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Scheduled monuments in Bedfordshire

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There are 134 scheduled monuments in the county of Bedfordshire in the East of England.[1] These protected sites date from the Neolithic period and include barrows, churches, castle earthworks, moated sites and medieval priories.[2] In the United Kingdom, the scheduling of monuments was first initiated to insure the preservation of "nationally important" archaeological sites or historic buildings. The protection given to scheduled monuments is given under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979[3]

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Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire

Bedfordshire is a ceremonial county in the East of England. The county has been administered by three unitary authorities, Borough of Bedford, Central Bedfordshire and Borough of Luton, since Bedfordshire County Council was abolished in 2009.

East of England

East of England

The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. This region was created in 1994 and was adopted for statistics purposes from 1999. It includes the ceremonial counties of Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Essex has the highest population in the region.

Scheduled monument

Scheduled monument

In the United Kingdom, a scheduled monument is a nationally important archaeological site or historic building, given protection against unauthorised change.

Tumulus

Tumulus

A tumulus is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus.

Earthworks (archaeology)

Earthworks (archaeology)

In archaeology, earthworks are artificial changes in land level, typically made from piles of artificially placed or sculpted rocks and soil. Earthworks can themselves be archaeological features, or they can show features beneath the surface.

Priory

Priory

A priory is a monastery of men or women under religious vows that is headed by a prior or prioress. Priories may be houses of mendicant friars or nuns, or monasteries of monks or nuns. Houses of canons regular and canonesses regular also use this term, the alternative being "canonry".

Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979

Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979

The Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 or AMAAA was a law passed by the UK government, the latest in a series of Ancient Monument Acts legislating to protect the archaeological heritage of England & Wales and Scotland. Northern Ireland has its own legislation.

Notable scheduled monuments in Bedfordshire

Image Name Location Date Notes
All Saints, Segenhoe - geograph.org.uk - 326144.jpg All Saints Church, Segenhoe Ridgmont 12th century Built in the 12th century. The church was abandoned in 1855 when a new, larger church on High Street, also named All Saints, was completed.[4][5]
Site of Bedford Castle - geograph.org.uk - 3789003.jpg Bedford Castle Dunstable after 1100 AD A Norman motte and bailey castle built by Henry I.[6] It was built on a previous Anglo-Saxon defensive site north of the River Great Ouse.[7]
Dunstable Priory from south west.jpg Dunstable Priory Dunstable 1131 AD Augustinian priory established by Henry I. The annulment of Catherine of Aragon's marriage to Henry VIII was announced here in 1533.[8]
Flitwick Castle earthworks.jpg Flitwick Castle Flitwick 11th century The earthwork remains of a medieval timber Motte-and-bailey castle. The castle was mentioned in the Domesday Book in 1086.[9]
Great Barford Bridge.png Great Barford Bridge Great Barford 15th century The bridge, built in the 15th century, crosses the River Great Ouse.[10]
Houghton House.jpg Houghton House Houghton Conquest 1621 Ruined 17th-century mansion built between 1615 and 1621 for Mary Sidney, Dowager Countess of Pembroke. Sidney hosted James I at the new completed house in 1621. She died of smallpox in London a short time later.[11]
GOC Breachwood Green 072 Someries Castle, Hyde (51159058306).jpg Someries Castle Luton 15th century Built by William de Someries on or near the location of a 13th century moated manor house. The remains of a 16th/17th century garden lie adjacent to the ruined castle.[12][13]

Discover more about Notable scheduled monuments in Bedfordshire related topics

All Saints Church, Segenhoe

All Saints Church, Segenhoe

All Saints Church, Segenhoe is a ruined medieval church located near the village of Ridgmont, Bedfordshire. It contains architectural details that range from the 11th century when it was first built to the 19th century. The church was abandoned in 1855 when a larger church was built in Ridgmont. The cemetery continues to be used for burials. The church is managed by the Bedfordshire County Council. All Saints Church is designated a scheduled Ancient Monument.

Bedford Castle

Bedford Castle

Bedford Castle was a large medieval castle in Bedford, England. Built after 1100 by Henry I, the castle played a prominent part in both the civil war of the Anarchy and the First Barons' War. The castle was significantly extended in stone, although the final plan of the castle remains uncertain. Henry III of England besieged the castle in 1224 following a disagreement with Falkes de Breauté; the siege lasted eight weeks and involved an army of as many as 2,700 soldiers with equipment drawn from across England. After the surrender of the castle, the king ordered its destruction (slighting).

Dunstable

Dunstable

Dunstable is a market town and civil parish in Bedfordshire, England, east of the Chiltern Hills, 30 miles north of London. There are several steep chalk escarpments, most noticeable when approaching Dunstable from the north. Dunstable is the fourth largest town in Bedfordshire and along with Houghton Regis forms the westernmost part of the Luton/Dunstable Urban Area.

Henry I of England

Henry I of England

Henry I, also known as Henry Beauclerc, was King of England from 1100 to his death in 1135. He was the fourth son of William the Conqueror and was educated in Latin and the liberal arts. On William's death in 1087, Henry's elder brothers Robert Curthose and William Rufus inherited Normandy and England, respectively, but Henry was left landless. He purchased the County of Cotentin in western Normandy from Robert, but his brothers deposed him in 1091. He gradually rebuilt his power base in the Cotentin and allied himself with William Rufus against Robert.

Dunstable Priory

Dunstable Priory

The Priory Church of St Peter with its monastery was founded in 1132 by Henry I for Augustinian Canons in Dunstable, Bedfordshire, England. St Peter's today is only the nave of what remains of an originally much larger Augustinian priory church. The monastic buildings consisted of a dormitory for the monks, an infirmary, stables, workshops, bakehouse, brewhouse and buttery. There was also a hostel for pilgrims and travellers, the remains of which is known today as Priory House. Opposite the Priory was one of the royal palaces belonging to Henry I, known as Kingsbury.

Augustinians

Augustinians

Augustinians are members of Christian religious orders that follow the Rule of Saint Augustine, written in about 400 AD by Augustine of Hippo. There are two distinct types of Augustinians in Catholic religious orders dating back to the 12th–13th centuries:Various congregations of Canons Regular also follow the Rule of Saint Augustine, embrace the evangelical counsels and lead a semi-monastic life, while remaining committed to pastoral care appropriate to their primary vocation as priests. They generally form one large community which might serve parishes in the vicinity, and are organized into autonomous congregations. Several orders of friars who live a mixed religious life of contemplation and apostolic ministry. The largest and most familiar is the Order of Saint Augustine (OSA), founded in 1244 and originally known as the Hermits of Saint Augustine (OESA). They are commonly known as the Austin Friars in England. Two other orders, the Order of Augustinian Recollects and the Discalced Augustinians, were once part of the OSA under a single prior general. The Recollects, founded in 1588 as a reform movement in Spain, became autonomous in 1612. The Discalceds became an independent congregation in 1592, and were raised to the status of a separate mendicant order in 1610.

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon was Queen of England as the first wife of King Henry VIII from their marriage on 11 June 1509 until their annulment on 23 May 1533. She was previously Princess of Wales as the wife of Henry's elder brother, Arthur, Prince of Wales.

Flitwick Castle

Flitwick Castle

Flitwick Castle was an 11th-century castle located in the town of Flitwick, in the county of Bedfordshire, England.

Flitwick

Flitwick

Flitwick is a town and civil parish in Bedfordshire, England. It is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "a hamlet on the River Flitt". The spelling Flytwyk appears in 1381.

Domesday Book

Domesday Book

Domesday Book – the Middle English spelling of "Doomsday Book" – is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William I, known as William the Conqueror. The manuscript was originally known by the Latin name Liber de Wintonia, meaning "Book of Winchester", where it was originally kept in the royal treasury. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that in 1085 the king sent his agents to survey every shire in England, to list his holdings and dues owed to him.

Great Barford Bridge

Great Barford Bridge

The early fifteenth century Great Barford Bridge, sometimes called simply Barford Bridge, spans the River Great Ouse at Great Barford, Bedfordshire. It is an arch bridge with seventeen arches, originally built from limestone and sandstone. The bridge underwent significant changes in the 19th century, with a widening project in 1818 that used wood being superseded in 1874 with the use of brick. It is Grade I listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

Great Barford

Great Barford

Great Barford is a village and civil parish in Bedfordshire, England, a few miles north-east of Bedford. It lies on the River Great Ouse at grid reference TL129523. It is twinned with Wöllstein, Germany. The village is bypassed by the busy A421 road on the way between Bedford and St Neots in Cambridgeshire, the bypass opening on 24 August 2006.

Source: "Scheduled monuments in Bedfordshire", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheduled_monuments_in_Bedfordshire.

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References
  1. ^ "Scheduled Monuments: List Search for Bedfordshire". Historic England. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  2. ^ "Historic Counties of Britain". Ancient Monuments UK. Retrieved 3 January 2023.
  3. ^ "Scheduled Monuments". Historic England. Retrieved 3 January 2023.
  4. ^ "Old Church of All Saints". Historic England. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  5. ^ "Segenhoe Church Architecture". Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  6. ^ "Bedford Castle". Britain Express. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  7. ^ "Bedford Castle". Bedford Bourough Council. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  8. ^ "Dunstable Priory". Britain Express. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  9. ^ "The Mount: a motte and bailey castle". Historic England. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  10. ^ "Barford Bridge and Causeway, Great Barford, Bedfordshire". Historic England. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  11. ^ "Mary Sidney". Poetry Foundation. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  12. ^ "Someries Castle". Britain Express. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  13. ^ "Someries Castle: a medieval magnate's residence and formal garden remains". Historic England. Retrieved 4 January 2023.

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