Rebecca (January 24, 2014). "'Frozen': Finding a diva in 41 languages". Los Angeles Times.
  24. ^ Quintanilla, Michael (June 15, 1999). "It's a Jungle Out There for 'Tarzan's' Debut". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  25. ^ Graser, Mark (July 16, 1999). "Disney goes digital". Variety. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  26. ^ "'Tarzan' Making Digital Run". Orlando Sentinel. July 17, 1999. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  27. ^ Szadkowski, Joseph (March 1, 1999). "Toy Fair '99: More Animated Stuff". Animation World Network. Retrieved November 7, 2009.
  28. ^ Quinn, Thomas (October 22, 1999). "Tarzan Escapes From The Mouse House" (Press release). Daily Mirror. Retrieved September 11, 2015 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  29. ^ Hernandez, Greg (May 28, 1999). "Fast-Food Promotional Wars Heading Into a Furious Summer". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  30. ^ "Nestle Chocolate & Confections Goes Bananas Over Disney's Tarzan" (Press release). Glendale, California. PR Newswire. May 13, 1999. Archived from the original on March 14, 2018 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  31. ^ "The Jungle Drums Are Beating for 'Tarzan' Swinging to Home Video and DVD on Feb. 1". Business Wire. October 27, 1999. Archived from the original on July 3, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2015 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  32. ^ Downing, Leanne (2005). "Media Synergies and the Politics of Affect in Tim Burton's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)". M/C Journal. 8 (6). doi:10.5204/mcj.2464.
  33. ^ "LaserDisc Database - Tarzan [PILA-3040]". LaserDisc Database.
  34. ^ King, Susan (February 3, 2000). "Disney's 'Tarzan' Swings Onto DVD". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  35. ^ Kilmer, David (November 1, 1999). "Disney's TARZAN is coming to home video". Animation World Network. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  36. ^ "Tarzan: Collector's Edition DVD Review - DVDizzy.com".
  37. ^ "Time Is Running Out ... Four of Disney's Greatest Animated Classics Are Disappearing Into the Vault" (Press release). PR Newswire. January 23, 2002. Archived from the original on October 26, 2014 – via TheFreeLibrary.com.
  38. ^ "Top 2000 Homevideo titles". Variety. January 8, 2001. p. 79.
  39. ^ Kauffman, Jeffery. "Tarzan Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com.
  40. ^ Brown, Kenneth. "Tarzan Blu-ray". Blu-ray.com.
  41. ^ Eller, Claudia (June 11, 1999). "Gauging the Heat of Competition as Post-'Menace' Season Begins". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  42. ^ Natale, Richard (June 21, 1999). "A Bigger Swinger Hits Town". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  43. ^ Welkos, Robert (June 22, 1999). "Weekend Box Office". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 24, 2014. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  44. ^ Natale, Richard (August 31, 1999). "The Summer's Other Hitting Streak". Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  45. ^ "Tarzan". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved October 5, 2021. Edit this at Wikidata
  46. ^ "Tarzan Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  47. ^ Manfredi, Lucas (November 24, 2022). "Strange World CinemaScore Might Be the Lowest Ever For a Walt Disney Animation Studio Film". TheWrap. Archived from the original on November 25, 2022. Retrieved December 10, 2022.
  48. ^ "Video Review: Simply Da Vine: With its dazzling high-tech Tarzan, Disney takes to the jungle and swings rings around live-action efforts of the past". Entertainment Weekly. February 4, 2000. Retrieved April 6, 2009.
  49. ^ Ebert, Roger (June 18, 1999). "Tarzan". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015 – via RogerEbert.com.
  50. ^ Berardinelli, James. "Tarzan review". Reel Views. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  51. ^ Howe, Desson (June 18, 1999). "Animated 'Tarzan' Really Swings". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  52. ^ McCarthy, Todd (June 7, 1999). "Review: 'Tarzan'". Variety. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  53. ^ Schwarzbaum, Lisa (June 25, 1999). "KING OF SWING "Tarzan" is a winner". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  54. ^ Stack, Peter (June 18, 1999). "THE JUNGLE KING / Disney works its magic with story-telling and animation in 'Tarzan'". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  55. ^ Turan, Kenneth (June 16, 1999). "Vine, Woman and Song". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  56. ^ Maslin, Janet (June 18, 1999). "'Tarzan': Monkey Business -- Rewriting the Jungle Book". The New York Times. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  57. ^ Jones, Alan. "Tarzan". Radio Times. Retrieved August 22, 2015.
  58. ^ Wilmington, Michael (June 18, 1999). "Techno 'Tarzan'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  59. ^ Burr, Ty (May 21, 1999). "Music Review: Tarzan (1999)". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved April 6, 2009.
  60. ^ "The 72nd Academy Awards (2000) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
  61. ^ "27th Annual Annie Awards". Annie Awards. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  62. ^ "Nominees/Winners". Casting Society of America. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  63. ^ "Tarzan – Golden Globes". HFPA. Retrieved July 5, 2021.
  64. ^ "1999 Grammy Awards". Grammy Awards. Retrieved December 18, 2021.
  65. ^ "1999 Sierra Award Winners". December 13, 2021. Retrieved January 31, 2022.
  66. ^ "Kids Choice Awards 1999". Internet Movie Database.
  67. ^ "4th Annual Film Awards (1999)". Online Film & Television Association. Retrieved May 15, 2021.
  68. ^ "International Press Academy website – 2000 4th Annual SATELLITE Awards". Archived from the original on 1 February 2008.
  69. ^ "Past Saturn Awards". Saturn Awards.org. Archived from the original on September 14, 2008. Retrieved May 7, 2008.
  70. ^ "21st Annual Young Artist Awards". YoungArtistAwards.org. Archived from the original on 2012-07-19. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
  71. ^ "AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs Nominees" (PDF). Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  72. ^ "AFI's 10 Top 10 Nominees" (PDF). Archived from the original on July 16, 2011. Retrieved August 19, 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  73. ^ Kilmer, David (July 12, 1999). "TARZAN 2 is in the works". Animation World Network. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  74. ^ "Disney's 'Tarzan' to close July 8 on Broadway". USA Today. June 24, 2007. Retrieved March 26, 2013.
External links
Categories

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.