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Rosegill

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Rosegill
ROSEGILL, URBANNA, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, VA.jpg
Rosegill is located in Virginia
Rosegill
Rosegill is located in the United States
Rosegill
LocationEast of Urbanna off VA 227, near Urbanna, Virginia
Coordinates37°37′39″N 76°33′57″W / 37.62750°N 76.56583°W / 37.62750; -76.56583Coordinates: 37°37′39″N 76°33′57″W / 37.62750°N 76.56583°W / 37.62750; -76.56583
Area400 acres (160 ha)
Builtc. 1740 (1740), c. 1850
NRHP reference No.73002040[1]
VLR No.059-0009
Significant dates
Added to NRHPNovember 27, 1973
Designated VLRFebruary 10, 1973[2]

Rosegill is a historic plantation house and farm complex located near Urbanna, Middlesex County, Virginia. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1973.[3]

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History

In 1649, Ralph Wormeley Sr. patented more than 3,200 acres of land on the lower side of the Rappahannock River, east of Nimcock Creek (a/k/a Rosegill Creek).[4] It contained both the old and new Nimcock native American towns.[5] Within a year Wormeley built a house for his bride, the former Agatha Eltonhead, who had survived her first husband, Luke Stubbinge of Northampton County. Wormeley was at the time a burgess for York County and the next year received an appointment to the Virginia Governor's Council. However, he died in 1651, leaving behind an infant son Ralph Wormeley Jr.. His widow soon married Sir Henry Chicheley, who became the colony's lieutenant governor, as well as lived at and operated Rosegill. Chicheley died at Rosegill, as many years later would Ralph Wormeley Jr. Both Chicheley and his stepson Ralph Wormeley Jr. (who also served as a burgess before being named to the Governor's Council) supported Governor William Berkeley during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, during which the plantation was plundered and both men imprisoned for a time.[6]

Most of the buildings now on the side were constructed by the grandson of Ralph Wormeley Jr., Ralph Wormeley IV (1715-1790). Although his grandfather was the family's most powerful member, and served on the Virginia Governor's Council and briefly as acting governor, this man (or he and his son) represented Middlesex County in the House of Burgesses before the French and Indian War and in the Virginia House of Delegates following the American Revolutionary War. The last generation of Wormeleys to live at the plantation was Ralph Wormeley V, who ardently supported the British cause in the American Revolutionary War and was sent by his father to supervise lands in Berkeley County in western Virginia.[7]

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Ralph Wormeley Sr.

Ralph Wormeley Sr.

Ralph Wormeley emigrated to Virginia where he became a planter and politician who represented York County in the House of Burgesses and developed Rosegill plantation in what became Middlesex County, Virginia.

York County, Virginia

York County, Virginia

York County is a county in the eastern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in the Tidewater. As of the 2020 census, the population was 70,045. The county seat is the unincorporated town of Yorktown.

Henry Chicheley

Henry Chicheley

Sir Henry Chicheley was a lieutenant governor of Virginia Colony who also served as Acting Governor during multiple periods in the aftermath of Bacon's Rebellion. Chicheley served in his leadership post during a period of sociopolitical turmoil and change, and, later in his career, was increasingly troubled by England's growing aggression and control over the colony.

Bacon's Rebellion

Bacon's Rebellion

Bacon's Rebellion was an armed rebellion held by Virginia settlers that took place from 1676 to 1677. It was led by Nathaniel Bacon against Colonial Governor William Berkeley, after Berkeley refused Bacon's request to drive Native Americans out of Virginia. Thousands of Virginians from all classes and races rose up in arms against Berkeley, chasing him from Jamestown and ultimately torching the settlement. The rebellion was first suppressed by a few armed merchant ships from London whose captains sided with Berkeley and the loyalists. Government forces arrived soon after and spent several years defeating pockets of resistance and reforming the colonial government to be once more under direct Crown control.

French and Indian War

French and Indian War

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) was a theater of the Seven Years' War, which pitted the North American colonies of the British Empire against those of the French, each side being supported by various Native American tribes. At the start of the war, the French colonies had a population of roughly 60,000 settlers, compared with 2 million in the British colonies. The outnumbered French particularly depended on their native allies.

Berkeley County, West Virginia

Berkeley County, West Virginia

Berkeley County is located in the Shenandoah Valley in the Eastern Panhandle region of West Virginia in the United States. The county is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2020 census, the county population was 122,076, making it the second-most populous of West Virginia's 55 counties, behind Kanawha County. The City of Martinsburg is the county seat.

Architecture

The house is an 11-bay, two story dwelling with a gable roof. The original section dates to about 1740, and the house was subsequently enlarged and modified to reach its present form about 1850. Another remodeling occurred in the 1940s. Also located on the property are a mid-18th century kitchen and wash house, mid-18th century office, a 19th-century frame smokehouse, and a 19th-century bake oven.[1]

Captain John Bailey bought the property in 1849 and renovated it, including removing the roof and raising the second floor to a full storey with a gable roof, and replacing the porch. The property also underwent an extensive remodeling in the 1940s.[1]

Current status

It is currently privately owned and operated as a rental property.[8]

Source: "Rosegill", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosegill.

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References
  1. ^ a b c "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. ^ Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission staff (January 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Rosegill". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying two photos
  4. ^ NRIS p. 3
  5. ^ https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=74697
  6. ^ Martha W. McCartney, Jamestown People to 1800, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2012) p. 458
  7. ^ https://www.virginiasriverrealm.com/places/rosegill-plantation/
  8. ^ https://www.virginiasriverrealm.com/places/rosegill-plantation/


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