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Richard Caring

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Richard Caring
Born
Richard Allan Caring

(1948-06-04) 4 June 1948 (age 74)
Finchley, London, England
OccupationBusinessman
Spouses
  • Jacqueline Stead
    (m. 1971; div. 2016)
  • Patricia Mondinni
    (m. 2018)
Children5

Richard Allan Caring (born 4 June 1948)[1][2] is a British businessman. He initially built a business, International Clothing Designs, supplying Hong Kong-manufactured fashion to UK retailers. After surviving the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, he diversified his business interest into restaurants and nightclubs and is the chairman of Caprice Holdings, which owns and runs The Ivy chain of restaurants.[3]

According to the Sunday Times Rich List in 2021, Caring's net worth is estimated to be £1.005 billion.[4]

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Early life

Caring was born on 4 June 1948,[2][5] the middle child of three born to Louis Caringi, an Italian-American GI, stationed in London during World War II, and Sylvia Parnes,[1] a Jewish-immigrant nurse who met him in the ambulance on his way to hospital, and cared for him during his recovery.[6]

After deciding to stay in London after the war, the couple married. Louis Caringi anglicized his surname to Caring, and set up in the clothing industry in offices off Great Portland Street; Louis Caring Originals sourced knitwear for retailers including Marks & Spencer.[7][1]

Caring's prowess at golf, playing off of scratch,[7] resulted in him representing Middlesex at county level, and being accepted into Millfield School in Street, Somerset on a 10-shilling-a-week sporting scholarship.[1]

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World War II

World War II

World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a global conflict that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries, including all of the great powers, fought as part of two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. Many participants threw their economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind this total war, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. Aircraft played a major role, enabling the strategic bombing of population centres and the only two nuclear weapons ever used in war.

Ambulance

Ambulance

An ambulance is a medically equipped vehicle which transports patients to treatment facilities, such as hospitals. Typically, out-of-hospital medical care is provided to the patient during the transport.

Great Portland Street

Great Portland Street

Great Portland Street in Marylebone, in the West End of London, links Oxford Street with the A501 Marylebone Road. The street, which is part of a broader rectilinear street pattern, includes the Embassy of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. and a number of small independent shops.

Marks & Spencer

Marks & Spencer

Marks and Spencer Group plc is a major British multinational retailer with headquarters in Paddington, London that specialises in selling clothing, beauty, home products and food products. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index; it had previously been in the FTSE 100 Index from its creation until 2019.

Golf

Golf

Golf is a club-and-ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible.

Middlesex

Middlesex

Middlesex is a historic county in southeast England. Its area is almost entirely within the wider urbanised area of London and mostly within the ceremonial county of Greater London, with small sections in neighbouring ceremonial counties. Three rivers provide most of the county's boundaries; the Thames in the south, the Lea to the east and the Colne to the west. A line of hills forms the northern boundary with Hertfordshire.

Millfield

Millfield

Millfield is a public school located in Street, Somerset, England. It was founded in 1935.

Street, Somerset

Street, Somerset

Street is a large village and civil parish in Somerset, England, with a population of 11,805 in 2011. On a dry spot in the Somerset Levels, at the end of the Polden Hills, it is two miles southwest of Glastonbury. There is evidence of Roman occupation. Much of the history of the village is dominated by Glastonbury Abbey, and a 12th-century causeway from Glastonbury built to transport local Blue Lias stone to it.

Shilling (British coin)

Shilling (British coin)

The British shilling, abbreviated "1/-", was a unit of currency and a denomination of sterling coinage worth 1⁄20 of one pound, or twelve pence. It was first minted in the reign of Henry VII as the testoon, and became known as the shilling, from the Old English scilling, sometime in the mid-16th century. It circulated until 1990. The word bob was sometimes used for a monetary value of several shillings, e.g. "ten-bob note". Following decimalisation on 15 February 1971 the coin had a value of five new pence, and a new coin of the same value but labelled as "five new pence" or "five pence" was minted with the same size as the shilling until 1990, after which the shilling no longer remained legal tender. It was made from silver from its introduction in or around 1503 until 1946, and thereafter in cupronickel.

Career

Clothing

Caring left school aged 16 and joined a shopping centre development company as an office boy, before joining Louis Caring Originals, his father's dress manufacturing business that employed seven people:[7][1]

My parents thought it important I got practical work experience – they weren't bothered about university. I understand the thought process, "Let's throw him into work." But looking back, I would very much have liked to go to university. You get a much broader mindset.

At that time, the family was in financial difficulties, which threatened losing their home.[1][7] Caring and his then girlfriend, made a range of mini-skirts that cost £2 to make, selling them for 69s 6d (£3.475 in decimalisation). With an initial target of 200 a week, after a few years they were selling 25,000 a week:[7][1]

We saved the house in the end. Maybe that's why I'm driven, because I saw it all happen at a young age.

In 1971 Caring first visited Hong Kong,[7] where labour and materials were far cheaper than in Britain.[1] Until this point, Hong Kong made basic clothing cheaply, such as underpants. Spending a year living out of a suitcase and resident in one hotel, Caring educated local manufacturers through producing the same garment over and over again to get the quality right.[8] As a result, he became one of the first western high fashion buyers to develop localised Chinese relationships,[9] and returned to the UK to sell the new high quality but cheaper garments to UK retailers.[7]

Forming International Clothing Designs (ICD) to exploit the new opportunity, Caring moved his family permanently to Hong Kong in 1979. Due to its international trading nature, the company's structure and holdings are complex, held through a series of offshore companies and trusts, making it hard to detect Caring’s full earnings from the fashion world.[7][10] The manoeuvre worked, and Caring cornered the market in fast fashion.[7][11] ICD at its height supplied 70% of the clothing sold by British high street retailers,[7] supplying Marks & Spencer, Mothercare and Next.

It was through ICD and its trading that he met and developed his relationship with Sir Philip Green. ICD was the dominant supplier to Arcadia Group, the then Green-owned fashion retail chain that included Dorothy Perkins, Topshop and Top Man.[7] Arcadia Group went into administration in November 2020.[12][13] This was not the normal retailer and supplier set-up but described as more of a partnership,[7] with Caring presenting Green with a Ferrari F430 Spider for his 50th birthday:[1]

I speak to him every day. We're more than friends – I think we'd do anything for each other. We're like brothers. We've grown up together and experienced lots of good times and tough times.

For less than a year, Caring worked for Green.[10] In 2001, Caring invested in Green's British Home Stores (BHS), owning 22.5% of the retailer and earning £100m in dividends, before disposing of his shares in 2006.[14] Caring supplied Next plc via a joint venture company NV, but sold his share in the 1990s back to the retailer.[10] He built a joint venture to supply Freemans catalogues, again now sold to the partner.[9] He also co-developed the Together brand, which after buying out partners he sold to German catalogue firm Otto Versand. In 2004–05, ICD saw sales drop to £74.2m from £85.5m, making a pre-tax loss of £523,644 from a £3.99m profit the year before after an exceptional loss on the sale of Amanda Wakeley's designer label.[10] In 2007, Caring looked at buying the distressed Prada brand.[15]

In 2009, ICD employed 250 people and was a smaller operation in the UK than it had previously been.[7]

Property

It is proposed by many that Caring first started investing in property while resident in Hong Kong, ploughing back profits from clothing sourcing into other assets.[9] His first UK publicised deal was the £45m purchase of a part of the Camden Market complex in 2004, that he purchased from Bebo Kobo and OD Kobo.[10]

Later that same year his friend Elliott Bernerd called him to ask whether, as an avid golfer, he might be interested in buying Wentworth Golf Club.[7] In partnership with then minority shareholder, airport hotel entrepreneur Surinder Arora, the pair paid £130m, £50m more than the club’s book value at the time:[7][10]

As a sporting facility in the UK there is nothing similar. Wentworth is to golf what Wimbledon is to tennis. It's priceless. There's only one Wentworth in the world.

He sold Wentworth in 2014 for £135m to Reignwood Investments,[16] a Chinese holding company associated with billionaire Yan Bin.[17]

In the meantime, Caring also purchased the former American Navy Building in London's Grosvenor Square in 2009.[18]

Restaurants and private members' clubs

After buying Wentworth, Caring realised he needed to raise the standard of food. He approached his favourite restaurant Le Caprice in summer 2005, but as discussions deteriorated Caring joked it was costing him so much he might as well buy the whole Caprice Holdings group; it emerged that the management was looking for a buyer.[1][10] Six weeks later, after selling designer evening wear label Amanda Wakeley, Caring secured a £31.5m deal to take over Caprice Holdings, owner of The Ivy, Le Caprice and J Sheekey, as well as Italian restaurant Daphne's and Vietnamese restaurant Bam-Bou.[2]

Caring began to reshape the group, which created much media coverage for someone who previously preferred to stay out of the limelight.[18] In 2005 he added fish restaurant Scott’s and catering firm Urban Productions, but sold Pasha to Algerian restaurateur Tony Kitous. He also bought Signature Restaurants from Luke Johnson for £57m, owner of mid-market Strada and Belgo chains.[10]

In 2006 he bought Rivington, a two-restaurant group independently set up by Caprice Holding’s chef director Mark Hix.[10] He sold Strada in 2007 for £140m.[19] In 2007 he purchased the Birley Group (Annabel's, Harry's Bar, Mark's Club) for £95m including the vast art collection,[9] concluded just a few months before Mark Birley's death.[10]

In 2008 he agreed a leveraged buyout of 28 small investors in private members' club Soho House, taking 80% for £105m, with the remainder held by Nick Jones who remains CEO, also his partner in Cecconi’s.[11] Caring also owns stakes in Cote (formed by the former management team of Strada),[7] and Alternative Investment Market listed chain Carluccio's.[18]

Caprice Holdings also owns Sexy Fish.[20]

The speed with which Caring has built his restaurant chain has resulted in many questioning his reasoning, on both a strategic level as well as the high purchase prices paid.[21] He has been dubbed by some as "the Lex Luthor of Mayfair" for his apparent supermarket-sweep approach to buying companies. Other critics say he is brandishing a credit card, playing a high-stakes game of Monopoly, buying every square he lands on.[7]

But Caring insists he has a masterplan:[7]

I spotted an international gap in the market. In the restaurant business, there are single brands, but not a group of brands – which is what we do. There is only one Ivy, one Annabel's – there is nothing like them. A group of top-notch brands like them – that is what we're trying to achieve. There is a grand plan and it starts with building strength in London.

Caring's strategy is built around three brands, with 60,000 people:[7]

  • Annabel's – including the Birley clubs (Mark's, Harry's Bar, George and Bath & Racquets), 12,000 members: He says "They're refined, discreet, elegant."
  • Soho House – 17,000 members: He says "They're for an arts, journalistic, younger crowd."
  • Caprice – 30,000 regular customers, the restaurant link between the two club chains

The brands have opened in several countries including: Le Caprice New York; Cecconi's Miami; Soho House, via £130m credit line supplied by HBoS,[10] in Berlin, Chicago, Miami and Los Angeles.[1]

Restaurant critic AA Gill once commented:[21]

He's setting up the restaurant equivalent of LVMH. He's spending a lot more on these businesses than they’re probably worth, but eventually he'll have a portfolio that, as a brand, is worth far more than the sum of its parts.

Caring owns restaurant chain The Ivy Collection.[22]

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Decimalisation

Decimalisation

Decimalisation or decimalization is the conversion of a system of currency or of weights and measures to units related by powers of 10.

Hong Kong

Hong Kong

Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is a city and special administrative region of China on the eastern Pearl River Delta in South China. With 7.5 million residents of various nationalities in a 1,104-square-kilometre (426 sq mi) territory, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world. Hong Kong is also a major global financial centre and one of the most developed cities in the world.

Suitcase

Suitcase

A suitcase is a form of luggage. It is a rectangular container with a handle typically used to carry one's clothes and other belongings while traveling. The first suitcases appeared in the late 19th century due to the increased popularity of mass tourism at the time and were meant to hold dress suits. They were originally made using heavier materials such as leather or steel, but, beginning in the 1930s, were constructed with more lightweight materials like plastic and cardboard.

China

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia. It is the world's most populous country, with a population exceeding 1.4 billion, slightly ahead of India. China spans the equivalent of five time zones and borders fourteen countries by land, the most of any country in the world, tied with Russia. With an area of approximately 9.6 million square kilometres (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the world's third largest country by total land area. The country consists of 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four municipalities, and two special administrative regions. The national capital is Beijing, and the most populous city and financial center is Shanghai.

International Clothing Designs

International Clothing Designs

International Clothing Designs is a UK-based supplier to the fashion retail industry. It was founded by entrepreneur Richard Caring in the 1970s and initially imported mass-produced clothing from manufacturers in Hong Kong into the UK market.

Fast fashion

Fast fashion

Fast fashion is a term used to describe the clothing industry's business model of replicating recent catwalk trends and high-fashion designs, mass-producing them at a low cost, and bringing them to retail stores quickly, while demand is at its highest. The term fast fashion is also used generically to describe the products of the fast fashion business model.

Mothercare

Mothercare

Mothercare plc is a British retailer which specialises in products for expectant mothers and in general merchandise for children up to eight years of age. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE SmallCap Index.

Philip Green

Philip Green

Sir Philip Nigel Ross Green is a British businessman who was the chairman of the retail company the Arcadia Group. He owned the high street clothing retailers Topshop, Topman and Miss Selfridge from 2002 to 2020. In May 2022, his net worth was estimated by the Sunday Times Rich List to be £910 million.

Arcadia Group

Arcadia Group

Arcadia Group Ltd was a British multinational retailing company headquartered in London, England. It was best known for being the previous parent company of British Home Stores (BHS), Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Debenhams, Evans, Miss Selfridge, Topman, Topshop, Wallis and Warehouse. At its peak, the group had more than 2,500 outlets in the UK, as well as concessions in UK department stores and several hundred franchises operated internationally.

Dorothy Perkins

Dorothy Perkins

Dorothy Perkins is an online British women's fashion brand based in the United Kingdom. Formerly a store chain, it sold both its own range of clothes and branded fashion goods until February 2021, when it became part of Boohoo.com, having been acquired after the collapse of Philip Green's fashion empire Arcadia Group.

Topman

Topman

Topman is a UK-based multinational men's fashion retail brand founded by Burton Group in 1978. Along with its women's clothing counterpart Topshop and the rest of Arcadia Group, Topman went into administration in late 2020. All high street stores subsequently closed and the brand was purchased by ASOS on 1 February 2021, relaunching as an online-only retailer.

Administration (law)

Administration (law)

As a legal concept, administration is a procedure under the insolvency laws of a number of common law jurisdictions, similar to bankruptcy in the United States. It functions as a rescue mechanism for insolvent entities and allows them to carry on running their business. The process – in the United Kingdom colloquially called being "under administration" – is an alternative to liquidation or may be a precursor to it. Administration is commenced by an administration order.

Politics

A friend of Lord Levy,[6] Caring lent £2m to the Labour Party to fund the 2005 United Kingdom general election.[18] Caring was not later implicated or named as part of the Cash for Honours investigation.[11] The loan monies have since been repaid.[6]

Caring has donated to the Conservative Party on several occasions, mainly in the form of auction prizes. This includes the hire of Annabel’s in 2008 for the Conservative Party's Black and White Ball in Battersea Park, which was as an auction prize that raised £70,000.[18][23]

He was also recorded as donating just over £50,000 to the party in 2010. In 2012 he was recorded as donating £170,000. This was followed by a £290,000 donation in the third quarter of 2015.[24]

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Labour Party (UK)

Labour Party (UK)

The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom that has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The Labour Party sits on the centre-left of the political spectrum. In all general elections since 1922, Labour has been either the governing party or the Official Opposition. There have been six Labour prime ministers and thirteen Labour ministries. The party holds the annual Labour Party Conference, at which party policy is formulated.

2005 United Kingdom general election

2005 United Kingdom general election

The 2005 United Kingdom general election was held on Thursday 5 May 2005, to elect 646 members to the House of Commons. The Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, won its third consecutive victory, with Blair becoming the second Labour leader after Harold Wilson to form three majority governments. However, its majority fell to 66 seats compared to the 167-seat majority it had won four years before. This was the first time the Labour Party had won a third consecutive election, and remains the party's most recent general election victory.

Conservative Party (UK)

Conservative Party (UK)

The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party and also known colloquially as the Tories, is one of the two main political parties in the United Kingdom, along with the Labour Party. It is the current governing party, having won the 2019 general election. It has been the primary governing party in Britain since 2010. The party is on the centre-right of the political spectrum, and encompasses various ideological factions including one-nation conservatives, Thatcherites, and traditionalist conservatives. The party currently has 356 Members of Parliament, 264 members of the House of Lords, 9 members of the London Assembly, 31 members of the Scottish Parliament, 16 members of the Welsh Parliament, 2 directly elected mayors, 30 police and crime commissioners, and around 6,663 local councillors. It holds the annual Conservative Party Conference.

Battersea Park

Battersea Park

Battersea Park is a 200-acre (83-hectare) green space at Battersea in the London Borough of Wandsworth in London. It is situated on the south bank of the River Thames opposite Chelsea and was opened in 1858.

Philanthropy

After the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Caring donated £1m to the relief effort.[18] He supports the NSPCC at its Fresh Start centre in Camden,[18] to combat child abuse and paedophilia.[7]

In 2005, he organised a charity costume "Napoleonic Ball" for the NSPCC in St Petersburg's Catherine Palace, Russia, featuring a performance by Sir Elton John.[18] Caring spent £8m flying in 450 guests in by private jet,[9] including Bob Geldof and former US president Bill Clinton, raising £11m.[11] The Guardian has reported that Caring donated $1m to the Clinton Foundation.[25][26]

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London Borough of Camden

London Borough of Camden

The London Borough of Camden is a London borough in Inner London. Camden Town Hall, on Euston Road, lies 1.4 mi (2.3 km) north of Charing Cross. The borough was established on 1 April 1965 from the area of the former boroughs of Hampstead, Holborn, and St Pancras—which together, prior to that date, had comprised part of the historic County of London.

Catherine Palace

Catherine Palace

The Catherine Palace is a Rococo palace in Tsarskoye Selo (Pushkin), 30 km south of St. Petersburg, Russia. It was the summer residence of the Russian tsars. The Palace is part of the World Heritage Site Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments.

Russia

Russia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. It is the largest country in the world, with its internationally recognised territory covering 17,098,246 square kilometres (6,601,670 sq mi), and encompassing one-eighth of Earth's inhabitable landmass. Russia extends across eleven time zones and shares land boundaries with fourteen countries. It is the world's ninth-most populous country and Europe's most populous country, with a population of 146 million people. The country's capital and largest city is Moscow. Saint Petersburg is Russia's cultural centre and second-largest city. Other major urban areas include Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg, Nizhny Novgorod, and Kazan.

Elton John

Elton John

Sir Elton Hercules John is a British singer, pianist and composer. Collaborating with lyricist Bernie Taupin since 1967, John is one of the most successful artists of all time, having sold over 300 million records worldwide in a six decade career in music. He is acclaimed by critics and musicians, particularly for his work during the 1970s, and his lasting impact on the music industry. John's music and showmanship have had a significant impact on popular music. His songwriting partnership with Taupin is one of the most successful in history.

Bob Geldof

Bob Geldof

Robert Frederick Zenon Geldof is an Irish singer-songwriter and political activist. He rose to prominence in the late 1970s as lead singer of the Irish rock band the Boomtown Rats, who achieved popularity as part of the punk rock movement. The band had UK number one hits with his co-composition "Rat Trap" and his lone composition "I Don't Like Mondays". Geldof starred as Pink in Pink Floyd's 1982 film Pink Floyd – The Wall. As a fundraiser, Geldof organised the charity supergroup Band Aid and the concerts Live Aid and Live 8, and co-wrote "Do They Know It's Christmas?", one of the best-selling singles to date.

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton

William Jefferson Clinton is an American retired politician who served as the 42nd president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. He previously served as governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and again from 1983 to 1992, and as attorney general of Arkansas from 1977 to 1979. A member of the Democratic Party, Clinton became known as a New Democrat, as many of his policies reflected a centrist "Third Way" political philosophy. He is the husband of Hillary Clinton, who was a U.S. senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, secretary of state from 2009 to 2013 and the Democratic nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as The Manchester Guardian, and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers The Observer and The Guardian Weekly, The Guardian is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust. The trust was created in 1936 to "secure the financial and editorial independence of The Guardian in perpetuity and to safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of The Guardian free from commercial or political interference". The trust was converted into a limited company in 2008, with a constitution written so as to maintain for The Guardian the same protections as were built into the structure of the Scott Trust by its creators. Profits are reinvested in its journalism rather than distributed to owners or shareholders. It is considered a newspaper of record in the UK.

Clinton Foundation

Clinton Foundation

The Clinton Foundation is a nonprofit organization under section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. tax code. It was established by former president of the United States Bill Clinton with the stated mission to "strengthen the capacity of people in the United States and throughout the world to meet the challenges of global interdependence." Its offices are located in New York City and Little Rock, Arkansas.

Personal life

Caring married his first wife, Jacqueline Stead, in 1971.[2] She is an Aldershot-born model and the daughter of a retired British Army major.[6] They have two sons, who were raised in Hong Kong: Jamie, a vice-president of MTV Networks Europe; and Ben, who works for Soho House.[7]

The family lived in Hampstead, north London, in a house known as the Versailles of London.[11] It has a 55-foot (17 m) ballroom, a cinema, a dining room that seats 30; and a 2-acre (0.81 ha) garden with a lake.[7] He has homes in Hong Kong, and owns the former stable block of Pixton Park, Dulverton, on the Somerset/Devon borders.[27] Purchased in 2005, the Pixton building has an interior designed by Tara Bernerd, daughter of property developer Elliott Bernerd,[21]

In 2016, Caring and Stead divorced in a high-profile case, which was described as "Britain's biggest divorce".[28] He left his wife to move into a £32 million home in St John's Wood with 35-year-old Brazilian Patricia Mondinni, with whom he had a son.[27] In March 2018, Caring married Mondinni.[28] The couple also have two daughters.[29]

His friends include Sir Philip Green and Scottish philanthropist Sir Tom Hunter.[30] His family relations include stockbroker Anthony Parnes and his son Michael Parnes, CEO of stock brokerage Old Park Lane Capital.[31]

2004 Indian Ocean earthquake

In 2004 over the Christmas period, Caring and his sons were scuba diving in the Maldives. On Boxing Day, the dive-master suggested they sail to an atoll and dive nearby. Anchored on the north side of the atoll, they dived to 100 feet (30 m) for 45 minutes. On their return to the surface, Caring received calls from friends around the world asking: "Are you all right?"[7]

Protected by the atoll, the divers had "felt a blip, but it could have been a big boat."[1] Divers on the southside of the atoll in the path of the tsunami were later found washed-up 100 miles (160 km) away.[1] Sir Philip Green sent his private jet to pick the family up, and Caring donated £1 million to the tsunami relief fund:[7][1]

My two sons nearly drowned with me. After you've experienced something like that, you examine things for a couple of hours and think, "I must smell the roses." Did I see the light? No. But it does change the way you think, the way you look at the world.

Controversy

In December 2014, Michelle Young accused Philip Green, Caring and Simon Cowell of helping her ex-husband, businessman Scot Young, to hide assets and so avoid paying maintenance to his ex-wife and their two daughters.[32] In February 2015, a note from HSBC bankers in Caring's files mentioned that Philip Green's wife Tina Green had been holding part of Caring's assets in cash on his behalf, prompting suspicions that Caring might have funnelled profits through Tina Green to avoid paying taxes on his assets.[25]

Following BHS's collapse into administration in 2016, leaving a pension fund deficit of £571m, it was reported that Caring had refused to reveal how much profit he had made from selling his shares in the company, and also refused to attend a parliamentary committee in person to give evidence.[33][34]

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Aldershot

Aldershot

Aldershot is a town in Hampshire, England. It lies on heathland in the extreme northeast corner of the county, 31 mi (50 km) southwest of London. The area is administered by Rushmoor Borough Council. The town has a population of 37,131, while the Aldershot Urban Area, a loose conurbation has a population of 243,344, making it the thirtieth-largest urban area in the UK.

British Army

British Army

The British Army is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of the British Armed Forces along with the Royal Navy and the Royal Air Force. As of 2022, the British Army comprises 79,380 regular full-time personnel, 4,090 Gurkhas, and 28,330 volunteer reserve personnel.

Hampstead

Hampstead

Hampstead is an area in London, which lies 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Charing Cross, and extends from the A5 road to Hampstead Heath, a large, hilly expanse of parkland. The area forms the northwest part of the London Borough of Camden, a borough in Inner London which for the purposes of the London Plan is designated as part of Central London.

Movie theater

Movie theater

A movie theater, cinema, or cinema hall, also known as a movie house, picture house, the movies, the pictures, picture theater, the silver screen, the big screen, or simply theater is a building that contains auditoria for viewing films for entertainment. Most, but not all, movie theaters are commercial operations catering to the general public, who attend by purchasing tickets.

Dulverton

Dulverton

Dulverton is a small town and civil parish in west Somerset, England, near the border with Devon. The town had a population of 1,408 at the 2011 Census. The parish includes the hamlets of Battleton and Ashwick which is located approximately 3.5 miles (5.6 km) north west of Dulverton. To the west of the hamlet lies Ashwick House, built in the Edwardian style in 1901. Also nearby is the estate of Northmoor, formerly a seat of Sir Frederick Wills, 1st Baronet of Northmoor, one of the four Wills Baronetcys, and the founders of the Imperial Tobacco Company. In 1929 Sir Frederick's son & heir, Sir Gilbert Wills, 2nd Baronet, was raised to the peerage as Baron Dulverton, whose principal seat was at Batsford Park, near Batsford, Gloucestershire.

Devon

Devon

Devon is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in South West England. The most populous settlement in Devon is the city of Plymouth, followed by Devon's county town, the city of Exeter. Devon is a coastal county with cliffs and sandy beaches. Home to the largest open space in southern England, Dartmoor, the county is predominately rural and has a relatively low population density for an English county.

Elliott Bernerd

Elliott Bernerd

Elliott Bernerd is a British property developer, the co-founder of the property company Chelsfield with Sir Stuart Lipton.

Anthony Parnes

Anthony Parnes

Anthony Keith Parnes is an English ex-stockbroker, who was convicted and jailed with Ernest Saunders, Gerald Ronson, and Jack Lyons in the Guinness share-trading fraud of the 1980s; they collectively became known as "the Guinness Four". He was sentenced to two-and-a-half years on charges of false accounting and theft

Christmas

Christmas

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed primarily on December 25 as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it is preceded by the season of Advent or the Nativity Fast and initiates the season of Christmastide, which historically in the West lasts twelve days and culminates on Twelfth Night. Christmas Day is a public holiday in many countries, is celebrated religiously by a majority of Christians, as well as culturally by many non-Christians, and forms an integral part of the holiday season organized around it.

Maldives

Maldives

Maldives, officially the Republic of Maldives, is an archipelagic state in South Asia, situated in the Indian Ocean. It lies southwest of Sri Lanka and India, about 750 kilometres from the Asian continent's mainland. Maldives' chain of 26 atolls stretches across the equator from Ihavandhippolhu Atoll in the north to Addu Atoll in the south.

Boxing Day

Boxing Day

Boxing Day is a holiday celebrated after Christmas Day, occurring on the second day of Christmastide. Though it originated as a holiday to give gifts to poor people, today Boxing Day forms part of Christmas celebrations, with many people choosing to take advantage of Boxing Day sales. It originated in Great Britain and is celebrated in several countries that previously formed part of the British Empire. The attached bank holiday or public holiday may take place on 28 December if necessary to ensure it falls on a weekday. Boxing Day is also concurrent with the Christian festival Saint Stephen's Day.

Atoll

Atoll

An atoll is a ring-shaped island, including a coral rim that encircles a lagoon partially or completely. There may be coral islands or cays on the rim. Atolls are located in warm tropical or subtropical oceans and seas where corals can grow. Most of the approximately 440 atolls in the world are in the Pacific Ocean.

Source: "Richard Caring", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Caring.

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References
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