Get Our Extension

Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
 Spring Street
 "C" train​​"E" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Spring Street - 8th Avenue Platform.jpg
Station statistics
AddressSpring Street & Sixth Avenue
New York, NY 10013
BoroughManhattan
LocaleHudson Square, SoHo
Coordinates40°43′32″N 74°00′15″W / 40.725503°N 74.004035°W / 40.725503; -74.004035Coordinates: 40°43′32″N 74°00′15″W / 40.725503°N 74.004035°W / 40.725503; -74.004035
DivisionB (IND)[1]
Line   IND Eighth Avenue Line
Services   A late nights (late nights)
   C all except late nights (all except late nights)
   E all times (all times)
TransitBus transport NYCT Bus: M21, M55, X27, X28
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedSeptember 10, 1932; 90 years ago (September 10, 1932)[2]
Opposite-
direction
transfer
Yes
Traffic
20194,423,135[4]Increase 14.8%
Rank110 out of 424[4]
Location
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line) is located in New York City Subway
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line) is located in New York City
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line) is located in New York
Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)
Track layout

Street map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times except late nights
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only

The Spring Street station is a local station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at Spring Street and Sixth Avenue (Avenue of the Americas) in the Hudson Square and SoHo neighborhoods of lower Manhattan, it is served by the C and E trains, the former of which is replaced by the A train during late nights.

Discover more about Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line) related topics

Metro station

Metro station

A metro station or subway station is a train station for a rapid transit system, which as a whole is usually called a "metro" or "subway". A station provides a means for passengers to purchase tickets, board trains, and evacuate the system in the case of an emergency. In the United Kingdom, they are known as underground stations, most commonly used in reference to the London Underground.

IND Eighth Avenue Line

IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

Spring Street (Manhattan)

Spring Street (Manhattan)

Spring Street is a street in Lower Manhattan, New York City, which runs west–east through the neighborhoods of Hudson Square, SoHo, and Nolita. It runs parallel to and between Dominick, Broome, and Kenmare Streets, and Vandam and Prince Streets. Address numbers ascend as Spring Street travels westward from the Bowery to West Street along the Hudson River.

Sixth Avenue

Sixth Avenue

Sixth Avenue – also known as Avenue of the Americas, although this name is seldom used by New Yorkers – is a major thoroughfare in New York City's borough of Manhattan, on which traffic runs northbound, or "uptown". It is commercial for much of its length.

Hudson Square

Hudson Square

Hudson Square is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is bounded approximately by Clarkson Street to the north, Canal Street to the south, Varick Street to the east, and the Hudson River to the west. To the north of the neighborhood is Greenwich Village, to the south is TriBeCa, and to the east are the South Village and SoHo. The area, once the site of the colonial property named Richmond Hill, became known in the 20th century as the Printing District, and into the 21st century it remains a center of media-related activity, including in advertising, design, communications, and the arts.

SoHo, Manhattan

SoHo, Manhattan

SoHo, sometimes written Soho, is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Since the 1970s, the neighborhood has been the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, and has also been known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socioeconomic, cultural, political, and architectural developments.

Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York City, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City, which is the most populated city in the United States with over 8.8 million residents as of the 2020 census.

C (New York City Subway service)

C (New York City Subway service)

The C Eighth Avenue Local is a 19-mile-long (31 km) rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Midtown Manhattan.

E (New York City Subway service)

E (New York City Subway service)

The E Eighth Avenue Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

A (New York City Subway service)

A (New York City Subway service)

The A Eighth Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

History

The station opened on September 10, 1932, as part of the city-operated Independent Subway System (IND)'s initial segment, the Eighth Avenue Line between Chambers Street and 207th Street.[2][5] Extensions southward in 1933 and 1936 brought direct access to Brooklyn on the IND Fulton Street Line, while service from Spring Street to Queens became possible with the opening of the IND Queens Boulevard Line on August 19, 1933 to Jackson Heights.[6]

The station was renovated as part of the 2010–2014 MTA Capital Program. An MTA study conducted in 2014 found that 31% of station components were out of date.[7]

Discover more about History related topics

Independent Subway System

Independent Subway System

The Independent Subway System, formerly known as the Independent City-Owned Subway System (ICOSS) or the Independent City-Owned Rapid Transit Railroad (ICORTR), was a rapid transit rail system in New York City that is now part of the New York City Subway. It was first constructed as the Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan in 1932.

IND Eighth Avenue Line

IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City's most populous borough, with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.

IND Fulton Street Line

IND Fulton Street Line

The IND Fulton Street Line is a rapid transit line of the IND Division of the New York City Subway, running from the Cranberry Street Tunnel under the East River through all of central Brooklyn to a terminus in Ozone Park, Queens. The IND Rockaway Line branches from it just east of Rockaway Boulevard. The A train runs express during daytime hours and local at night on the underground portion of the line; it runs local on the elevated portion of the line at all times. The C train runs local on the underground portion of the line at all times except late nights.

Queens

Queens

Queens is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Queens County, in the U.S. state of New York. Located on Long Island, it is the largest New York City borough by area. It is bordered by the borough of Brooklyn at the western tip of Long Island, and Nassau County to its east. Queens shares water borders with the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island.

IND Queens Boulevard Line

IND Queens Boulevard Line

The IND Queens Boulevard Line, sometimes abbreviated as QBL, is a line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan and Queens, New York City, United States. The line, which is underground throughout its entire route, contains 23 stations. The core section between 50th Street in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, and 169th Street in Jamaica, Queens, was built by the Independent Subway System (IND) in stages between 1933 and 1940, with the Jamaica–179th Street terminus opening in 1950. As of 2015, it is among the system's busiest lines, with a weekday ridership of over 460,000 people.

Station layout

G Street level Exit/entrance
B1
Platform level
Side platform
Northbound local "C" train toward 168th Street (West Fourth Street–Washington Square)
"E" train toward Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer (West Fourth Street–Washington Square)
"A" train toward Inwood–207th Street late nights (West Fourth Street–Washington Square)
Northbound express "A" train does not stop here
Southbound express "A" train does not stop here →
Southbound local "C" train toward Euclid Avenue (Canal Street)
"E" train toward World Trade Center (Canal Street)
"A" train toward Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue late nights (Canal Street)
Side platform
B2 Crossunder Connection between platforms
An original IND mosaic (left) at the south end of the station, and a modern  mosaic (right) at the north end covering an exit to Prince Street
An original IND mosaic (left) at the south end of the station, and a modern  mosaic (right) at the north end covering an exit to Prince Street
An original IND mosaic (left) at the south end of the station, and a modern mosaic (right) at the north end covering an exit to Prince Street
Northbound entrance
Northbound entrance

Like most local subway stations, Spring Street has two side platforms and four tracks. The two center express tracks are used by the A train during daytime hours. A crossunder just within fare control allows a free transfer between directions.

Wall tiling suggests that fare controls and a crossunder have been removed from the north end of the station. The platforms have a blue trim line on a dark blue border (ultramarine blue and cobalt blue, with replacement tiles at the north end that are ultramarine blue and navy blue).[8] The name tablets consist of "SPRING ST" in white sans-serif font on a dark blue background with a lighter blue border. Beneath the trim line and name tablets are "SPRING" and directional signs in white lettering on a black border tiled onto the walls.[9] Blue I-beam columns run along the entire length of both platforms, with every other one having the standard black and white station signs.[10]

Exits

All fare control areas are at platform level. The station's main ones are at the south end of the platform. Each contains banks of regular and HEET turnstiles, a token booth, and a single staircase going up to Spring Street and Sixth Avenue. The one on the northbound side is built inside the headquarters for God's Love We Deliver and leads to the northeast corner while the one on the southbound side leads to the northwest corner.[11] The southbound platform has an un-staffed HEET entrance that has a single staircase going up to the southwest corner of Vandam Street and Sixth Avenue.[11] There are also closed fare control areas at the north end of the station, which led to all four corners of the intersection of Prince Street/Charlton Street and Sixth Avenue.[7]

Discover more about Station layout related topics

Side platform

Side platform

A side platform is a platform positioned to the side of one or more railway tracks or guideways at a railway station, tram stop, or transitway. A station having dual side platforms, one for each direction of travel, is the basic design used for double-track railway lines. Side platforms may result in a wider overall footprint for the station compared with an island platform where a single width of platform can be shared by riders using either track.

C (New York City Subway service)

C (New York City Subway service)

The C Eighth Avenue Local is a 19-mile-long (31 km) rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Midtown Manhattan.

West Fourth Street–Washington Square station

West Fourth Street–Washington Square station

The West Fourth Street–Washington Square station is an express station and transfer stop on the IND Sixth Avenue and IND Eighth Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. It is served by the A, D, E, and F trains at all times; the B and M trains on weekdays; the C train at all times except late nights; and the train during rush hours in the peak direction.

E (New York City Subway service)

E (New York City Subway service)

The E Eighth Avenue Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer station

Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer station

The Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer station is the northern terminal station of the IND and BMT Archer Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at Parsons Boulevard and Archer Avenue in Jamaica, Queens. It is served by E and J trains at all times, as well as Z trains during rush hours in the peak direction.

A (New York City Subway service)

A (New York City Subway service)

The A Eighth Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

Inwood–207th Street station

Inwood–207th Street station

The Inwood–207th Street station is the northern terminal station of the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of 207th Street and Broadway in the Manhattan neighborhood of Inwood, near Inwood Hill Park, it is served by the A train at all times.

Euclid Avenue station (IND Fulton Street Line)

Euclid Avenue station (IND Fulton Street Line)

The Euclid Avenue station is an express station on the IND Fulton Street Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Euclid and Pitkin Avenues in East New York, Brooklyn. It is served by the A train at all times and is the southern terminal for the C train at all times except nights. During nights, this is the northern terminal for the Lefferts Boulevard shuttle train from Ozone Park, Queens.

Canal Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

Canal Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)

The Canal Street station is an express station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Canal Street, Vestry Street, and Sixth Avenue in Lower Manhattan, it is served by the A and E trains at all times, and the C train at all times except late nights.

Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station

Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station

The Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station is the eastern terminal station of the New York City Subway's IND Rockaway Line. Originally a Long Island Rail Road station, it is currently the easternmost station in the New York City Subway. It is served by the A train at all times.

Mosaic

Mosaic

A mosaic is a pattern or image made of small regular or irregular pieces of colored stone, glass or ceramic, held in place by plaster/mortar, and covering a surface. Mosaics are often used as floor and wall decoration, and were particularly popular in the Ancient Roman world.

Artwork

Mosaic depicting the 14th Street–Union Square station's platform at the entrance to Spring Street station
Mosaic depicting the 14th Street–Union Square station's platform at the entrance to Spring Street station

In December 1984, Chilean artist Alfredo Jaar rented all the ad space in the station for the month, and put up an installation he called "Rushes", which showed 81 photos he had taken of poor Brazilian workers digging in Serra Pelada, a government-run gold mine. Scattered amongst them were signs giving world oil prices.[12][13][14]

The 1994 artwork installed at the stairway of the northbound platform's fare control is a large, lively mosaic called New York City Subway Station by Edith Kramer.[15] It consists of a single painting depicting 14th Street–Union Square on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line.[15]

Discover more about Artwork related topics

Source: "Spring Street station (IND Eighth Avenue Line)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 13th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_Street_station_(IND_Eighth_Avenue_Line).

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). Vol. 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "List of the 28 Stations on the New 8th Av. Line". The New York Times. September 10, 1932. p. 6. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  3. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  5. ^ Crowell, Paul (September 10, 1932). "Gay Midnight Crowd Rides First Trains In The New Subway: Throngs at Station an Hour Before Time, Rush Turnstiles When Chains are Dropped" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved November 8, 2015.
  6. ^ "C Train". Stationreporter.net. Archived from the original on March 13, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  7. ^ a b Review of the A and C Lines (PDF) (Report). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 11, 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 3, 2020. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  8. ^ "IND Station Tile Colors". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  9. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (May 24, 2010). "A Spring St name tablet on the downtown platform with exit text to Vandam". subwaynut.com. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  10. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (January 2, 2011). "The extreme northern end of the uptown platform tiling gets back to normal". subwaynut.com. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  11. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: SoHo / Tribeca" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  12. ^ Michael W. Brooks (1997). Subway City: Riding the Trains, Reading New York. Rutgers University Press. p. 214. ISBN 9780813523965. Retrieved February 14, 2013. spring street ind station -atlanta.
  13. ^ Tracy Fitzpatrick (May 30, 2009). Art and the Subway: New York Underground. ISBN 9780813544526. Retrieved February 14, 2013.
  14. ^ "IN THE SUBWAYS; A Little Digging Yields Clues to the Revolution". Retrieved February 15, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "subway station art". Ephemeral New York. Retrieved February 15, 2013.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.