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Robert Dyke

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Robert Dyke, Dyck or Dyche (died 1449) was an English-born cleric and judge who held high office in fifteenth-century Ireland. He was appointed to the offices of Archdeacon of Dublin, Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland, Lord High Treasurer of Ireland, and Master of the Rolls in Ireland, as well as holding several Church livings.[1]

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Judge

Judge

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges. A judge hears all the witnesses and any other evidence presented by the barristers or solicitors of the case, assesses the credibility and arguments of the parties, and then issues a ruling in the case based on their interpretation of the law and their own personal judgment. A judge is expected to conduct the trial impartially and, typically, in an open court.

Archdeacon of Dublin

Archdeacon of Dublin

The Archdeacon of Dublin is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Anglican Diocese of Dublin and Glendalough. The Archdeacon is responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy within the Dublin part of the diocese, which is by far the largest.

Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland

Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland

The Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland was the head of the Exchequer of Ireland and a member of the Dublin Castle administration under the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in the Kingdom of Ireland. In early times the title was sometimes given as Chancellor of the Green Wax. In the early centuries, the Chancellor was often a highly educated cleric with knowledge of Finance. In later centuries, when sessions of Parliament had become regular, the Chancellor was invariably an MP in the Irish House of Commons.

Lord High Treasurer of Ireland

Lord High Treasurer of Ireland

The Lord High Treasurer of Ireland was the head of the Exchequer of Ireland, chief financial officer of the Kingdom of Ireland. The designation High was added in 1695.

Career

Bridgnorth, Shropshire, where Dyke was vicar in the 1420s
Bridgnorth, Shropshire, where Dyke was vicar in the 1420s

Little is known of his life before 1415, when he was an official at the English Court.[1] He was then evidently a Crown servant of some seniority, given the later references to his many years of "good and laudable" service to the Crown.[2] His first link to Ireland was apparently created in that year, when he and John Gland were given joint custody of the lands formerly held by Katherine Bernevall, widow of Reginald Bernevall, at Drimnagh and Ballyfermot, Dublin.[3] This John Gland was one of the Barons of the Court of Exchequer (Ireland), having been appointed to the Court earlier the same year.[3] Also in 1415 Dyke and Philip Earles were granted the manor of Lucan, Dublin "in consideration of their good and laudable service".[3]

In 1422 Robert was appointed the Irish Chancellor of the Exchequer (or Chancellor of the Green Wax, as the office was often described then) and clerk of the Court of Common Pleas (Ireland) with power to appoint a deputy to each office.[4] His appointment was stated to be "during good behaviour", but in 1430 he was made Chancellor for life.[2] He was in Holy orders, and became vicar of Bridgnorth, Shropshire in 1422. The actual date on which he arrived in Ireland to take up his official duties is unclear, although he had held lands there since 1415. He was acting as Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland through deputies in 1430.[5] He had probably arrived in Ireland by 1431, when he became Archdeacon of Dublin. He was made parson of St. Patrick's Church, Trim, County Meath (now Trim Cathedral) in 1435, despite strong objections from the Archdeacon of Meath, William Yonge, who had nominated his own chaplain, John Ardagh.[6]

St Patrick's Church, Trim, now Trim Cathedral
St Patrick's Church, Trim, now Trim Cathedral


He became Master of the Rolls in 1436, with a salary of 5 shillings a day,[7] and he acted as Deputy to the Lord Chancellor of Ireland in 1447.[1]

By 1442 he had been appointed a member of the Privy Council of Ireland.[8] He was present at a crucial Council meeting in 1442, at which very serious accusations were made against Richard Wogan, the Lord Chancellor, whereby he was deemed to have vacated office.[9] Dyke served as Lord Treasurer in 1444-6, at the suggestion of Edward Somerton, the King's Serjeant, who praised his good qualities.[2] In 1441 he was granted the manor of Ballymagarvey, Balrath, County Meath, for a term of seven years.[8] He was a witness to the Charter of Athboy in 1446, whereby King Henry VI of England confirmed the liberties and exemptions of Dublin Corporation.[10]

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Drimnagh

Drimnagh

Drimnagh is a suburb in Dublin, Ireland to the south of the city between Walkinstown, Crumlin and Inchicore, bordered by the Grand Canal to the north and east. Drimnagh is in postal district Dublin 12.

Ballyfermot

Ballyfermot

Ballyfermot is a suburb of the city of Dublin, Ireland. Located seven kilometres west of the city centre, south of the Phoenix Park, it is bordered on the north by Chapelizod, on the south by Bluebell, on the east by Inchicore, on the northwest by Palmerstown and the southwest by Clondalkin and Parkwest. The River Liffey lies to the north, and the Grand Canal, now a recreational waterway, lies to the south. Ballyfermot lies within the postal district Dublin 10. Cherry Orchard is also a suburb, sometimes considered to sit within Ballyfermot.

Court of Exchequer (Ireland)

Court of Exchequer (Ireland)

The Court of Exchequer (Ireland) or the Irish Exchequer of Pleas, was one of the senior courts of common law in Ireland. It was the mirror image of the equivalent court in England. The Court of Exchequer was one of the four royal courts of justice which gave their name to the building in which they were located, which is still called the Four Courts, and in use as a Courthouse, in Dublin.

Court of Common Pleas (Ireland)

Court of Common Pleas (Ireland)

The Court of Common Pleas was one of the principal courts of common law in Ireland. It was a mirror image of the equivalent court in England. Common Pleas was one of the four courts of justice which gave the Four Courts in Dublin, which is still in use as a courthouse, its name.

Holy orders

Holy orders

In certain Christian denominations, holy orders are the ordained ministries of bishop, priest (presbyter), and deacon, and the sacrament or rite by which candidates are ordained to those orders. Churches recognizing these orders include the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, Independent Catholic and some Lutheran churches. Except for Lutherans and some Anglicans, these churches regard ordination as a sacrament.

Bridgnorth

Bridgnorth

Bridgnorth is a town in Shropshire, England. The River Severn splits it into High Town and Low Town, the upper town on the right bank and the lower on the left bank of the River Severn. The population at the 2011 Census was 12,079.

Archdeacon of Meath

Archdeacon of Meath

The Archdeacon of Meath is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the united Diocese of Meath and Kildare.

Edward Somerton

Edward Somerton

Edward Somerton, or Somertoun was an Irish barrister and judge who held the offices of Serjeant-at-law (Ireland) and judge of the Court of King's Bench (Ireland) and the Court of Common Pleas (Ireland). He was born in Ireland, possibly in Waterford. By 1426 he was a clerk in the Court of Chancery (Ireland), and was paid 26 shillings for his labours in preparing writs and enrolment of indentures. In 1427 he is recorded in London studying law at Lincoln's Inn. He returned to Ireland and was appointed King's Serjeant for life in 1437; he also acted as counsel for the city of Waterford, a position subsequently held by another future judge, John Gough.

County Meath

County Meath

County Meath is a county in the Eastern and Midland Region of Ireland, within the province of Leinster. It is bordered by Dublin to the southeast, Louth to the northeast, Kildare to the south, Offaly to the southwest, Westmeath to the west, Cavan to the northwest, and Monaghan to the north. To the east, Meath also borders the Irish Sea along a narrow strip between the rivers Boyne and Delvin, giving it the second shortest coastline of any county. Meath County Council is the local authority for the county.

Charter

Charter

A charter is the grant of authority or rights, stating that the granter formally recognizes the prerogative of the recipient to exercise the rights specified. It is implicit that the granter retains superiority, and that the recipient admits a limited status within the relationship, and it is within that sense that charters were historically granted, and it is that sense which is retained in modern usage of the term.

Athboy

Athboy

Athboy is a small agricultural town located in County Meath. The town is located on the Yellow Ford River, in wooded country near the County Westmeath border. Local Clubs are Clann Na Ngael and Athboy Celtic.

Henry VI of England

Henry VI of England

Henry VI was King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1422 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471, and disputed King of France from 1422 to 1453. The only child of Henry V, he succeeded to the English throne at the age of nine months upon his father's death, and succeeded to the French throne on the death of his maternal grandfather, Charles VI, shortly afterwards.

Political Controversy

Irish politics from the late 1410s to the 1440s was dominated by the Butler–Talbot feud, led by James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond on the one side and John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and his formidable brother Richard, Archbishop of Dublin, on the other. It was almost impossible for any Irish Crown official to avoid being drawn into the feud: all of them were forced to take sides. Dyke was a Butler partisan, and is said to have particularly offended Archbishop Talbot: among a long list of charges made against Talbot by the Irish Parliament in 1442 was that he had assaulted Dyke and Hugh Banent, Dyke's successor as Lord Treasurer. Since Talbot, despite his high clerical office, was notoriously hot-tempered, the charge may well be true.[11]

Dyke died in 1449.[1] He was praised as "a man of honest life and conversation" who had served the King for many years, and filled several important Crown offices with honour.[2]

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James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond

James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond

James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormond was the son of James Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond. He was called 'The White Earl', and was esteemed for his learning. He was the patron of the Irish literary work, 'The Book of the White Earl'. His career was marked by his long and bitter feud with the Talbot family.

John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury

John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury

John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, 1st Earl of Waterford, 7th Baron Talbot, KG, known as "Old Talbot", was an English nobleman and a noted military commander during the Hundred Years' War. He was the most renowned in England and most feared in France of the English captains in the last stages of the conflict. Known as a tough, cruel, and quarrelsome man, Talbot distinguished himself militarily in a time of decline for the English. Called the "English Achilles" and the "Terror of the French", he is lavishly praised in the plays of Shakespeare. The manner of his death, leading an ill-advised charge against field artillery, has come to symbolize the passing of the age of chivalry. He also held the subsidiary titles of 10th Baron Strange of Blackmere and 6th Baron Furnivall jure uxoris.

Richard Talbot (archbishop of Dublin)

Richard Talbot (archbishop of Dublin)

Richard Talbot was an English-born statesman and cleric in fifteenth-century Ireland. He was a younger brother of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury. He held the offices of Archbishop of Dublin and Lord Chancellor of Ireland. He was one of the leading political figures in Ireland for more than thirty years, but his career was marked by controversy and frequent conflicts with other statesmen. In particular, the Talbot brothers' quarrel with the powerful Earl of Ormonde was the main cause of the Butler–Talbot feud, which dominated Irish politics for decades, and seriously weakened the authority of the English Crown in Ireland.

Parliament of Ireland

Parliament of Ireland

The Parliament of Ireland was the legislature of the Lordship of Ireland, and later the Kingdom of Ireland, from 1297 until 1800. It was modelled on the Parliament of England and from 1537 comprised two chambers: the House of Commons and the House of Lords. The Lords were members of the Irish peerage and bishops. The Commons was directly elected, albeit on a very restricted franchise. Parliaments met at various places in Leinster and Munster, but latterly always in Dublin: in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin Castle, Chichester House (1661–1727), the Blue Coat School (1729–31), and finally a purpose-built Parliament House on College Green.

Source: "Robert Dyke", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Dyke.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d Ball, F. Elrington The Judges in Ireland 1221-1921 John Murray London 1926 Vol.1 p.177
  2. ^ a b c d Patent Roll 22 Henry VI
  3. ^ a b c Patent Roll 3 Henry V
  4. ^ Patent Roll 8 Henry VI
  5. ^ The deputies were Hugh Conyngham and Henry Stanyhurst- Patent Roll 8 Henry VI
  6. ^ Potterton, Michael The Archaeology and History of Medieva Trim, County Meath Ph.D thesis National University of Ireland Maynooth 2003
  7. ^ Patent Roll 14 Henry VI
  8. ^ a b Patent Roll 20 Henry VI
  9. ^ Patent Roll 20 Henry VI
  10. ^ Morrin, James Calendar of the Patent and Close Rolls of Chancery in Ireland of the 18th to the 45th of Queen Elizabeth Dublin Alexander Thom and Co 1862 Volume 2 p.455
  11. ^ Graves, James ed. A Roll of the Proceedings in the King's Council in Ireland for a portion of the Year 1392-3 Cambridge University Press 2012 p.xliii

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