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Portugal–Spain football rivalry

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Iberian Derby
Spain and Portugal match at the FIFA World Cup 2010-06-29 7.jpg
Sergio Ramos (top center) of Spain tries to pass the ball to Fernando Torres (center) as Portugal's Fábio Coentrão (left), Bruno Alves (right) and Cristiano Ronaldo (top) look on during a match at 2010 FIFA World Cup match.
LocationIberian Peninsula
Teams Portugal
 Spain
First meeting18 December 1921
Friendly
Spain 3–0 Portugal
Latest meeting27 September 2022
UEFA Nations League
Portugal 0–1 Spain
Statistics
Meetings total40
Top scorerIsidro Lángara (7)
All-time seriesPortugal: 6
Draw: 17
Spain: 17
Largest victorySpain 9–0 Portugal
1934 FIFA World Cup qualification
(11 March 1934)

The PortugalSpain football rivalry (also known as The Iberian War or The Iberian Derby) is one of the oldest football rivalries at a national level. It began on 19 December 1921, when Portugal lost 0–3 to Spain at Madrid in their first ever international friendly game. Portugal lost their first matches, with their first draw (2–2) only coming in 1926. Portugal's first win came much later (4–1) in 1947.

Both belong to the strongest football nations of the world, and have met a total of 40 times (of which 11 matches were competitive) which resulted in 6 victories for Portugal, 17 draws, and 17 victories for Spain.

Background

The rivalry between two countries goes back to 1581, when the king Henry of Portugal died with no heir and it triggered a succession crisis. Where the main claimants to the throne were Philip II of Spain and António, Prior of Crato. Philip II of Spain was made king, and he united both Crown of João VI and Spanish Crown to form Iberian Union. It lasted only 60 years until 1640, when the Portuguese Restoration War was initiated against Spain, and Portugal regained its independence under the Braganza dynasty.

In the 18th century, wars were very often between the major kingdoms and Portugal and Spain always found themselves on the opposite sides. The Portuguese, courtesy of their long-standing alliance, aligned themselves with Great Britain, while Spain, through the Pacte de Famille, allied themselves to France. In 1762, during the Seven Years' War, Spain launched an unsuccessful invasion of Portugal.

In 1777, there was a conflict between the two states over the borders of their possessions in South America.

During Napoleonic Era, in 1807, the king of Spain and his French allies invaded Portugal, using a route that crossed through Spanish territory. However, the French decided to take over both countries, overthrowing the King of Spain and forcing the Portuguese royal family to escape to the Portuguese colony of Brazil.

After the fall of Napoleon, both countries came close to war a number of times during the early 19th century. Both lost their American colonies shortly after the end of the Peninsular War, which severely weakened their global power.

Discover more about Background related topics

Henry, King of Portugal

Henry, King of Portugal

Henry, dubbed the Chaste and the Cardinal-King, was king of Portugal and a cardinal of the Catholic Church, who ruled Portugal between 1578 and 1580. As a clergyman, he was bound to chastity, and as such, had no children to succeed him, and thus put an end to the reigning House of Aviz. His death led to the Portuguese succession crisis of 1580 and ultimately to the 60-year Iberian Union that saw Portugal share a monarch with that of Habsburg Spain. The next independent monarch of Portugal would be John IV, who restored the throne after 60 years of Spanish rule.

Philip II of Spain

Philip II of Spain

Philip II, also known as Philip the Prudent, was King of Spain from 1556, King of Portugal from 1580, and King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until his death in 1598. He was jure uxoris King of England and Ireland from his marriage to Queen Mary I in 1554 until her death in 1558. He was also Duke of Milan from 1540. From 1555, he was Lord of the Seventeen Provinces of the Netherlands.

António, Prior of Crato

António, Prior of Crato

António, Prior of Crato, was a grandson of King Manuel I of Portugal who claimed the Portuguese throne during the 1580 dynastic crisis. According to some historians, he was king of Portugal for 33 days in 1580. Philip II of Spain prevailed in the succession struggle, but António claimed the throne until 1583. He was a disciple of Bartholomew of Braga.

Crown of João VI

Crown of João VI

The Crown of João VI, also known as the Portuguese Royal Crown is the most recent and only extant crown of the Portuguese Crown Jewels.

Monarchy of Spain

Monarchy of Spain

The monarchy of Spain or Spanish monarchy, constitutionally referred to as The Crown, is a constitutional institution and the highest office of Spain. The monarchy comprises the reigning monarch, his or her family, and the royal household organization which supports and facilitates the monarch in the exercise of his duties and prerogatives. The Spanish monarchy is currently represented by King Felipe VI, Queen Letizia, and their daughters Leonor, Princess of Asturias, and Infanta Sofía.

Iberian Union

Iberian Union

The Iberian Union was the dynastic union of the Crowns of Castile and Aragon and the Kingdom of Portugal that existed between 1580 and 1640 and brought the entire Iberian Peninsula, as well as Portuguese and Spanish overseas possessions, under the Spanish Habsburg monarchs Philip II, Philip III, and Philip IV. The union began after the Portuguese crisis of succession and the ensuing War of the Portuguese Succession, and lasted until the Portuguese Restoration War, during which the House of Braganza was established as Portugal's new ruling dynasty with the acclamation of John IV as the new King of Portugal. As a personal union, the Kingdoms of Portugal and Spain remained independent states, sharing only a single monarch.

House of Braganza

House of Braganza

The Most Serene House of Braganza, also known as the Brigantine Dynasty, is a dynasty of emperors, kings, princes, and dukes of Portuguese origin which reigned in Europe and the Americas.

Great Britain

Great Britain

Great Britain is an island in the North Atlantic Ocean off the north-west coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), it is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island and the ninth-largest island in the world. It is dominated by a maritime climate with narrow temperature differences between seasons. The 60% smaller island of Ireland is to the west—these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands and named substantial rocks, form the British Isles archipelago.

Pacte de Famille

Pacte de Famille

The Pacte de Famille is one of three separate, but similar alliances between the Bourbon kings of France and Spain. As part of the settlement of the War of the Spanish Succession that brought the House of Bourbon of France to the throne of Spain, Spain and France made a series of agreements that did not unite the two thrones, but did lead to cooperation on a defined basis.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a country primarily located in Western Europe. It also includes overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, giving it one of the largest discontiguous exclusive economic zones in the world. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain over 68 million people.

Colonial Brazil

Colonial Brazil

Colonial Brazil comprises the period from 1500, with the arrival of the Portuguese, until 1815, when Brazil was elevated to a kingdom in union with Portugal as the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves. During the early 300 years of Brazilian colonial history, the economic exploitation of the territory was based first on brazilwood extraction, which gave the territory its name; sugar production ; and finally on gold and diamond mining. Slaves, especially those brought from Africa, provided most of the work force of the Brazilian export economy after a brief period of Indian slavery to cut brazilwood.

Peninsular War

Peninsular War

The Peninsular War (1807–1814) was the military conflict fought in the Iberian Peninsula by Spain, Portugal, and the United Kingdom against the invading and occupying forces of the First French Empire during the Napoleonic Wars. In Spain, it is considered to overlap with the Spanish War of Independence. The war started when the French and Spanish armies invaded and occupied Portugal in 1807 by transiting through Spain, and it escalated in 1808 after Napoleonic France occupied Spain, which had been its ally. Napoleon Bonaparte forced the abdications of Ferdinand VII and his father Charles IV and then installed his brother Joseph Bonaparte on the Spanish throne and promulgated the Bayonne Constitution. Most Spaniards rejected French rule and fought a bloody war to oust them. The war on the peninsula lasted until the Sixth Coalition defeated Napoleon in 1814, and is regarded as one of the first wars of national liberation. It is also significant for the emergence of large-scale guerrilla warfare.

Major Tournaments

1934 FIFA World Cup qualification

First leg

Spain 9–0 Portugal
González 3'
Lángara 13', 14' (pen.), 46', 71', 85'
Regueiro 65', 70'
Ventolrà 68'
(Report)

Second leg

Portugal 1–2 Spain
Silva 10' (Report) Lángara 12', 25'

1950 FIFA World Cup qualification

First leg

Spain and Portugal met in 1950 FIFA World Cup qualification round with Spain going away with a 5-1 victory at home.[1]

Spain 5–1 Portugal
Zarra 11', 58'
Basora 13'
Panizo 15'
Molowny 65'
Report Cabrita 36'
Attendance: 80,000
Referee: Reg Leafe (England)

Second leg

Second leg saw both sides drawing 2-2, meaning Spain qualified for 1950 FIFA World Cup after defeating Portugal 5-1 in first leg.[2]

Portugal 2–2 Spain
Travassos 51'
Correia 53'
Report Zarra 24'
Gaínza 82'
Attendance: 30,000
Referee: Jack Mowat (Scotland)

UEFA Euro 1984

In UEFA Euro 1984 group stage Portugal and Spain were paired together, both sides qualified to the next round as Portugal drew Spain 1-1. António Sousa gave Portugal in 52nd minute, after 21 minutes Santillana equalised for Spain at 73rd minute.[3]

Portugal 1–1 Spain
Sousa 52' Report Santillana 73'
Attendance: 24,364

UEFA Euro 2004

Portugal and Spain faced off in group stage of UEFA Euro 2004 hosted by Portugal. Portugal won the game 1-0 as half time substitute Nuno Gomes scored a goal from 20 yards, giving Portugal their first ever victory against Spain in a major tournament, this was also Portugal's first victory over Spain since 1981.[4]

Spain 0–1 Portugal
Report Nuno Gomes 57'
Attendance: 47,491
Referee: Anders Frisk (Sweden)

2010 FIFA World Cup

Spain defeated Portugal 1–0 in the Iberian derby to progress to the quarter finals where they were to play Paraguay. The game took place on Tuesday 29 June 2010 at the Cape Town Stadium. Spain dominated the game with a ball possession ratio of 62% and several opportunities, but had to endure a pair of missed chances by the Portuguese in the first half, including one by Hugo Almeida which nearly resulted in a goal. In the second half, the Portuguese attacking threat decreased, and the entry of Fernando Llorente for Fernando Torres on the field brought new energy to the Spanish team. The only goal of the match came on the 63rd minute: David Villa picked up a brilliant pass by Xavi, having his first shot saved, but then lifted the rebound into the roof of the net.[5] Post-match replays showed that the goal was scored from an offside position (0.22m according to ESPN axis).[6][7][8][9][10][11]

Spain 1–0 Portugal
David Villa 63' Report

UEFA Euro 2012

Portugal faced Spain for the sixth time in a major tournament at UEFA Euro 2012 semi-finals.[12] In early minutes of first half, Spain missed an scoring opportunity as Álvaro Arbeloa shot a half-cleared ball by Bruno Alves just above the crossbar. After a Portugal free-kick hit the wall, Spain started a counter-attack with Xavi passing the ball at the edge of the box, just to be hit above the crossbar by Andrés Iniesta. Halfway through first half Cristiano Ronaldo shot just waved past the Spanish goalkeeper Iker Casillas missing the goal by inches. In the 85th minute Portugal got two back-to-back freekicks as Ronaldo was fouled for the first one and second for handball which happened as Ronaldo hit the first freekick at the wall, the second freekick went above the bar, as the 90 minutes ended with a 0-0 scoreline. At 95th minute Portuguese keeper Rui Patrício saved a shot from Iniesta as he fired in a cross in the six yard box. As extra-time ended 0-0, the penalty shootout started, Spain went out victorious as Cristiano Ronaldo didn't take a penalty after Xabi Alonso saw Patrício saving his first penalty. After the match Portuguese coach Paulo Bento said: "We had this order. Ronaldo was fifth."[13][12]

2018 FIFA World Cup

Spain faced Portugal in the second match of Group B. Cristiano Ronaldo gave Portugal an early lead from the spot-kick in 4th minute of the match after deceiving Nacho inside the box. In the 24th minute, Diego Costa equalised for Spain after scoring past the Portuguese defence. Isco then saw his shot thumping against the post. Ronaldo gave Portugal lead once again in 44th minute after Spanish keeper David de Gea was unable to handle the shot. Costa once again equalised for Spanish side in the 55th minute. Nacho redeemed himself after scoring a superb half-volley from outside the box at 58th minute. Gerard Piqué brought down Ronaldo outside the box at 86th minute, Ronaldo scored the free kick to equalise the game at 3-3, earning his first-ever World Cup hat-trick.[15][16]

Portugal 3–3 Spain
Report

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Portugal national football team

Portugal national football team

The Portugal national football team has represented Portugal in international men's football competition since 1921. The national team is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF), the governing body for football in Portugal. Portugal's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Portugal, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Cidade do Futebol, is located in Oeiras. The head coach of the team is Roberto Martínez, who replaced Fernando Santos in January 2023 following his stepping down after the 2022 World Cup, and the captain is Cristiano Ronaldo, who also holds the team records for most caps and most goals.

Isidro Lángara

Isidro Lángara

Isidro Lángara Galarraga was a Spanish football striker from the Basque Country. He played 12 times for Spain, scoring 17 goals. He has the highest goal ratio in La Liga at 1.14.

Penalty kick (association football)

Penalty kick (association football)

A penalty kick is a method of restarting play in association football, in which a player is allowed to take a single shot at the goal while it is defended only by the opposing team's goalkeeper. It is awarded when an offence punishable by a direct free kick is committed by a player in their own penalty area. The shot is taken from the penalty mark, which is 11 m from the goal line and centred between the touch lines.

Luis Regueiro

Luis Regueiro

Luis Regueiro Pagola, sometimes nicknamed Corso, was a footballer, and an Olympian from the Basque Country in the north of Spain.

Martí Ventolrà

Martí Ventolrà

Martí Ventolrà i Fort was a former Spanish footballer. He formed part of the forward set up of FC Barcelona which also included Raich, Escolà, Fernandez and Munlloch. He represented Spain at the 1934 FIFA World Cup.

Estadio Chamartín

Estadio Chamartín

Estadio Chamartín was a multi-use stadium in Madrid, Spain. It was initially used as the stadium of Real Madrid matches before the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium opened in 1947. The stadium held 22,500 people and was built in 1924.

Madrid

Madrid

Madrid is the capital and most populous city of Spain. The city has almost 3.4 million inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.7 million. It is the second-largest city in the European Union (EU), and its monocentric metropolitan area is the second-largest in the EU. The municipality covers 604.3 km2 (233.3 sq mi) geographical area.

Royal Belgian Football Association

Royal Belgian Football Association

The Royal Belgian Football Association is the governing body of football in Belgium. It was a founding member of FIFA in 1904 and UEFA in 1954 and was based in Brussels, not far from the King Baudouin Stadium. Since October 2021, the headquarters of the RBFA are located in Tubize, next to its technical centre. Its chairman is Robert Huygens.

Estádio do Lumiar

Estádio do Lumiar

Estádio do Lumiar was a multi-use stadium in Lisbon, Portugal. It was initially used as the stadium of Sporting Clube de Portugal matches. It was replaced by the Estádio José Alvalade in 1956. The capacity of the stadium was 35,000 spectators.

Lisbon

Lisbon

Lisbon is the capital and largest city of Portugal, with an estimated population of 544,851 within its administrative limits in an area of 100.05 km2. Lisbon's urban area extends beyond the city's administrative limits with a population of around 2.7 million people, being the 11th-most populous urban area in the European Union. About 3 million people live in the Lisbon metropolitan area, making it the third largest metropolitan area in the Iberian Peninsula, after Madrid and Barcelona. It represents approximately 27% of the country's population. It is mainland Europe's westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. Lisbon lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the River Tagus. The westernmost portions of its metro area, the Portuguese Riviera, form the westernmost point of Continental Europe, culminating at Cabo da Roca.

Portugal

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located on the Iberian Peninsula, in southwestern Europe, and whose territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira. It features the westernmost point in continental Europe, and its Iberian portion is bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain, the sole country to have a land border with Portugal. Its two archipelagos form two autonomous regions with their own regional governments. Lisbon is the capital and largest city by population.

1950 FIFA World Cup qualification

1950 FIFA World Cup qualification

A total of 34 teams entered the qualification rounds of the 1950 FIFA World Cup, competing for a total of 16 spots in the final tournament. Brazil, as the hosts, and Italy, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 14 spots open for competition.

List of matches

No. Date Location Competition Result
1 18 December 1921 Spain Madrid Friendly Spain  3–0  Portugal
2 17 December 1922 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  1–2  Spain
3 16 December 1923 Spain Seville Spain  3–0  Portugal
4 17 May 1925 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  0–2  Spain
5 10 January 1928 Portugal  2–2  Spain
6 17 March 1929 Spain Seville Spain  5–0  Portugal
7 30 November 1930 Portugal Porto Portugal  0–1  Spain
8 2 April 1933 Spain Vigo Spain  3–0  Portugal
9 11 March 1934 Spain Madrid 1934 FIFA World Cup qualification Spain  9–0  Portugal
10 18 March 1934 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  1–2  Spain
11 5 May 1935 Friendly Portugal  3–3  Spain
12 12 January 1941 Portugal  2–2  Spain
13 16 March 1941 Spain Bilbao Spain  5–1  Portugal
14 13 March 1945 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  2–2  Spain
15 6 May 1945 Spain La Coruña Spain  4–2  Portugal
16 26 January 1947 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  4–1  Spain
17 20 March 1948 Spain Madrid Spain  2–0  Portugal
18 20 March 1949 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  1–1  Spain
19 2 April 1950 Spain Madrid 1950 FIFA World Cup qualification Spain  5–1  Portugal
20 9 April 1950 Portugal Lisbon Portugal  2–2  Spain
21 3 June 1956 Friendly Portugal  3–1  Spain
22 13 April 1958 Spain Madrid Spain  1–0  Portugal
23 15 November 1964 Portugal Porto Portugal  2–1  Spain
24 26 September 1979 Spain Vigo Spain  1–1  Portugal
25 20 June 1981 Portugal Porto Portugal  2–0  Spain
26 17 June 1984 France Marseille UEFA Euro 1984 Portugal  1–1  Spain
27 16 January 1991 Spain Castellón Friendly Spain  1–1  Portugal
28 15 January 1992 Portugal Torres Novas Portugal  0–0  Spain
29 19 January 1994 Spain Vigo Spain  2–2  Portugal
30 13 February 2002 Spain Barcelona 1–1
31 6 September 2003 Portugal Guimarães Portugal  0–3  Spain
32 20 June 2004 Portugal Lisbon UEFA Euro 2004 Spain  0–1  Portugal
33 29 June 2010 South Africa Cape Town 2010 FIFA World Cup Spain  1–0  Portugal
34 17 November 2010 Portugal Lisbon Friendly Portugal  4–0  Spain
35 27 June 2012 Ukraine Donetsk UEFA Euro 2012 Portugal  0–0
(2–4 p)
 Spain
36 15 June 2018 Russia Sochi 2018 FIFA World Cup Portugal  3–3  Spain
37 7 October 2020 Portugal Lisbon Friendly Portugal  0–0  Spain
38 4 June 2021 Spain Madrid Spain  0–0  Portugal
39 2 June 2022 Spain Seville 2022–23 UEFA Nations League Spain  1–1  Portugal
40 27 September 2022 Portugal Braga Portugal  0–1  Spain

Unofficial matches

An additional three matches have been played between the countries which are not considered official (although are included in some media articles relating to the rivalry and in some statistical tallies of caps for the players involved):[18][19][20][21][22]

  • In May 1927, Spain played a friendly against Portugal in Madrid[23][24][25] on the same day as they played Italy in Rome.[26][27][28][29] The squad for the Italy game was more experienced and considered to be stronger, while several players in the Portugal match made their debuts; consequently the Spain team is considered to have been equivalent to its B team[30] (although they won their match while the A team lost theirs)[29] and thus not a full international.
  • Following the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in 1936, no official matches were played by Spain until 1941.[31] The vast majority of the squad in 1936[32] either originated from the Basque provinces, or played for FC Barcelona in Catalonia, both of which were initially within Republican territory in the conflict. The Basque players formed their own quasi-national team and left Spain to play a long series of exhibition matches on tour around Eastern Europe[33] and Latin America[34] to provide funds and exposure for local causes, and Barcelona did likewise;[35] most of the players in both groups never returned.[31] Back in Spain, as the Nationalist side took control of more of the country, General Franco saw the opportunity to use football as a positive propaganda tool, and arranged for a match to be played in his home region of Galicia against Portugal, whose leader Salazar was supportive of Francoist Spain.[31][36][37][38] Recognition was granted by FIFA at short notice and the match took place in Vigo in November 1937. In contrast to Portugal's settled squad, the Spain pool was hastily assembled from the best available players in Nationalist areas, and Portugal won for their first victory over their neighbours.[36][37][39][40] A return match was arranged for the following January in Lisbon, also won by Portugal,[31][41][38] and which attracted attention when three local players refused to give the Roman salute before kick-off; they were initially imprisoned, but were soon released due to the political influence held by the hierarchy of the club they played for, Belenenses.[36][37]
No. Date Venue Competition Result
N/A[a] 29 May 1927[23][24][25] Spain Madrid Unofficial friendly[29] Spain B  2–0  Portugal
N/A[b] 28 November 1937[42][43] Spain Vigo Unofficial friendly[31][36][37][39][40] Spain  1–2  Portugal
N/A[c] 30 January 1938[44][45][41] Portugal Lisbon Unofficial friendly[31][36][37] Portugal  1–0  Spain
  1. ^ Taking all matches into account, this would have been the 7th meeting.
  2. ^ Taking all matches into account, this would have been the 13th meeting.
  3. ^ Taking all matches into account, this would have been the 14th meeting.

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Spain

Spain

Spain, or the Kingdom of Spain, is a country primarily located in southwestern Europe with parts of territory in the Atlantic Ocean and across the Mediterranean Sea. The largest part of Spain is situated on the Iberian Peninsula; its territory also includes the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea, and the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla in Africa. The country's mainland is bordered to the south by Gibraltar; to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea; to the north by France, Andorra and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean. With an area of 505,990 km2 (195,360 sq mi), Spain is the second-largest country in the European Union (EU) and, with a population exceeding 47.4 million, the fourth-most populous EU member state. Spain's capital and largest city is Madrid; other major urban areas include Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, Málaga, Murcia, Palma de Mallorca, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Bilbao.

Madrid

Madrid

Madrid is the capital and most populous city of Spain. The city has almost 3.4 million inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.7 million. It is the second-largest city in the European Union (EU), and its monocentric metropolitan area is the second-largest in the EU. The municipality covers 604.3 km2 (233.3 sq mi) geographical area.

Spain national football team

Spain national football team

The Spain national football team has represented Spain in international men's football competitions since 1920. It is governed by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Portugal national football team

Portugal national football team

The Portugal national football team has represented Portugal in international men's football competition since 1921. The national team is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF), the governing body for football in Portugal. Portugal's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Portugal, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Cidade do Futebol, is located in Oeiras. The head coach of the team is Roberto Martínez, who replaced Fernando Santos in January 2023 following his stepping down after the 2022 World Cup, and the captain is Cristiano Ronaldo, who also holds the team records for most caps and most goals.

Portugal

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located on the Iberian Peninsula, in southwestern Europe, and whose territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira. It features the westernmost point in continental Europe, and its Iberian portion is bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain, the sole country to have a land border with Portugal. Its two archipelagos form two autonomous regions with their own regional governments. Lisbon is the capital and largest city by population.

Lisbon

Lisbon

Lisbon is the capital and largest city of Portugal, with an estimated population of 544,851 within its administrative limits in an area of 100.05 km2. Lisbon's urban area extends beyond the city's administrative limits with a population of around 2.7 million people, being the 11th-most populous urban area in the European Union. About 3 million people live in the Lisbon metropolitan area, making it the third largest metropolitan area in the Iberian Peninsula, after Madrid and Barcelona. It represents approximately 27% of the country's population. It is mainland Europe's westernmost capital city and the only one along the Atlantic coast. Lisbon lies in the western Iberian Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and the River Tagus. The westernmost portions of its metro area, the Portuguese Riviera, form the westernmost point of Continental Europe, culminating at Cabo da Roca.

Seville

Seville

Seville is the capital and largest city of the Spanish autonomous community of Andalusia and the province of Seville. It is situated on the lower reaches of the River Guadalquivir, in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

Statistics

Overall

As of 27 September 2022
Matches Wins Goals
Portugal Draws Spain Portugal Spain
FIFA World Cup* 6 0 2 4 7 22
UEFA European Championship 3 1 2** 0 2 1
UEFA Nations League 2 0 1 1 1 2
All competitions 11 1 5 5 10 25
Friendly 29 5 12 12 35 52
Total 29 5 12 12 35 52
All matches 40 6 17 17 45 77
  • ^* Matches for FIFA World Cup includes qualification matches from 1934 and 1950 edition.
  • ^** Spain defeated Portugal 4–2 on penalties at UEFA Euro 2012 semi-finals.

Top goalscorers

As of 27 September 2022
# Player FIFA World Cup FIFA World Cup qualification UEFA European Championship UEFA European Championship qualifying Friendly All matches
1 Spain Isidro Lángara5 7 2 9
2 Portugal Fernando Peyroteo 7 7
3 Spain Telmo Zarra 3 3 6
4 Portugal Francisco Palmeiro 3 3
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo 3 3
Portugal José Travassos 1 2 3
Spain Epifanio Fernández 3 3
Spain César Rodríguez 3 3
Spain Gaspar Rubio 3 3
Spain José Luis Zabala 3 3

5 Player scored 5 goals

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FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament has been held every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are Argentina, who won their third title at the 2022 tournament.

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship

The UEFA European Football Championship, less formally the European Championship and informally the Euro, is the primary association football tournament organised by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). The competition is contested by UEFA members' senior men's national teams, determining the continental champion of Europe. It is the second-most watched football tournament in the world after the FIFA World Cup. The Euro 2012 final was watched by a global audience of around 300 million. The competition has been held every four years since 1960, except for 2020, when it was postponed until 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, but kept the name Euro 2020. Scheduled to be in the even-numbered year between FIFA World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the European Nations' Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Since 1996, the individual events have been branded as "UEFA Euro [year]".

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League

The UEFA Nations League is a biennial international football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the member associations of UEFA, the sport's European governing body.

Exhibition game

Exhibition game

An exhibition game is a sporting event whose prize money and impact on the player's or the team's rankings is either zero or otherwise greatly reduced. In team sports, matches of this type are often used to help coaches and managers select and condition players for the competitive matches of a league season or tournament. If the players usually play in different teams in other leagues, exhibition games offer an opportunity for the players to learn to work with each other. The games can be held between separate teams or between parts of the same team.

UEFA Euro 2012

UEFA Euro 2012

The 2012 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2012 or simply Euro 2012, was the 14th European Championship for men's national football teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament, held between 8 June and 1 July 2012, was co-hosted by Poland and Ukraine, and was won by Spain, who beat Italy 4–0 in the final at the Olympic Stadium, Kyiv, Ukraine.

FIFA World Cup qualification

FIFA World Cup qualification

The FIFA World Cup qualification is a competitive match that a national association football team takes in order to qualify for one of the available berths at the final tournament of the men's FIFA World Cup.

UEFA European Championship qualifying

UEFA European Championship qualifying

The UEFA European Championship qualifying, branded as the European Qualifiers, is the process that UEFA-affiliated national football teams go through in order to qualify for the UEFA European Championship.

Spain

Spain

Spain, or the Kingdom of Spain, is a country primarily located in southwestern Europe with parts of territory in the Atlantic Ocean and across the Mediterranean Sea. The largest part of Spain is situated on the Iberian Peninsula; its territory also includes the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean, the Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean Sea, and the autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla in Africa. The country's mainland is bordered to the south by Gibraltar; to the south and east by the Mediterranean Sea; to the north by France, Andorra and the Bay of Biscay; and to the west by Portugal and the Atlantic Ocean. With an area of 505,990 km2 (195,360 sq mi), Spain is the second-largest country in the European Union (EU) and, with a population exceeding 47.4 million, the fourth-most populous EU member state. Spain's capital and largest city is Madrid; other major urban areas include Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, Málaga, Murcia, Palma de Mallorca, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Bilbao.

Isidro Lángara

Isidro Lángara

Isidro Lángara Galarraga was a Spanish football striker from the Basque Country. He played 12 times for Spain, scoring 17 goals. He has the highest goal ratio in La Liga at 1.14.

Portugal

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located on the Iberian Peninsula, in southwestern Europe, and whose territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira. It features the westernmost point in continental Europe, and its Iberian portion is bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain, the sole country to have a land border with Portugal. Its two archipelagos form two autonomous regions with their own regional governments. Lisbon is the capital and largest city by population.

Fernando Peyroteo

Fernando Peyroteo

Fernando Baptista de Seixas Peyroteo de Vasconcelos was a Portuguese footballer who played as a striker.

Telmo Zarra

Telmo Zarra

Pedro Telmo Zarraonandía Montoya, known as Telmo Zarra, was a Spanish football forward. He spent the majority of his career at Athletic Bilbao, from 1940 to 1955, for whom he remains the top scorer in competitive matches with 335 goals.

Source: "Portugal–Spain football rivalry", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portugal–Spain_football_rivalry.

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