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Street money

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Street money (also called walking-around money[1][2]) is an American political tactic where local party officials are given legal cash handouts by an electoral candidate's campaign in exchange for the officials' support in turning out voters on election day.[1][3]

Usage

The money given out to ward leaders and party foot soldiers can range from $10, $20 or $50[1] to as high as $400.[4] Ward bosses in the city's poorer neighborhoods often use the money to offset the costs of gasoline and food for their volunteers.[1][4] Although most well known in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, street money is also common in Chicago, Baltimore, Newark and Los Angeles.[1] In Baltimore, the term "walk around money" means street money.[5]

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Chicago

Chicago

Chicago is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Illinois and the third-most populous in the United States, after New York City and Los Angeles. With a population of 2,746,388 in the 2020 census, it is also the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. As the seat of Cook County, the city is the center of the Chicago metropolitan area, one of the largest in the world.

Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maryland, fourth most populous city in the Mid-Atlantic, and the 30th most populous city in the United States with a population of 585,708 in 2020. Baltimore was designated an independent city by the Constitution of Maryland in 1851, and today is the most populous independent city in the United States. As of 2021, the population of the Baltimore metropolitan area was estimated to be 2,838,327, making it the 20th largest metropolitan area in the country. Baltimore is located about 40 miles (64 km) north northeast of Washington, D.C., making it a principal city in the Washington–Baltimore combined statistical area (CSA), the third-largest CSA in the nation, with a 2021 estimated population of 9,946,526.

Newark, New Jersey

Newark, New Jersey

Newark is the most populous city in the U.S. state of New Jersey and the seat of Essex County and part of the New York metropolitan area. The city had a population of 311,549 as of the 2020 United States census, making it the nation's 62nd-most populous municipality, after being ranked 73rd in the nation in 2010. It is one of the nation's major air, shipping, and rail hubs.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, often referred to by its initials L.A., is the largest city in the state of California and the second most populous city in the United States after New York City, as well as one of the world's most populous megacities. Los Angeles is the commercial, financial, and cultural center of Southern California. With a population of roughly 3.9 million as of 2020, Los Angeles is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic and cultural diversity, Hollywood film industry, and sprawling metropolitan area. The city of Los Angeles lies in a basin in Southern California adjacent to the Pacific Ocean extending through the Santa Monica Mountains and into the San Fernando Valley. It covers about 469 square miles (1,210 km2), and is the seat of Los Angeles County, which is the most populous county in the United States with an estimated 9.86 million as of 2022.

History

During the 1997 Camden, New Jersey City Council race, the Camden City Democratic Committee spent $10,765 to pay street workers $40 each to "get out the vote".[6] Others have included Jon Corzine (whose campaign paid out $75 apiece to New Jersey party officials during his successful 2000 Senate bid), John Kerry (in Pennsylvania during the 2004 presidential election) and Robert A. Brady (during the 2002 U.S. House race).[1]

After the 1993 New Jersey gubernatorial campaign, Republican Christine Todd Whitman's campaign manager Ed Rollins was accused of boasting that he had given $500,000 in street money to black churches in New Jersey in exchange for their keeping their congregation from voting for incumbent James Florio. Rollins later retracted his claims, saying that his comments were taken out of context. Subsequent investigations by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office and Federal Bureau of Investigation found no wrongdoing on Rollins' part, finding that his original claims were braggadocio.[7][8]

During the 2008 Pennsylvania Democratic primary, both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton refused to hand out street money,[9] Governor of Pennsylvania Ed Rendell commented that the unusual amount of interest in the race would bring people out in support of both candidates, street money or not.[10] Rendell later remarked that the Clinton campaign had "barely enough [money] to communicate on basic media", much less for street money.[9]

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Camden, New Jersey

Camden, New Jersey

Camden is a city in and the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey, United States. Camden is part of the Delaware Valley metropolitan area and is located directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the 2020 U.S. census, the city had a population of 71,791 and was ranked as the 14th most populous municipality in New Jersey. The city was incorporated on February 13, 1828. Camden has been the county seat of Camden County since the county was formed on March 13, 1844. The city derives its name from Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden. Camden is made up of over 20 neighborhoods. Geographically, the city is part of the South Jersey region.

New Jersey

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by Delaware Bay and the state of Delaware. At 7,354 square miles (19,050 km2), New Jersey is the fifth-smallest state in land area; but with close to 9.3 million residents, it ranks 11th in population and first in population density. The state capital is Trenton, and the most populous city is Newark. With the exception of Warren County, all of the state's 21 counties lie within the combined statistical areas of New York City or Philadelphia.

Jon Corzine

Jon Corzine

Jon Stevens Corzine is an American financial executive and retired politician who served as a United States Senator from New Jersey from 2001 to 2006 and the 54th governor of New Jersey from 2006 to 2010. Corzine ran for a second term as governor but lost to Republican Chris Christie. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously worked at Goldman Sachs; after leaving politics, he was CEO of MF Global from 2010 until its collapse in 2011.

John Kerry

John Kerry

John Forbes Kerry is an American attorney, politician and diplomat who currently serves as the first United States special presidential envoy for climate. A member of the Forbes family and the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 68th United States secretary of state from 2013 to 2017 under Barack Obama and as a United States Senator from Massachusetts from 1985 to 2013. He was the Democratic nominee for President of the United States in the 2004 election, losing to incumbent President George W. Bush.

Bob Brady

Bob Brady

Robert A. Brady is an American politician who served as the U.S. representative for Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district from 1998 to 2019. He was the ranking Democrat and Chairman of the United States House Committee on House Administration from 2007 to 2019. He has served as Chairman of the Philadelphia Democratic Party for more than 30 years and is a registered lobbyist for NBC Universal and Independence Blue Cross.

Christine Todd Whitman

Christine Todd Whitman

Christine Temple Whitman is an American politician and author who served as the 50th governor of New Jersey from 1994 to 2001 and as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the administration of President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2003.

Ed Rollins

Ed Rollins

Edward Rollins is a Republican campaign consultant and advisor who has worked on several high-profile political campaigns in the United States. In 1983 and 1984, he was national campaign director for the successful Reagan-Bush 1984 campaign. Rollins is currently the chairman of the pro–Donald Trump Great America PAC.

James Florio

James Florio

James Joseph Florio was an American politician who served as the 49th governor of New Jersey from 1990 to 1994. He served as a member of the New Jersey General Assembly from 1970 to 1975 and in the United States House of Representatives between 1975 and 1990. He was a member of the Democratic Party.

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

Barack Hussein Obama II is an American politician who served as the 44th president of the United States from 2009 to 2017. A member of the Democratic Party, Obama was the first African-American president of the United States. He previously served as a U.S. senator from Illinois from 2005 to 2008 and as an Illinois state senator from 1997 to 2004, and previously worked as a civil rights lawyer before entering politics.

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton

Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton is an American politician, diplomat, and former lawyer who served as the 67th United States Secretary of State for President Barack Obama from 2009 to 2013, as a United States senator representing New York from 2001 to 2009, and as First Lady of the United States as the wife of President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 2001. A member of the Democratic Party, she was the party's nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election, becoming the first woman to win a presidential nomination by a major U.S. political party; Clinton won the popular vote, but lost the Electoral College vote, thereby losing the election to Donald Trump.

Ed Rendell

Ed Rendell

Edward Gene Rendell is an American lawyer, prosecutor, politician, and author. He served as the 45th Governor of Pennsylvania from 2003 to 2011, as chair of the national Democratic Party, and as the 96th Mayor of Philadelphia from 1992 to 2000.

Source: "Street money", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_money.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d e f Nicholas, Peter (2008-04-11). "Barack Obama may lose support in Philadelphia over 'street money'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2008-04-15. Retrieved 2008-04-22.
  2. ^ https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/walking-around-money
  3. ^ Beam, Christopher (2008-10-23). "What's "Street Money"? Or "walking-around money"? Or "get-out-the-vote money"?". Slate.
  4. ^ a b MacAskill, Ewen (2008-04-21). "The high price of 'street money' in Philadelphia campaigns". The Guardian. Retrieved 2008-04-22.
  5. ^ Magnuson, Carolyn (2003-04-25). "Judge strikes down "walk around" money law". Daily Record (Baltimore). Retrieved 2008-04-22.
  6. ^ Riley, Clint (2000-07-02). "Moran campaign violations uncovered". The Courier-Post. Retrieved 2008-04-24.
  7. ^ "Attention Ed Rollins". The New York Times Editorial Board. 1994-03-05. Retrieved 2008-04-24.
  8. ^ "The Truth in Ed Rollins' Lies". The New York Times Editorial Board. 1994-01-14. Retrieved 2008-04-24.
  9. ^ a b Davies, Dave (2008-04-15). "Word on the street: No election $". Philadelphia Daily News. Archived from the original on 2008-05-02. Retrieved 2008-04-22.
  10. ^ Pallasch, Abdon M. (2008-04-21). "On eve of Pa. primary, a kinder, gentler Clinton". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved 2008-04-22.

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