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Sonic Rush

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Sonic Rush
Sonic Rush Coverart.png
North American box art
Developer(s)Dimps
Sonic Team
Publisher(s)Sega
Director(s)Akinori Nishiyama[1]
Producer(s)
Designer(s)
  • Yukihiro Higashi
  • Takayuki Sakamoto
  • Masaaki Yamagiwa
Programmer(s)
  • Katsuya Kuramoto
  • Takaya Yamane
  • Shinichi Manabe
Artist(s)
  • Yuji Uekawa
  • Kazuhiko Yamamoto
Composer(s)
SeriesSonic the Hedgehog
Platform(s)Nintendo DS
Release
  • NA: November 15, 2005
  • PAL: November 18, 2005
  • JP: November 23, 2005
Genre(s)Platform, action
Mode(s)Single-player, two-player

Sonic Rush[a] is a 2005 platform video game developed by Sonic Team and Dimps for the Nintendo DS as part of Sega's Sonic the Hedgehog series. It was released on November 15, 2005, in North America, November 18 in the PAL region, and November 23 in Japan and was the final game in the mainline Sonic series to be produced by Yuji Naka before his departure from Sega. It is a 2D platform game, similar to earlier games in the series like Sonic Advance, as well as later ones like Sonic Mania. Levels in the game are side-scrolling and displayed using both of the DS's screens. However, boss battles, the main characters, and a special stage are rendered in 3D, creating a 2.5D effect. The game's storyline follows the intertwining adventures of the series' main character, Sonic the Hedgehog and a new character, Blaze the Cat. They respectively battle Doctor Eggman and his doppelgänger Eggman Nega at certain points.

The game was announced under the working title Sonic DS at Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) 2004, and under Sonic Rush at E3 2005. The game's 2.5D format was based on Sonic Team's idea to combine elements from 2D and 3D games in the series. Upon release, Sonic Rush was well received by critics, with praise stemming from the game's visuals, music and similarity to older games in the series and criticism stemming from its overall quickness. A sequel, Sonic Rush Adventure, was released in 2007.

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Platform game

Platform game

A platform game is a sub-genre of action video games in which the core objective is to move the player character between points in an environment. Platform games are characterized by levels that consist of uneven terrain and suspended platforms of varying height that require jumping and climbing to traverse. Other acrobatic maneuvers may factor into the gameplay, such as swinging from vines or grappling hooks, jumping off walls, air dashing, gliding through the air, being shot from cannons, or bouncing from springboards or trampolines. Games where jumping is automated completely, such as 3D games in The Legend of Zelda series, fall outside of the genre.

Dimps

Dimps

Dimps Corporation is a Japanese video game developer based in Osaka, Japan, with an additional office in Tokyo. It is best known for developing games in the Sonic the Hedgehog, Dragon Ball and Street Fighter franchises. The company was founded on March 6, 2000 by several former SNK and Capcom employees, including Street Fighter, Fatal Fury, Art of Fighting and The King of Fighters co-creator Takashi Nishiyama and Hiroshi Matsumoto.

Nintendo DS

Nintendo DS

The Nintendo DS is a handheld game console produced by Nintendo, released globally across 2004 and 2005. The DS, an initialism for "Developers' System" or "Dual Screen", introduced distinctive new features to handheld games: two LCD screens working in tandem, a built-in microphone and support for wireless connectivity. Both screens are encompassed within a clamshell design similar to the Game Boy Advance SP. The Nintendo DS also features the ability for multiple DS consoles to directly interact with each other over Wi-Fi within a short range without the need to connect to an existing wireless network. Alternatively, they could interact online using the now-defunct Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection service. Its main competitor was Sony's PlayStation Portable during the seventh generation of video game consoles.

Sega

Sega

Sega Corporation is a Japanese multinational video game and entertainment company headquartered in Shinagawa, Tokyo. Its international branches, Sega of America and Sega Europe, are headquartered in Irvine, California and London, respectively. Its division for the development of both arcade games and home video games, Sega Games, has existed in its current state since 2020; from 2015 to that point, the two had made up separate entities known as Sega Games and Sega Interactive Co., Ltd. Sega is a subsidiary of Sega Sammy Holdings. From 1983 until 2001, Sega also developed video game consoles.

2D computer graphics

2D computer graphics

2D computer graphics is the computer-based generation of digital images—mostly from two-dimensional models and by techniques specific to them. It may refer to the branch of computer science that comprises such techniques or to the models themselves.

Sonic Advance

Sonic Advance

Sonic Advance is a 2001 platform game developed by Dimps for the Game Boy Advance (GBA). It was the first Sonic the Hedgehog game released on a Nintendo console with Sonic Adventure 2: Battle on the GameCube, and was produced in commemoration of the series' tenth anniversary. The story follows Sonic, Tails, Knuckles, and Amy as they journey to stop Doctor Eggman from taking over the world. Controlling a character, players are tasked with completing each level, defeating Eggman and his robot army, and collecting the seven Chaos Emeralds.

Sonic Mania

Sonic Mania

Sonic Mania is a 2017 platform game published by Sega for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows. Produced in commemoration of the Sonic the Hedgehog series' 25th anniversary, Sonic Mania pays homage to the original Sega Genesis Sonic games, featuring speedy side-scrolling gameplay. It takes place over 13 levels, including several redesigned from past games. The story follows Sonic, Tails and Knuckles as they venture to defeat their nemesis Doctor Eggman and his robotic henchmen, the Hard-Boiled Heavies.

Side-scrolling video game

Side-scrolling video game

A side-scrolling video game, is a game viewed from a side-view camera angle where the screen follows the player as they move left or right. The jump from single-screen or flip-screen graphics to scrolling graphics during the golden age of arcade games was a pivotal leap in game design, comparable to the move to 3D graphics during the fifth generation.

Boss (video games)

Boss (video games)

In video games, a boss is a significant computer-controlled opponent. A fight with a boss character is commonly referred to as a boss battle or boss fight. Bosses are generally far stronger than other opponents the player has faced up to that point. Boss battles are generally seen at climax points of particular sections of games, such as at the end of a level or stage or guarding a specific objective. A miniboss is a boss weaker or less significant than the main boss in the same area or level, though usually more powerful than the standard opponents and often fought alongside them. A superboss is generally much more powerful than the bosses encountered as part of the main game's plot and is often an optional encounter. A final boss is often the main antagonist of a game's story and the defeat of that character usually provides a positive conclusion to the game. A boss rush is a stage where the player faces multiple previous bosses again in succession.

2.5D

2.5D

2.5D perspective refers to gameplay or movement in a video game or virtual reality environment that is restricted to a two-dimensional (2D) plane with little to no access to a third dimension in a space that otherwise appears to be three-dimensional and is often simulated and rendered in a 3D digital environment.

Doppelgänger

Doppelgänger

A doppelgänger, doppelgaenger or doppelganger is a biologically unrelated look-alike, or a double, of a living person.

Sonic Rush Adventure

Sonic Rush Adventure

Sonic Rush Adventure is a 2007 adventure platform game for the Nintendo DS and the sequel to 2005's Sonic Rush. It follows Sonic the Hedgehog and Tails, who are teleported to an alternate dimension and seek the help of Blaze the Cat, while battling a band of robot pirates. Gameplay is similar to prior installments in the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, with players controlling Sonic or Blaze through a series of side-scrolling levels while collecting rings and defeating enemies. Sonic Rush Adventure deviates from prior games with its elements of sea travel, featuring boating minigames that take advantage of the DS's touchscreen.

Gameplay

Blaze runs through a loop in an early level of the game, demonstrating the dual-screen feature.
Blaze runs through a loop in an early level of the game, demonstrating the dual-screen feature.

Sonic Rush is a 2D platform game, similar to earlier games in the series as well as later ones like Sonic Advance and Sonic Mania. The player controls either Sonic the Hedgehog or Blaze the Cat, who differ in terms of special abilities.[3] In the tradition of past Sonic games, gameplay consists of moving quickly through levels, collecting rings and defeating enemies.[4][5][6] The player collects rings as a form of health; when they are attacked by an enemy or harmful obstacle, their rings bounce in all directions. The player starts the game with a certain number of lives, which are lost when they are hit without any rings in their possession, get crushed, drown, fall into a bottomless pit, or exceed an act 10-minute limit. The game ends when the player loses their last life. Both of the DS's screens are used to display the play area, with the player's character moving between them as necessary.[4][7] Levels in the game are divided into "zones", each consisting of two acts of normal gameplay then a 3D boss battle. The course of the game differs depending on whether Sonic or Blaze is chosen;[8] the seven zones are the same, but are accessed in different orders.[3] During boss battles, Blaze fights Doctor Eggman[9] and Sonic fights an Eggman doppelgänger called Eggman Nega.[7][10] As the characters' stories progress, they meet each other several times and unite in the final zone that comes after the seventh.[8] The game features special stages the player can access via certain handles in order to obtain the Chaos Emeralds. These Special Stages resemble those of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and use the DS' stylus controls.[11]

New features include a grading system that grades the player based on the time it takes for them to complete the level; they can return to levels later to try for a higher grade.[7] There is a point system based on the one in Sonic Advance 2 but displaying points in multiple categories. Sonic Rush introduces a "Tension Gauge" on the left side of the screen which is filled by doing tricks and defeating enemies.[3] The energy it generates allows the player to use boosts of speed while moving;[4] defeating enemies,[3][5] moving through the level more quickly which results in more points and a higher grade, and when playing as Sonic, accessing the special stage.[4] Although the game is primarily two-dimensional, there are three-dimensional elements which create a 2.5D effect. For the first time in the series, Sonic and Blaze's sprites are rendered in 3D.[3]

The game has a two-player mode in which Sonic and Blaze race to the end of a chosen level from the game. There is also a feature in which players who own the game can send a demo of the game to other Nintendo DS users.[4][8]

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Platform game

Platform game

A platform game is a sub-genre of action video games in which the core objective is to move the player character between points in an environment. Platform games are characterized by levels that consist of uneven terrain and suspended platforms of varying height that require jumping and climbing to traverse. Other acrobatic maneuvers may factor into the gameplay, such as swinging from vines or grappling hooks, jumping off walls, air dashing, gliding through the air, being shot from cannons, or bouncing from springboards or trampolines. Games where jumping is automated completely, such as 3D games in The Legend of Zelda series, fall outside of the genre.

Sonic Advance

Sonic Advance

Sonic Advance is a 2001 platform game developed by Dimps for the Game Boy Advance (GBA). It was the first Sonic the Hedgehog game released on a Nintendo console with Sonic Adventure 2: Battle on the GameCube, and was produced in commemoration of the series' tenth anniversary. The story follows Sonic, Tails, Knuckles, and Amy as they journey to stop Doctor Eggman from taking over the world. Controlling a character, players are tasked with completing each level, defeating Eggman and his robot army, and collecting the seven Chaos Emeralds.

Sonic Mania

Sonic Mania

Sonic Mania is a 2017 platform game published by Sega for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Windows. Produced in commemoration of the Sonic the Hedgehog series' 25th anniversary, Sonic Mania pays homage to the original Sega Genesis Sonic games, featuring speedy side-scrolling gameplay. It takes place over 13 levels, including several redesigned from past games. The story follows Sonic, Tails and Knuckles as they venture to defeat their nemesis Doctor Eggman and his robotic henchmen, the Hard-Boiled Heavies.

Sonic the Hedgehog (character)

Sonic the Hedgehog (character)

Sonic the Hedgehog is the title character and the main protagonist of the video game series of the same name published by Sega, and appears in numerous spin-off comics, animations, and other media. He is an anthropomorphic blue hedgehog who can run at supersonic speeds and curl into a ball, primarily to attack enemies. In most games, Sonic must race through levels, collecting power-up rings and avoiding obstacles and enemies.

Boss (video games)

Boss (video games)

In video games, a boss is a significant computer-controlled opponent. A fight with a boss character is commonly referred to as a boss battle or boss fight. Bosses are generally far stronger than other opponents the player has faced up to that point. Boss battles are generally seen at climax points of particular sections of games, such as at the end of a level or stage or guarding a specific objective. A miniboss is a boss weaker or less significant than the main boss in the same area or level, though usually more powerful than the standard opponents and often fought alongside them. A superboss is generally much more powerful than the bosses encountered as part of the main game's plot and is often an optional encounter. A final boss is often the main antagonist of a game's story and the defeat of that character usually provides a positive conclusion to the game. A boss rush is a stage where the player faces multiple previous bosses again in succession.

Doppelgänger

Doppelgänger

A doppelgänger, doppelgaenger or doppelganger is a biologically unrelated look-alike, or a double, of a living person.

Sonic Advance 2

Sonic Advance 2

Sonic Advance 2 is a 2002 side-scrolling platform video game developed by Dimps for the Game Boy Advance. It is an installment in the Sonic the Hedgehog series and the sequel to 2001's Sonic Advance. The story follows Sonic as he sets out to save his friends and retrieve the seven magical Chaos Emeralds from series antagonist Doctor Eggman. Gameplay consists of the player completing various levels as one of five characters, each with their own unique attributes. After each zone is completed, the player faces Doctor Eggman in a boss battle.

2.5D

2.5D

2.5D perspective refers to gameplay or movement in a video game or virtual reality environment that is restricted to a two-dimensional (2D) plane with little to no access to a third dimension in a space that otherwise appears to be three-dimensional and is often simulated and rendered in a 3D digital environment.

Sprite (computer graphics)

Sprite (computer graphics)

In computer graphics, a sprite is a two-dimensional bitmap that is integrated into a larger scene, most often in a 2D video game. Originally, the term sprite referred to fixed-sized objects composited together, by hardware, with a background. Use of the term has since become more general.

Game demo

Game demo

A game demo is a trial version of a video game that is limited to a certain time limit or a point in progress, which leads to the player buying the game if they liked it. A game demo comes in forms such as shareware, demo disc, downloadable software and tech demos.

Plot

Sonic fights one of the game's bosses, the Egg Scarab. Boss battles are rendered in 3D.
Sonic fights one of the game's bosses, the Egg Scarab. Boss battles are rendered in 3D.

Blaze the Cat is somehow pulled from her native dimension into Sonic's world. Her world had seven Sol Emeralds—similar to the Chaos Emeralds—but they were stolen by Doctor Eggman.[3] She then makes it her goal to retrieve them. While searching, she meets Cream the Rabbit and is surprised by her politeness. Meanwhile, Sonic is searching for the Chaos Emeralds, which have been stolen by Doctor Eggman Nega, Eggman's alternate counterpart from Blaze's dimension.[8]

Sonic briefly encounters Blaze during his search, but she departs before he can question her. His friend Tails learns that the two dimensions are merging somehow, and both will collapse if the process is not stopped.[3] Suspicious of Blaze, Sonic and Tails begin searching for her. Upon finding Blaze and Cream, Sonic questions Blaze about her nature, but she refuses to give any information and leaves with Cream. Sonic follows her to Eggman Nega's base, where it is revealed that Eggman and Eggman Nega are working together to collect both the Chaos Emeralds and the Sol Emeralds. Blaze declares that she is the only one who can save their worlds, without anyone's help. Sonic and Blaze fight each other, until Sonic wins the fight and Blaze realizes the error of her ways.

After Eggman kidnaps Cream, Blaze goes after him while Sonic takes on Nega. Sonic collects the last of the seven Chaos Emeralds and catches up with Blaze, who fails to prevent Eggman and Eggman Nega from draining the Sol Emeralds's power for their Egg Salamander mech. As the world begins to destabilize, Sonic and his friends help Blaze realize the meaning of friendship. This restores the Sol Emeralds, and Sonic and Blaze use both sets of Emeralds to transform into Super Sonic and Burning Blaze. The two destroy the Egg Salamander, restoring the dimensions to normal, and Blaze returns to her world, now better understanding her powers. Cream is saddened by Blaze's departure, but Sonic assures her that Blaze promised to return someday.

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Development

Sonic Rush was developed by Sonic Team and Dimps, and published by Sega.[4] Yuji Naka, Sega's executive managing director, announced the game at Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) 2004, along with Project Rub.[12] A demo of the newly titled Sonic Rush was featured at E3 2005,[13] and won video game publication IGN's "Biggest Surprise" award.[14] Blaze the Cat, a new character, was revealed at Tokyo Game Show (TGS) 2005.[13] The game's 2.5D format was based on Sonic Team's idea to combine elements from 2D and 3D games in the series. Director Akinori Nishiyama stated in a September 2005 interview with GameSpot that Sonic Team "wanted to keep the elements from 2D, yet still explore some of the new elements from 3D."[8] At TGS 2005, he stated that while working on Sonic Advance 3, he realized that the series was becoming more complicated, opting for a "fast, dynamic action" approach to the next title in the series.[15]

The music was primarily composed by Hideki Naganuma of Jet Set Radio fame. Additional music was composed by the game's sound director Teruhiko Nakagawa,[16] along with Masayoshi Ishi and Hiroyuki Hamada of T's Music.[17] Composing the music was a challenge for Naganuma, who had to work under the limitations of the Nintendo DS' sound chip.[18]

Sonic Rush introduced Blaze, who has become a recurring character in the series. Blaze appeared for the second time in Sonic the Hedgehog in 2006,[19] and then in Sonic Rush Adventure, the sequel to Sonic Rush,[20] and numerous other games.[21]

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Sonic Team

Sonic Team

Sonic Team is a video game developer owned by the Japanese video game company Sega as part of its Sega CS Research and Development No. 2 division. Sonic Team is best known for the long-running Sonic the Hedgehog series and games such as Nights into Dreams and Phantasy Star Online.

Dimps

Dimps

Dimps Corporation is a Japanese video game developer based in Osaka, Japan, with an additional office in Tokyo. It is best known for developing games in the Sonic the Hedgehog, Dragon Ball and Street Fighter franchises. The company was founded on March 6, 2000 by several former SNK and Capcom employees, including Street Fighter, Fatal Fury, Art of Fighting and The King of Fighters co-creator Takashi Nishiyama and Hiroshi Matsumoto.

Sega

Sega

Sega Corporation is a Japanese multinational video game and entertainment company headquartered in Shinagawa, Tokyo. Its international branches, Sega of America and Sega Europe, are headquartered in Irvine, California and London, respectively. Its division for the development of both arcade games and home video games, Sega Games, has existed in its current state since 2020; from 2015 to that point, the two had made up separate entities known as Sega Games and Sega Interactive Co., Ltd. Sega is a subsidiary of Sega Sammy Holdings. From 1983 until 2001, Sega also developed video game consoles.

IGN

IGN

IGN is an American video game and entertainment media website operated by IGN Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Ziff Davis, Inc. The company's headquarters is located in San Francisco's SoMa district and is headed by its former editor-in-chief, Peer Schneider. The IGN website was the brainchild of media entrepreneur Chris Anderson and launched on September 29, 1996. It focuses on games, films, anime, television, comics, technology, and other media. Originally a network of desktop websites, IGN is now also distributed on mobile platforms, console programs on the Xbox and PlayStation, FireTV, Roku, and via YouTube, Twitch, Hulu, and Snapchat.

Tokyo Game Show

Tokyo Game Show

Tokyo Game Show , commonly known as TGS, is a video game expo / convention held annually in September in the Makuhari Messe, in Chiba, Japan. It is presented by the Computer Entertainment Supplier's Association (CESA) and Nikkei Business Publications, Inc. The main focus of the show is on Japanese games, but some international video game developers use it to showcase upcoming releases/related hardware. The duration of the event is four days. The first two days of Tokyo Game Show are open only to industry attendees (business) and the general public can attend during the final two days.

GameSpot

GameSpot

GameSpot is an American video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information on video games. The site was launched on May 1, 1996, created by Pete Deemer, Vince Broady and Jon Epstein. In addition to the information produced by GameSpot staff, the site also allows users to write their own reviews, blogs, and post on the site's forums. It has been owned by Fandom, Inc. since October 2022.

Sonic Advance 3

Sonic Advance 3

Sonic Advance 3 is a platform video game developed by Dimps and Sonic Team for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. It is part of the Sonic the Hedgehog series, and the sequel to Sonic Advance 2. The game stars the characters Sonic, Tails, Knuckles, Amy, and Cream as they seek to keep Doctor Eggman and his robot assistant Gemerl from building empires on each of seven chunks Eggman has divided the Earth into.

Hideki Naganuma

Hideki Naganuma

Hideki Naganuma is a Japanese composer and DJ who primarily does work for video games. Naganuma is best known for his score for the game Jet Set Radio and its sequel Jet Set Radio Future.

Jet Set Radio

Jet Set Radio

Jet Set Radio is a 2000 action game developed by Smilebit and published by Sega for the Dreamcast. The player controls a member of a youth gang, the GGs, as they use inline skates to traverse Tokyo, spraying graffiti, challenging rival gangs, and evading authorities.

Sound chip

Sound chip

A sound chip is an integrated circuit (chip) designed to produce audio signals through digital, analog or mixed-mode electronics. Sound chips are typically fabricated on metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) mixed-signal chips that process audio signals. They normally contain audio components such as oscillators, envelope controllers, samplers, filters, amplifiers, and envelope generators.

Sonic the Hedgehog (2006 video game)

Sonic the Hedgehog (2006 video game)

Sonic the Hedgehog is a 2006 platform game developed by Sonic Team and published by Sega. It was produced in commemoration of the Sonic series' 15th anniversary, and intended as a reboot for the seventh-generation video game consoles. Players control Sonic, Shadow, and the new character Silver, who battle Solaris, an ancient evil pursued by Doctor Eggman. Each playable character has his own campaign and abilities, and must complete levels, explore hub worlds and fight bosses to advance the story. In multiplayer modes, players can work cooperatively to collect Chaos Emeralds or race to the end of a level.

Sonic Rush Adventure

Sonic Rush Adventure

Sonic Rush Adventure is a 2007 adventure platform game for the Nintendo DS and the sequel to 2005's Sonic Rush. It follows Sonic the Hedgehog and Tails, who are teleported to an alternate dimension and seek the help of Blaze the Cat, while battling a band of robot pirates. Gameplay is similar to prior installments in the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise, with players controlling Sonic or Blaze through a series of side-scrolling levels while collecting rings and defeating enemies. Sonic Rush Adventure deviates from prior games with its elements of sea travel, featuring boating minigames that take advantage of the DS's touchscreen.

Reception

Sonic Rush was released on November 15, 2005, in North America; November 18 in Europe; and November 23 in Japan.[2] It was the ninth best-selling DS game of December 2006.[24] It sold 360,000 copies in Europe from March 2006 to March 2007.[25] The game received a "Platinum" sales award from the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA),[26] indicating sales of at least 300,000 copies in the United Kingdom.[27]

The game was released to "generally favorable" reviews, according to video game review aggregator Metacritic.[23] Critics praised the game for its usage of elements from older Sonic games. GameSpot, IGN, and Nintendo Power compared the game to older games in the series, specifically those on the Sega Genesis.[3][4][11] GameSpy staff writer Greg Sewart offered a similar opinion, also praising the game for its "gorgeous graphics".[5] The visuals were well received, with some calling it "gorgeous" and "colourful".[28][23][5] The game's overall quickness was not as well received. GameSpy's Greg Sewart, although giving a mostly positive review, complained that "it's so fast you almost can't tell what's going on most of the time."[5] 1UP.com and GamePro thought similarly.[7][22] The game's music was well-received, called "bright [and] buoyant" by 1UP.com and compared to that of Jet Set Radio by GameSpot.[3] GameSpy called the music "all very fitting and very catchy", noting its use of sampling and unconventional structure.[22]

In 2008, Sonic Rush was listed at #17 in IGN's list of the top 25 DS games.[6] In 2009, it was listed as one of the "cheers" on IGN's "Cheers & Tears" list of action games for the DS.[29]

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Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, television shows, music albums, video games, and formerly books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999, and is owned by Fandom, Inc. as of 2023.

GamePro

GamePro

Gamepro.com is an international multiplatform video game magazine media company that covers the video game industry, video game hardware and video game software in countries such as Germany and France. The publication, GamePro, was originally launched as an American online and print content video game magazine. The magazine featured content on various video game consoles, PC computers and mobile devices. GamePro Media properties included GamePro magazine and their website. The company was also a part subsidiary of the privately held International Data Group (IDG), a media, events and research technology group. The magazine and its parent publication printing the magazine went defunct in 2011, but is outlasted by Gamepro.com.

GameSpot

GameSpot

GameSpot is an American video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information on video games. The site was launched on May 1, 1996, created by Pete Deemer, Vince Broady and Jon Epstein. In addition to the information produced by GameSpot staff, the site also allows users to write their own reviews, blogs, and post on the site's forums. It has been owned by Fandom, Inc. since October 2022.

GameSpy

GameSpy

GameSpy was an American provider of online multiplayer and matchmaking middleware for video games founded in 1996 by Mark Surfas. After the release of a multiplayer server browser for the game, QSpy, Surfas licensed the software under the GameSpy brand to other video game publishers through a newly established company, GameSpy Industries, which also incorporated his Planet Network of video game news and information websites, and GameSpy.com.

IGN

IGN

IGN is an American video game and entertainment media website operated by IGN Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Ziff Davis, Inc. The company's headquarters is located in San Francisco's SoMa district and is headed by its former editor-in-chief, Peer Schneider. The IGN website was the brainchild of media entrepreneur Chris Anderson and launched on September 29, 1996. It focuses on games, films, anime, television, comics, technology, and other media. Originally a network of desktop websites, IGN is now also distributed on mobile platforms, console programs on the Xbox and PlayStation, FireTV, Roku, and via YouTube, Twitch, Hulu, and Snapchat.

Nintendo Power

Nintendo Power

Nintendo Power was a video game news and strategy magazine from Nintendo of America, first published in July/August 1988 as Nintendo's official print magazine for North America. The magazine's publication was initially done monthly by Nintendo of America, then independently, and in December 2007 contracted to Future US, the American subsidiary of British publisher Future. Its 24–year production run is one of the longest of all video game magazines in the United States and Canada.

Review aggregator

Review aggregator

A review aggregator is a system that collects reviews of products and services. This system stores the reviews and uses them for purposes such as supporting a website where users can view the reviews, selling information to third parties about consumer tendencies, and creating databases for companies to learn about their actual and potential customers. The system enables users to easily compare many different reviews of the same work. Many of these systems calculate an approximate average assessment, usually based on assigning a numeric value to each review related to its degree of positive rating of the work.

Sega Genesis

Sega Genesis

The Sega Genesis, known as the Mega Drive outside North America, is a 16-bit fourth generation home video game console developed and sold by Sega. It was Sega's third console and the successor to the Master System. Sega released it in 1988 in Japan as the Mega Drive, and in 1989 in North America as the Genesis. In 1990, it was distributed as the Mega Drive by Virgin Mastertronic in Europe, Ozisoft in Australasia, and Tec Toy in Brazil. In South Korea, it was distributed by Samsung as the Super Gam*Boy and later the Super Aladdin Boy.

Jet Set Radio

Jet Set Radio

Jet Set Radio is a 2000 action game developed by Smilebit and published by Sega for the Dreamcast. The player controls a member of a youth gang, the GGs, as they use inline skates to traverse Tokyo, spraying graffiti, challenging rival gangs, and evading authorities.

Sampling (music)

Sampling (music)

In sound and music, sampling is the reuse of a portion of a sound recording in another recording. Samples may comprise elements such as rhythm, melody, speech, sounds or entire bars of music, and may be layered, equalized, sped up or slowed down, repitched, looped, or otherwise manipulated. They are usually integrated using hardware (samplers) or software such as digital audio workstations.

Source: "Sonic Rush", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonic_Rush.

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Notes
  1. ^ Japanese: ソニック・ラッシュ[2], Hepburn: Sonikku Rasshu
References
  1. ^ Doree, Adam (2005-11-30). "Sonic Team Interview November 2005". Kikizo. Retrieved 2014-07-09.
  2. ^ a b "Related Games". GameSpot. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved March 31, 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Gerstmann, Jeff (November 14, 2005). "Sonic Rush for DS Review - DS Sonic Rush Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on March 2, 2009. Retrieved February 20, 2009.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Harris, Craig (November 11, 2005). "IGN: Sonic Rush Review". IGN. Archived from the original on May 16, 2012. Retrieved February 19, 2009.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Sewart, Greg (November 15, 2005). "GameSpy: Sonic Rush Review". GameSpy. Retrieved February 20, 2009.
  6. ^ a b "IGN: The Top 25 Nintendo DS Games". IGN. October 24, 2008. Retrieved March 3, 2009.
  7. ^ a b c d e Ouroboros (November 17, 2005). "Review : Sonic Rush (DS) - from GamePro.com". Archived from the original on 2011-06-07. Retrieved February 26, 2009.
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