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Robert Hardy Smith

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Robert Hardy Smith
Robert Hardy Smith (1813–1878).png
Member of the Provisional Confederate Congress
In office
1861–1862
Member of the Alabama Senate
In office
1851
Member of the Alabama House of Representatives
In office
1849
Personal details
Born(1813-03-21)March 21, 1813
Camden County, North Carolina
DiedMarch 13, 1878(1878-03-13) (aged 64)
Mobile, Alabama
Resting placeMagnolia Cemetery
OccupationPolitician, military officer

Robert Hardy Smith (March 21, 1813 – March 13, 1878) was an American politician who served as a senior officer of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War.

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Politician

Politician

A politician is a person who has political power in the government of a state or a person active in party politics or a person holding or seeking an elected office in government.

Officer (armed forces)

Officer (armed forces)

An officer is a person who holds a position of authority as a member of an armed force or uniformed service.

Confederate States Army

Confederate States Army

The Confederate States Army, also called the Confederate Army or the Southern Army, was the military land force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War (1861–1865), fighting against the United States forces to win the independence of the Southern states and uphold the institution of slavery. On February 28, 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress established a provisional volunteer army and gave control over military operations and authority for mustering state forces and volunteers to the newly chosen Confederate president, Jefferson Davis. Davis was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, and colonel of a volunteer regiment during the Mexican–American War. He had also been a United States senator from Mississippi and U.S. Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce. On March 1, 1861, on behalf of the Confederate government, Davis assumed control of the military situation at Charleston, South Carolina, where South Carolina state militia besieged Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, held by a small U.S. Army garrison. By March 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress expanded the provisional forces and established a more permanent Confederate States Army.

American Civil War

American Civil War

The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States. It was fought between the Union and the Confederacy, the latter formed by states that had seceded. The central cause of the war was the dispute over whether slavery would be permitted to expand into the western territories, leading to more slave states, or be prevented from doing so, which was widely believed would place slavery on a course of ultimate extinction.

Early life and career

Smith was born in Camden County, North Carolina on March 21, 1813, and later moved to Alabama. In Alabama, Smith served in the state's House of Representatives in 1849 and the Alabama Senate in 1851. At the onset of the American Civil War, Smith was elected to represent the State of Alabama in the Provisional Confederate Congress from 1861 to 1862. He later served as a Colonel of the 36th Alabama Infantry Regiment. In an 1861 speech, Smith stated that Alabama declared its secession from the Union over the issue of slavery, which he referred to as "the negro quarrel". In the speech, he praised the Confederate Constitution for its un-euphemistic protections of the right to own slaves:

We have dissolved the late Union chiefly because of the negro quarrel. Now, is there any man who wished to reproduce that strife among ourselves? And yet does not he, who wished the slave trade left for the action of Congress, see that he proposed to open a Pandora's box among us and to cause our political arena again to resound with this discussion. Had we left the question unsettled, we should, in my opinion, have sown broadcast the seeds of discord and death in our Constitution. I congratulate the country that the strife has been put to rest forever, and that American slavery is to stand before the world as it is, and on its own merits. We have now placed our domestic institution, and secured its rights unmistakably, in the Constitution. We have sought by no euphony to hide its name. We have called our negroes "slaves", and we have recognized and protected them as persons and our rights to them as property.

— Robert Hardy Smith, 1861[1][2][3]

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Camden County, North Carolina

Camden County, North Carolina

Camden County is a county located in the U.S. State of North Carolina. As of the 2020 census, the population was 10,335, making it the fourth-least populous county in North Carolina. Its county seat is Camden. Camden County is part of the Elizabeth City, NC Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC Combined Statistical Area.

Alabama Senate

Alabama Senate

The Alabama State Senate is the upper house of the Alabama Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Alabama. The body is composed of 35 members representing an equal number of districts across the state, with each district containing at least 127,140 citizens. Similar to the lower house, the Alabama House of Representatives, the Senate serves both without term limits and with a four-year term.

Alabama in the American Civil War

Alabama in the American Civil War

Alabama was central to the Civil War, with the secession convention at Montgomery, birthplace of the Confederacy, inviting other states to form a Southern Republic, during January–March 1861, and develop constitutions to legally run their own affairs. The 1861 Alabama Constitution granted citizenship to current U.S. residents, but prohibited import duties (tariffs) on foreign goods, limited a standing military, and as a final issue, opposed emancipation by any nation, but urged protection of African slaves, with trial by jury, and reserved the power to regulate or prohibit the African slave trade. The secession convention invited all slaveholding states to secede, but only 7 Cotton States of the Lower South formed the Confederacy with Alabama, while the majority of slave states were in the Union. Congress voted to protect the institution of slavery by passing the Corwin Amendment on March 4, 1861, but it was never ratified.

Death

Smith died in Mobile, Alabama on March 13, 1878, and was buried at the Magnolia Cemetery.[4]

Source: "Robert Hardy Smith", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Hardy_Smith.

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References
  1. ^ Smith, Robert Hardy (1861). "An Address to the Citizens of Alabama on the Constitution and Laws of the Confederate States of America". Mobile. p. 19. Archived from the original on May 3, 2001. Retrieved May 3, 2001.
  2. ^ DeRosa, Marshall L. (1991). "The Confederate Constitution of 1861: An Inquiry into American Constitutionalism". Columbia, Missouri: University of Missouri Press. p. 66. Archived from the original on May 3, 2001. Retrieved May 3, 2001.
  3. ^ Shedenhelm, Richard (2001). "Some Doubts About the Confederate Case". Open Thought. Archived from the original on May 3, 2001. Retrieved May 3, 2001.
  4. ^ "Robert H. Smith". Selma Dollar Times. March 20, 1878. p. 2. Retrieved January 30, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
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