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Piʻilani

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Piʻilani
Mōʻī of Maui
SpouseLaielohelohe
Mokuahualeiakea
Kunuʻunuiakapokiʻi
IssueLono-a-Piilani
Kiha-a-Piilani
Piʻikea, Chiefess of Maui and Hawaiʻi
FatherKawaokaohele
MotherKepalaoa
ReligionHawaiian religion
Coconut tree on Maui, island of Piʻilani
Coconut tree on Maui, island of Piʻilani

Piʻilani ("ascent to heaven"[1]) (born ca. 1577)[2] ruled as Mōʻī of the island of Maui in the later part of the 16th century. At the time Maui was an independent kingdom within the islands of Hawaii.

He was the first Aliʻi to unite the island under a single line.[3] His rule was peaceful for most of his reign. His father was Kawaokaohele[4] and his mother was Kepalaoa.[5] Pilʻilani and his offspring are important in legends of Maui, in the same way that Līloa and his son ʻUmi-a-Liloa in the legends of the island of Hawaii.[4] The two family lines of Piʻilani and Liloa were closely associated although from separate islands. ʻUmi was a supporter of Kiha-a-Piilani, Piʻilani's son, when he went to war. The lineage continued in west Hawaii and east Maui in lesser lines and in the lines of Moana Kane from Liloa and Piʻilaniwahine from Piʻilani in the couple's marriage and offspring.[6]

Piʻilani's father and grandfathers came from western Maui. Under Piʻilani for the first time this family controlled the eastern side as well.[7] Piʻilani began building a roadway to encircle the entire island, the first such road in the islands. It was wide enough for eight men to walk beside each other. It was completed by his son. Some sections of Piʻilani Highway follow the old path. In places, the old stones are still visible.[8] After Piʻilani's death the line of succession became a struggle similar to that of ʻUmi and Hakua of Hawaii.[7]

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Monarchy

Monarchy

A monarchy is a form of government in which a person, the monarch, is head of state for life or until abdication. The political legitimacy and authority of the monarch may vary from restricted and largely symbolic, to fully autocratic, and can expand across the domains of the executive, legislative, and judicial.

List of islands of Hawaii

List of islands of Hawaii

The following is a list of the islands in Hawaii. The state of Hawaii, consisting of the Hawaiian Islands, has the fourth-longest ocean coastline of the 50 states at 750 miles (1,210 km). It is the only state that consists entirely of islands, with 6,422.62 mi² (16,635 km²) of land. The Hawaiian Island archipelago extends some 1,500 miles (2,400 km) from the southernmost island of Hawaiʻi to the northernmost Kure Atoll. Despite being within the boundaries of Hawaii, Midway Atoll, comprising several smaller islands, is not included as an island of Hawaii, because it is classified as a United States Minor Outlying Islands and is therefore administered by the federal government and not the state.

Aliʻi

Aliʻi

The aliʻi were the traditional nobility of the Hawaiian islands. They were part of a hereditary line of rulers, the noho aliʻi.

Island

Island

An island is an isolated piece of habitat that is surrounded by a dramatically different habitat, such as water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. Sedimentary islands in the Ganges delta are called chars. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands, such as the Philippines, is referred to as an archipelago.

Kawaokaohele

Kawaokaohele

Kawaokaohele was a High Chief who ruled the island of Maui in ancient Hawaii.

Līloa

Līloa

Līloa was a ruler of the island of Hawaii in the late 15th century. He kept his royal compound in Waipi'o Valley.

Umi-a-Liloa

Umi-a-Liloa

ʻUmi-a-Līloa was a ruling ali'i-ai-moku who inherited religious authority of Hawai'i from his father, High Chief Liloa, whose line is traced, unbroken to Hawaiian "creation". His mother was Akahi. She was of a lesser line of chiefs who Liloa had fallen in love with when he discovered her bathing in a river. He became Chief after the death of his half-brother Hākau, who inherited the lands of his father to rule. Umi-a-Liloa was considered a just ruler, religious and the first to unite almost all of [Hawaii (island]. The legend of Umi is one of the most popular hero sagas in Hawaiian history. While there is probably embellishment to the story, as many sagas do, a portion of historical accuracy remains.

Hawaii (island)

Hawaii (island)

Hawaii is the largest island in the United States, located in the state of Hawaii. It is the southeasternmost of the Hawaiian Islands, a chain of volcanic islands in the North Pacific Ocean. With an area of 4,028 square miles (10,430 km2), it has 63% of the Hawaiian archipelago's combined landmass. However, it has only 13% of Hawaiʻi's population. The island of Hawaiʻi is the third largest island in Polynesia, behind the two main islands of New Zealand.

Kiha-a-Piilani

Kiha-a-Piilani

Kiha-a-Piilani was an Alii nui of Maui. He was born ca. 1626.

Piʻilaniwahine

Piʻilaniwahine

Piʻilaniwahine II was a Hawaiian High Chiefess. She is known to us today from the old chants.

Family tree

Kahekili I, King of Maui
Kawaokaohele
Hauanuihonialawahine, Chiefess of Kauai
Piʻilani, Mōʻī of Maui
Kepalaoa
Piʻikea, Chiefess of Maui and Hawaiʻi
Kumalae, Chief of Hilo
ʻUmi-a-Liloa, King of Hawaiʻi
Kaawa

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Kahekili I

Kahekili I

Kahekili I was a king of Maui. He was a noted warrior chief who nearly destroyed his country. He was styled Kahekilinui or "Kahekili the Great" even though his greatness was small in comparison to his descendant Kahekili II. His name was short for Kāne-Hekili after the Hawaiian god of thunder.

Kawaokaohele

Kawaokaohele

Kawaokaohele was a High Chief who ruled the island of Maui in ancient Hawaii.

Piʻikea

Piʻikea

Piʻikea was a High Chiefess. She was a daughter of Piʻilani and Queen La’ieloheloheikawai and sister of Lono-a-Piilani and Kiha-a-Piilani. Piʻilani built a great temple; according to the myth, Piʻilani was a son of Kū.

Kumalae

Kumalae

Kumalae was a Hawaiian High Chief, Aliʻi Nui (ruler) of Hilo. He is also known as Kumalae-nui-a-ʻUmi.

Umi-a-Liloa

Umi-a-Liloa

ʻUmi-a-Līloa was a ruling ali'i-ai-moku who inherited religious authority of Hawai'i from his father, High Chief Liloa, whose line is traced, unbroken to Hawaiian "creation". His mother was Akahi. She was of a lesser line of chiefs who Liloa had fallen in love with when he discovered her bathing in a river. He became Chief after the death of his half-brother Hākau, who inherited the lands of his father to rule. Umi-a-Liloa was considered a just ruler, religious and the first to unite almost all of [Hawaii (island]. The legend of Umi is one of the most popular hero sagas in Hawaiian history. While there is probably embellishment to the story, as many sagas do, a portion of historical accuracy remains.

Source: "Piʻilani", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piʻilani.

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References
  1. ^ Piʻilani
  2. ^ Piʻilani's family
  3. ^ Glenda Bendure; Ned Friary (2008). Lonely Planet Maui. Lonely Planet. pp. 242–. ISBN 978-1-74104-714-1.
  4. ^ a b Patrick Vinton Kirch (7 July 2012). A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai'i. University of California Press. pp. 206–. ISBN 978-0-520-95383-3.
  5. ^ P. Christiaan Klieger (1 January 1998). Moku'Ula: Maui's Sacred Island. Bishop Museum Press. ISBN 978-1-58178-002-4.
  6. ^ Kanalu G. Terry Young (25 February 2014). Rethinking the Native Hawaiian Past. Routledge. pp. 48–. ISBN 978-1-317-77669-7.
  7. ^ a b Patrick Vinton Kirch (2 November 2010). How Chiefs Became Kings: Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawai'i. University of California Press. pp. 101–. ISBN 978-0-520-94784-9.
  8. ^ Greg Ward (2001). Maui. Rough Guides. pp. 229–. ISBN 978-1-85828-852-9.

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