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Scream 4

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Scream 4
Scream4Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byWes Craven
Written byKevin Williamson
Based onCharacters
by Kevin Williamson
Produced by
  • Wes Craven
  • Iya Labunka
  • Kevin Williamson
Starring
CinematographyPeter Deming
Edited byPeter McNulty
Music byMarco Beltrami
Production
companies
Distributed byDimension Films[1]
Release dates
  • April 11, 2011 (2011-04-11) (TCL Chinese Theatre)
  • April 15, 2011 (2011-04-15) (United States)
Running time
111 minutes[2]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$40 million[2]
Box office$97.2 million[2]

Scream 4 (stylized as SCRE4M) is a 2011 American slasher film directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. Produced by Outerbanks Entertainment and distributed by Dimension Films, it is the fourth installment in the Scream film series. The film stars Neve Campbell, David Arquette, Courteney Cox, Emma Roberts, Hayden Panettiere, Anthony Anderson, Alison Brie, Adam Brody, Rory Culkin, Marielle Jaffe, Erik Knudsen, Mary McDonnell, Marley Shelton, Nico Tortorella, and Roger L. Jackson. The film takes place on the fifteenth anniversary of the original Woodsboro murders and involves Sidney Prescott returning to the town after ten years, where Ghostface once again begins killing students from Woodsboro High. Like its predecessors, Scream 4 combines the violence of the slasher genre with elements of black comedy and "whodunit" mystery to satirize the clichés of film remakes. The film also provides commentary on the extensive usage of social media and the obsession with internet fame.

The series was originally intended to be a trilogy, concluding with Scream 3 in 2000. However, in June 2008, The Weinstein Company announced a third sequel was in development, with Craven confirmed to direct in March 2010. In September 2009, Arquette, Campbell, and Cox were announced to be returning, after which the casting process lasted between April and September 2010. Principal photography began in June 2010 and ended in September that same year, taking place in and around Ann Arbor, Michigan. Scenes set in and around Woodsboro High School were actually filmed at Woodworth Middle School in Dearborn, Michigan. During production, Ehren Kruger, who previously wrote the screenplay for Scream 3, was hired for script rewrites. Reshoots were filmed in early 2011, following test screenings.

Scream 4 premiered at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles on April 11, 2011, and was released in the United States on April 15, 2011, by Dimension Films. The film received mixed reviews from critics, who praised the performances, direction and humor, while criticizing the film's lack of scares and reliance on clichéd formulas. However, many considered it to be an improvement over its predecessor, and it has enjoyed several positive reappraisals since, particularly for its prescient examination of the impact of social media.[3][4][5] It grossed $97 million worldwide on a budget of $40 million, becoming the lowest-grossing film in the Scream franchise.

Scream 4 was the final film to be directed by Craven before his death in 2015. It was followed by Scream, an anthology television series, which was developed for MTV without the involvement of the main cast or crew of the films, although Roger L. Jackson returned to voice Ghostface in the third season. A fifth film that is a direct sequel, simply titled Scream, was released on January 14, 2022, by Paramount Pictures.

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Dimension Films

Dimension Films

Dimension Films is an American film production company owned by Lantern Entertainment. It was formerly used as Harvey and Bob Weinstein's label within Miramax, which was acquired by The Walt Disney Company on June 30, 1993, to produce and release independent films and genre titles, specifically horror and science fiction films.

David Arquette

David Arquette

David Arquette is an American actor and former professional wrestler. He is best known for his role as Dewey Riley in the slasher film franchise Scream, for which he won a Teen Choice Award and two Blockbuster Entertainment Awards. As a professional wrestler, he is best remembered for his 2000 stint in World Championship Wrestling (WCW), where he won the WCW World Heavyweight Championship and headlined the Slamboree pay-per-view event; he has received praise in recent times for his work on the independent circuit.

Courteney Cox

Courteney Cox

Courteney Bass Cox is an American actress and filmmaker. She gained international recognition for her starring role as Monica Geller on the NBC sitcom Friends, which aired from 1994 to 2004. For her performance in the series, she received seven Screen Actors Guild Award nominations, of which she won one. She received further recognition for starring as Gale Weathers in the horror film franchise Scream (1996–present). She also starred as Lauren Miller in the NBC sitcom Family Ties (1987–1989), Lucy Spiller in the FX drama series Dirt (2007–2008), and as Jules Cobb in the ABC/TBS sitcom Cougar Town (2009–2015), the lattermost of which earned her nominations at the Golden Globe Awards and the Critics' Choice Awards.

Emma Roberts

Emma Roberts

Emma Rose Roberts is an American actress. Known for her work in film and television projects of the horror and thriller genres, she has received various accolades, including a Young Artist Award, an MTV Movie & TV Award, and a ShoWest Award.

Anthony Anderson

Anthony Anderson

Anthony Anderson is an American actor, comedian and game show host. He is best known for his leading roles in comedy series such as Andre 'Dre' Johnson on Black-ish, drama series such as Marlin Boulet on K-Ville, and as NYPD Detective Kevin Bernard on the NBC crime drama Law & Order and comedy sitcom television series Guys with Kids. He had major roles in feature films such as Me, Myself & Irene (2000), Kangaroo Jack (2003), Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London (2004), The Departed (2006), Transformers (2007), and Scream 4 (2011).

Alison Brie

Alison Brie

Alison Brie Schermerhorn is an American actress. Her breakthrough came with the role of Trudy Campbell in the drama series Mad Men (2007–2015), which won her a Screen Actors Guild Award. She gained recognition for her role as Annie Edison in the NBC sitcom Community (2009–2015) and voicing Diane Nguyen in the animated comedy series BoJack Horseman (2014–2020). For playing Ruth Wilder in the comedy-drama series GLOW (2017–2019) she received nominations for two Golden Globes and two Critics' Choice Awards.

Adam Brody

Adam Brody

Adam Jared Brody is an American actor, writer, musician, and producer. He is known for his breakthrough role as Seth Cohen on the Fox television series The O.C., which premiered in 2003. Subsequently, Brody appeared in films including Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005), Thank You for Smoking (2005), In the Land of Women (2007), and Jennifer's Body (2009).

Black comedy

Black comedy

Black comedy, also known as dark comedy, morbid humor, or gallows humor, is a style of comedy that makes light of subject matter that is generally considered taboo, particularly subjects that are normally considered serious or painful to discuss. Writers and comedians often use it as a tool for exploring vulgar issues by provoking discomfort, serious thought, and amusement for their audience. Thus, in fiction, for example, the term black comedy can also refer to a genre in which dark humor is a core component. Popular themes of the genre include death, crime, poverty, suicide, war, violence, terrorism, discrimination, disease, racism, sexism, and human sexuality.

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Ann Arbor is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan and the county seat of Washtenaw County. The 2020 census recorded its population to be 123,851, making it the fifth-largest city in Michigan. It is the principal city of the Ann Arbor Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Washtenaw County. Ann Arbor is also included in the Greater Detroit Combined Statistical Area and the Great Lakes megalopolis, the most populated and largest megalopolis in North America.

Dearborn, Michigan

Dearborn, Michigan

Dearborn is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. At the 2020 census, it had a population of 109,976. Dearborn is the seventh most-populated city in Michigan and is home to the largest Muslim population in the United States per capita. It also is home to the largest mosque in the United States.

Ehren Kruger

Ehren Kruger

Ehren Kruger is an American film screenwriter and producer. He is best known for writing three of the five installments in the original Transformers film series: Revenge of the Fallen, Dark of the Moon, and Age of Extinction, in addition to the American version of The Ring and its sequel The Ring Two and the American adaptation of Ghost in the Shell.

Anthology series

Anthology series

An anthology series is a radio, television, video game or film series that spans different genres and presents a different story and a different set of characters in each different episode, season, segment, or short. These usually have a different cast in each episode, but several series in the past, such as Four Star Playhouse, employed a permanent troupe of character actors who would appear in a different drama each week. Some anthology series, such as Studio One, began on radio and then expanded to television.

Plot

On the 15th[a] anniversary week of the original Woodsboro murders, high school students Jenny Randall and Marnie Cooper are murdered by Ghostface. Sidney Prescott returns to Woodsboro the next day to promote her book with her publicist, Rebecca Walters. After evidence is found in her rental car, Sidney becomes a suspect in the murders and must stay in town until they are solved.

Sidney's cousin, Jill Roberts, who is coping with the infidelity of her ex-boyfriend, Trevor Sheldon, gets a threatening phone call from Ghostface, as does her friend Olivia Morris. Jill and Olivia, alongside their friend Kirby Reed, are questioned about their calls by Dewey Riley, now the town's sheriff, while his deputies Judy Hicks, Anthony Perkins, and Hoss assist him in the case. Gale Weathers, Dewey's wife, is struggling with writer's block and decides to investigate the murders against her husband's wishes. Sidney stays over with Jill and her mother, Sidney's aunt Kate. That night, Olivia is killed by Ghostface as Jill and Kirby watch in horror from across the street. Sidney herself is then confronted by Ghostface, and they fight until Ghostface is forced to flee when Perkins and Hoss arrive.

At the hospital, Sidney fires Rebecca after learning of her desire to exploit the murders to increase book sales, and Rebecca is subsequently murdered by Ghostface at a parking garage. Gale enlists the help of two high school movie fanatics, Charlie Walker and Robbie Mercer. Charlie theorizes that the killer is following the rules of horror remakes, and Gale and Sidney conclude that the killer will likely strike at the "Stabathon", a screening party held in a barn where teenagers gather to watch all movies in the Stab franchise. Gale sneaks into the party to investigate, but Ghostface attacks her, stabbing her in the shoulder. Hoss and Perkins, who were assigned to guard Jill's house, are also murdered. Sidney discovers from another taunting call from Ghostface that Jill has left for Kirby's, before Ghostface attacks them and kills Kate.

Jill, Kirby, Charlie, Robbie, and Trevor are at an after party at Kirby's house when Ghostface strikes, killing a drunken Robbie. Sidney arrives to leave with Jill, but they are both chased by Ghostface. As Sidney calls Dewey and tries to find Jill, Kirby frees Charlie, who was bound and gagged, but he immediately stabs her, revealing himself as Ghostface, before leaving her to bleed out.[b] Sidney is confronted by Charlie and stabbed by a second Ghostface, who reveals herself as Jill. She admits to masterminding the murders out of jealousy from the fame that Sidney received for surviving the original murders, and desires to achieve fame as a "survivor" of the murders and framing Trevor as Ghostface. Jill kills Trevor and betrays Charlie, stabbing him to death to pin him as Trevor's accomplice so she can be the sole survivor. She then stabs Sidney and mutilates herself to frame Trevor further.

Dewey and the police arrive as Sidney and Jill are taken to the hospital. After discovering that Sidney has survived, an enraged Jill goes to her hospital room and makes a final attempt to kill her. Dewey, Gale, and Judy intervene, having been clued in by the fact that Jill somehow knew exactly where Gale was stabbed. Jill subdues Dewey and Hicks and holds Gale at gunpoint, but Sidney incapacitates her with a defibrillator while denouncing her motive, and ultimately kills Jill by shooting her in the heart. Dewey calls in all police units, as reporters outside erroneously name Jill as the "sole surviving hero".

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Scream (1996 film)

Scream (1996 film)

Scream is a 1996 American slasher film directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. The film stars Neve Campbell, David Arquette, Courteney Cox, Matthew Lillard, Rose McGowan, Skeet Ulrich, Jamie Kennedy, and Drew Barrymore. Released on December 20, it follows high school student Sidney Prescott (Campbell) and her group of friends in the fictional town of Woodsboro, California, who become the targets of a mysterious killer in a Halloween costume known as Ghostface. The film satirizes the clichés of the slasher genre popularized in films such as Halloween (1978), Friday the 13th (1980) and Craven's own A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). Scream was considered unique at the time of its release for featuring characters aware of real-world horror films who openly discussed the clichés that the film attempted to subvert.

Ghostface (identity)

Ghostface (identity)

Ghostface is a fictional identity adopted by eleven characters and the primary antagonist in the Scream franchise. The figure was originally created by Kevin Williamson, and is primarily mute in person but voiced over the phone by Roger L. Jackson, regardless of who is behind the mask. Ghostface first appeared in Scream (1996) as a disguise used by teenagers Billy Loomis and Stu Macher, during their killing spree in the fictional town of Woodsboro. The mask was a popular Halloween costume created and designed by Fun World costume company before being chosen by Marianne Maddalena and Craven for the film. The identity is used primarily as a disguise for the antagonists of each film to conceal their identities while conducting serial murders, and as such has been portrayed by several actors.

Sidney Prescott

Sidney Prescott

Sidney Prescott is a fictional character and the protagonist of the Scream franchise. The character was created by Kevin Williamson and is portrayed by Canadian actress Neve Campbell. She first appeared in Scream (1996) followed by four sequels: Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011), and Scream (2022). The character appears in the Scream films as the target of a series of killers who adopt the Ghostface persona, a ghost mask and black cloak, to pursue her. In each film, the Ghostface killers often murder people close to Sidney and taunt her by phone with threats and intimate knowledge of her life or the murder of her mother, leading to a final confrontation where the true killer is revealed.

Kirby Reed

Kirby Reed

Kirby Reed is a fictional character in the Scream film series, created by Kevin Williamson and portrayed by Hayden Panettiere. She first appeared in Scream 4 (2011). She re-appears in a photographic Easter egg in the fifth film, simply titled Scream (2022), confirming her fate, and makes a formal return in the following film, Scream VI (2023).

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers is a fictional character of the Scream film series, created by Kevin Williamson and portrayed by Courteney Cox. The character first appeared in Scream (1996), followed by five sequels: Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011), Scream (2022) and Scream VI (2023). She is the only character who has appeared in every movie of the series.

Writer's block

Writer's block

Writer's block is a condition, primarily associated with writing, in which an author is either unable to produce new work or experiences a creative slowdown. The condition ranges from difficulty in coming up with original ideas to being unable to produce a work for years. Writer's block is not solely measured by time passing without writing. It is measured by time passing without productivity in the task at hand.

Cast

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List of Scream (film series) characters

List of Scream (film series) characters

Kevin Williamson's and Wes Craven's American meta horror slasher film series Scream features a large cast of characters created primarily by Kevin Williamson with contributions from Craven and Ehren Kruger. The series focuses on a succession of murderers who adopt a ghost-like disguise, dubbed Ghostface, who taunt and attempt to kill Sidney Prescott in the first four films, and Sam and Tara Carpenter in the fifth and sixth films. The series comprises five films: Scream (1996), Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011), and Scream (2022), with Scream VI set to be released in 2023. Other major recurring characters include ambitious news reporter Gale Weathers, police officer Dewey Riley, film-geek Randy Meeks, and Cotton Weary.

List of Scream (film series) cast members

List of Scream (film series) cast members

Scream is an American meta horror slasher film series created in 1996 by Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven. Each of the films features a large ensemble of actors and actresses. The leading role of the series is Sidney Prescott, portrayed by Canadian actress Neve Campbell, who is accompanied by ambitious news reporter Gale Weathers, played by Courteney Cox, and the police officer Dewey Riley, played by David Arquette, who appear in all five Scream films. Other major recurring characters include film-geek Randy Meeks, played by Jamie Kennedy, and Cotton Weary, played by Liev Schreiber, in the first three films. The series consists of five films: Scream (1996), Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011) and Scream (2022), with Scream VI set to be released in 2023. The first four films were directed by Wes Craven and scored by Marco Beltrami. Kevin Williamson wrote Scream, Scream 2 and Scream 4, but scheduling commitments meant he could provide only notes for Scream 3, with writing duties instead helmed by Ehren Kruger.

David Arquette

David Arquette

David Arquette is an American actor and former professional wrestler. He is best known for his role as Dewey Riley in the slasher film franchise Scream, for which he won a Teen Choice Award and two Blockbuster Entertainment Awards. As a professional wrestler, he is best remembered for his 2000 stint in World Championship Wrestling (WCW), where he won the WCW World Heavyweight Championship and headlined the Slamboree pay-per-view event; he has received praise in recent times for his work on the independent circuit.

Courteney Cox

Courteney Cox

Courteney Bass Cox is an American actress and filmmaker. She gained international recognition for her starring role as Monica Geller on the NBC sitcom Friends, which aired from 1994 to 2004. For her performance in the series, she received seven Screen Actors Guild Award nominations, of which she won one. She received further recognition for starring as Gale Weathers in the horror film franchise Scream (1996–present). She also starred as Lauren Miller in the NBC sitcom Family Ties (1987–1989), Lucy Spiller in the FX drama series Dirt (2007–2008), and as Jules Cobb in the ABC/TBS sitcom Cougar Town (2009–2015), the lattermost of which earned her nominations at the Golden Globe Awards and the Critics' Choice Awards.

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers is a fictional character of the Scream film series, created by Kevin Williamson and portrayed by Courteney Cox. The character first appeared in Scream (1996), followed by five sequels: Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011), Scream (2022) and Scream VI (2023). She is the only character who has appeared in every movie of the series.

Emma Roberts

Emma Roberts

Emma Rose Roberts is an American actress. Known for her work in film and television projects of the horror and thriller genres, she has received various accolades, including a Young Artist Award, an MTV Movie & TV Award, and a ShoWest Award.

Hayden Panettiere

Hayden Panettiere

Hayden Lesley Panettiere is an American actress, model, and singer. She is best known for her lead roles as Claire Bennet on the NBC superhero series Heroes (2006–2010) and Juliette Barnes in the ABC/CMT musical drama series Nashville (2012–2018), the latter of which earned her two nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film. She also stars in Wes Craven's meta-slasher franchise, Scream, portraying tomboy film geek Kirby Reed.

Kirby Reed

Kirby Reed

Kirby Reed is a fictional character in the Scream film series, created by Kevin Williamson and portrayed by Hayden Panettiere. She first appeared in Scream 4 (2011). She re-appears in a photographic Easter egg in the fifth film, simply titled Scream (2022), confirming her fate, and makes a formal return in the following film, Scream VI (2023).

Anthony Anderson

Anthony Anderson

Anthony Anderson is an American actor, comedian and game show host. He is best known for his leading roles in comedy series such as Andre 'Dre' Johnson on Black-ish, drama series such as Marlin Boulet on K-Ville, and as NYPD Detective Kevin Bernard on the NBC crime drama Law & Order and comedy sitcom television series Guys with Kids. He had major roles in feature films such as Me, Myself & Irene (2000), Kangaroo Jack (2003), Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London (2004), The Departed (2006), Transformers (2007), and Scream 4 (2011).

Adam Brody

Adam Brody

Adam Jared Brody is an American actor, writer, musician, and producer. He is known for his breakthrough role as Seth Cohen on the Fox television series The O.C., which premiered in 2003. Subsequently, Brody appeared in films including Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005), Thank You for Smoking (2005), In the Land of Women (2007), and Jennifer's Body (2009).

Alison Brie

Alison Brie

Alison Brie Schermerhorn is an American actress. Her breakthrough came with the role of Trudy Campbell in the drama series Mad Men (2007–2015), which won her a Screen Actors Guild Award. She gained recognition for her role as Annie Edison in the NBC sitcom Community (2009–2015) and voicing Diane Nguyen in the animated comedy series BoJack Horseman (2014–2020). For playing Ruth Wilder in the comedy-drama series GLOW (2017–2019) she received nominations for two Golden Globes and two Critics' Choice Awards.

Erik Knudsen

Erik Knudsen

Erik Knudsen is a Canadian actor. He is perhaps best known for portraying Daniel Matthews in Saw II, Alec Sadler in Continuum, Robbie in Scream 4 and Dale Turner in the CBS series Jericho.

Production

Development

Scream 4 was announced by The Weinstein Company in July 2008,[6] with Wes Craven saying that he would not mind directing the film if the script was as good as Scream.[7] Kevin Williamson, the writer of Scream and Scream 2, confirmed his return in January 2010, stating that the fourth film's production would begin during the hiatus of his show The Vampire Diaries and that Craven would direct the film.[8] In March 2010, it was confirmed that Craven would indeed direct.[9]

In May 2010, Cathy Konrad, who produced the first three films in the series, filed a $3 million lawsuit against The Weinstein Company, alleging that they violated a written agreement that entitled her company, Cat Entertainment, first rights to produce all films in the series.[10] The Weinsteins argued that this contract required Konrad's services be exclusive to the franchise, which Konrad calls "false pretext", claiming the previous film did not require this condition.[10] The suit accuses the Weinsteins of surreptitious behavior and "a scheme to force Plaintiffs to walk away from the Scream franchise without compensation,"[10] enabling them to cut costs by hiring someone else to produce (Craven's wife, Iya Labunka, not named in the suit).[11] In April 2011, it was reported that the Weinsteins had settled out of court with Konrad, the details remaining confidential, though it was claimed that she would receive a cash payment plus a percentage of the profits from Scream 4.[12]

Writing

Craven stated that there had been no "real life" Ghostface murders from between the decade time jump of Scream 3 to Scream 4[c] but that there had been numerous sequels to the film-within-a-film Stab. He also commented on the status of Sidney Prescott, "She's done her best to move on from the events that occurred in the previous films, even releasing a successful book". Craven said that endless sequels, the modern spew of remakes, film studios, and directors are the butts of parodies in the film. The main characters have to figure out where the horror genre is in current days to figure out the modern events happening to and around them.[13] Williamson expressed his desire to tell a story in which the audience would really care about the characters, like with Sidney Prescott, who survived the first three films, and focus on them rather than the next kill, in comparison to other horror films like those of the Saw franchise.[8]

In an early draft of the script, Gale and Dewey had a baby, but this was changed after it was decided bringing a baby into the film would make shooting "impossible". In another early form of the script, the opening scene had Sidney start fighting with Ghostface and be left for dead. There would have been a two-year gap in the story while she recovered; however, Bob Weinstein feared it would slow the pace of the story and bringing in young characters would work out best.[14]

There were numerous other differences between the original script and the version that eventually reached the screen. For instance, the opening sequences were changed around, as can be seen in the alternative versions and deleted scenes on the DVD. Also, the Stabathon and the sequences involving Gale being attacked there did not appear in the original script. Another major difference was the ending. The hospital finale scenes were added on later in the writing process. The original script ended at the house, with Jill being loaded into the ambulance and speaking to Dewey, then agreeing to give the photographers one photo under the pretense that they would then leave her alone (though she really wanted them to take her photograph). Just then, a paramedic from inside the house shouts that they have a woman alive, not specified but assumed to be either Sidney or Kirby. The film would have ended on this cliffhanger, presumably setting Jill up as an antagonist/anti-heroine in the next film. There were rumors that Sidney would then possibly be suffering from amnesia in the next film, unable to recall that Jill was the killer. There were also rumors that Williamson was upset that this ending was changed.[15][16]

Scream 3 writer Ehren Kruger was brought in during production to do re-writes. Craven said, "Look, there was a bumpy period when things shifted over from Kevin to Ehren. I signed up to do a script by Kevin and unfortunately that didn't go all the way through the shooting. But it certainly is Kevin's script and concept and characters and themes".[17] Additional rewrites were made by Paul Harris Boardman.[18][19] It was reported that the actors were not given the 140-page script[20] past page 75 in order to protect the identity of the Ghostface killer.[21]

Casting

Emma Roberts at the film's premiere at the TCL Chinese Theatre
Emma Roberts at the film's premiere at the TCL Chinese Theatre

In September 2009, Variety reported that Neve Campbell, David Arquette, and Courteney Cox would return.[22] Craven briefly explained their roles in a later interview with Entertainment Weekly, saying "It's a total integration of those three and new kids. The story of Sid, Gale, and Dewey is very much a part of the movie."[13] At a press conference for Repo Men, Liev Schreiber—who played Cotton Weary in the first three films—stated there were no plans for his return.[23] In an interview with FEARnet, Williamson continued to deny a rumor of Jamie Kennedy returning, "I would love nothing more than to have Jamie Kennedy in the film. However to have Randy in the film, it sort of just takes it... I mean Scream 2 was a lie, you know? It's a false move. So I just won't do it. I can't do that. I just won't do it."[24] In April, over 12 casting sides were released to the public to buy for auditions of the film.[25]

In May 2010, Hayden Panettiere and Rory Culkin signed on.[26] Ashley Greene was offered the role of Sidney's cousin, Jill, but the role later went to Emma Roberts.[27] Lake Bell was to play Deputy Judy Hicks, but dropped out four days before filming due to scheduling conflicts, causing the role to ultimately go to Marley Shelton.[28] Nancy O'Dell reprises her role from the second and third films as a reporter.[29] Roger L. Jackson returned as the voice of Ghostface.[30] Lauren Graham was to play Kate Roberts, the mother of Roberts' character, but dropped out a few days into principal photography.[31][32] Craven, like in the previous three films, has a cameo and took to his Twitter to ask fans to pick his role (the cameo was, however, deleted from the final cut of the film).[33] The Hollywood Reporter reported that Anna Paquin and Kristen Bell have cameos in the beginning of the film akin to Drew Barrymore and Jada Pinkett Smith in the first and second films.[20] Shenae Grimes and Lucy Hale also have cameos in the film.[34] In September 2010, Aimee Teegarden and Britt Robertson were cast as the film's actual opening roles, Jenny Randall and Marnie Cooper.[35][36]

Filming

Filming taking place at Kellogg Park in Plymouth, Michigan, July 2010
Filming taking place at Kellogg Park in Plymouth, Michigan, July 2010

On a budget of $40 million, principal photography began on June 28, 2010.[13] Filming was scheduled to end on September 6, after a 42-day shoot, but instead concluded on September 24.[20] Filming took place in and around Ann Arbor, Michigan.[37][38] Scenes portraying Woodsboro High School featured in the original Scream film were shot at Woodworth Middle School in Dearborn, Michigan.[39] The former 16th District Court in Livonia, Michigan was used as a police station.[40]

In April 2010, while scouting for a bookstore to use in the film, Craven spotted a new bookstore that had not yet opened in downtown Northville, Michigan named Next Chapter Bookstore Bistro. Craven instantly loved the building as well as the name and decided to use both in the film. He also hired the owner's chef to prepare the food and pastry for a scene in the film. The scenes were shot the first week of July.[41] After the test screening in January, Craven and Weinstein did not think two scenes played well for the audience. Aimee Teegarden and Alison Brie returned to Detroit in late January and early February 2011 for four days of additional shooting. The scenes involved Teegarden's character, who is stalked at her home, and Brie's character, who is attacked in a parking garage.[42][43][44]

The film also extensively used computer-generated imagery for the first time in the franchise. For example, instead of using a "collapsing knife", the knife's blade was added during post-production with CGI effects.[45] Anderson's death scene in which he is stabbed in the forehead and walks a few feet while talking before finally falling to his death, was not in the script but was inspired by a "real-life medical emergency" Craven had seen in a documentary about a person being stabbed through their head and walked into an emergency room. He thought it was "extraordinary if somebody was stabbed in the head and still be alive for a while". Craven also did not tell the studio that he was taking this approach for the death scene, jokingly saying he hoped he would not be fired the next day.[46]

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Scream (1996 film)

Scream (1996 film)

Scream is a 1996 American slasher film directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. The film stars Neve Campbell, David Arquette, Courteney Cox, Matthew Lillard, Rose McGowan, Skeet Ulrich, Jamie Kennedy, and Drew Barrymore. Released on December 20, it follows high school student Sidney Prescott (Campbell) and her group of friends in the fictional town of Woodsboro, California, who become the targets of a mysterious killer in a Halloween costume known as Ghostface. The film satirizes the clichés of the slasher genre popularized in films such as Halloween (1978), Friday the 13th (1980) and Craven's own A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984). Scream was considered unique at the time of its release for featuring characters aware of real-world horror films who openly discussed the clichés that the film attempted to subvert.

Kevin Williamson (screenwriter)

Kevin Williamson (screenwriter)

Kevin Meade Williamson is an American screenwriter, director, and producer. He is known for developing and writing the screenplay for slasher film Scream (1996)—which launched the Scream franchise—along with those for Scream 2 (1997) and Scream 4 (2011). He is also known for creating the WB teen drama series Dawson's Creek (1998–2003), the CW supernatural drama series The Vampire Diaries (2009–2017), the Fox crime thriller series The Following (2013–2015), the CBS crime drama series Stalker (2014–2015), and the CBS All Access thriller series Tell Me a Story (2018–2020).

Cathy Konrad

Cathy Konrad

Cathy Konrad is an American film and television producer who has produced nineteen feature films including critically acclaimed films such as Golden Globe-winner Walk the Line, 3:10 to Yuma, Girl, Interrupted, Kids and the Scream tetralogy. Since 2011, she has been working exclusively on TV. In 1999, she married film producer James Mangold; they have two sons. In 2014, the couple announced that they were divorcing. Konrad is credited as an executive producer for the former MTV and now, VH1 series Scream.

Ghostface (identity)

Ghostface (identity)

Ghostface is a fictional identity adopted by eleven characters and the primary antagonist in the Scream franchise. The figure was originally created by Kevin Williamson, and is primarily mute in person but voiced over the phone by Roger L. Jackson, regardless of who is behind the mask. Ghostface first appeared in Scream (1996) as a disguise used by teenagers Billy Loomis and Stu Macher, during their killing spree in the fictional town of Woodsboro. The mask was a popular Halloween costume created and designed by Fun World costume company before being chosen by Marianne Maddalena and Craven for the film. The identity is used primarily as a disguise for the antagonists of each film to conceal their identities while conducting serial murders, and as such has been portrayed by several actors.

Saw (franchise)

Saw (franchise)

Saw is a horror franchise created by Australian film makers James Wan and Leigh Whannell, consisting of nine feature films and additional media. Set in an unnamed city in the United States, the first eight films primarily revolve around the fictional serial killer John "Jigsaw" Kramer, while the ninth movie revolves around a copycat killer while still keeping continuity with the previous films. John Kramer was introduced briefly in Saw and developed in more detail in Saw II and the subsequent films. Rather than killing his victims outright, he traps them in life-threatening situations that he calls "tests" or "games" to test their will to survive through physical or psychological torture, believing that if they survive, they will be "rehabilitated". Kramer was killed off in Saw III, but the films continued to focus on his posthumous influence, particularly by his apprentices, and explore his character via flashbacks.

Ehren Kruger

Ehren Kruger

Ehren Kruger is an American film screenwriter and producer. He is best known for writing three of the five installments in the original Transformers film series: Revenge of the Fallen, Dark of the Moon, and Age of Extinction, in addition to the American version of The Ring and its sequel The Ring Two and the American adaptation of Ghost in the Shell.

Paul Harris Boardman

Paul Harris Boardman

Paul Harris Boardman is an American screenwriter and film producer, best known for his work in the horror genre. Boardman has also written other screenplays for various studios and production companies, including TriStar, Disney, Bruckheimer Films, IEG, APG, Sony, Lakeshore, Screen Gems, Universal and MGM.

Neve Campbell

Neve Campbell

Neve Adrianne Campbell is a Canadian actress. She is known for her work in the drama and horror genres.

David Arquette

David Arquette

David Arquette is an American actor and former professional wrestler. He is best known for his role as Dewey Riley in the slasher film franchise Scream, for which he won a Teen Choice Award and two Blockbuster Entertainment Awards. As a professional wrestler, he is best remembered for his 2000 stint in World Championship Wrestling (WCW), where he won the WCW World Heavyweight Championship and headlined the Slamboree pay-per-view event; he has received praise in recent times for his work on the independent circuit.

Courteney Cox

Courteney Cox

Courteney Bass Cox is an American actress and filmmaker. She gained international recognition for her starring role as Monica Geller on the NBC sitcom Friends, which aired from 1994 to 2004. For her performance in the series, she received seven Screen Actors Guild Award nominations, of which she won one. She received further recognition for starring as Gale Weathers in the horror film franchise Scream (1996–present). She also starred as Lauren Miller in the NBC sitcom Family Ties (1987–1989), Lucy Spiller in the FX drama series Dirt (2007–2008), and as Jules Cobb in the ABC/TBS sitcom Cougar Town (2009–2015), the lattermost of which earned her nominations at the Golden Globe Awards and the Critics' Choice Awards.

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly is an American digital-only entertainment magazine based in New York City, published by Dotdash Meredith, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books, and popular culture. The magazine debuted on February 16, 1990, in New York City.

Press conference

Press conference

A press conference or news conference is a media event in which notable individuals or organizations invite journalists to hear them speak and ask questions. Press conferences are often held by politicians, corporations, non-governmental organizations, as well as organizers for newsworthy events.

Music

The Scream 4: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack was released on April 12, 2011, by Lakeshore Records.[47] A score soundtrack was also released, on April 19, 2011, by Varèse Sarabande.[48]

Scream 4: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
No.TitleWriter(s)ArtistLength
1."Something to Die For"Jesper Anderberg
Johan Bengtsson
Fredrik Blond
Maja Ivarsson
Felix Rodriguez
The Sounds3:42
2."Bad Karma"Desmond Child
Ida Maria Sivertsen
Stefan Tornby
Ida Maria2:55
3."Cup of Coffee"Corey Marriott
Jay Marriott
Steve Turnock
Liam Young
The Novocaines1:30
4."Make My Body"Christophe Eagleton
Kamtin Mohager
The Chain Gang of 19743:37
5."Don't Mess with the Original"Marco BeltramiMarco Beltrami3:33
6."Yeah Yeah Yeah"Jesper Anderberg
Johan Bengtsson
Fredrik Blond
Maja Ivarsson
Felix Rodriguez
The Sounds3:31
7."Run for Your Life"Tamara Schlesinger6 Day Riot2:32
8."Axel F"Harold FaltermeyerRaney Shockne3:01
9."On Fire"Jesse LazLocksley1:54
10."Devils"Eric ElbogenSay Hi2:20
11."Denial"Lucas Banker
Logan Conrad Mader
Stereo Black3:43
12."Jill's America"Marco BeltramiMarco Beltrami3:26
Total length:35:51

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Johan Bengtsson

Johan Bengtsson

Johan Bengtsson is the bassist for The Sounds. He has also collaborated with DJ Tommie Sunshine on the song "Dance Among the Ruins".

Maja Ivarsson

Maja Ivarsson

Maja Ivarsson is a Swedish singer and lead vocalist of the Swedish indie rock band The Sounds.

Desmond Child

Desmond Child

John Charles Barrett, known professionally as Desmond Child, is an American songwriter and producer. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2008.

Ida Maria

Ida Maria

Ida Maria Børli Sivertsen, better known simply as Ida Maria, is a Norwegian musician and songwriter.

The Chain Gang of 1974

The Chain Gang of 1974

The Chain Gang of 1974 is the indietronica project of American musician and DJ, Kamtin Mohager. "The Chain Gang of 1974" can also be in reference to Kamtin Mohager himself. Mohager was raised in Hawaii and Colorado, and currently lives in Los Angeles, California. He formed the grunge band Heavenward in 2020.

Marco Beltrami

Marco Beltrami

Marco Beltrami is an American composer and conductor of film and television scores. He has worked in a number of genres, including horror, action, science-fiction, Western, and superhero.

Axel F

Axel F

"Axel F" is an electronic instrumental by German musician Harold Faltermeyer. It served as the theme for the 1984 film Beverly Hills Cop, starring Eddie Murphy, and became an international number one hit in 1985. The track reached number one in Ireland as well as on the US Billboard Hot Dance Club Play chart. Additionally, it was a number two hit in Belgium, Canada, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the UK and West Germany.

Harold Faltermeyer

Harold Faltermeyer

Hans Hugo Harold Faltermeier is a German musician, composer and record producer.

Raney Shockne

Raney Shockne

Raney Shockne is an American music composer and producer based in Los Angeles. He has written and produced songs for Giorgio Moroder, Pitbull, Britney Spears, Foxes, Matthew Koma, Leona Lewis and others. His score and songwriting collaborations have appeared in over 30 films and 100 televisions shows to date. Shockne is perhaps best known as the composer of USA drama Queen of the South, CBS primetime comedy Kevin Can Wait, Anger Management starring Charlie Sheen, the film The To Do List, and Fame, where his remake of the title song reached the American Billboard Hot 100. Additionally, Shockne's current video game credits include Cyberpunk 2077, Star Wars Battlefront II, Tron RUN/r, Dragon Age: Inquisition and The Sims franchise.

Locksley (band)

Locksley (band)

Locksley is an indie four-piece pop rock/power pop band from Madison, Wisconsin. They are self-released on their own Feature Records label. Their songwriting is heavily influenced by early British Invasion bands with an instrumental style based more on early American punk bands and modern garage rock groups. The band describe their sound as doo-wop punk.

Say Hi

Say Hi

Say Hi is a Seattle-based indie rock band formed in Brooklyn in 2002 by Eric Elbogen.

Logan Mader

Logan Mader

Logan Conrad Mader is a Canadian record producer and current guitarist of melodic death metal band Once Human, as well as the former lead guitarist of groove metal band Machine Head.

Release

The film was released in North America on April 15, 2011.

Home media

Scream 4 was first released on DVD and Blu-ray in Mexico on August 5, 2011.[49] It was later released in the United Kingdom and Ireland on August 22, 2011,[50] in Canada and the United States on October 4, 2011,[51][52] and in Australia and New Zealand on October 13, 2011.[53] The film made roughly $4,103,282 in DVD sales in the United States, bringing the film's lifetime gross to approximately $101,334,702.[54] In the US DVD and Blu-ray rental charts, Scream 4 entered at #2 on its week of release.[55] The film then spent 7 consecutive weeks among the top twenty of the chart.[56] Scream 4 made its television debut on April 20, 2012, on cable channel Showtime.[57] In December 2012, Showtime featured Scream 4 during a free weekend preview, where the station was available in over 80 million homes in America.[58] On April 19, 2013, Scream 4 was added to Netflix's online streaming service.[59] To promote the DVD and Blu-ray release, Universal Studios produced "Terror Tram: SCRE4M For Your Life" as an event featured in its annual Halloween Horror Nights throughout September and October 2011.[60]

Reception

Box office

Scream 4 grossed $38.2 million in the United States and Canada, and $59.1 million in other territories, for a total gross of $97.2 million, against its budget of $40 million.[2]

The film was released in 3,305 theaters on 4,400 screens and grossed over $1 million in its midnight previews.[61] It made $8.7 million on Friday and $19.3 million in its opening weekend, finishing second at the box office.[62][63] According to industry experts, the film's opening weekend was "disappointing,"[62][64] experiencing the third-lowest opening of the Scream franchise.[65] In its second weekend, it fell to fifth place, taking in $7 million ($7.8 million over the four-day Easter frame), then $2.2 million in its third weekend.[66]

In its first weekend worldwide the film took $37.3 million from 30 territories, behind only Rio which took $53.9 million from 62 territories. The film topped the box office in the United Kingdom taking over £2 million, came in second in France, third in Mexico and fourth in Australia.[67]

Critical response

On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 60% based on 190 reviews, with an average score of 5.90/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "The franchise is showing its age, but Scream 4 is undeniably an improvement over its predecessor, with just enough meta humor and clever kills."[68] On Metacritic, the film received a score of 52 based on 32 reviews, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[69] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B−" on an A+ to F scale.[64]

Roger Ebert gave the film two out of four stars, criticizing the film for using the clichéd formula of the slasher genre, but complimenting Craven's direction and Williamson's dialogue.[70] Empire gave the film two out of five stars, criticizing the film's old-fashioned formula and lack of scare factor.[71] The New York Daily News thought the film was "dated" and that "relying on obvious clichés doesn't seem ironic anymore, just easy."[72] The Toronto Sun gave the film a mixed review, writing that "this installment is nowhere near the hip, serrated-edge blast of newness the original was in 1996. Suddenly, it's the horror thriller that, like, your parents are excited about"; however, the review praised director Wes Craven.[73] Colin Covert of the Minneapolis Star Tribune gave the film a perfect score of four out of four stars, praising the combination of scares, comedy, and twists.[74]

The Boston Herald wrote that the film is "often amusing" but too long.[75] Lisa Kennedy from the Denver Post stated that Scream 4 "pays plenty of homage to their 1996 original", but that it is not close to its greatness, despite calling it a "cut above most slasher flicks".[76] Lisa Schwarzbaum of Entertainment Weekly praised the film, stating "It's a giddy reminder of everything that made Scream such a fresh scream in the first place",[77] while Betsy Sharkey of the Los Angeles Times wrote that "Scream 4 finds a way to live up to its gory past while it carves out new terrors in new ways."[78] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone gave the movie two out of four stars, criticizing the comedic overtones.[79]

In the years since its release, many have credited Scream 4 with foreshadowing the effects of social media on today's youth and the extreme lengths they go to achieve internet fame.[80][81]

Accolades

In June 2011, Scream 4 was nominated for a Teen Choice Award for Best Horror Movie but lost to Paranormal Activity 2.[82] On March 2, 2012, Scream 4 won the award for Best Horror Movie, and Ghostface came in third place for Best Villain at the Virgin Media Movie Awards.[83]

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Rio (2011 film)

Rio (2011 film)

Rio is a 2011 American 3D computer-animated musical adventure comedy film produced by Blue Sky Studios and 20th Century Fox Animation, and directed by Carlos Saldanha. The title refers to the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro, where the film is set. The film features the voices of Jesse Eisenberg, Anne Hathaway, Leslie Mann, Rodrigo Santoro, Jemaine Clement, George Lopez, Tracy Morgan, will.i.am, and Jamie Foxx. It tells the story of Blu (Eisenberg), a domesticated male Spix's macaw who is taken to Rio de Janeiro to mate with a free-spirited female Spix's macaw, Jewel (Hathaway). The two eventually fall in love, and together they have to escape from being smuggled by Nigel (Clement), a cockatoo.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a country primarily located in Western Europe. It also includes overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, giving it one of the largest discontiguous exclusive economic zones in the world. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain 68 million people.

Mexico

Mexico

Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country in the southern portion of North America. It is bordered to the north by the United States; to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; to the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and to the east by the Gulf of Mexico. Mexico covers 1,972,550 square kilometers (761,610 sq mi), making it the world's 13th-largest country by area; with approximately 126,014,024 inhabitants, it is the 10th-most-populous country and has the most Spanish-speakers. Mexico is organized as a federal republic comprising 31 states and Mexico City, its capital. Other major urban areas include Monterrey, Guadalajara, Puebla, Toluca, Tijuana, Ciudad Juárez, and León.

Australia

Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. With an area of 7,617,930 square kilometres (2,941,300 sq mi), Australia is the largest country by area in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country. Australia is the oldest, flattest, and driest inhabited continent, with the least fertile soils. It is a megadiverse country, and its size gives it a wide variety of landscapes and climates, with deserts in the centre, tropical rainforests in the north-east, and mountain ranges in the south-east.

Review aggregator

Review aggregator

A review aggregator is a system that collects reviews of products and services. This system stores the reviews and uses them for purposes such as supporting a website where users can view the reviews, selling information to third parties about consumer tendencies, and creating databases for companies to learn about their actual and potential customers. The system enables users to easily compare many different reviews of the same work. Many of these systems calculate an approximate average assessment, usually based on assigning a numeric value to each review related to its degree of positive rating of the work.

Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, television shows, music albums, video games, and formerly books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999, and is owned by Fandom, Inc. as of 2023.

CinemaScore

CinemaScore

CinemaScore is a market research firm based in Las Vegas. It surveys film audiences to rate their viewing experiences with letter grades, reports the results, and forecasts box office receipts based on the data.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Joseph Ebert was an American film critic, film historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Neil Steinberg of the Chicago Sun-Times said Ebert "was without question the nation's most prominent and influential film critic," and Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times called him "the best-known film critic in America."

Boston Herald

Boston Herald

The Boston Herald is an American daily newspaper whose primary market is Boston, Massachusetts, and its surrounding area. It was founded in 1846 and is one of the oldest daily newspapers in the United States. It has been awarded eight Pulitzer Prizes in its history, including four for editorial writing and three for photography before it was converted to tabloid format in 1981. The Herald was named one of the "10 Newspapers That 'Do It Right'" in 2012 by Editor & Publisher.

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly is an American digital-only entertainment magazine based in New York City, published by Dotdash Meredith, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books, and popular culture. The magazine debuted on February 16, 1990, in New York City.

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper that started publishing in Los Angeles in 1881. Based in the LA-adjacent suburb of El Segundo since 2018, it is the sixth-largest newspaper by circulation in the United States. The publication has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes. It is owned by Patrick Soon-Shiong and published by the Times Mirror Company. The newspaper’s coverage emphasizes California and especially Southern California stories.

Peter Travers

Peter Travers

Peter Joseph Travers is an American film critic, journalist, and television presenter. He reviews films for ABC News and previously served as a movie critic for People and Rolling Stone. Travers also hosts the film interview program Popcorn with Peter Travers for ABC News.

Sequel

Prior to the release of Scream 4, Wes Craven and Kevin Williamson both stated that its success would lead to a fifth and sixth film.[84] Williamson stated in January 2010 that he was contracted to write a fifth film in addition to the fourth one.[8] Following the under-performance of the film at the box office, as well as the death of Craven in 2015, doubts were cast on the possibility of future films. In 2015, MTV began airing an anthology television series spin-off of the franchise, although none of the cast or crew from the films were involved. Although star Neve Campbell has expressed doubts over any more installments, David Arquette voiced his desire to have a fifth film to pay homage to Craven.[84]

In June 2015, Bob Weinstein, when asked about the possibility of a film continuation after Scream 4, denied the possibility of a fifth installment or any further continuation of the film franchise, citing the MTV series as the right place for the franchise.[85]

However, in early 2019, it was reported that Blumhouse Productions, which specializes in horror-themed films and produced a direct sequel of the Halloween film in 2018, was interested in reviving the series, and that head of studio Jason Blum was working on making such Scream installments happen.[86] Rumors arose later in the year that Blumhouse was rebooting the franchise, though Blumhouse later said they were not, but the rumors continued, indicating that another studio was involved.[87]

In November 2019, it was reported that Spyglass Media Group is making a new installment in the franchise. At this time, it was yet unknown whether the film would be a sequel, reboot, or remake. Kevin Williamson returned as an executive producer, but it was unknown if any of the three main cast members (Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, and David Arquette) would return.[88][89][90][91][92] In December 2019, it was announced that the reboot would feature a new cast predominately, but could possibly feature appearances from the previous main cast members.

In March 2020, it was announced that Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett would direct the movie, with Kevin Williamson producing, and that it had already entered official development, with filming hoping to begin May 2020.[93] In May 2020, it was announced that Neve Campbell was in talks to reprise her role as Sidney Prescott in the fifth film.[94] That same month, it was announced that David Arquette would be reprising his role of Dewey Riley for the fifth film and James Vanderbilt and Guy Busick were announced as additional writers. It was also confirmed that the film will begin production later in the year in Wilmington, North Carolina when safety protocols are in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In July 2020, it was also confirmed that Courteney Cox would reprise her role of Gale Weathers in the upcoming sequel.[95] In September 2020, it was confirmed that Neve Campbell and Marley Shelton would reprise their roles as Sidney Prescott and Judy Hicks, respectively.[96]

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Scream (2022 film)

Scream (2022 film)

Scream is a 2022 American slasher film directed by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett and written by James Vanderbilt and Guy Busick. It is the fifth installment in the Scream film series. Though billed as a relaunch of the film series, the film is a direct sequel to Scream 4 (2011) and is the first film in the series to not be directed by Wes Craven, following his death in 2015. The film is dedicated to Craven at the beginning of the closing credits. The film stars Melissa Barrera, Kyle Gallner, Mason Gooding, Mikey Madison, Dylan Minnette, Jenna Ortega, Jack Quaid, Jasmin Savoy Brown, and Sonia Ammar, alongside Heather Matarazzo, Roger L. Jackson, Marley Shelton, Skeet Ulrich, Courteney Cox, David Arquette, and Neve Campbell, who reprise their roles from previous installments. The film takes place twenty-five years after the original Woodsboro murders, when yet another Ghostface appears and begins targeting a group of teenagers who are each somehow linked to the original killings. Similar to previous entries, Scream combines the violence of the slasher genre with elements of black comedy and "whodunit" mystery to satirize the trend of reboots and legacy sequels. The film also provides commentary on the horror fandom culture, particularly the divide between "elevated horror" and classic slasher films.

Anthology series

Anthology series

An anthology series is a radio, television, video game or film series that spans different genres and presents a different story and a different set of characters in each different episode, season, segment, or short. These usually have a different cast in each episode, but several series in the past, such as Four Star Playhouse, employed a permanent troupe of character actors who would appear in a different drama each week. Some anthology series, such as Studio One, began on radio and then expanded to television.

Scream (TV series)

Scream (TV series)

Scream is an American anthology slasher television series developed by Jill Blotevogel, Dan Dworkin and Jay Beattie for MTV and Brett Matthews for VH1. It is based on the slasher film series of the same name created by Kevin Williamson and Wes Craven. The series is produced by Dimension Television and MTV Production Development, and was formerly filmed in Louisiana, in locations such as Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Blotevogel and Jaime Paglia originally served as showrunners during the first season before being replaced by Michael Gans and Richard Register in the second season, because of creative differences.

Bob Weinstein

Bob Weinstein

Robert Weinstein is an American film producer. He is the founder and head of Dimension Films, former co-chairman of Miramax Films and The Weinstein Company, all of which he co-founded with his older brother, Harvey. He has focused on making action and horror films.

Blumhouse Productions

Blumhouse Productions

Blumhouse Productions is an American film and television production company founded in 2000 by Jason Blum.

Halloween (2018 film)

Halloween (2018 film)

Halloween is a 2018 American slasher film directed by David Gordon Green and co-written by Green, Jeff Fradley and Danny McBride. It is the eleventh installment in the Halloween film series and a sequel to the 1978 film of the same name, while disregarding all previous sequels. The film stars Jamie Lee Curtis who reprises her role as Laurie Strode. James Jude Courtney portrays Michael Myers, with Nick Castle returning to the role for a cameo. Halloween also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Will Patton, Haluk Bilginer, and Virginia Gardner. Its plot follows a post-traumatic Laurie Strode who prepares to face Michael Myers in a final showdown on Halloween night, forty years after she survived his killing spree.

Jason Blum

Jason Blum

Jason Ferus Blum is an American film and television producer. He is the founder and CEO of Blumhouse Productions, which produced the horror franchises Paranormal Activity (2007–2021), Insidious (2010–2023), and The Purge (2013–2021). Blum also produced Sinister (2012), Oculus (2013), Whiplash (2014), The Gift (2015), Hush (2016), Split (2016), Ouija: Origin of Evil (2016), Get Out (2017), Happy Death Day (2017), Upgrade (2018), Halloween (2018), Us (2019), The Invisible Man (2020), Freaky (2020), The Black Phone (2021) and M3GAN (2022).

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin is an American director, writer, actor, and musician. He is a founding member of the punk band Link 80 and co-creator of the filmmaking collectives Chad, Matt & Rob and Radio Silence. He is best known for his work in horror films, including V/H/S, Southbound, Ready or Not and Scream.

James Vanderbilt

James Vanderbilt

James Platten Vanderbilt is an American filmmaker best known for the films Zodiac (2007), The Amazing Spider-Man (2012), White House Down (2013), The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014), Independence Day: Resurgence (2016), Murder Mystery (2019) and Scream (2022). He also contributed as producer for the films The House with a Clock in Its Walls (2018) and Ready or Not (2019), where he cameoed as demon Mr. Le Bail.

Guy Busick

Guy Busick

Guy Busick is an American film and television screenwriter best known for his collaborations with directors Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett, including Scream (2022) and Ready or Not (2019).

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified in an outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December 2019. Attempts to contain it there failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 30 January 2023, the pandemic had caused more than 670 million cases and 6.82 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers

Gale Weathers is a fictional character of the Scream film series, created by Kevin Williamson and portrayed by Courteney Cox. The character first appeared in Scream (1996), followed by five sequels: Scream 2 (1997), Scream 3 (2000), Scream 4 (2011), Scream (2022) and Scream VI (2023). She is the only character who has appeared in every movie of the series.

Source: "Scream 4", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scream_4.

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Notes
  1. ^ The sequel reveals it occurs in its release year.
  2. ^ The sequel reveals that Kirby survived the attack.
  3. ^ The sequel reveals the fourth film occurs in its release year. Wes Craven refers to a ten-year time jump when the film was originally assumed to occur in 2010.
References
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  2. ^ a b c d "Scream 4". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved January 13, 2023.Edit this at Wikidata
  3. ^ "I've Been Wrong About Scream 4 for 10 Years". io9. April 8, 2021. Archived from the original on April 30, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2021.
  4. ^ "Scream 3 Is the Best Worst Sequel of Any Horror Franchise". Consequence. February 4, 2020. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved May 8, 2021.
  5. ^ "Bet You Didn't See That Coming: Why 'Scream 4' May Be the Best Film in the Franchise - Bloody Disgusting". April 14, 2021. Archived from the original on April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  6. ^ Fletcher, Alex (July 15, 2008). "Weinstein Company confirms Scream 4". Digital Spy. Digital Spy Limited. Archived from the original on April 18, 2009. Retrieved May 22, 2009.
  7. ^ Shearer, Joe (February 27, 2009). "Scream 4: It's Happening". Paste Magazine. Paste Media Group. Archived from the original on May 7, 2010. Retrieved May 1, 2010.
  8. ^ a b c "Williamson Has Much to Say About Scream 4". ShockTilYouDrop. CraveOnline Media. January 29, 2010. Archived from the original on January 31, 2010. Retrieved June 25, 2021.
  9. ^ "Official: Wes Craven Back for Scream 4". DreadCentral. CraveOnline. March 23, 2010. Archived from the original on March 26, 2010. Retrieved May 1, 2010.
  10. ^ a b c Belloni, Matthew (May 20, 2010). "Producer says Weinsteins cut her out of Scream 4". The Hollywood Reporter. Los Angeles. Reuters. Archived from the original on May 24, 2010. Retrieved December 26, 2010.
  11. ^ Dickey, Josh (May 18, 2010). "Konrad Sues Weinsteins Over Scream 4". The Wrap. Archived from the original on May 22, 2010. Retrieved May 20, 2010.
  12. ^ Belloni, Matthew (April 5, 2011). "Weinsteins Pay to Settle Producer Cathy Konrad's Scream 4 Lawsuit (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Los Angeles. Reuters. Archived from the original on August 17, 2011. Retrieved April 7, 2011.
  13. ^ a b c Young, John (April 28, 2010). "Exclusive: New Scream 4 poster, plus an interview with director Wes Craven". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Archived from the original on May 1, 2010. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  14. ^ Stack, Tim (April 17, 2011). "Scream 4: What plot twists didn't make it to the final film? -- EXCLUSIVE". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Archived from the original on May 4, 2011. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  15. ^ "Scream 4: What plot twists didn't make it to the final film? -- EXCLUSIVE". EW.com. Archived from the original on November 1, 2019. Retrieved January 26, 2020.
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