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Six in Paris

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Six in Paris
Six in Paris FilmPoster.jpeg
Theatrical release poster
FrenchParis vu par...
Directed by
Written by
  • Éric Rohmer
  • Jean-Luc Godard
  • Jean Douchet
  • Claude Chabrol
  • Jean-Daniel Pollet
  • Jean Rouch
  • Georges Keller
Produced byBarbet Schroeder
Cinematography
Production
companies
Distributed byLes films du losange
Release date
  • 19 May 1965 (1965-05-19) (France)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench

Six in Paris (French: Paris vu par..., lit.'Paris Seen By...') is a 1965 French comedy-drama anthology film.

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French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Literal translation

Literal translation

Literal translation, direct translation or word-for-word translation, is a translation of a text done by translating each word separately, without looking at how the words are used together in a phrase or sentence.

Anthology film

Anthology film

An anthology film is a single film consisting of several shorter films, each complete in itself and distinguished from the other, though frequently tied together by a single theme, premise, or author. Sometimes each one is directed by a different director or written by a different author, or may even have been made at different times or in different countries. Anthology films are distinguished from "revue films" such as Paramount on Parade (1930)—which were common in Hollywood in the early decades of sound film, composite films, and compilation films.

Cast and segments

"Saint-Germain-des-Prés" Directed by Jean Douchet

Segment about an American girl student taken in by a French playboy and gets wise to another's ways. Director Douchet was at the time, like Eric Rohmer, a freshly resigned critic from Cahiers du Cinéma best known later for book on Hitchcock.

"Gare du Nord" Directed by Jean Rouch

Segment shows the influence of documentary and 16 mm by Rouch. Also notably uses almost one long hand-held continuous take, following Odile from a breakfast table argument with her boyfriend (played by producer/director Barbet Schroeder in an early role), whom she is bored and irritated by into the street where she meets a mysterious man. The man seems to be the answer to all her complaints and wants her to go away with him but for otherwise saying he will kill himself if she does not.

"Rue Saint-Denis" Directed by Jean-Daniel Pollet

Format again inflects form in Jean Daniel Pollet's segment with comedy as real-world stage actress Michelline Dax plays the worldly Parisian prostitute broadly as she kindheartedly makes fun of her inexperienced customer. Melki, like a few New Wave actors, riffs on Buster Keaton in nod to a tradition of shorts being comedies in the role.

"Place de l'Etoile" Directed by Eric Rohmer

Some would later identify this as uncharacteristically Rohmer neglecting his writing on silent comedy. The short plays upon the confusion around the Arc de Triomphe in Paris embodied by the character Jean-Marc as deftly shot by Nestor Almendros. In going to and from work the character mistakenly believes that he has killed a man in a rude encounter and tries to dodge location and responsibility.

"Montparnasse-Levallois" Directed by Jean-Luc Godard

Segment interprets the news story that Alfred Lubitsch (Jean-Paul Belmondo) reads to Angela (Anna Karina) in a restaurant in A Woman Is a Woman (1961). Itself based on the Jean Giraudoux story "La Méprise" with the genders reversed in the film where two women receive the letters mistakenly sent by their lover to the wrong person. Shot by American documentarian Albert Maysles, showing the woman's plight, Monica, to retrieve and amend the letters she sent.[1]

"La Muette" Directed by Claude Chabrol

Known for his Hitchcockian 'horror-beneath-the-bourgeois-surface' exposed on film, director Claude Chabrol himself plays the 'bourgeois' father here with his then-wife Stephane Audran as the mother of a mischievous boy who starts putting ear-plugs in his ears to keep from hearing their constant arguments playfully exploiting the critical-laden term diegesis.

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Jean Douchet

Jean Douchet

Jean Douchet was a French film director, historian, film critic and teacher who began his career in the early 1950s at Gazette du Cinéma and Cahiers du cinéma with members of the future French New Wave.

Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock

Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was an English filmmaker. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential figures in the history of cinema. In a career spanning six decades, he directed over 50 feature films, many of which are still widely watched and studied today. Known as the "Master of Suspense", he became as well known as any of his actors thanks to his many interviews, his cameo roles in most of his films, and his hosting and producing the television anthology Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955–65). His films garnered 46 Academy Award nominations, including six wins, although he never won the award for Best Director despite five nominations.

Barbet Schroeder

Barbet Schroeder

Barbet Schroeder is an Iranian-born Swiss film director and producer who started his career in French cinema in the 1960s, working with directors such as Jean-Luc Godard and Jacques Rivette. Since the late 1980s, he has directed many big budget Hollywood films, often mixing melodrama with the thriller genre in films like Single White Female, Kiss of Death, and Murder by Numbers. He has been nominated for the Palme d'Or for his 1987 film Barfly, and an Academy Award for Best Director for his 1990 film Reversal of Fortune.

Jean-Daniel Pollet

Jean-Daniel Pollet

Jean-Daniel Pollet was a French film director and screenwriter who was most active in the 1960s and 1970s. He was associated with two approaches to filmmaking: comedies which blended burlesque and melancholic elements, and poetic films based on texts by writers such as the French poet Francis Ponge.

Claude Melki

Claude Melki

Claude Melki (1939–1994) was a French actor.

French New Wave

French New Wave

French New Wave is a French art film movement that emerged in the late 1950s. The movement was characterized by its rejection of traditional filmmaking conventions in favor of experimentation and a spirit of iconoclasm. New Wave filmmakers explored new approaches to editing, visual style, and narrative, as well as engagement with the social and political upheavals of the era, often making use of irony or exploring existential themes. The New Wave is often considered one of the most influential movements in the history of cinema.

Buster Keaton

Buster Keaton

Joseph Frank "Buster" Keaton was an American actor, comedian, and filmmaker. He is best known for his silent film work, in which his trademark was physical comedy accompanied by a stoic, deadpan expression that earned him the nickname "The Great Stone Face". Critic Roger Ebert wrote of Keaton's "extraordinary period from 1920 to 1929" when he "worked without interruption" as having made him "the greatest actor-director in the history of the movies". In 1996, Entertainment Weekly recognized Keaton as the seventh-greatest film director, writing that "More than Chaplin, Keaton understood movies: He knew they consisted of a four-sided frame in which resided a malleable reality off which his persona could bounce. A vaudeville child star, Keaton grew up to be a tinkerer, an athlete, a visual mathematician; his films offer belly laughs of mind-boggling physical invention and a spacey determination that nears philosophical grandeur." In 1999 the American Film Institute ranked him as the 21st-greatest male star of classic Hollywood cinema.

Jean-Michel Rouzière

Jean-Michel Rouzière

Jean-Michel Rouzière was a French comic actor and theatre head.

Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard was a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter, and film critic. He rose to prominence as a pioneer of the French New Wave film movement of the 1960s, alongside such filmmakers as François Truffaut, Agnès Varda, Éric Rohmer, and Jacques Demy. He was arguably the most influential French filmmaker of the post-war era. According to AllMovie, his work "revolutionized the motion picture form" through its experimentation with narrative, continuity, sound, and camerawork. His most acclaimed films include Breathless (1960), Vivre sa vie (1962), Contempt (1963), Band of Outsiders (1964), Alphaville (1965), Pierrot le Fou (1965), Masculin Féminin (1966), Weekend (1967), and Goodbye to Language (2014).

Jean-Paul Belmondo

Jean-Paul Belmondo

Jean-Paul Charles Belmondo was a French actor. Initially associated with the New Wave of the 1960s, he was a major French film star for several decades from the 1960s onward. His best known credits include Breathless (1960), That Man from Rio (1964), Pierrot le Fou (1965), Borsalino (1970), and The Professional (1981). He was most notable for portraying police officers in action thriller films and became known for his unwillingness to appear in English-language films, despite being heavily courted by Hollywood. An undisputed box-office champion like Louis de Funès and Alain Delon of the same period, Belmondo attracted nearly 160 million spectators in his 50-year career. Between 1969 and 1982, he played four times in the most popular films of the year in France: The Brain (1969), Fear Over the City (1975), Animal (1977), Ace of Aces (1982), being surpassed on this point only by Louis de Funès.

Anna Karina

Anna Karina

Anna Karina was a Danish-French film avant garde actress, director, writer, and singer. She was French New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard's collaborator in the 1960s, performing in several of his films, including The Little Soldier, A Woman Is a Woman, My Life to Live, Bande à part, Pierrot le Fou and Alphaville. For her performance in A Woman Is a Woman, Karina won the Silver Bear Award for Best Actress at the Berlin Film Festival.

A Woman Is a Woman

A Woman Is a Woman

A Woman Is a Woman is a 1961 French musical romantic comedy film written and directed by Jean-Luc Godard, starring Jean-Paul Belmondo, Anna Karina and Jean-Claude Brialy. It is a tribute to American musical comedy and associated with the French New Wave. It is Godard's third feature film, and his first in color and Cinemascope.

Source: "Six in Paris", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_in_Paris.

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References
  1. ^ Brody, Richard (2008). Everything Is Cinema: The Working Life of Jean-Luc Godard. New York: Metropolitan Books. pp. 177–179. ISBN 978-0-80506-886-3.
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