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Puerto Rico Highway 14

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Highway 14

Ruta 14
Route information
Maintained by Puerto Rico DTPW
Length73.1 km[1] (45.4 mi)
Existed1886 (as the old Carretera Central)–present
Major junctions
West end PR-123 / PR-123P in PrimeroCuarto
Major intersections
East end PR-1 in Cayey barrio-pueblo–Monte Llano
Location
CountryUnited States
TerritoryPuerto Rico
MunicipalitiesPonce, Juana Díaz, Coamo, Aibonito, Cayey
Highway system
PR-12 PR-15

Puerto Rico Highway 14 (PR-14) is a main highway connecting Cayey, Puerto Rico to Ponce, Puerto Rico.[2] The road runs the same course as the historic Carretera Central. The Coamo-to-Ponce section of PR-14 was built under the direction of Spanish engineer Raimundo Camprubí Escudero (b. Pamplona 15 March 1846 - d. Madrid 1924).[3]

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Route description

Detailed map of PR-14 in the Municipality of Ponce
Detailed map of PR-14 in the Municipality of Ponce

Except in the city of Ponce where (with the exception of the Ponce Historic Zone) the road is a 4-lane road known as Avenida Tito Castro, the rest of PR-14 is a two-lane country road as it makes its way through the four towns it runs through, Juana Diaz, Coamo, Aibonito and Cayey.[4] PR-14 is one of the roads that lead into the Ponce Historic Zone.[5]

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Ponce, Puerto Rico

Ponce, Puerto Rico

Ponce is both a city and a municipality on the southern coast of Puerto Rico. The city is the seat of the municipal government.

Ponce Historic Zone

Ponce Historic Zone

The Ponce Historic Zone is a historic district in downtown Ponce, Puerto Rico, consisting of buildings and structures with architecture that date to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The zone goes by various names, including Ponce Tradicional, Ponce Centro, Ponce Histórico, and Distrito Histórico.

Casillas de Camineros

Casillas de Camineros

Casillas de Camineros is the name in Spanish given to structures built every 6 kilometers during the latter part of the 19th century alongside the major roads built in Puerto Rico and provided as residences to the "camineros", specially-trained government workers charged with providing maintenance to the surface of approximately six kilometers of a major road.

Bucaná River

Bucaná River

Bucaná River is a river in the municipality of Ponce, Puerto Rico. Río Bucaná has its origin in barrio Machuelo Arriba where it forms at an altitude of 115 feet (35 m). It forms from the confluence of Río Cerrillos and Río Bayagán. It is also fed by Río Portugues during its southernly run. Río Bucaná used to run for some 29.5 kilometers (18.3 mi) prior to canalization and other diversion work by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It now runs for 5.89 miles (9.48 km) to drain into the Caribbean Sea. This river is one of the 14 rivers in the municipality.

Puerto Rico Highway 10

Puerto Rico Highway 10

Puerto Rico Highway 10 (PR-10) is a major highway in Puerto Rico. The primary state road connects the city of Ponce in the south coast to Arecibo in the north; it is also the shortest route between the two cities.

Major intersections

MunicipalityLocationkm[1]miDestinationsNotes
PoncePrimeroCuarto line0.00.0
PR-123 / PR-123P south (Calle Ferrocarril) – Ponce
Western terminus of PR-14; the Carretera Central continues toward Playa; PR-123P southbound access via Calle Aurora
CuartoTercero line0.5–
0.6
0.31–
0.37

PR-133 east (Calle Comercio) – Ponce
One-way street
Tercero0.70.43
PR-1P east (Calle Willie Vicéns Tous) – Ponce
One-way street
TerceroQuinto line0.80.50
PR-1 west (Calle Reina Isabel) – Ponce
One-way street
QuintoSexto line1.20.75
PR-14P east (Avenida Ramón Emeterio Betances) / PR-14R (Calle Guadalupe) – Ponce
One-way streets; PR-14P eastbound access via Calle Romaguera
Machuelo Abajo2.21.4
PR-14P west (Avenida Tito Castro) – Ponce
2.61.6
PR-12 south (Avenida Santiago de los Caballeros) – Ponce
Seagull intersection; Playa
Machuelo AbajoMachuelo Arriba line4.6–
4.8
2.9–
3.0

PR-10 (Carretera Salvador "Chiry" Vassallo Ruiz) to PR-52 (Autopista Luis A. Ferré) – Ponce, Adjuntas, San Juan, Mayagüez



PR-139 north to PR-505 north (Carretera La Guardarraya) – Jayuya
Mercedita Airport, San Patricio; diamond interchange
Cerrillos5.93.7 PR-5139 – Ponce
Coto Laurel8.85.5 PR-506 (Carretera Doctor Humberto Zayas Chardón) – Ponce
Coto LaurelReal line9.96.2 PR-511 – Jayuya
Juana DíazCallabo10.96.8 PR-512 – Collores
Jacaguas11.57.1 PR-574 / PR-580 – Jacaguas
11.87.3 PR-573 – Jacaguas
Juana Díaz barrio-puebloLomas line13.78.5 PR-149 – Juana Díaz, Villalba
Juana Díaz barrio-pueblo14.08.7 PR-570 (Calle Carrión Maduro) – Juana DíazOne-way street
14.18.8 PR-592 (Calle Luis Muñoz Rivera) – Juana DíazOne-way street; Amuelas
Tijeras15.69.7 PR-510 – Amuelas
16.610.3 PR-551 – Guayabal
Río Cañas ArribaRío Cañas Abajo line18.511.5 PR-535 – Río Cañas Abajo
19.512.1 PR-540 – Río Cañas Arriba
22.714.1 PR-536 – Santa IsabelDescalabrado
23.714.7 PR-586 – Río Cañas Arriba
Río Descalabrado23.8–
23.9
14.8–
14.9
Puente Obispo Zengotita[6]
CoamoLos Llanos26.216.3 PR-545 – Los Llanos
San Ildefonso29.7–
29.8
18.5–
18.5
PR-5559 – Santa Catalina
29.918.6Puente General Méndez Vigo over the Río de la Mina[6]
30.8–
30.9
19.1–
19.2


PR-138 north (Avenida Luis Muñoz Marín) / PR-153 south – Coamo, Santa Isabel
Roundabout
Coamo barrio-pueblo32.820.4
PR-150 west (Calle Ramón Power) – Villalba
33.120.6 PR-155 (Calle Bobby Capó) – OrocovisOne-way street; northbound access via Calle Carrión Maduro or Calle Mario Brashi
33.720.9Puente Padre Íñigo over the Río Coamo[6]
PalmarejoCoamo barrio-pueblo line33.8–
33.9
21.0–
21.1
PR-702 – Palmarejo
Coamo barrio-pueblo34.221.3 PR-5558 – Pasto
Palmarejo35.722.2
PR-238 west (Desvío Sur de Coamo) – Santa Isabel
Río Cuyón38.824.1Puente de las Calabazas[6]
AibonitoPastoAsomante line45.928.5 PR-723 (Ruta Panorámica) – PulguillasWestern terminus of the Ruta Panorámica concurrency; the Ruta Panorámica continues toward Barranquitas
46.829.1
PR-7718 east (Paseo Don Julio Francisco "Paco" Santos Vázquez) – Aibonito
Eastern terminus of the Ruta Panorámica concurrency; the Ruta Panorámica continues toward Cayey
PastoLlanos
Asomante tripoint
47.329.4
PR-162 north – Barranquitas
Western terminus of PR-162 concurrency
Aibonito barrio-pueblo49.7–
49.8
30.9–
30.9
PR-724 – San LuisLlanos
49.8–
49.9
30.9–
31.0
PR-7719 (Avenida Félix Ríos) – Pasto
50.231.2 PR-725 (Calle Román Baldorioty de Castro) – LlanosOne-way street
50.331.3 PR-162 (Calle Federico Degetau) – CuyónEastern terminus of PR-162 concurrency; one-way street
50.531.4 PR-726 (Calle José C. Vázquez) – Caonillas
50.931.6 PR-721 – Aibonito
51.031.7
PR-722 south – Robles
RoblesPlata line54.934.1 PR-727 – Plata
RoblesPlata line56.8–
56.9
35.3–
35.4
Puente de Quebrada Honda over the Quebrada Honda[6]
57.235.5
PR-173 north – Cidra, Plata
Río Matón62.9–
63.0
39.1–
39.1
Puente del Río Matón[6]
CayeyMatón Abajo63.039.1 PR-730 / PR-7730 – Matón Abajo, Honduras
ToítaCayey barrio-pueblo line68.342.4 PR-730 – Cayey
Cayey barrio-pueblo68.7–
68.8
42.7–
42.8

PR-206 south – Cayey
69.843.4 PR-170 (Calle Luis Muñoz Rivera) / PR-731 – CayeyPR-170 access via Calle José Celso Barbosa
70.143.6Puente Santo Domingo over the Quebrada Santo Domingo[6]
70.143.6
PR-15 south (Avenida Luis Muñoz Marín) – Guayama
71.244.2 PR-171 – Cidra
71.744.6 PR-7014 – CayeyUnsigned
Cayey barrio-puebloMonte Llano line73.145.4 PR-1 (Avenida Jesús T. Piñero) – Caguas, AibonitoEastern terminus of PR-14; the Carretera Central continues toward Cidra
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

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Puerto Rico Highway 1

Puerto Rico Highway 1

Puerto Rico Highway 1 (PR-1) is a highway in Puerto Rico that connects the city of Ponce to San Juan. Leaving Ponce, the road heads east and follows a somewhat parallel route along the southern coast of the island heading towards Salinas. At Salinas, the road turns north to cut through the Cordillera Central in its approach to San Juan. Before reaching San Juan, it climbs to make its way to the mountain town of Cayey and then it winds down into the city of Caguas on its final approach to San Juan.

Puente de las Calabazas

Puente de las Calabazas

Puente de las Calabazas is a single-span lattice girder bridge near Coamo, Puerto Rico on the Carreterra Central that dates from 1882. It was designed by Ricardo Camprubi and was fabricated by Eugen Rollin and Co., a Belgian firm that exported via Spain from Braine le Comte, Belgium. Prolific engineer Camprubí designed several single span lattice bridges in Puerto Rico. He also designed the first two-span lattice girder bridge in Puerto Rico, the Padre Inigo Bridge, which is also NRHP-listed. All of these were part of the Carretera Central.

Coamo, Puerto Rico

Coamo, Puerto Rico

Coamo is a town and municipality founded in 1579 in the south-central region of Puerto Rico, located north of Santa Isabel; south of Orocovis and Barranquitas; east of Villalba and Juana Díaz; and west of Aibonito and Salinas. Coamo is spread over 10 barrios and Coamo Pueblo – the downtown area and the administrative center of the city. It is both a principal city of the Coamo Micropolitan Statistical Area and the Ponce-Yauco-Coamo Combined Statistical Area.

Ponce, Puerto Rico

Ponce, Puerto Rico

Ponce is both a city and a municipality on the southern coast of Puerto Rico. The city is the seat of the municipal government.

Puerto Rico Highway 123

Puerto Rico Highway 123

Puerto Rico Highway 123 (PR-123) is a secondary highway that connects the city Arecibo to the city of Ponce. It runs through the towns of Utuado and Adjuntas, before reaching Ponce. A parallel road is being built, PR-10, that is expected to take on most of the traffic currently using PR-123.

Carretera Central (Puerto Rico)

Carretera Central (Puerto Rico)

The Carretera Central is a historic north–south central highway in Puerto Rico, linking the cities of San Juan and Ponce by way of Río Piedras, Caguas, Cayey, Aibonito, Coamo, and Juana Díaz. It crosses the Cordillera Central. Plans for the road started in the first half of the 19th century, and the road was fully completed in 1898. At the time the United States took possession of Puerto Rico in 1898, the Americans called it "the finest road in the Western Hemisphere."

Playa, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Playa, Ponce, Puerto Rico

Barrio Playa, also known as Playa de Ponce, Ponce Playa, or La Playa, is one of the thirty-one barrios that comprise the municipality of Ponce, Puerto Rico. Along with Bucaná, Canas, Vayas, and Capitanejo, Playa is one of the municipality's five coastal barrios. Barrio Playa also incorporates several islands, the largest of which is Caja de Muertos. It was founded in 1831.

Puerto Rico Highway 133

Puerto Rico Highway 133

Puerto Rico Highway 133 (PR-133) is a major access road in Ponce, Puerto Rico. The road is 1.2 miles long and consists of three segments called "Calle Comercio", "Avenida Cuatro Calles", and "Avenida Ednita Nazario". The road has both of its endpoints, as well as its entire length, within the Ponce city limits. It runs west to east. The road is a main access road from downtown Ponce to PR-1, providing access to Guayama and all other points in the eastern portion of the Puerto Rico, and to PR-52, which provides expressway access to San Juan.

Source: "Puerto Rico Highway 14", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Rico_Highway_14.

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See also
References
  1. ^ a b Google (28 February 2020). "PR-14" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  2. ^ Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works. "Datos de Transito 2000-2009" (in Spanish). Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  3. ^ Ingenieros de Caminos en Puerto Rico: 1866-1898. Fernando Sáenz Ridruejo. "Anuario de Estudios Atlanticos." ISSN 0570-4065. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (2009). No 55. p.334.
  4. ^ Sur, Redaccion Voces del (26 September 2019). "Ordenan cierre de la carretera PR-14 de Aibonito a Coamo" (in Spanish).
  5. ^ "Ponce. Let's Go". Archived from the original on 4 December 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Luis F. Pumarada O’Neill (1991). "Los Puentes Históricos de Puerto Rico" (PDF) (in Spanish). Retrieved 10 March 2020.
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