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Slovenia national football team

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Slovenia
Shirt badge/Association crest
AssociationFootball Association of Slovenia
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachMatjaž Kek
CaptainJan Oblak
Most capsBoštjan Cesar (101)
Top scorerZlatko Zahovič (35)
Home stadiumStožice Stadium
FIFA codeSVN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 63 Increase 2 (6 October 2022)[1]
Highest15 (October–November 2010)
Lowest134 (December 1993)
First international
Unofficial
Kingdom of Yugoslavia Slovenia 0–5 France 
(Ljubljana, Kingdom of SCS; 23 June 1921)
Official
 Estonia 1–1 Slovenia 
(Tallinn, Estonia; 3 June 1992)
Biggest win
 Oman 0–7 Slovenia 
(Muscat, Oman; 8 February 1999)
Biggest defeat
 France 5–0 Slovenia 
(Saint-Denis, France; 12 October 2002)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2002)
Best resultGroup stage (2002 and 2010)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2000)
Best resultGroup stage (2000)

The Slovenia national football team (Slovene: Slovenska nogometna reprezentanca) represents Slovenia in men's international football and is controlled by the Football Association of Slovenia, the governing body for football in Slovenia. The squad is under the global jurisdiction of FIFA and is governed in Europe by UEFA. It competes in the three major professional tournaments available to European nations: the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Slovenia played its first official match in 1992, one year after the country gained independence from Yugoslavia. The majority of Slovenia's home matches are played at Stožice Stadium in Ljubljana.

Slovenia have qualified for the FIFA World Cup on two occasions, and the UEFA European Championship once, but have never progressed beyond the group stage of a finals tournament. At the 2010 FIFA World Cup, Slovenia achieved its first (and so far only) victory in a major tournament, defeating Algeria 1–0. The team have achieved some noteworthy results, such as beating the 2006 FIFA World Cup winners Italy 1–0 in 2004, which was Italy's only defeat in the entire 2006 World Cup campaign. Their biggest defeat came in 2002 with a 5–0 loss to France, while their highest-scoring victory was a 7–0 win over Oman in 1999.

Boštjan Cesar holds the record for Slovenia appearances, having played 101 times between 2003 and 2018. Zlatko Zahovič scored 35 goals for Slovenia and is the record holder for most goals scored.

Discover more about Slovenia national football team related topics

Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel the ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposition by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

Football Association of Slovenia

Football Association of Slovenia

The Football Association of Slovenia is the governing body of football in Slovenia. It organizes the first division, second division, third division, Slovenian Cup, Slovenian Women's League, and other competitions. It is also responsible for the Slovenia national football team and the Slovenia women's national football team. It was founded as Ljubljana Football Subassociation on 24 April 1920.

Football in Slovenia

Football in Slovenia

Football in Slovenia is governed by the Football Association of Slovenia. Slovenia has participated in international football as an independent nation since 1991, when the country gained independence from SFR Yugoslavia. The Slovenia national football team has qualified for three major tournaments.

FIFA

FIFA

FIFA is the international governing body of association football, beach football and futsal. It was founded in 1904 to oversee international competition among the national associations of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. Headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, its membership now comprises 211 national associations. These national associations must each also be members of one of the six regional confederations into which the world is divided: CAF (Africa), AFC, UEFA (Europe), CONCACAF, OFC (Oceania) and CONMEBOL.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

Breakup of Yugoslavia

Breakup of Yugoslavia

The breakup of Yugoslavia occurred as a result of a series of political upheavals and conflicts during the early 1990s. After a period of political and economic crisis in the 1980s, constituent republics of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia split apart, but the unresolved issues caused bitter inter-ethnic Yugoslav wars. The wars primarily affected Bosnia and Herzegovina, neighbouring parts of Croatia and, some years later, Kosovo.

2010 FIFA World Cup

2010 FIFA World Cup

The 2010 FIFA World Cup, also branded as South Africa 2010, was the 19th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in South Africa from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco to become the first African nation to host the finals.

Algeria national football team

Algeria national football team

The Algeria national football team represents Algeria in men's international football and is governed by the Algerian Football Federation. The team plays their home matches at the 5 July Stadium in Algiers and Miloud Hadefi Stadium in Oran. Algeria joined FIFA on 1 January 1964, a year and a half after gaining independence. They are the current champions of the FIFA Arab Cup.

2006 FIFA World Cup

2006 FIFA World Cup

The 2006 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Germany 2006, was the 18th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which had won the right to host the event in July 2000. Teams representing 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams qualified from this process along with hosts Germany for the finals tournament. It was the second time that Germany staged the competition and the first as a unified country along with the former East Germany with Leipzig as a host city, and the 10th time that the tournament was held in Europe.

Italy national football team

Italy national football team

The Italy national football team has represented Italy in international football since its first match in 1910. The national team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy, which is a co-founder and member of UEFA. Italy's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Italy, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Centro Tecnico Federale di Coverciano, is located in Florence. Italy are the reigning European champions, having won UEFA Euro 2020.

France national football team

France national football team

The France national football team represents France in men's international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF. The team's colours are blue, white, and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus. They are the reigning world champions, having won the most recent World Cup final in 2018.

Boštjan Cesar

Boštjan Cesar

Boštjan Cesar is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a centre-back.

History

Origins and pre-independence years (1921–1991)

Before Slovenia's independence in 1991, the national football team of Slovenia existed only as a regional team, not officially recognised by FIFA. On 23 June 1921, the Slovenian capital Ljubljana hosted a match between France and a selection of players from Slovenian clubs. One of the guests at the match was the acting FIFA president Jules Rimet,[3] who later initiated the first FIFA World Cup tournament. The French team won the match 5–0 and, although the match was not official by international standards, it was, at least in Slovenia, generally accepted as the first appearance of the Slovenian national team.[3][4] In the following decades, Slovenia played four more unofficial friendly matches: in 1956 against China, in 1968 against Austria, in 1990 against Bosnia and Herzegovina, and in 1991 against Croatia.[4]

Independence, first victory and first qualifiers (1992–1998)

In 1992, one year after Slovenia's independence from Yugoslavia, the national team was admitted to UEFA and FIFA.[5] On 3 June of the same year, Slovenia played its first FIFA-recognised game, a friendly match against Estonia in Tallinn.[6] The match ended in a 1–1 draw, and the first official goal for the team was scored by Igor Benedejčič. The first team manager was Bojan Prašnikar.[7] On 7 April 1993, the two teams played another friendly, and this time Slovenia achieved its first international victory by winning the match 2–0.[8]

In 1994, managed by Zdenko Verdenik, Slovenia debuted in official competitions as the team competed in the UEFA Euro 1996 qualifiers. Slovenia played in Group 4 and finished in fifth place out of six teams, with eleven points.[9] In the opening match of the qualifiers, Slovenia drew 1–1 at home against the 1994 FIFA World Cup finalists Italy.[10] In the qualifiers for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, in a group with Denmark, Croatia, Greece and Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia finished in last place, registering just one point in eight matches.[11]

Golden generation (1998–2002)

UEFA Euro 2000 campaign

In July 1998, Srečko Katanec was appointed as the new manager of the team.[12] Under his guidance, Slovenia finished the UEFA Euro 2000 qualifiers in second place, only behind Norway.[13] Zlatko Zahovič scored eight of Slovenia's twelve goals in the qualifiers.[14] In the additional playoffs, Slovenia faced Ukraine. The first leg was played in Ljubljana, which Slovenia won 2–1 after going a goal behind. Zahovič scored Slovenia's first goal, and Milenko Ačimovič scored a goal from the halfway line late in the match for the final score of 2–1.[15] The second match was played in snowy conditions in Kyiv. Serhii Rebrov scored from the penalty spot in the 68th minute to give Ukraine a lead, while Slovenia equalised eight minutes later with a goal by Miran Pavlin.[16] The 1–1 draw meant that Slovenia won 3–2 on aggregate and qualified for its first major tournament.[16]

Slovenia's lineup for their first ever game at a major tournament, against FR Yugoslavia at the UEFA Euro 2000.[17]

At UEFA Euro 2000, Slovenia were drawn into Group C, together with Spain, FR Yugoslavia and Norway. In the first game, Slovenia played against Yugoslavia and took a 3–0 lead after one hour of play, with Zahovič scoring twice and Pavlin once. However, Yugoslavia made a comeback as they scored three goals in just six minutes for a final score of 3–3, playing with only ten players after Siniša Mihajlović was sent off when the score was still 3–0 for Slovenia.[17] The second game against Spain was played in Amsterdam. Spain took a 1–0 lead with a goal by Raúl, but Slovenia equalised after one hour of play as Zahovič scored his third goal of the tournament. Just a minute later, Spain was leading again as Joseba Etxeberria scored the winning goal.[18] In the last round of the group stage, Slovenia played against Norway and still had a chance to progress to the quarterfinals. The match finished in a goalless draw and Slovenia won its second point of the tournament, but was eliminated.[19]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Spain 3 2 0 1 6 5 +1 6 Advance to knockout stage
2  FR Yugoslavia 3 1 1 1 7 7 0 4
3  Norway 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 4
4 Slovenia 3 0 2 1 4 5 −1 2
Source: RSSSF

2002 FIFA World Cup campaign

For the 2002 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, Slovenia were drawn into a group with Russia, FR Yugoslavia, Switzerland, Faroe Islands and Luxembourg.[20] In its first five qualifying games, Slovenia won only one match (away at Luxembourg), and even drew 2–2 with the underdogs Faroe Islands despite leading 2–0 with less than five minutes remaining.[21] In the next five matches, Slovenia won four times, including a last minute victory over Russia.[20] Slovenia finished in second place without a single defeat, and advanced to the playoff stage.[20] In the playoffs, Slovenia faced Romania. They came from a goal down to win the first game 2–1 with the goals from Ačimovič in the first half and Milan Osterc in the second half.[20] In the second leg in Bucharest, Slovenia took the lead with a goal scored by Mladen Rudonja.[20] The final result was 1–1, and Slovenia qualified for its second consecutive major tournament and first ever World Cup.[22][23]

At the World Cup, Slovenia played in Group B with Spain, Paraguay and South Africa. In the first game, Slovenia faced Spain for the second time in a row at a big tournament, having lost the previous game at Euro 2000. Spain took the lead in the first half with the goal from Raúl. Juan Carlos Valerón scored Spain's second goal 15 minutes before full-time for a 2–0 lead. A few minutes later, Sebastjan Cimirotič scored the first World Cup goal for Slovenia to reduce the score to 2–1, before Fernando Hierro scored in the 87th minute for the final score of 3–1.[24] The match is notable due to the conflict between manager Katanec and star player Zahovič, after which Katanec announced his retirement after the tournament, while Zahovič was expelled from the team and sent home.[25] Slovenia lost the two remaining matches against South Africa (1–0) and Paraguay (3–1) and finished last in the group with three defeats.[26][27]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Spain 3 3 0 0 9 4 +5 9 Advance to knockout stage
2  Paraguay 3 1 1 1 6 6 0 4
3  South Africa 3 1 1 1 5 5 0 4
4 Slovenia 3 0 0 3 2 7 −5 0
Source: RSSSF

Decline (2003–2007)

After the resignation of Katanec, Prašnikar took over the team on a four-year contract.[28] The team has undergone some major changes, with several key players retiring from the national team.[29]

In the UEFA Euro 2004 qualifying campaign, Slovenia played against France, Israel, Cyprus and Malta. The team finished in second place with four wins out of eight games, however, they lost both matches against France without scoring any goals.[30] In the playoffs, Slovenia played against its biggest rivals, Croatia. The first leg was played in Zagreb, where Croatia took the lead as Dado Pršo scored a goal in the fifth minute, while Slovenia equalised in the 22nd minute with a goal by Ermin Šiljak, for the final score of 1–1.[30][31] In the second leg, Pršo scored the only goal of the game 15 minutes into the second half.[30] Croatia qualified for the UEFA Euro 2004 with the aggregate score of 2–1, and Slovenia failed to qualify for its third consecutive major tournament. Šiljak scored a total of nine goals in the whole campaign, thus becoming the top goalscorer of the whole UEFA qualification tournament.[32]

In May 2004, Prašnikar was replaced by Branko Oblak.[33] Under Oblak's management, Slovenia played in the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifiers. Grouped with Italy, Norway, Scotland, Belarus and Moldova, the team started with victories over Moldova and Italy and a draw against Scotland, but still finished in fourth place after securing only five points in the remaining seven matches.[34] With the victory over Italy, Slovenia became the only team to beat the eventual world champions, as Italy did not lose another game during the entire campaign (qualifiers and the main tournament).[35]

Oblak was still in charge of Slovenia when the UEFA Euro 2008 qualifiers started. Grouped with the Netherlands, Romania, Bulgaria, Belarus, Albania and Luxembourg, the team started out with defeats to Bulgaria and Belarus, thus significantly reducing their chances to qualify, and as a result, in November 2006, Oblak was dismissed by the Football Association of Slovenia.[36] During his two-year stint as the manager, Oblak tried out over forty different players.[37]

In January 2007, Matjaž Kek was appointed as the new manager of the national team.[38] He led Slovenia in the remainder of the Euro 2008 qualifiers, where Slovenia finished in sixth place, only above Luxembourg.[39]

First World Cup victory (2008–2011)

Slovenian players celebrating Nejc Pečnik's goal against Russia in the 2010 World Cup playoffs.
Slovenian players celebrating Nejc Pečnik's goal against Russia in the 2010 World Cup playoffs.

For the 2010 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, Slovenia were drawn into a group with the Czech Republic, Poland, Northern Ireland, Slovakia and San Marino.[40] In its opening match, Slovenia held Poland to a 1–1 draw in Wrocław, before winning two consecutive home games against Slovakia and Northern Ireland, respectively.[41] Slovenia then won only one point in the two games against the Czech Republic and lost away to Northern Ireland, and thus fell to fifth place in the group.[42] However, the team greatly improved its form and won the last four games without conceding a single goal.[41] As runners-up, Slovenia qualified for the playoffs, where they were drawn against Russia.[43] The first leg was played in Moscow. The match ended in a 2–1 win for the home side, with Nejc Pečnik scoring a crucial away goal for Slovenia late in the game.[44] In the second leg, held in Maribor, Slovenia defeated Russia 1–0 with a goal by Zlatko Dedić, advancing to the main tournament with an aggregate score of 2–2 due to the away goals rule.[45] The top scorer of the national team during the qualifying campaign was Milivoje Novaković with five goals.[46]

At the 2010 FIFA World Cup, Slovenia played in Group C alongside England, Algeria and the United States. In the opening game against Algeria, Slovenia achieved its first ever victory at the World Cup after Robert Koren scored the only goal in the match for a 1–0 victory.[47] In their second game against the United States, Slovenia were leading 2–0 at half-time with goals from Valter Birsa and Zlatan Ljubijankić, however, Landon Donovan and Michael Bradley scored in the second half for the United States for the final score of 2–2.[48] In their last match of the group stage, Slovenia lost to England 1–0 with a goal by Jermain Defoe. The United States defeated Algeria with a goal scored in the last moments of the match, thus eliminating Slovenia from the tournament.[49]

Slovenia vs. United States at the 2010 World Cup
Slovenia vs. United States at the 2010 World Cup

After the 2010 World Cup, Slovenia achieved their highest ever position in the FIFA World Rankings, as the team was ranked 15th in October 2010.[50] However, Slovenia started the UEFA Euro 2012 qualifiers with an unexpected home defeat against Northern Ireland.[51] Two defeats against Italy and another unexpected home defeat, this time against Estonia, meant that Slovenia finished only in fourth place in the group, behind Italy, Estonia and Serbia.[52]

Katanec's second spell and management changes (2011–2018)

In October 2011, the Football Association of Slovenia appointed Slaviša Stojanović as the new manager.[53] He led the team in only nine matches, including the first four matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, where Slovenia recorded one victory and three defeats.[54] He was sacked by the end of 2012 and was replaced by Katanec, who had previously led the team between 1998 and 2002.[55][56] Under his leadership, Slovenia lost at home to Iceland, before winning four consecutive games to finish third in the group, two points behind Iceland.[54] In the qualifiers for UEFA Euro 2016, Slovenia came close to directly qualifying for the tournament for the first time, however, the team lost a decisive game away to Switzerland.[57] Slovenia led 2–0 with less than 15 minutes remaining, but the Swiss team then scored three times to win 3–2.[58] As the third-placed team, Slovenia advanced to the playoffs, where they were eliminated by the Ukraine 3–1 on aggregate.[57] The qualifiers for the 2018 FIFA World Cup were similar to the previous ones, as Slovenia narrowly lost two decisive away matches against Slovakia and England.[59] After the defeat at Wembley, where Harry Kane scored the only goal of the match in the 94th minute, Katanec announced his resignation as the manager.[60] In December 2017, Tomaž Kavčič became the new manager.[61]

In 2018, Slovenia competed in the inaugural edition of the UEFA Nations League. In accordance with the FIFA World Rankings, the team competed in the third-tier League C along with Bulgaria, Cyprus and Norway.[62] After the poor run of results, in which Slovenia obtained only one point in the first four matches, Kavčič was sacked. He became the manager with the shortest tenure in Slovenian history, leading the team in only seven games.[63] As Slovenia finished last in the group, they were supposed to be relegated to the bottom tier League D, but UEFA changed the system for the next edition and the team remained in League C.[64]

Kek's second spell and Nations League promotion (2019 to present)

Kek was appointed as the manager for the second time in November 2018.[65] Slovenia failed to make a breakthrough during the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifiers, losing both games against Austria and obtaining only one point against North Macedonia.[66] Despite the unexpected 2–0 home victory against Poland, Slovenia finished fourth in the group.[66] In the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League C, however, Slovenia remained undefeated in all six games against Greece, Moldova and Kosovo. Under the leadership of team captain Jan Oblak, Slovenia held Greece to a 0–0 draw in both matches, and also obtained all twelve available points against Moldova and Kosovo, thus securing first place in the group and promotion to League B for the 2022–23 edition.[67] In the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers, Slovenia once again failed to qualify for the main event. They started the campaign with a 1–0 home victory versus Croatia with a goal by Sandi Lovrić, which was notably Slovenia's first victory over their neighbour rivals after failing to beat them in the previous eight official matches.[68] After two narrow defeats against Russia and a surprising defeat to Cyprus, Slovenia finished fourth in the group with four wins in ten matches, behind Croatia, Russia and Slovakia.[69]

In 2022, Slovenia made their maiden appearance in League B of the Nations League, and avoided relegation after finishing third in a group with Serbia, Norway and Sweden.[70] Benjamin Šeško scored three of Slovenia's six goals in the competition,[71] including a goal in the decisive 1–1 away draw to Sweden that secured a crucial point on the last matchday.[72]

Discover more about History related topics

FIFA

FIFA

FIFA is the international governing body of association football, beach football and futsal. It was founded in 1904 to oversee international competition among the national associations of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. Headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, its membership now comprises 211 national associations. These national associations must each also be members of one of the six regional confederations into which the world is divided: CAF (Africa), AFC, UEFA (Europe), CONCACAF, OFC (Oceania) and CONMEBOL.

France national football team

France national football team

The France national football team represents France in men's international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF. The team's colours are blue, white, and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus. They are the reigning world champions, having won the most recent World Cup final in 2018.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

China national football team

China national football team

The China national football team represents the People's Republic of China in international association football and is governed by the Chinese Football Association.

Austria national football team

Austria national football team

The Austria national football team represents Austria in men's international football competition and it is controlled by the Austrian Football Association.

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

The Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football competitions, and is governed by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Until 1992, Bosnian footballers played for Yugoslavia.

Croatia national football team

Croatia national football team

The Croatia national football team represents Croatia in international football matches and is controlled by the Croatian Football Federation (HNS). The team was recognised by both FIFA and UEFA following the dissolution of Yugoslavia. Sides were active during period of political upheaval, representing sovereign entities such as the Banovina of Croatia from 1939 to 1941 or the Independent State of Croatia from 1941 to 1944.

Estonia national football team

Estonia national football team

The Estonia national football team represents Estonia in international football matches and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia. Estonia's home ground is Lilleküla Stadium in Tallinn.

Igor Benedejčič

Igor Benedejčič

Igor Benedejčič is a retired Slovenian football midfielder and manager.

Bojan Prašnikar

Bojan Prašnikar

Bojan Prašnikar is a Slovenian football manager and former player. Prašnikar managed the Slovenian national team three times, between 1991 and 1993, in 1998, and between 2002 and 2004.

1994 FIFA World Cup

1994 FIFA World Cup

The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national soccer teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from June 17 to July 17, 1994, at nine venues across the country. The United States was chosen as the host by FIFA on July 4, 1988. Despite soccer's relative lack of popularity in the host nation, the tournament was the most financially successful in World Cup history. It broke tournament records with overall attendance of 3,587,538 and an average of 68,991 per game, marks that stood unsurpassed as of 2018 despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams starting with the 1998 World Cup.

1998 FIFA World Cup

1998 FIFA World Cup

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the football world championship for men's national teams. The finals tournament was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. The country was chosen as the host nation by FIFA for the second time in the history of the tournament, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. It was the second time that France staged the competition and the ninth time that it was held in Europe. Spanning 32 days, it is the longest World Cup tournament ever held.

Team image

Nickname and mascot

The Slovenian national team does not have an official nickname and was the only team at the 2010 FIFA World Cup without one.[73][74] During the 2010 World Cup qualifiers, Slovenian journalists and the Football Association of Slovenia tried to choose a nickname for the team, but the process failed to gain the support of fans.[75] In 2010, the Slovenian web portal Siol organized a fan vote and the nickname "Kekci", a reference to the Slovenian fictional child character Kekec and the then national team manager Matjaž Kek, finished in first place.[76] However, the nickname was never officially adopted by the Football Association of Slovenia.[73] "Kekci" is still occasionally used by the Slovenian media when referring to the national team.[77][78]

During the 2010 World Cup, some foreign media articles used the nickname "Zmajčeki" (English: Little Dragons) when referring to the Slovenian national team,[79][80] however, this was the old nickname of Slovenian club NK Olimpija Ljubljana when they competed in the Yugoslav football system.[73] Because Olimpija had a long tradition in the former Yugoslav First League, football fans and the media in the countries of the former Yugoslavia still use this nickname today when referring to the Slovenian team.[81][82] The 1998–2002 generation, managed by Srečko Katanec, is still referred to as the 'golden generation'.[83][84]

In 2002, Slovenia received an official mascot for its appearance at the 2002 FIFA World Cup. The mascot, called Trigi, is based on a round shape representing the Earth or a ball, with the Triglav mountain symbol on its head in a green, white and blue colour combination.[85][86]

Kits and colours

First home kit, used until 1993

Until 1993,[87] Slovenia played its matches in white, blue and red, which are the traditional colours of the country.[88][89] In 1993, the board of the Football Association of Slovenia decided to change the main colours to green and white, which were also the main colours of Olimpija from the capital city of Ljubljana.[90][91]

In 2009, a new board of the Football Association of Slovenia immediately opted for a change of the colours. In December 2009, the board voted to change the jersey colours to white for home matches and blue for away matches.[92] The new colours came into effect in April 2012, when Nike unveiled the new home kits. The strip was all-white with a blue and green trim.[93] The new away kit, introduced a few months earlier, was all-blue with a green and white trim.[91] In 2016, the all-green version returned as an away kit, while the light blue kit became the new home kit.[94] In 2022, the new Slovenian kits were selected through an online fan vote for the first time.[95] The home colours were again changed to all-white and the away colours to all-blue, with a black pattern in the middle of the jersey on both kits.[95]

At the FIFA World Cup tournaments in 2002 and 2010, the Slovenian kit included an abstract shape of a mountain, which represented a stylized depiction of Triglav, the highest mountain in the country.[90] Since 2010, the depiction of Triglav has been used on each new kit set.[96]

Kit suppliers

Since 2007, the kit provider of the national team is Nike.[97] Previously, the kit providers were Puma, Adidas, Uhlsport, and Kappa.

Kit provider Period
Puma[98] 1993–1996
Adidas[99] 1997–2001
Uhlsport[100] 2002–2003
Kappa[101] 2003–2006
Nike[97] 2007–present

Home stadium

A total of ten venues in eight cities have hosted Slovenia's home matches.[102] The Football Association of Slovenia lists four of them, in Celje, Koper, Ljubljana and Maribor, as the national team's home stadium.[103] Since 2010, most matches have been played in Ljubljana at the Stožice Stadium, with a seating capacity of 16,038.[104][105] The final training sessions and physical preparation of the team before domestic matches are held at the National Football Centre Brdo in Predoslje.[106][107]

The first home stadium of Slovenia was the Bežigrad Stadium, located in the Bežigrad District in Ljubljana. It was the main stadium of the national team until 2004, when UEFA banned it due to insufficient infrastructure.[108] In the same year, the newly built Arena Petrol in Celje became the new main venue of the team for the next three years.[109][110] For the 2010 World Cup qualifiers, Slovenia moved to the recently renovated Ljudski vrt stadium in Maribor, where the team remained undefeated in their six home matches during the qualifying campaign (five wins and a draw), consequently qualifying for the main tournament.[111] Stožice were built in 2010, and since then the venue has hosted most of the national team's home competitive matches.[112] During the inaugural international match at the venue in August 2010, the highest ever home attendance of the Slovenian team was achieved, as 16,135 spectators gathered for a friendly match between Slovenia and Australia.[112]

Other venues where Slovenia played at least one home match are the Bonifika Stadium in Koper, Fazanerija City Stadium in Murska Sobota, Domžale Sports Park in Domžale, Nova Gorica Sports Park in Nova Gorica, Stanko Mlakar Stadium in Kranj, and ŽŠD Ljubljana Stadium in Ljubljana.[102]

Rivalries

Slovenia's main football rivals are its neighbours Croatia. The matchup between the two sides is known as the Neighbourhood derby (Slovene: Sosedski derbi).[29][113] As of March 2022 they have played each other twelve times (eleven official matches and one unofficial match).[114][115] One of the most notable matches between Slovenia and Croatia took place in 2003, where the two teams met in the qualifying playoffs for UEFA Euro 2004. After a 1–1 draw in the first match in Zagreb, Slovenia then lost 1–0 at home and failed to qualify for its third consecutive major tournament.[29] In March 2021, Slovenia finally managed to defeat Croatia after failing to do so in the previous nine matches, as they won 1–0 at home during the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifiers.[116]

Discover more about Team image related topics

2010 FIFA World Cup

2010 FIFA World Cup

The 2010 FIFA World Cup, also branded as South Africa 2010, was the 19th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in South Africa from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco to become the first African nation to host the finals.

Football Association of Slovenia

Football Association of Slovenia

The Football Association of Slovenia is the governing body of football in Slovenia. It organizes the first division, second division, third division, Slovenian Cup, Slovenian Women's League, and other competitions. It is also responsible for the Slovenia national football team and the Slovenia women's national football team. It was founded as Ljubljana Football Subassociation on 24 April 1920.

Siol

Siol

Siol.net is a Slovenian web media and the oldest news portal in Slovenia. It is owned and managed by TSmedia company that is itself owned by the Telekom Slovenije. The main contents cover daily politics, news, sports, technology, lifestyle, and motoring. Since 2020, Peter Jančič serves as the editor-in-chief.

Kekec

Kekec

Kekec is a Slovenian fictional child character created by Josip Vandot in 1918 when it was first published in Kekec on the Hard Path at the Zvonček (year19#1/2) publication.

Matjaž Kek

Matjaž Kek

Matjaž Kek is a Slovenian professional football manager and former player who is the manager of the Slovenia national team.

NK Olimpija Ljubljana (1945–2005)

NK Olimpija Ljubljana (1945–2005)

Nogometni klub Olimpija Ljubljana, commonly referred to as NK Olimpija Ljubljana or simply Olimpija, was a Slovenian association football club based in Ljubljana. The club was founded in 1945 under the name NK Enotnost and adopted the name Olimpija in 1962.

Srečko Katanec

Srečko Katanec

Srečko Katanec is a Slovenian professional football manager and former player who is the manager of the Uzbekistan national team. At international level, he was capped for both the Yugoslavia and Slovenia national teams.

2002 FIFA World Cup

2002 FIFA World Cup

The 2002 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Korea Japan 2002, was the 17th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial football world championship for men's national teams organized by FIFA. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at sites in South Korea and Japan, with its final match hosted by Japan at International Stadium in Yokohama.

Ljubljana

Ljubljana

Ljubljana is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. It is the country's cultural, educational, economic, political and administrative center.

Nike, Inc.

Nike, Inc.

Nike, Inc. is an American multinational corporation that is engaged in the design, development, manufacturing, and worldwide marketing and sales of footwear, apparel, equipment, accessories, and services. The company is headquartered near Beaverton, Oregon, in the Portland metropolitan area. It is the world's largest supplier of athletic shoes and apparel and a major manufacturer of sports equipment, with revenue in excess of US$37.4 billion in its fiscal year 2020. As of 2020, it employed 76,700 people worldwide. In 2020, the brand alone was valued in excess of $32 billion, making it the most valuable brand among sports businesses. Previously, in 2017, the Nike brand was valued at $29.6 billion. Nike ranked 89th in the 2018 Fortune 500 list of the largest United States corporations by total revenue.

Adidas

Adidas

Adidas AG is a German multinational corporation, founded and headquartered in Herzogenaurach, Bavaria, that designs and manufactures shoes, clothing and accessories. It is the largest sportswear manufacturer in Europe, and the second largest in the world, after Nike. It is the holding company for the Adidas Group, which consists 8.33% stake of the football club Bayern München, and Runtastic, an Austrian fitness technology company. Adidas's revenue for 2018 was listed at €21.915 billion.

Kappa (brand)

Kappa (brand)

Kappa is an Italian sportswear brand founded in Turin, Piedmont, Italy in 1978 by Marco Boglione, as a sportswear branch of the already existing "Robe di Kappa".

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.[117]

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixtures

2022

26 March Friendly Croatia  1–1  Slovenia Al Rayyan, Qatar
17:00 UTC+3
  • Kramarić 39'
Report
Stadium: Education City Stadium
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Abdullah Jamali (Kuwait)
29 March Friendly Qatar  0–0  Slovenia Al Rayyan, Qatar
20:30 UTC+3 Report Stadium: Education City Stadium
Referee: Youssef Essrayri (Tunisia)
2 June 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Slovenia  0–2  Sweden Ljubljana, Slovenia
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Stožice Stadium
Attendance: 5,123
Referee: Ruddy Buquet (France)
9 June 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Norway  0–0  Slovenia Oslo, Norway
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Ullevaal Stadion
Attendance: 18,134
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)
12 June 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Slovenia  2–2  Serbia Ljubljana, Slovenia
20:45 UTC+2 Report Stadium: Stožice Stadium
Attendance: 13,782
Referee: Maurizio Mariani (Italy)
24 September 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Slovenia  2–1  Norway Ljubljana, Slovenia
18:00 UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Stožice Stadium
Attendance: 14,824
Referee: Lawrence Visser (Belgium)
27 September 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Sweden  1–1  Slovenia Solna, Sweden
20:45 UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Friends Arena
Attendance: 22,895
Referee: Felix Zwayer (Germany)
17 November Friendly Romania  1–2  Slovenia Cluj-Napoca, Romania
18:30 UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Cluj Arena
Attendance: 6,845
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)
20 November Friendly Slovenia  1–0  Montenegro Ljubljana, Slovenia
15:00 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Stožice Stadium
Attendance: 11,165
Referee: Christopher Jäger (Austria)

2023

10 September UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying San Marino  v  Slovenia San Marino
20:45 UTC+2 Report
17 November UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Denmark  v  Slovenia Denmark
20:45 UTC+1 Report

Discover more about Results and fixtures related topics

Slovenia national football team results (2020–present)

Slovenia national football team results (2020–present)

This is a list of international football games played by the Slovenia national football team from 2020 to present.

Croatia national football team

Croatia national football team

The Croatia national football team represents Croatia in international football matches and is controlled by the Croatian Football Federation (HNS). The team was recognised by both FIFA and UEFA following the dissolution of Yugoslavia. Sides were active during period of political upheaval, representing sovereign entities such as the Banovina of Croatia from 1939 to 1941 or the Independent State of Croatia from 1941 to 1944.

Exhibition game

Exhibition game

An exhibition game is a sporting event whose prize money and impact on the player's or the team's rankings is either zero or otherwise greatly reduced. In team sports, matches of this type are often used to help coaches and managers select and condition players for the competitive matches of a league season or tournament. If the players usually play in different teams in other leagues, exhibition games offer an opportunity for the players to learn to work with each other. The games can be held between separate teams or between parts of the same team.

Al Rayyan (city)

Al Rayyan (city)

Al-Rayyan is a city in the municipality of its namesake, Al Rayyan, Qatar. The city and its suburbs comprise the largest population center in Qatar outside of Doha proper, immediately to its east. Consisting of all of the districts in the municipality's easternmost section, its western boundary is roughly where the Al Majd Highway runs through the municipality. It is considered a part of the metropolitan Doha area. It is one of the venues for the Qatar 2022 World Cup.

Andrej Kramarić

Andrej Kramarić

Andrej Kramarić is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a forward or attacking midfielder for Bundesliga club 1899 Hoffenheim and the Croatia national team.

Jaka Bijol

Jaka Bijol

Jaka Bijol is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Italian club Udinese and the Slovenia national team. Initially a defensive midfielder, he switched to his current position in the 2021–22 season.

Education City Stadium

Education City Stadium

Education City Stadium is a football stadium which is located in Al Rayyan, Qatar, and was built as a venue in time for the ongoing 2022 FIFA World Cup held in Qatar. The stadium is located within several university campuses at the Qatar Foundation's Education City. Following the FIFA World Cup, the stadium will retain 25,000 seats for use by university athletic teams. On 3 September 2020, the stadium hosted its first official match, played in the 2020–21 Qatar Stars League season.

Kuwait Football Association

Kuwait Football Association

The Kuwait Football Association is the governing body of football in Kuwait.

Qatar national football team

Qatar national football team

The Qatar national football team represents Qatar in international football, and is controlled by the Qatar Football Association and AFC.

Tunisian Football Federation

Tunisian Football Federation

The Tunisian Football Federation is the governing body of football in Tunisia. It was established in 1957. It became a member in the FIFA in 1960, and in the same year it also became a member in the CAF association. It organises the football league, the Tunisian Ligue Professionnelle 1, the Tunisia national football team and the Tunisia women's national football team. It is based in Tunis.

Sweden national football team

Sweden national football team

The Sweden national football team represents Sweden in men's international football and it is controlled by the Swedish Football Association, the governing body of football in Sweden. Sweden's home ground is Friends Arena in Solna and the team is coached by Janne Andersson. From 1945 to late 1950s, they were considered one of the greatest teams in Europe.

2022–23 UEFA Nations League B

2022–23 UEFA Nations League B

The 2022–23 UEFA Nations League B was the second division of the 2022–23 edition of the UEFA Nations League, the third season of the international football competition involving the men's national teams of the 55 member associations of UEFA.

Management

Katanec (left) and Kek (right) managed Slovenia at the FIFA World Cup in 2002 and 2010, respectively.
Katanec (left) and Kek (right) managed Slovenia at the FIFA World Cup in 2002 and 2010, respectively.
Katanec (left) and Kek (right) managed Slovenia at the FIFA World Cup in 2002 and 2010, respectively.

Since 1991, eight managers have been in charge of the national team.[118] Bojan Prašnikar, Srečko Katanec and Matjaž Kek are the only three managers with more than one spell.[118]

Tomaž Kavčič is the manager with the shortest managerial tenure, having been in charge for only seven matches in 2018 before being sacked.[119] He was replaced by Igor Benedejčič, who became the first manager to be appointed as a caretaker.[120]

List of managers

Statistics updated as of 20 November 2022, after the match against Montenegro.

Manager Tenure Played Won Drawn Lost Major tournaments Ref.
Bojan Prašnikar 1991–1993 4 1 2 1 [121]
Zdenko Verdenik 1994–1997 32 10 8 14 [122]
Bojan Prašnikar 1998 5 1 1 3 [121]
Srečko Katanec 1998–2002 47 18 16 13 Euro 2000 – Group stage
2002 World Cup – Group stage
[123]
Bojan Prašnikar 2002–2004 16 6 3 7 [121]
Branko Oblak 2004–2006 23 6 7 10 [124]
Matjaž Kek 2007–2011 49 20 9 20 2010 World Cup – Group stage [125]
Slaviša Stojanović 2011–2012 9 2 2 5 [126]
Srečko Katanec 2013–2017 42 16 7 19 [123]
Tomaž Kavčič 2017–2018 7 1 1 5 [127]
Igor Benedejčič 2018 2 0 2 0 [128]
Matjaž Kek 2018– 40 17 13 10 [125]

Discover more about Management related topics

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

Bojan Prašnikar

Bojan Prašnikar

Bojan Prašnikar is a Slovenian football manager and former player. Prašnikar managed the Slovenian national team three times, between 1991 and 1993, in 1998, and between 2002 and 2004.

Srečko Katanec

Srečko Katanec

Srečko Katanec is a Slovenian professional football manager and former player who is the manager of the Uzbekistan national team. At international level, he was capped for both the Yugoslavia and Slovenia national teams.

Matjaž Kek

Matjaž Kek

Matjaž Kek is a Slovenian professional football manager and former player who is the manager of the Slovenia national team.

Tomaž Kavčič

Tomaž Kavčič

Tomaž Kavčič is a Slovenian football manager and former player. Kavčič was the manager of the Slovenian national team between 2017 and 2018, and Slovenian under-21 team for eight years between 2008 and 2014; he was also an assistant manager of the national team manager Srečko Katanec between 2016 and 2017. While playing for Gorica he scored his debut goal in the Slovenian PrvaLiga aged 38 years and 4 months, which is still a Slovenian record.

Igor Benedejčič

Igor Benedejčič

Igor Benedejčič is a retired Slovenian football midfielder and manager.

Caretaker manager

Caretaker manager

In association footballing terms, a caretaker manager or interim manager is somebody who takes temporary charge of the management of a football team, usually when the regular manager is dismissed or leaves for a different club. However, a caretaker manager may also be appointed if the regular manager is suspended, ill, suspected COVID-19 or unable to attend to their usual duties, for example they handed to assistant manager like Jordi Roura, Angelo Alessio, Germán Burgos and Rob Page. Caretaker managers are normally appointed at short notice from within the club, usually the assistant manager, a senior coach, or an experienced player.

Montenegro national football team

Montenegro national football team

The Montenegro national football team has represented Montenegro in international football since 2007. It is controlled by the Football Association of Montenegro, the governing body for football in Montenegro. Montenegro's home ground is Podgorica City Stadium in Podgorica.

UEFA Euro 2000

UEFA Euro 2000

The 2000 UEFA European Football Championship, also known as Euro 2000, was the 11th UEFA European Championship, a football tournament held every four years and organised by UEFA, the sport's governing body in Europe.

2002 FIFA World Cup

2002 FIFA World Cup

The 2002 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Korea Japan 2002, was the 17th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial football world championship for men's national teams organized by FIFA. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at sites in South Korea and Japan, with its final match hosted by Japan at International Stadium in Yokohama.

Branko Oblak

Branko Oblak

Branko Oblak is a Slovenian football coach and former international player. He usually played as an attacking midfielder or deep-lying playmaker.

2010 FIFA World Cup

2010 FIFA World Cup

The 2010 FIFA World Cup, also branded as South Africa 2010, was the 19th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in South Africa from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco to become the first African nation to host the finals.

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for the friendly matches against Romania and Montenegro in November 2022.[129]

Caps and goals are correct as of 20 November 2022, after the match against Montenegro.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Jan Oblak (captain) (1993-01-07) 7 January 1993 (age 29) 54 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
12 1GK Matevž Vidovšek (1999-10-30) 30 October 1999 (age 23) 0 0 Slovenia Olimpija Ljubljana
16 1GK Igor Vekić (1998-05-06) 6 May 1998 (age 24) 0 0 Portugal Paços de Ferreira

2 2DF Žan Karničnik (1994-09-18) 18 September 1994 (age 28) 14 0 Bulgaria Ludogorets Razgrad
3 2DF Jure Balkovec (1994-09-09) 9 September 1994 (age 28) 26 0 Turkey Alanyaspor
4 2DF Miha Blažič (1993-05-08) 8 May 1993 (age 29) 24 0 France Angers
5 2DF Jon Gorenc Stanković (1996-01-14) 14 January 1996 (age 26) 15 1 Austria Sturm Graz
6 2DF Jaka Bijol (1999-02-05) 5 February 1999 (age 23) 35 1 Italy Udinese
20 2DF Petar Stojanović (1995-10-07) 7 October 1995 (age 27) 41 2 Italy Empoli
23 2DF David Brekalo (1998-12-03) 3 December 1998 (age 23) 6 0 Norway Viking
24 2DF Gregor Sikošek (1994-02-13) 13 February 1994 (age 28) 11 0 Slovenia Maribor

7 3MF Timi Max Elšnik (1998-04-29) 29 April 1998 (age 24) 2 0 Slovenia Olimpija Ljubljana
8 3MF Sandi Lovrić (1998-03-28) 28 March 1998 (age 24) 25 3 Italy Udinese
10 3MF Miha Zajc (1994-07-01) 1 July 1994 (age 28) 35 8 Turkey Fenerbahçe
14 3MF Jasmin Kurtić (1989-01-10) 10 January 1989 (age 33) 83 2 Greece PAOK
15 3MF Tomi Horvat (1999-03-24) 24 March 1999 (age 23) 3 0 Austria Sturm Graz
22 3MF Adam Gnezda Čerin (1999-07-16) 16 July 1999 (age 23) 17 2 Greece Panathinaikos

9 4FW Andraž Šporar (1994-02-27) 27 February 1994 (age 28) 42 7 Greece Panathinaikos
11 4FW Benjamin Šeško (2003-05-31) 31 May 2003 (age 19) 17 5 Austria Red Bull Salzburg
18 4FW Andrés Vombergar (1994-11-20) 20 November 1994 (age 28) 1 0 Argentina San Lorenzo
19 4FW Luka Zahović (1995-11-15) 15 November 1995 (age 27) 14 0 Poland Pogoń Szczecin
21 4FW Benjamin Verbič (1993-11-27) 27 November 1993 (age 29) 47 5 Greece Panathinaikos

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been selected by Slovenia in the past twelve months, but are not part of the current squad.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Vid Belec (1990-06-06) 6 June 1990 (age 32) 18 0 Cyprus APOEL v.  Romania, 17 November 2022 INJ
GK Martin Turk (2003-08-21) 21 August 2003 (age 19) 0 0 Italy Reggiana v.  Serbia, 12 June 2022
GK Žiga Frelih (1998-02-06) 6 February 1998 (age 24) 0 0 Unattached v.  Qatar, 29 March 2022

DF Miha Mevlja (1990-06-12) 12 June 1990 (age 32) 50 2 Russia Spartak Moscow v.  Romania, 17 November 2022 WD
DF Martin Milec (1991-09-20) 20 September 1991 (age 31) 8 0 Slovenia Maribor v.  Serbia, 12 June 2022

MF Domen Črnigoj (1995-11-18) 18 November 1995 (age 27) 26 3 Italy Venezia v.  Romania, 17 November 2022 WD
MF Blaž Vrhovec (1992-02-20) 20 February 1992 (age 30) 5 0 Poland Górnik Zabrze v.  Serbia, 12 June 2022
MF Leo Štulac (1994-09-26) 26 September 1994 (age 28) 8 0 Italy Palermo v.  Sweden, 2 June 2022 INJ
MF Dejan Petrovič (1998-01-12) 12 January 1998 (age 24) 2 0 Austria Rapid Wien v.  Qatar, 29 March 2022

FW Jan Mlakar (1998-10-23) 23 October 1998 (age 24) 6 1 Croatia Hajduk Split v.  Sweden, 27 September 2022
FW Žan Celar (1999-03-14) 14 March 1999 (age 23) 6 0 Switzerland Lugano v.  Norway, 24 September 2022 INJ
FW Blaž Kramer (1996-06-01) 1 June 1996 (age 26) 5 0 Poland Legia Warsaw v.  Serbia, 12 June 2022

Notes
  • INJ = Withdrew due to injury
  • WD = Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue.

Previous squads

Discover more about Players related topics

List of Slovenia international footballers

List of Slovenia international footballers

The Slovenia national football team represents the nation of Slovenia in international association football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Slovenia (NZS), the nation's governing body for football, and is a member of both the European football federation, UEFA, and the world football association, FIFA.

Montenegro national football team

Montenegro national football team

The Montenegro national football team has represented Montenegro in international football since 2007. It is controlled by the Football Association of Montenegro, the governing body for football in Montenegro. Montenegro's home ground is Podgorica City Stadium in Podgorica.

Goalkeeper (association football)

Goalkeeper (association football)

The goalkeeper is a position in association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's main role is to stop the opposing team from scoring. This is accomplished by having the goalkeeper move into the trajectory of the ball to either catch it or direct it further from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are allowed to use their hands, giving them the sole rights on the field to handle the ball. The goalkeeper is indicated by wearing a different coloured kit from their teammates and opposition.

Jan Oblak

Jan Oblak

Jan Oblak is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for La Liga club Atlético Madrid and captains the Slovenia national team. He is frequently ranked as one of the best goalkeepers in the world.

Captain (association football)

Captain (association football)

The team captain of an association football team, sometimes known as the skipper, is a team member chosen to be the on-pitch leader of the team; they are often one of the older/or more experienced members of the squad, or a player that can heavily influence a game or has good leadership qualities. The team captain is usually identified by the wearing of an armband.

Atlético Madrid

Atlético Madrid

Club Atlético de Madrid, S.A.D., known simply as Atleti in the Spanish-speaking world and commonly referred to at international level as Atlético Madrid, is a Spanish professional football club based in Madrid that plays in La Liga. The club play their home games at the Metropolitano, which has a capacity of 68,456.

Matevž Vidovšek

Matevž Vidovšek

Matevž Vidovšek is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Olimpija Ljubljana.

Football Association of Slovenia

Football Association of Slovenia

The Football Association of Slovenia is the governing body of football in Slovenia. It organizes the first division, second division, third division, Slovenian Cup, Slovenian Women's League, and other competitions. It is also responsible for the Slovenia national football team and the Slovenia women's national football team. It was founded as Ljubljana Football Subassociation on 24 April 1920.

Igor Vekić

Igor Vekić

Igor Vekić is a Slovenian footballer who plays for Paços de Ferreira, on loan from Bravo, as a goalkeeper.

F.C. Paços de Ferreira

F.C. Paços de Ferreira

Futebol Clube Paços de Ferreira is a Portuguese football club based in Paços de Ferreira, Porto district. Founded in 1950, the club competes in the Primeira Liga, holding home games at the 9,077-seater Estádio da Mata Real, a municipal stadium where the team has been based since 1973. The club's colours are yellow and green.

Defender (association football)

Defender (association football)

In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield position whose primary role is to stop attacks during the game and prevent the opposition from scoring.

Bulgarian Football Union

Bulgarian Football Union

The Bulgarian Football Union is a football association based in Bulgaria and a member of UEFA. It organizes a football league, Bulgarian Parva Liga, and fields its Bulgaria national football team in UEFA and FIFA-authorised competitions.

Records

Individual records

As of 20 November 2022, 220 players have made at least one appearance for the Slovenian national team.[130][131] With 101 caps, Boštjan Cesar has the most appearances for Slovenia.[132] Cesar also started the most matches as captain (39)[133] and had the longest career as a Slovenian international footballer: 15 years, 1 month and 15 days.[134] Zlatko Zahovič is the highest-scoring Slovenia player with 35 goals.[135] Sašo Udovič scored the most goals in a single match, scoring five against Iceland in 1996.[136]

As of 20 November 2022[132]
Players in bold are still active with Slovenia.
Boštjan Cesar is Slovenia's all-time most capped player.
Boštjan Cesar is Slovenia's all-time most capped player.
Most appearances
Rank Player Caps Goals Career
1 Boštjan Cesar 101 10 2003–2018
2 Bojan Jokić 100 1 2006–2019
3 Valter Birsa 90 7 2006–2018
4 Jasmin Kurtić 83 2 2012–present
5 Samir Handanović 81 0 2004–2015
6 Milivoje Novaković 80 32 2006–2017
Zlatko Zahovič 80 35 1992–2004
8 Josip Iličić 79 16 2010–2021
9 Mišo Brečko 77 0 2004–2015
10 Milenko Ačimovič 74 13 1998–2007
Aleš Čeh 74 1 1992–2002
Top goalscorers
Rank Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Zlatko Zahovič 35 80 0.44 1992–2004
2 Milivoje Novaković 32 80 0.4 2006–2017
3 Sašo Udovič 16 42 0.38 1993–2000
Josip Iličić 16 79 0.2 2010–2021
5 Ermin Šiljak 14 48 0.29 1994–2005
6 Milenko Ačimovič 13 74 0.18 1998–2007
7 Tim Matavž 11 39 0.28 2010–2020
8 Primož Gliha 10 28 0.36 1992–1998
Boštjan Cesar 10 101 0.1 2003–2018
10 Miha Zajc 8 35 0.23 2016–present
Milan Osterc 8 44 0.18 1997–2002
Zlatko Dedić 8 49 0.16 2004–2013

Team records

  • Biggest victory: 7–0 vs. Oman, 8 February 1999[137]
  • Heaviest defeat: 0–5 vs. France, 12 October 2002[137]
  • Most consecutive victories: 4
  • Most consecutive matches without defeat: 9, from 3 September 2020 against Greece to 24 March 2021 against Croatia[138]
  • Most consecutive defeats: 4 (achieved on five occasions, most recently in 2014)[137][138]
  • Most consecutive matches without victory: 9, from 6 September 2018 against Bulgaria to 7 June 2019 against Austria[138]
  • Most consecutive matches without scoring: 4
  • Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal: 6, from 3 September 2020 against Greece to 11 November 2020 against Azerbaijan[138]

Discover more about Records related topics

Boštjan Cesar

Boštjan Cesar

Boštjan Cesar is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a centre-back.

Captain (association football)

Captain (association football)

The team captain of an association football team, sometimes known as the skipper, is a team member chosen to be the on-pitch leader of the team; they are often one of the older/or more experienced members of the squad, or a player that can heavily influence a game or has good leadership qualities. The team captain is usually identified by the wearing of an armband.

Sašo Udovič

Sašo Udovič

Sašo Udovič is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a forward for Hajduk Split, KSK Beveren, Lausanne, and LASK. He made 42 appearances for the Slovenia national team and was a participant at the Euro 2000.

Iceland national football team

Iceland national football team

The Iceland national football team represents Iceland in men's international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland, and have been a FIFA member since 1947 and an UEFA member since 1957. The team's nickname is Strákarnir okkar, which means Our Boys in Icelandic.

Bojan Jokić

Bojan Jokić

Bojan Jokić is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a centre-back or left-back. Jokić amassed 100 caps with the Slovenia national team between 2006 and 2019.

Jasmin Kurtić

Jasmin Kurtić

Jasmin Kurtić is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Super League Greece club PAOK, on loan from Parma, and the Slovenia national team.

Samir Handanović

Samir Handanović

Samir Handanović is a Slovenian professional footballer who serves as captain and plays as a goalkeeper for Serie A club Inter Milan.

Milivoje Novaković

Milivoje Novaković

Milivoje Novaković is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a forward.

Josip Iličić

Josip Iličić

Josip Iličić is a Slovenian professional footballer who plays as a forward for Slovenian PrvaLiga club Maribor.

Mišo Brečko

Mišo Brečko

Mišo Brečko is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a right-back. He spent most of his career in Germany, most notably with 1. FC Köln. At international level, he made 77 appearances for the Slovenia national team, also participating at the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

Milenko Ačimovič

Milenko Ačimovič

Milenko "Mile" Ačimovič is a Slovenian former professional footballer who played as a midfielder. Besides Slovenia, he has played in FR Yugoslavia, England, France, Saudi Arabia, and Austria.

Aleš Čeh

Aleš Čeh

Aleš Čeh is a former Slovenian football midfielder who has represented his country at two of the major tournaments for which they have qualified.

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup Qualification
Year Host Round Pld W D L F A Squad Pos. Pld W D L F A
1930 to 1990 Part of Yugoslavia Part of Yugoslavia
1994  United States Did not enter Did not enter
1998  France Did not qualify 5th 8 0 1 7 5 20
2002  South Korea
 Japan
Group stage 3 0 0 3 2 7 Squad 2nd 10 5 5 0 17 9
2006  Germany Did not qualify 4th 10 3 3 4 10 13
2010  South Africa Group stage 3 1 1 1 3 3 Squad 2nd 10 6 2 2 18 4
2014  Brazil Did not qualify 3rd 10 5 0 5 14 11
2018  Russia Did not qualify 4th 10 4 3 3 12 7
2022  Qatar Did not qualify 4th 10 4 2 4 13 12
2026  Canada
 Mexico
 United States
To be determined To be determined
Total Group stage 6 1 1 4 5 10 2/22 68 27 16 25 89 76

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship Qualification
Year Host Round Pld W D L F A Squad Pos. Pld W D L F A
1960 to 1992 Part of Yugoslavia Part of Yugoslavia
1996  England Did not qualify 5th 10 3 2 5 13 13
2000  Belgium
 Netherlands
Group stage 3 0 2 1 4 5 Squad 2nd 10 5 2 3 12 14
2004  Portugal Did not qualify 2nd 8 4 2 2 15 12
2008  Austria
 Switzerland
Did not qualify 6th 12 3 2 7 9 16
2012  Poland
 Ukraine
Did not qualify 4th 10 4 2 4 11 7
2016  France Did not qualify 3rd 10 5 1 4 18 11
2020  Europe Did not qualify 4th 10 4 2 4 16 11
2024  Germany To be determined To be determined
Total Group stage 3 0 2 1 4 5 1/16 70 28 13 29 94 84

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League
Season Division Group Round Pos Pld W D L GF GA P/R RK
2018–19 C 3 Group stage 4th 6 0 3 3 5 8 Same position 38th
2020–21 C 3 Group stage 1st 6 4 2 0 8 1 Rise 33rd
2022–23 B 4 Group stage 3rd 6 1 3 2 6 10 Same position 25th
2024–25 B To be determined
Total 18 5 8 5 19 19

Discover more about Competitive record related topics

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

FIFA World Cup qualification

FIFA World Cup qualification

The FIFA World Cup qualification is a competitive match that a national association football team takes in order to qualify for one of the available berths at the final tournament of the (men's) FIFA World Cup.

1930 FIFA World Cup

1930 FIFA World Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in Uruguay from 13 to 30 July 1930. FIFA, football's international governing body, selected Uruguay as host nation, as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its first constitution and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

1990 FIFA World Cup

1990 FIFA World Cup

The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event for a second time. Teams representing 116 national football associations entered and qualification began in April 1988. 22 teams qualified from this process, along with host nation Italy and defending champions Argentina.

1994 FIFA World Cup

1994 FIFA World Cup

The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national soccer teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from June 17 to July 17, 1994, at nine venues across the country. The United States was chosen as the host by FIFA on July 4, 1988. Despite soccer's relative lack of popularity in the host nation, the tournament was the most financially successful in World Cup history. It broke tournament records with overall attendance of 3,587,538 and an average of 68,991 per game, marks that stood unsurpassed as of 2018 despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams starting with the 1998 World Cup.

1998 FIFA World Cup

1998 FIFA World Cup

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the football world championship for men's national teams. The finals tournament was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. The country was chosen as the host nation by FIFA for the second time in the history of the tournament, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. It was the second time that France staged the competition and the ninth time that it was held in Europe. Spanning 32 days, it is the longest World Cup tournament ever held.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a transcontinental country predominantly located in Western Europe and spanning overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Due to its several coastal territories, France has the largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Andorra, and Spain in continental Europe, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname, and Brazil in the Americas via its overseas territories in French Guiana and Saint Martin. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain close to 68 million people. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre; other major urban areas include Marseille, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, and Nice.

1998 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

1998 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

Group 1 consisted of five teams entered into the European zone: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Denmark, Greece, and Slovenia. These five teams competed on a home-and-away basis for two of the 15 spots in the final tournament allocated to the European zone, with the group's winner and runner-up claiming those spots.

2002 FIFA World Cup

2002 FIFA World Cup

The 2002 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Korea Japan 2002, was the 17th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial football world championship for men's national teams organized by FIFA. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at sites in South Korea and Japan, with its final match hosted by Japan at International Stadium in Yokohama.

2002 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

2002 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

The 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification UEFA Group 1 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. The group comprised Faroe Islands, Luxembourg, Russia, Slovenia, Switzerland and Yugoslavia.

2006 FIFA World Cup

2006 FIFA World Cup

The 2006 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Germany 2006, was the 18th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which had won the right to host the event in July 2000. Teams representing 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams qualified from this process along with hosts Germany for the finals tournament. It was the second time that Germany staged the competition and the first as a unified country along with the former East Germany with Leipzig as a host city, and the 10th time that the tournament was held in Europe.

2006 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 5

2006 FIFA World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 5

The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification UEFA Group 5 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. The group comprised Belarus, Italy, Moldova, Norway, Scotland and Slovenia.

Head-to-head record

The following table shows Slovenia's all-time international record, correct as of 20 November 2022 after the match against Montenegro.[139][140]

Key
Positive balance (more wins)
Neutral balance (equal W/L ratio)
Negative balance (more losses)
  1. ^ Includes matches against FR Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro.

Discover more about Head-to-head record related topics

Albania national football team

Albania national football team

The Albania national football team represents Albania in men's international football, and is governed by the Albanian Football Association, the governing body for football in Albania.

Algeria national football team

Algeria national football team

The Algeria national football team represents Algeria in men's international football and is governed by the Algerian Football Federation. The team plays their home matches at the 5 July Stadium in Algiers and Miloud Hadefi Stadium in Oran. Algeria joined FIFA on 1 January 1964, a year and a half after gaining independence. They are the current champions of the FIFA Arab Cup.

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

Australia men's national soccer team

Australia men's national soccer team

The Australia men's national soccer team represents Australia in international men's soccer. Officially nicknamed the Socceroos, the team is controlled by the governing body for soccer in Australia, Football Australia, which is affiliated with the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF).

Austria national football team

Austria national football team

The Austria national football team represents Austria in men's international football competition and it is controlled by the Austrian Football Association.

Azerbaijan national football team

Azerbaijan national football team

The Azerbaijan national football team is the national football team of Azerbaijan and is controlled by Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan. It represents Azerbaijan in international football competitions. The majority of Azerbaijan's home matches are held at the national stadium, Baku Olympic Stadium, with friendly matches sometimes hosted at club stadiums.

Belarus national football team

Belarus national football team

The Belarus national football team represents Belarus in international football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Belarus, the governing body for football in Belarus. Belarus' home ground is Dinamo Stadium in Minsk. Since independence in 1991, Belarus has not yet qualified for a FIFA World Cup or UEFA European Championship.

Belgium national football team

Belgium national football team

The Belgium national football team officially represents Belgium in men's international football since their maiden match in 1904. The squad is under the global jurisdiction of FIFA and is governed in Europe by UEFA—both of which were co-founded by the Belgian team's supervising body, the Royal Belgian Football Association. Periods of regular Belgian representation at the highest international level, from 1920 to 1938, from 1982 to 2002 and again from 2014 onwards, have alternated with mostly unsuccessful qualification rounds. Most of Belgium's home matches are played at the King Baudouin Stadium in Brussels.

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

The Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football competitions, and is governed by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Until 1992, Bosnian footballers played for Yugoslavia.

Bulgaria national football team

Bulgaria national football team

The Bulgaria national football team represents Bulgaria in men's international football and is administered by the Bulgarian Football Union, a member association of UEFA. The team's home venue is the Vasil Levski Stadium in Sofia.

Canada men's national soccer team

Canada men's national soccer team

The Canada men's national soccer team represents Canada in international soccer competitions since 1924. They are overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association, the governing body for soccer in Canada. They have been a member of FIFA since 1948 and a member of CONCACAF since 1961.

China national football team

China national football team

The China national football team represents the People's Republic of China in international association football and is governed by the Chinese Football Association.

Honours

Minor tournaments

Winners: 1994
Runners-up: 1996
Runners-up: 1998, 2006
Runners-up: 1999, 2000
Third place: 2002

Other awards

Source: "Slovenia national football team", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slovenia_national_football_team.

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See also
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