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Sharptor

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Sharptor
Pasture near Wardbrook Farm - geograph.org.uk - 1075321.jpg
Pasture at the top of Sharptor looking north from access land towards the prominent "nose" of Sharp Tor
Sharptor is a hamlet in the civil parish of Linkinhorne in east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Sharptor is a hamlet in the civil parish of Linkinhorne in east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom
Sharptor
Location within Cornwall
Population24 
OS grid referenceSX 25997 73186
• London200 km (120 mi)
Civil parish
  • Linkinhorne
Unitary authority
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townLISKEARD
Postcode districtPL14
PoliceDevon and Cornwall
FireCornwall
AmbulanceSouth Western
List of places
UK
England
Cornwall
50°31′57″N 4°27′28″W / 50.53250°N 4.45778°W / 50.53250; -4.45778Coordinates: 50°31′57″N 4°27′28″W / 50.53250°N 4.45778°W / 50.53250; -4.45778

Sharptor is a hamlet west of Henwood in the civil parish of Linkinhorne in east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is named after Sharp Tor on Bodmin Moor.[1][2] Sharptor is close to Minions to the south, Kingbeare in the north and Darleyford to the east. Sharptor is around 280 m (920 ft) above sea level.[3]

There have been some visitors over the years who have been struck by Sharp Tor and the views:

Sharpy-torry (Sharp-torr from its conical shape) - The views brought to my mind the beautiful lines in Ovid: Tum freta diffundi rapidisque tumescere ventis Jussit, et ambitæ circumdare littora terræ. Addidit et fontes, immensaque stagna lacusque. Jussit et extendi campos, subsidere valles, Fronde tegi silvas, lapidosos surgere montes. Then he ordered the seas to be poured abroad, and to swell with furious winds, and to draw a shore quite round the inclosed earth. He Likewise added springs, and immense pools and lakes. He ordered likewise plains to be extended, and valleys to sink; the woods to be covered with green leaves, and the rocky mountains to rise.[4]

Sharp Point Tor is directly south of Kilmarth, is equal to it in height, and on the south-east side has a curious assemblage of rocks.[5]

Sharptor — a fine, pointed, granite hill.[6]

Sharp Tor or Sharp Point Tor is a conical hill of granite boulders, whose vertex is 1200 feet above the sea. The panoramic scenery from its top is grand and interesting.[7]

The conical Sharp Tor overhangs it as Mount Sinai overhung the village of Morality in The Pilgrim's Progress.[8]

Local attractions include the Cheesewring, a number of granite stones on Stowe's Hill; the Darley Oak, an ancient tree thought to be 1,000 years old; The Hurlers, a group of three ancient stone circles; Gold Diggings Quarry, a popular spot for swimming;[9] Daniel Gumb's cave, the home to a stonecutter and his family;[10], Siblyback Lake[11] a reservoir with a 3.2-mile (5.1 km) walk, various water sports and fishing (Rainbow trout and Blue trout[12]); Golitha Falls[13] a natural waterfall walk on the River Fowey; King Doniert's Stone, two pieces of decorated 9th century cross believed to commemorate Dungarth, King of Cornwall and the nearby Rillaton Barrow, an ancient burial mound.

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Henwood, Cornwall

Henwood, Cornwall

Henwood is a hamlet in the civil parish of Linkinhorne in east Cornwall, England. Henwood is on the edge of Bodmin Moor and situated between Stowe Hill (southwest) and Notter Tor (northeast).

Linkinhorne

Linkinhorne

Linkinhorne is a civil parish and village in southeast Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The village itself is situated at grid reference SX 320 736 and is approximately four miles (6.5 km) northwest of Callington and seven miles (11 km) south of Launceston. The parish population at the 2011 census including Downgate was 1,541

Cornwall

Cornwall

Cornwall is a historic county and ceremonial county in South West England. It is recognised as one of the Celtic nations, and is the homeland of the Cornish people. Cornwall is bordered to the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, with the River Tamar forming the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The southwesternmost point is Land's End and the southernmost Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 568,210 and an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The administrative centre of Cornwall is Truro, its only city.

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor is a granite moorland in north-eastern Cornwall, England. It is 208 square kilometres (80 sq mi) in size, and dates from the Carboniferous period of geological history. It includes Brown Willy, the highest point in Cornwall, and Rough Tor, a slightly lower peak. Many of Cornwall's rivers have their sources here. It has been inhabited since at least the Neolithic era, when primitive farmers started clearing trees and farming the land. They left their megalithic monuments, hut circles and cairns, and the Bronze Age culture that followed left further cairns, and more stone circles and stone rows. By medieval and modern times, nearly all the forest was gone and livestock rearing predominated.

Minions, Cornwall

Minions, Cornwall

Minions is a village in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is situated on the eastern flank of Bodmin Moor northwest of Caradon Hill approximately four miles (6 km) north of Liskeard. Minions is first recorded in 1613 and its meaning is unknown.

Darleyford

Darleyford

Darleyford is a hamlet in the parish of Linkinhorne in Cornwall, UK.

Ovid

Ovid

Pūblius Ovidius Nāsō, known in English as Ovid, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists. Although Ovid enjoyed enormous popularity during his lifetime, the emperor Augustus banished him to a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained a decade until his death.

Cheesewring

Cheesewring

The Cheesewring is a granite tor in Cornwall, United Kingdom, situated on the eastern flank of Bodmin Moor on Stowe's Hill in the parish of Linkinhorne approximately one mile northwest of the village of Minions and four miles (6 km) north of Liskeard. It is a natural geological formation, a rock outcrop of granite slabs formed by weathering. The name derives from the resemblance of the piled slabs to a "cheesewring", a press-like device that was once used to make cheese.

Darley Oak

Darley Oak

The Darley Oak is a Pedunculate oak tree which grows near Darleyford in the parish of Linkinhorne on the edge of Bodmin Moor, Cornwall, England, UK. This ancient tree is thought to be at least 1,000 years old, and a considerable number of legends take it as their core. Folk tradition attributes healing properties to the tree, and it is said that any wish made to it will eventually come true. Its acorns are also used as amulets, and were once used by pregnant women during pregnancy, to bring them luck. It was chosen one of the 50 Great British Trees by The Tree Council in 2002.

Rainbow trout

Rainbow trout

The rainbow trout is a species of trout native to cold-water tributaries of the Pacific Ocean in Asia and North America. The steelhead is an anadromous (sea-run) form of the coastal rainbow trout (O. m. irideus) or Columbia River redband trout (O. m. gairdneri) that usually returns to fresh water to spawn after living two to three years in the ocean. Freshwater forms that have been introduced into the Great Lakes and migrate into tributaries to spawn are also called steelhead.

King Doniert's Stone

King Doniert's Stone

King Doniert's Stone consists of two pieces of a decorated 9th-century cross, near St Cleer on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall. The inscription is believed to commemorate Dungarth, King of Cornwall, who died around 875.

Donyarth

Donyarth

Donyarth or Dungarth was the last recorded king of Cornwall. He was probably an under-king, paying tribute to the West Saxons.

History

Before Sharptor, there was a lot of human activity in the area including a prehistoric hillfort and field systems on Stowe's Hill and Neolithic cairns, field systems and enclosures on Sharp Tor.[14][15]

There are several mine works and quarries close to Sharptor. Most of the properties in Sharptor were for workers, and most are orientated to face east so as to wake the occupants as the sun rose in the morning.. According to the 1871 census, there were 21 residents in Sharptor, most of the men (around 43%) working in the quarries and the remainder (35%) working in mining. It is interesting that Sharptor seemed to be a male enclave with only 2 women residents. The average age was around 36.[16]

At the top of the Sharptor road are the remains of the Liskeard and Caradon Railway which opened in 1844 and closed in 1917. The track materials were removed to aid the war effort, but many of the stone sleepers remain. The railway can be easily walked to Minions.

Sharp Tor or West Sharptor Mine was held under a lease for 21 years, from 1849, granted by the Duke of Cornwall, who owns most of the mineral rights around Sharptor. The mine was first opened in 1850 and was worked for copper. The original company had 256 shares, with £62 paid for each, representing a capital of £15,872; the amount expended to 1855 was about £15,000. The mine was worked using a 60-horsepower steam engine installed by Willam West in 1850. The mine lies within the Phoenix United Mine district. Ore was shipped to Looe.[17]

Although the primary mineral was copper, there are other minerals that can be found in the mine tailings such as brochantite, cassiterite, chalcocite, chalcopyrite, chamosite, connellite, langite, pyrite, quartz, copper(I) oxide (known locally as tile ore) and orthochamosite (daphnite).[18]

As the railway was built so the Cheesewring Quarry was developed. The fine silver Granite was in demand for engineering and architectural work. As the tin was sent to Looe, so was the granite where it was shipped to London and further afield. Nineteenth century structures built from the granite included Devonport Dockyard, as well as the docks at Birkenhead and Copenhagen. Other structures include the breakwaters at Alderney and Dover, the Spithead forts, Thames Embankment, Westminster Bridge, Tower Bridge and a lighthouse in Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon). The quarry, for most of its history, was owned and worked by John Freeman and Sons, who had over 80 quarries in Cornwall. At its peak, there were over a 100 men and boys working at the quarry. But after World War I, the decline in demand and also difficulty in extracting fine granite from under the Cheesewring (now an attraction) meant the quarry went into decline.[19]

Several of the houses in Sharptor and Henwood were extended, and one issue was the use of Mundic block (blocks made from mine waste) for construction between 1900 and 1960.[20]

In 1944, an American transport plane hit Sharp Tor and several fragments of the plane were found and removed.[21]

The maps highlight the location of Sharptor Mine in 1877 and 1907. Most of the buildings that were mapped in both years remain until today. The mine chimney has been removed but some of the structures remain and it is believed that one property was previously used as an engine house. Although the mine has been open for years, most of the engine house has now fallen into the shaft. [22]

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Duke of Cornwall

Duke of Cornwall

Duke of Cornwall is a title in the Peerage of England, traditionally held by the eldest son of the reigning British monarch, previously the English monarch. The duchy of Cornwall was the first duchy created in England and was established by a royal charter in 1337. The present duke is Prince William. His wife, Catherine, is the current duchess of Cornwall.

Brochantite

Brochantite

Brochantite is a sulfate mineral, one of a number of cupric sulfates. Its chemical formula is Cu4SO4(OH)6. Formed in arid climates or in rapidly oxidizing copper sulfide deposits, it was named by Armand Lévy for his fellow Frenchman, geologist and mineralogist A. J. M. Brochant de Villiers.

Cassiterite

Cassiterite

Cassiterite is a tin oxide mineral, SnO2. It is generally opaque, but it is translucent in thin crystals. Its luster and multiple crystal faces produce a desirable gem. Cassiterite was the chief tin ore throughout ancient history and remains the most important source of tin today.

Chalcocite

Chalcocite

Chalcocite, copper(I) sulfide (Cu2S), is an important copper ore mineral. It is opaque and dark gray to black, with a metallic luster. It has a hardness of 2.5–3 on the Mohs scale. It is a sulfide with a monoclinic crystal system.

Chalcopyrite

Chalcopyrite

Chalcopyrite ( KAL-kə-PY-ryte, -⁠koh-) is a copper iron sulfide mineral and the most abundant copper ore mineral. It has the chemical formula CuFeS2 and crystallizes in the tetragonal system. It has a brassy to golden yellow color and a hardness of 3.5 to 4 on the Mohs scale. Its streak is diagnostic as green-tinged black.

Chamosite

Chamosite

Chamosite is the Fe2+end member of the chlorite group. A hydrous aluminium silicate of iron, which is produced in an environment of low to moderate grade of metamorphosed iron deposits, as gray or black crystals in oolitic iron ore. Like other chlorites, it is a product of the hydrothermal alteration of pyroxenes, amphiboles and biotite in igneous rock. The composition of chlorite is often related to that of the original igneous mineral so that more Fe-rich chlorites are commonly found as replacements of the Fe-rich ferromagnesian minerals (Deer et al., 1992).

Connellite

Connellite

Connellite is a rare mineral species, a hydrous copper chloro-sulfate, Cu19(OH)32(SO4)Cl4·3H2O, crystallizing in the hexagonal system. It occurs as tufts of very delicate acicular crystals of a fine blue color, and is associated with other copper minerals of secondary origin, such as cuprite and malachite. Its occurrence in Cornwall, England, was noted by Philip Rashleigh in 1802, and it was first examined chemically by Prof Arthur Connell FRSE in 1847, after whom it is named.

Copper(I) oxide

Copper(I) oxide

Copper(I) oxide or cuprous oxide is the inorganic compound with the formula Cu2O. It is one of the principal oxides of copper, the other being or copper(II) oxide or cupric oxide (CuO). This red-coloured solid is a component of some antifouling paints. The compound can appear either yellow or red, depending on the size of the particles. Copper(I) oxide is found as the reddish mineral cuprite.

Chlorite group

Chlorite group

The chlorites are the group of phyllosilicate minerals common in low-grade metamorphic rocks and in altered igneous rocks. Greenschist, formed by metamorphism of basalt or other low-silica volcanic rock, typically contains significant amounts of chlorite.

Granite

Granite

Granite is a coarse-grained (phaneritic) intrusive igneous rock composed mostly of quartz, alkali feldspar, and plagioclase. It forms from magma with a high content of silica and alkali metal oxides that slowly cools and solidifies underground. It is common in the continental crust of Earth, where it is found in igneous intrusions. These range in size from dikes only a few centimeters across to batholiths exposed over hundreds of square kilometers.

HMNB Devonport

HMNB Devonport

His Majesty's Naval Base, Devonport is one of three operating bases in the United Kingdom for the Royal Navy and is the sole nuclear repair and refuelling facility for the Royal Navy. The largest naval base in Western Europe, HMNB Devonport is located in Devonport, in the west of the city of Plymouth, England.

Birkenhead

Birkenhead

Birkenhead is a town and ferry port in the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral, Merseyside, England; historically, it was part of Cheshire until 1974. The town is on the Wirral Peninsula, along the south bank of the River Mersey, opposite the city of Liverpool. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 88,818.

Climate

Weather

Sharptor has an Oceanic climate according to the Köppen climate classification but, like the rest of Bodmin Moor, due to its high altitude, it is often cooler, windier and wetter than further down the valley off the moor. However, there is a good balance of fair days too, which can get warm in the summer. In winter, frosts are common and even though it snows most years, it is never prolonged or severe. However, in previous years, residents have been snowed in.

Climate data for Sharptor
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 8
(46)
8
(46)
10
(50)
12
(54)
14
(57)
17
(63)
19
(66)
18
(64)
17
(63)
14
(57)
11
(52)
9
(48)
19
(66)
Average low °C (°F) 4
(39)
4
(39)
4
(39)
5
(41)
8
(46)
10
(50)
13
(55)
13
(55)
11
(52)
9
(48)
6
(43)
4
(39)
4
(39)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 5.4
(2.1)
2.3
(0.9)
0.8
(0.3)
0.2
(0.1)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2.6
(1.0)
11.3
(4.4)
Average rainy days 11 10 8 6 7 7 6 7 6 9 10 11 98
Average snowy days 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Source: World Weather Online[24]

Weather phenomena

Being on Bodmin Moor, often there is a mist but when clear, Dartmoor can be seen in the distance. Also, some weather phenomena can be seen such as 22° haloes and "white of morning" a local reference to when the morning mist cloaks lower elevations down from Sharptor in the River Lynher valley. Often this is referred to as valley fog where fog is trapped in the bowl of a valley.[25]

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Oceanic climate

Oceanic climate

An oceanic climate, also known as a marine climate, is the humid temperate climate sub-type in Köppen classification Cfb, typical of west coasts in higher middle latitudes of continents, generally featuring cool summers and mild winters, with a relatively narrow annual temperature range and few extremes of temperature. Oceanic climates can be found in both hemispheres generally between 40 and 55 latitude, most notably in Northwest Europe, Northwest North America, as well as New Zealand.

Köppen climate classification

Köppen climate classification

The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by German-Russian climatologist Wladimir Köppen (1846–1940) in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936. Later, the climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1894–1981) introduced some changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.

Dartmoor

Dartmoor

Dartmoor is an upland area in southern Devon, England. The moorland and surrounding land has been protected by National Park status since 1951. Dartmoor National Park covers 954 km2 (368 sq mi).

22° halo

22° halo

A 22° halo is an atmospheric optical phenomenon that consists of a halo with an apparent radius of approximately 22° around the Sun or Moon. When visible around the Moon, it is also known as a moon ring or winter halo. It forms as sunlight or moonlight is refracted by millions of hexagonal ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere. Its radius is roughly the length of an outstretched hand at arm's length.

River Lynher

River Lynher

The River Lynher flows through east Cornwall, England, and enters the River Tamar at the Hamoaze, which in turn flows into Plymouth Sound.

Flora and fauna

Flora

Native trees around Sharptor include hawthorn, blackthorn/sloe, hazel, oak, rowan and elderberry. Many of the trees that are protected from the wind have lichen growing from the branches. There are also a large number of conifers, rhododendrons and many buddleja that have been planted or self-seeded.

There is also a proliferation of gorse and bracken. As bracken is a highly invasive species, residents can often be seen stomping fields to break the stems to prevent growth. As parts of Sharptor are within a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) it is important to control bracken to protect existing flora and fauna.[26]

Fauna

Fauna seen commonly around Sharptor are red fox, several corvidae such as raven, magpie, and jay. Smaller birds that are common include Wagtail, European robin, wren, treecreeper, European stonechat, European golden plover, common cuckoo, common skylark, meadow pipit, wheatear, redwing, mistle thrush and woodpecker. Birds of prey include barn owl, red kite, common buzzard and kestrel.

Bats are also prevalent at dusk due to several derelict buildings and mine adits. Common bats found around Sharptor include greater horseshoe, lesser horseshoe and brown long-eared.

Unlike Dartmoor, there is no specific breed of pony on Bodmin Moor. However, they do roam free and are rounded up in the autumn for sale, generally at auction. Like the ponies, there is no specific breed of sheep but there are some common breeds found on the moor. Popular breeds are Scottish Blackface and North Country Cheviot replacing more traditional breeds of Devon and Cornwall Longwool and Greyface Dartmoor. There are various sheep creeps around the Sharptor area to allow sheep to pass through the heavy Cornish hedge. There are also cattle on the moors around Sharptor with popular breeds being Highland, Galloway and Blue Grey. Ponies, sheep and cattle are often found in the fields and lanes around Sharptor.[27]

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Crataegus

Crataegus

Crataegus, commonly called hawthorn, quickthorn, thornapple, May-tree, whitethorn, Mayflower, or hawberry, is a genus of several hundred species of shrubs and trees in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia, North Africa, and North America. The name "hawthorn" was originally applied to the species native to northern Europe, especially the common hawthorn C. monogyna, and the unmodified name is often so used in Britain and Ireland. The name is now also applied to the entire genus and to the related Asian genus Rhaphiolepis.

Prunus spinosa

Prunus spinosa

Prunus spinosa, called blackthorn or sloe, is a species of flowering plant in the rose family Rosaceae. The species is native to Europe, western Asia, and regionally in northwest Africa. It is locally naturalized in New Zealand, Tasmania, and the Pacific Northwest and New England regions of the United States.

Hazel

Hazel

The hazel (Corylus) is a genus of deciduous trees and large shrubs native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. The genus is usually placed in the birch family Betulaceae, though some botanists split the hazels into a separate family Corylaceae. The fruit of the hazel is the hazelnut.

Oak

Oak

An oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus of the beech family, Fagaceae. There are approximately 500 extant species of oaks. The common name "oak" also appears in the names of species in related genera, notably Lithocarpus, as well as in those of unrelated species such as Grevillea robusta and the Casuarinaceae (she-oaks). The genus Quercus is native to the Northern Hemisphere, and includes deciduous and evergreen species extending from cool temperate to tropical latitudes in the Americas, Asia, Europe, and North Africa. North America has the largest number of oak species, with approximately 160 species in Mexico of which 109 are endemic and about 90 in the United States. The second greatest area of oak diversity is China, with approximately 100 species.

Fruticose lichen

Fruticose lichen

A fruticose lichen is a form of lichen fungi that is characterized by a coral-like shrubby or bushy growth structure. It is formed from a symbiotic relationship of a photobiont such as green algae or less commonly cyanobacteria and one, two or more mycobionts. Fruticose lichens are not a monophyletic and holophyletic lineage, but is a form encountered in many classes. Fruticose lichens have a complex vegetation structure, and are characterized by an ascending, bushy or pendulous appearance. As with other lichens, many fruticose lichens can endure high degrees of desiccation. They grow slowly and often occur in habitats such as on tree barks, on rock surfaces and on soils in the Arctic and mountain regions.

Conifer

Conifer

Conifers are a group of cone-bearing seed plants, a subset of gymnosperms. Scientifically, they make up the division Pinophyta, also known as Coniferophyta or Coniferae. The division contains a single extant class, Pinopsida. All extant conifers are perennial woody plants with secondary growth. The great majority are trees, though a few are shrubs. Examples include cedars, Douglas-firs, cypresses, firs, junipers, kauri, larches, pines, hemlocks, redwoods, spruces, and yews. As of 1998, the division Pinophyta was estimated to contain eight families, 68 genera, and 629 living species.

Buddleja

Buddleja

Buddleja is a genus comprising over 140 species of flowering plants endemic to Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The generic name bestowed by Linnaeus posthumously honoured the Reverend Adam Buddle (1662–1715), an English botanist and rector, at the suggestion of Dr. William Houstoun. Houstoun sent the first plants to become known to science as buddleja to England from the Caribbean about 15 years after Buddle's death.

Bracken

Bracken

Bracken (Pteridium) is a genus of large, coarse ferns in the family Dennstaedtiaceae. Ferns (Pteridophyta) are vascular plants that have alternating generations, large plants that produce spores and small plants that produce sex cells. Brackens are noted for their large, highly divided leaves. They are found on all continents except Antarctica and in all environments except deserts, though their typical habitat is moorland. The genus probably has the widest distribution of any fern in the world.

Corvidae

Corvidae

Corvidae is a cosmopolitan family of oscine passerine birds that contains the crows, ravens, rooks, jackdaws, jays, magpies, treepies, choughs, and nutcrackers. In colloquial English, they are known as the crow family or corvids. Currently, 133 species are included in this family. The genus Corvus, including the jackdaws, crows, rooks, and ravens, makes up over a third of the entire family. Corvids are the largest passerines.

Magpie

Magpie

Magpies are birds of the Corvidae family. Like other members of their family, they are widely considered to be intelligent creatures. The Eurasian magpie, for instance, is thought to rank among the world's most intelligent creatures, and is one of the few non-mammal species able to recognize itself in a mirror test. They are particularly well known for their songs and were once popular as cagebirds. In addition to other members of the genus Pica, corvids considered as magpies are in the genera Cissa, Urocissa, and Cyanopica.

Jay

Jay

A jay is a member of a number of species of medium-sized, usually colorful and noisy, passerine birds in the Crow family, Corvidae. The evolutionary relationships between the jays and the magpies are rather complex. For example, the Eurasian magpie seems more closely related to the Eurasian jay than to the East Asian blue and green magpies, whereas the blue jay is not closely related to either.

European robin

European robin

The European robin, known simply as the robin or robin redbreast in Great Britain & Ireland, is a small insectivorous passerine bird that belongs to the chat subfamily of the Old World flycatcher family. About 12.5–14.0 cm (4.9–5.5 in) in length, the male and female are similar in colouration, with an orange breast and face lined with grey, brown upper-parts and a whitish belly. It is found across Europe, east to Western Siberia and south to North Africa; it is sedentary in most of its range except the far north.

Sport and recreation

Sharptor offers some good walks and cycling, including routes to Sharp Tor and Stowe's Hill. There are several climbing and bouldering opportunities.[28] Sharptor gives direct access to Bodmin Moor on horseback, but the road is steep and vehicular access is restrictive.

Food and drink

Although Sharptor itself does not have any outlets for food or drink, there are two nearby cafes in Minions. One cafe is also a post office and village shop.[29]

There has been a public house in Minions dating back to 1836. The current public house suffered a fire which started on the morning of the 24th December 2021 which caused substantial damage.[30][31] The public house has yet to be re-opened.

Transport

Bus

Sharptor is relatively remote and does not have any direct public transport links. The nearest bus stop is at Darley Ford Garage, 1.3 miles (2.1 km), where the 112 bus (Callington Community College to Minions) and 236 bus (Liskeard to Launceston, via Darite, North Hill and South Petherwin) stop. [32][33]

Rail

The nearest mainline rail service is Liskeard, 8 miles (13 km).[34] Trains run northwest to London Paddington station and southwest to Penzance railway station. The trains are run by GWR.

Air

The nearest airport is Newquay Airport (IATA: NQY, ICAO: EGHQ) which is around 32 miles (51 km) from Sharptor. The airport runs mainly a seasonal schedule running flights to Manchester, London-Gatwick, London-Heathrow, Alicante, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Newcastle, Faro, Leeds Bradford, Teesside, Birmingham and St Mary's. In 2019, it was announced that the airport would host Spaceport Cornwall a base for Virgin Orbit. Newquay airport is also home to Cornwall Air Ambulance and HM Coastguard, who are regularly seen over Sharp Tor and Stowe's Hill training.

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Callington Community College

Callington Community College

Callington Community College is a coeducational secondary school and sixth form with academy status, in Callington Cornwall.

Liskeard

Liskeard

Liskeard is a small ancient stannary and market town in south-east Cornwall, South West England. It is situated approximately 20 miles (32 km) west of Plymouth, 14 miles (23 km) west of the Devon border, and 12 miles (20 km) east of Bodmin. The Bodmin Moor lies to the north-west of the town. The total population of the town at the 2011 census was 11,366

Launceston, Cornwall

Launceston, Cornwall

Launceston is a town, ancient borough, and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is 1 mile (1.6 km) west of the middle stage of the River Tamar, which constitutes almost the entire border between Cornwall and Devon. The landscape of the town is generally steep particularly at a sharp south-western knoll topped by Launceston Castle. These gradients fall down to the River Kensey and smaller tributaries.

Darite

Darite

Darite is a village in the civil parish of St Cleer, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is three miles (5 km) north of Liskeard.

Great Western Railway (train operating company)

Great Western Railway (train operating company)

Great Western Railway (GWR) is a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup that operates the Greater Western passenger railway franchise. It manages 197 stations and its trains call at over 270. GWR operates long-distance inter-city services along the Great Western Main Line to and from the West of England and South Wales, inter-city services from London to the West Country via the Reading–Taunton line, and the Night Riviera sleeper service between London and Penzance. It also provides commuter and outer-suburban services from its London terminus at Paddington to West London, the Thames Valley region including parts of Berkshire, parts of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire; and regional services throughout the West of England and South Wales to the South coast of England. Great Western Railway also provides and maintains the Electrostar Class 387 fleet for Heathrow Express.

IATA airport code

IATA airport code

A IATA airport code, also known as a IATA location identifier, IATA station code, or simply a location identifier, is a three-character alphanumeric geocode designating many airports and metropolitan areas around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). The characters prominently displayed on baggage tags attached at airport check-in desks are an example of a way these codes are used.

ICAO airport code

ICAO airport code

The ICAO airport code or location indicator is a four-letter code designating aerodromes around the world. These codes, as defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators, are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning. ICAO codes are also used to identify other aviation facilities such as weather stations, international flight service stations or area control centers, whether or not they are located at airports. Flight information regions are also identified by a unique ICAO-code.

Gatwick Airport

Gatwick Airport

Gatwick Airport, also known as London Gatwick, is a major international airport near Crawley, West Sussex, England, 29.5 miles (47.5 km) south of Central London. In 2021, Gatwick was the third-busiest airport by total passenger traffic in the UK, after Heathrow and Stansted airports, and was the 36th-busiest in Europe by total passenger traffic. It covers a total area of 674 hectares.

Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Airport, called London Airport until 1966 and now known as London Heathrow, is a major international airport in London, England. It is the largest of the six international airports serving Greater London. The airport facility is owned and operated by Heathrow Airport Holdings. In 2021, it was the seventh-busiest airport in the world by international passenger traffic and eighth-busiest in Europe by total passenger traffic.

Edinburgh Airport

Edinburgh Airport

Edinburgh Airport is an airport located in the Ingliston area of Edinburgh, Scotland. It was the busiest airport in Scotland in 2019, handling over 14.7 million passengers. It was also the sixth-busiest airport in the United Kingdom by total passengers in 2019. It is located 5 NM west of the city centre, just off the M8 and M9 motorways. It is owned and operated by Global Infrastructure Partners, who are also a minority shareholder of Gatwick Airport. The airport has one runway and one passenger terminal, and employs about 2,500 people.

Glasgow Airport

Glasgow Airport

Glasgow Airport, also known as Glasgow International Airport, formerly Abbotsinch Airport, is an international airport in Scotland. It is located in Paisley, Renfrewshire, 8.6 nautical miles west of Glasgow city centre. In 2019, the airport handled 8.84 million passengers, an 8.4% annual decrease, making it the second-busiest in Scotland, after Edinburgh Airport, and the ninth-busiest airport in the United Kingdom.

Faro Airport

Faro Airport

Faro Airport, officially Gago Coutinho Airport, is located four kilometres west of Faro in Portugal. The airport opened in July 1965 being the main gateway to the year-round resort region of the Algarve with nine million passengers using the facility in 2019.

Culture

Sharptor Mine is mentioned in the Retallick Saga by E. V. Thompson.[35] E. V. Thompson was a resident of Sharptor and lived in Idle Cottage, one of the stone miners' cottages in lower Sharptor. One of Mr. Thompson's books, Chase the Wind, was voted the best historical novel of the year (1980).[36] He Said The storylines come from researching. In my very first book I was sitting on the doorstep of an old miner's cottage, wondering about the people who lived there before - most probably Idle Cottage.[37]

Gallery

Source: "Sharptor", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharptor.

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References
  1. ^ Ordnance Survey Bodmin Moor, 109 Explorer
  2. ^ Ordnance Survey Plymouth & Launceston, 201 Landranger
  3. ^ OS Grid Ref: SX 25892 73194, Altitude: 280 m,https://explore.osmaps.com/?lat=50.532548&lon=-4.458073&zoom=15.5192&overlays=&style=Leisure&type=2d&placesCategory=,accessed Oct 2022
  4. ^ "Topographical and Historical Sketches of the Boroughs of East and West Looe, in the County of Cornwall With an Account of the Natural and Artificial Curiosities and Picturesque Scenery of the Neighbourhood", Thomas Bond, 1823
  5. ^ "An Illustrated Itinerary of the County of Cornwall", Cyrus Redding, 1842
  6. ^ "History of the Borough of Liskeard and its Vicinity", John Allen, 1856
  7. ^ "History of the Parish of Linkinhorne" from the Ms. of W. Harvey (Written In 1727) with Additions and notes by Joseph Polsue, Surveyor, Printed and Published by E. T. Crabb, Fore -Street, Liskeard, 1876
  8. ^ Bodmin Moor, E.C. Axford, 1975
  9. ^ https://explorecornwall.uk/gold-diggings-quarry-a-cornish-wild-swimming-adventure/, accessed Oct 2022
  10. ^ https://pensilva-history-group.netlify.app/people/daniel-gumb, accessed Oct 2022
  11. ^ https://www.swlakestrust.org.uk/siblyback, accessed Oct 2022
  12. ^ https://academic.oup.com/jhered/article/97/1/89/2187656, accessed Oct 2022
  13. ^ https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/woods/golitha-falls/, accessed Oct 2022
  14. ^ https://historicengland.org.uk/advice/heritage-at-risk/search-register/list-entry/41335, accessed Oct 2022
  15. ^ https://historicengland.org.uk/advice/heritage-at-risk/search-register/list-entry/44103, accessed Oct 2022
  16. ^ https://sites.rootsweb.com/~kayhin/72235.html, accessed Nov 2022
  17. ^ https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/1856_Mines_in_Devon_and_Cornwall, accessed Oct 2022
  18. ^ https://www.mindat.org/loc-1048.html, accessed Oct 2022
  19. ^ "The Minions Moor, a Guide to South-East Bodmin Moor, Cornwall", Peter Stanier, 3rd Edition, 2007
  20. ^ https://www.cornwall.gov.uk/housing/private-housing/cornwall-responsible-landlord-scheme/a-guide-to-mundic-block/, accessed Oct 2022
  21. ^ "The Landscape Archaeology of their uses and Activities, Bodmin Moor", Peter Herring, 2008, Bodmin Moor an Archaeological Survey, Vol. 2, The Industrial and Post-medieval Landscapes
  22. ^ https://www.aditnow.co.uk/Photo/West-Sharptor-Mine_50372/, accessed Nov 2022
  23. ^ "History of the Borough of Liskeard and its Vicinity", John Allen, 1856
  24. ^ https://www.worldweatheronline.com/sharptor-weather-averages/cornwall/gb.aspx, accessed Nov 2022
  25. ^ https://education.nationalgeographic.org/resource/fog, accessed Oct 2022
  26. ^ https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/brownstone-and-coleton-camp/features/battling-bracken, accessed Oct 2022
  27. ^ "An Introduction to Bodmin Moor",Mark Camp,2009
  28. ^ "Cheesewring and South East Cornwall: A Climber's Guide", Sean Hawken, St Ives Printing & Publishing Company (1 Aug. 1998),ISBN-13:978-0948385261
  29. ^ https://www.postoffice.co.uk/branch-finder/3195392/minions, accessed Oct 2022
  30. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-59781171, accessed Oct 2022
  31. ^ https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/cheesewring-hotel-fire-caused-electrical-6415619, accessed Oct 2022
  32. ^ https://www.gocornwallbus.co.uk/services/TFCN/112, accessed Oct 2022
  33. ^ https://www.gocornwallbus.co.uk/services/TFCN/236, accessed Oct 2022
  34. ^ https://www.gwr.com/stations-and-destinations/stations/liskeard, accessed Oct 2022
  35. ^ https://www.goodreads.com/series/53467, accessed Oct 2022
  36. ^ "100 Years on Bodmin Moor", EW. V. Thompson, Bossiney Books, 1984
  37. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-18234258, accessed Nov 2022

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