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Ribbesford House

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Ribbesford House
Ribbesford House is located in Worcestershire
Ribbesford House
Location within Worcestershire
General information
TypeMansion
Architectural styleJacobean
LocationBewdley, Worcestershire, England
Coordinates52°21′44″N 2°18′54″W / 52.3622°N 2.315°W / 52.3622; -2.315Coordinates: 52°21′44″N 2°18′54″W / 52.3622°N 2.315°W / 52.3622; -2.315

Ribbesford House is a historic English mansion in Bewdley, Worcestershire. With a history dating back a thousand years, the house is a Grade II* listed building with architectural elements ranging from the 16th to the 19th century.[1][2]

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England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Mansion

Mansion

A mansion is a large dwelling house. The word itself derives through Old French from the Latin word mansio "dwelling", an abstract noun derived from the verb manere "to dwell". The English word manse originally defined a property large enough for the parish priest to maintain himself, but a mansion is no longer self-sustaining in this way. Manor comes from the same root—territorial holdings granted to a lord who would "remain" there.

Bewdley

Bewdley

Bewdley is a town and civil parish in the Wyre Forest District in Worcestershire, England on the banks of the River Severn. It is in the Severn Valley three miles west of Kidderminster and 22 miles (35 km) southwest of Birmingham. It lies on the River Severn, at the gateway of the Wyre Forest national nature reserve, and at the time of the 2011 census had a population of 9,470. Bewdley is a popular tourist destination and is known for the Bewdley Bridge, designed by Thomas Telford, and the well preserved Georgian riverside.

Worcestershire

Worcestershire

Worcestershire is a county in the West Midlands of England. The area that is now Worcestershire was absorbed into the unified Kingdom of England in 927, at which time it was constituted as a county.

Description

The house has 20 bedrooms, 10 reception rooms and nine bathrooms on three storeys. The building has two octagonal turrets. The property includes a cottage, outbuildings, and eight acres of land with gardens and a woodland.[3][1]

There is a description of Ribbesford House in the Pevsner Architectural Guide for Worcestershire (1968), detailing its various elements dating from the 16th century (ceiling oak beams) to the 19th century.[4]

History

Ribbesford house, early 20th century
Ribbesford house, early 20th century

An Anglo-Saxon charter from the early 11th century mentions that the estate was given by Bishop Wulfstan to his sister. It was seized by the Danes, then regained by the monks, only to be captured by Turstin the Fleming. In 1074 the estate was presented to Ralph de Mortimer in recognition of his services to William the Conqueror.[1] The house seems to have been rebuilt around 1535, when the turrets were probably added. Around the same time, John Leland called it a "goodly manour place."[4]

Ribbesford House remained in the Mortimer family until the early 17th century, when it passed to Baron Herbert of Cherbury, whose coat of arms still stands at the property. The correspondence of his son Henry with Oliver Cromwell, Queen of Bohemia and other contemporaries was discovered in one of the towers.[1] Parts of the house were renovated in 1669. The estate was purchased in 1787 by Francis Ingram, who demolished the larger part of the house.[4]

The visitors to Ribbesford House included Bewdley-born prime minister Stanley Baldwin and his cousin writer Rudyard Kipling. The mansion was used to train Free French soldiers during World War II, when 211 French soldiers stayed at the property. Charles de Gaulle is believed to have regularly visited them there. About a third of the soldiers were later killed in the war. The house was also used as the headquarters of the British 18th Infantry Division, by American military, and for Polish and Italian prisoners of war. The property was bought in 1947 by RAF Wing Commander Alfred John Howell, who converted it into private apartments.[3][1]

Ribbesford House was Grade II listed in 1952 (Entry Number 1329928). At the time, it was described as a "Country house, now flats. Mid-C16, partly rebuilt late C17, remodelled early C19 with some mid-C20 alterations".[5] The 1968 Pevsner’s guide, The Buildings of England: Worcestershire, included the house an property in its coverage.[6]

Samuel & Russell Leeds Ownership

In 2018, Howell's daughter Merryn placed the estate for sale by auction with a guide price of £500,000. It was purchased for £810,000 by brothers Samuel & Russell Leeds.[7] They planned to restore the building to its original character. Restoration work began but the building proved to be in a worse condition than they had expected. Their £1 million restoration budget had to be doubled to £2 million.[8]

In 2021 Historic England placed Ribbesford House on its at risk register.[9] Footage filmed in August 2022 revealed that restoration work had temporarily halted. However, as of October 2022 work had restarted.[10]

Discover more about History related topics

Anglo-Saxon charters

Anglo-Saxon charters

Anglo-Saxon charters are documents from the early medieval period in England which typically made a grant of land or recorded a privilege. The earliest surviving charters were drawn up in the 670s: the oldest surviving charters granted land to the Church, but from the eighth century, surviving charters were increasingly used to grant land to lay people.

Danelaw

Danelaw

The Danelaw was the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. The Danelaw contrasts with the West Saxon law and the Mercian law. The term is first recorded in the early 11th century as Dena lage. The areas that constituted the Danelaw lie in northern and eastern England, long occupied by Danes and other Norsemen.

Mortimer

Mortimer

Mortimer is an English surname, and occasionally a given name.

John Leland (antiquary)

John Leland (antiquary)

John Leland or Leyland was an English poet and antiquary.

Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Cherbury

Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Cherbury

Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert of Cherbury KB was an English soldier, diplomat, historian, poet and religious philosopher of the Kingdom of England.

Henry Herbert, 4th Baron Herbert of Chirbury

Henry Herbert, 4th Baron Herbert of Chirbury

Henry Herbert, 4th Baron Herbert of Chirbury was an English aristocrat, soldier and politician.

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell was an English politician and military officer who is widely regarded as one of the most important statesmen in English history. He came to prominence during the 1639 to 1651 Wars of the Three Kingdoms, first as a senior commander in the Parliamentarian army and then as a politician. A leading advocate of the execution of Charles I in January 1649, which led to the establishment of the Republican Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland, he ruled as Lord Protector from December 1653 until his death in September 1658. Cromwell nevertheless remains a deeply controversial figure in both Britain and Ireland, due to his use of the military to first acquire, then retain political power, and the brutality of his 1649 Irish campaign.

Free France

Free France

Free France was a political entity that claimed to be the legitimate government of France following the dissolution of the Third Republic. Led by French general Charles de Gaulle, Free France was established as a government-in-exile in London in June 1940 after the Fall of France during World War II and fought the Axis as an Allied nation with its Free French Forces. Free France also supported the resistance in Nazi-occupied France, known as the French Forces of the Interior, and gained strategic footholds in several French colonies in Africa.

Charles de Gaulle

Charles de Gaulle

Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle was a French army officer and statesman who led Free France against Nazi Germany in World War II and chaired the Provisional Government of the French Republic from 1944 to 1946 in order to restore democracy in France. In 1958, he came out of retirement when appointed President of the Council of Ministers by President René Coty. He rewrote the Constitution of France and founded the Fifth Republic after approval by referendum. He was elected President of France later that year, a position to which he was reelected in 1965 and held until his resignation in 1969.

18th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

18th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

The 18th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the British Army which fought briefly in the Malayan Campaign of the Second World War. In March 1939, after the re-emergence of Germany as a European power and its occupation of Czechoslovakia, the British Army increased the number of divisions in the Territorial Army (TA) by duplicating existing units. The 18th Infantry Division was formed in September 1939 as a second-line duplicate of the 54th Infantry Division, with men from Essex and the East Anglian counties of Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire.

Royal Air Force

Royal Air Force

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the United Kingdom's air and space force. It was formed towards the end of the First World War on 1 April 1918, becoming the first independent air force in the world, by regrouping the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). Following the Allied victory over the Central Powers in 1918, the RAF emerged as the largest air force in the world at the time. Since its formation, the RAF has taken a significant role in British military history. In particular, it played a large part in the Second World War where it fought its most famous campaign, the Battle of Britain.

Historic England

Historic England

Historic England is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. It is tasked with protecting the historic environment of England by preserving and listing historic buildings, scheduling ancient monuments, registering historic Parks and Gardens and by advising central and local government.

Source: "Ribbesford House", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribbesford_House.

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See also
References
  1. ^ a b c d e "20-bedroom house with unique history sells for £810,000". Birmingham Live. 18 April 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Ribbesford House, Ribbesford - Wyre Forest". Historic England. 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Charles de Gaulle cadet mansion sold in Bewdley". BBC. 18 April 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  4. ^ a b c Alan Brooks, Nikolaus Pevsner (2007). Buildings of England: Worcestershire. Yale University Press. p. 573. ISBN 9780300112986. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  5. ^ RIBBESFORD HOUSE
  6. ^ Fancy a mansion? This massive 20-bedroom Bewdley home could be all yours for £500k
  7. ^ [https://www.countrylife.co.uk/property/20-bedroom-castle-went-market-500000-happened-men-bought-201251 The 20-bedroom castle that went on the market for £500,000 — and what happened to the men who bought it
  8. ^ [https://www.countrylife.co.uk/property/20-bedroom-castle-went-market-500000-happened-men-bought-201251 The 20-bedroom castle that went on the market for £500,000 — and what happened to the men who bought it
  9. ^ Historic England Entry for Ribbesford House
  10. ^ August 2022 Drone Footage of Ribbesford House

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