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Peter Cosgrove

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Peter Cosgrove
Peter Cosgrove 2017 (1).jpg
Cosgrove in 2017
26th Governor-General of Australia
In office
28 March 2014 – 1 July 2019
MonarchElizabeth II
Prime MinisterTony Abbott
Malcolm Turnbull
Scott Morrison
Preceded byDame Quentin Bryce
Succeeded byDavid Hurley
Personal details
Born
Peter John Cosgrove

(1947-07-28) 28 July 1947 (age 75)
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Spouse(s)Lynne, Lady Cosgrove
Children3
Alma materRoyal Military College, Duntroon
National Defence College, India
Military service
AllegianceAustralia
Branch/serviceAustralian Army
Years of service1965–2005
RankGeneral
CommandsChief of the Defence Force (2002–05)
Chief of Army (2000–02)
Land Command Australia (2000)
International Force East Timor (1999–00)
1st Division (1998–99)
6th Brigade (1992–93)
1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (1983–84)
Battles/warsVietnam War
International Force East Timor
AwardsKnight of the Order of Australia
Commander of the Royal Victorian Order
Military Cross
Complete list

General Sir Peter John Cosgrove, AK, CVO, MC (born 28 July 1947) is a retired senior Australian Army officer who served as the 26th governor-general of Australia, in office from 2014 to 2019.

A graduate of the Royal Military College, Duntroon, Cosgrove fought in the Vietnam War, receiving the Military Cross in 1971. From 1983 to 1984, he was commander of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, and he later served as commander of the 6th Brigade and the 1st Division. Cosgrove rose to prominence in 1999, when he served as commander of the International Force for East Timor (INTERFET), which oversaw the peacekeeping mission in East Timor during its transition to independence. He is also an alumnus of National Defence College, India.

Cosgrove was Australia's Chief of Army from 2000 to 2002 and Chief of the Defence Force from 2002 to 2005, receiving corresponding promotions to lieutenant general and general. Cosgrove retired from active service following the end of his term as Chief of the Defence Force, and subsequently served as leader of a taskforce helping to rebuild communities in Queensland after Cyclone Larry in 2006. In January 2014, Cosgrove was named to succeed Dame Quentin Bryce as Governor-General of Australia. He was sworn in on 28 March 2014 and made a Knight of the Order of Australia on the same date. Cosgrove retired on 1 July 2019 and was succeeded by General David Hurley.

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General (Australia)

General (Australia)

General is the second-highest rank, and the highest active rank, of the Australian Army and was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of general; it is also considered a four-star rank.

Military Cross

Military Cross

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

Australian Army

Australian Army

The Australian Army is the principal land warfare force of Australia, a part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. The Army is commanded by the Chief of Army (CA), who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) who commands the ADF. The CA is also directly responsible to the Minister for Defence, with the Department of Defence administering the ADF and the Army.

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment is a regular motorised infantry battalion of the Australian Army. 1 RAR was first formed as the 65th Australian Infantry Battalion of the 34th Brigade (Australia) on Balikpapan in 1945 and since then has been deployed on active service during the Korean War, the Malayan Emergency, the Vietnam War, Unified Task Force in Somalia, East Timor, Iraq War and Afghanistan. Additionally, the battalion has deployed on peacekeeping and other operations to a number of countries including Japan, Rifle Company Butterworth, Timor Leste, Solomon Islands, Tonga and the Philippines. 1 RAR remains one of the Australian Army's most heavily deployed units sending individuals and detachments to domestic, regional and other enduring operations. The battalion is currently based in Coral Lines at Lavarack Barracks, Townsville, Queensland, where it forms part of the 3rd Brigade.

6th Brigade (Australia)

6th Brigade (Australia)

The 6th Combat Support Brigade is an Australian Army brigade. First formed in 1912 as a Militia formation to provide training under the compulsory training scheme, the brigade was re-raised during the First World War as an infantry unit of the all volunteer Australian Imperial Force. It subsequently served at Gallipoli and in France and Belgium on the Western Front. In the 1920s, as part of a reorganisation of the Australian Army, it became part of the 3rd Military District of the Citizens Military Force, encompassing units from Victoria and South Australia. In 1991, it became part of the Ready Reserve Scheme, based at Enoggera Barracks, in Brisbane, Queensland, before being disbanded in 1996 when the scheme was discontinued. The brigade was re-raised on 1 March 2010 to oversee the Army's command support and intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance units.

1st Division (Australia)

1st Division (Australia)

The 1st Division is the main formation of the Australian Army and contains the majority of the Army's regular forces. Its headquarters is in Enoggera, a suburb of Brisbane. The division was first formed in 1914 for service during World War I as a part of the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). It was initially part of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) and served with that formation during the Gallipoli campaign, before later serving on the Western Front. After the war, the division became a part-time unit based in New South Wales, and during World War II it undertook defensive duties in Australia before being disbanded in 1945.

East Timor

East Timor

East Timor, also known as Timor-Leste, officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, is an island country in Southeast Asia. It comprises the eastern half of the island of Timor, the Oecusse exclave on the north-western half, and the minor islands of Atauro and Jaco. Australia is the country's southern neighbour, separated by the Timor Sea. The country's size is 14,874 square kilometres (5,743 sq mi). Dili is its capital city.

Chief of Army (Australia)

Chief of Army (Australia)

The Chief of Army is the most senior appointment in the Australian Army, responsible to both the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary, Department of Defence (SECDEF). The rank associated with the position is lieutenant general (3-star).

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) is the highest-ranking and most senior military officer in the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and is the principal military advisor to the National Security Committee and the Minister for Defence. The current Chief of the Defence Force is General Angus Campbell, who took office on 6 July 2018.

Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general is the second-highest active rank of the Australian Army. It was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of lieutenant general, and is considered a three-star rank.

Cyclone Larry

Cyclone Larry

Severe Tropical Cyclone Larry was a tropical cyclone that made landfall in Australia during the 2005–06 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season. Larry originated as a low pressure system over the eastern Coral Sea on 16 March 2006, and was monitored by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Brisbane, Australia. The low-pressure area organized into a tropical cyclone two days later and quickly strengthened into a Category 4 storm on the Australian tropical cyclone scale. Larry made landfall in Far North Queensland close to Innisfail, on 20 March 2006, as a Category 5 tropical cyclone on the Australian scale, with wind gusts reaching 240 kilometres per hour (150 mph), before dissipating over land several days later.

David Hurley

David Hurley

General David John Hurley, is an Australian former senior officer in the Australian Army who has served as the 27th governor-general of Australia since 1 July 2019. He was previously the 38th governor of New South Wales, serving from 2014 to 2019.

Early life and education

Cosgrove was born in Sydney, New South Wales, on 28 July 1947. He was educated at Waverley College in Sydney, then followed his father, a warrant officer, into the Australian Army by attending the Royal Military College, Duntroon in 1965. Cosgrove's uncle, Bill Cosgrove, was a professional Australian rules football player, but was killed in action while serving with the Royal Australian Air Force during World War II.[1] Cosgrove class of 1964 spent time in Waverley College's Cadet Unit, as a cadet he was Adjutant CUO P. Cosgrove and tied for the Major General JA Chapman Cane for the most efficient cadet in the Unit. Years later the cadet unit has named an award after Cosgrove, the General Cosgrove Shield (for the most efficient Speciality in the Cadet Unit) each year to honour the achievements of the most senior ranking officer to graduate.

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Sydney

Sydney

Sydney is the capital city of the state of New South Wales, and the most populous city in both Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Sydney Harbour and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, spread across 33 local government areas. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". The 2021 census recorded the population of Greater Sydney as 5,231,150, meaning the city is home to approximately 66% of the state's population. Nicknames of the city include the 'Emerald City' and the 'Harbour City'.

New South Wales

New South Wales

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Coral and Tasman Seas to the east. The Australian Capital Territory and Jervis Bay Territory are enclaves within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In December 2021, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.3 million, live in the Greater Sydney area.

Waverley College

Waverley College

Waverley College is a dual-campus independent Catholic early learning, primary and secondary day school for boys, located on Birrell and Henrietta Street in Waverley, in the eastern suburbs of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The school was founded by the Congregation of Christian Brothers in 1903 and is operated in the tradition of Blessed Edmund Rice through its membership of Edmund Rice Education Australia.

Warrant officer

Warrant officer

Warrant officer (WO) is a rank or category of ranks in the armed forces of many countries. Depending on the country, service, or historical context, warrant officers are sometimes classified as the most junior of the commissioned ranks, the most senior of the non-commissioned officer (NCO) ranks, or in a separate category of their own. Warrant officer ranks are especially prominent in the militaries of Commonwealth nations and the United States.

Australian Army

Australian Army

The Australian Army is the principal land warfare force of Australia, a part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. The Army is commanded by the Chief of Army (CA), who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) who commands the ADF. The CA is also directly responsible to the Minister for Defence, with the Department of Defence administering the ADF and the Army.

Royal Military College, Duntroon

Royal Military College, Duntroon

The Royal Military College, Duntroon, also known simply as Duntroon, is the Australian Army's officer training establishment. It was founded at Duntroon, in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, in 1911 and is at the foot of Mount Pleasant near Lake Burley Griffin, close to the Department of Defence headquarters at Russell Hill. It is comparable to the United Kingdom's Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the United States Military Academy at West Point. Duntroon is adjacent to the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), which is Australian Defence Force's tri-service military academy that provides military and tertiary academic education for junior officers of the Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal Australian Navy.

Bill Cosgrove

Bill Cosgrove

William Nicholas Pax Cosgrove was an Australian rules footballer who played with Richmond in the Victorian Football League (VFL). He served in the RAAF during World War II, and was killed in action in 1943 when his plane crashed.

Australian rules football

Australian rules football

Australian football, also called Australian rules football or Aussie rules, or more simply football or footy, is a contact sport played between two teams of 18 players on an oval field, often a modified cricket ground. Points are scored by kicking the oval ball between the central goal posts, or between a central and outer post.

Killed in action

Killed in action

Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own personnel at the hands of enemy or hostile forces. The United States Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA did not need to have fired their weapons, but only to have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs include those killed by friendly fire in the midst of combat, but not from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes, murder or other non-hostile events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events.

Royal Australian Air Force

Royal Australian Air Force

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the principal air and space force of Australia, a part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Australian Army. Constitutionally, the Governor-General of Australia, is the de jure Commander-in-Chief of the Australian Defence Force. The Royal Australian Air Force is commanded by the Chief of Air Force (CAF), who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF). The CAF is also directly responsible to the Minister for Defence, with the Department of Defence administering the ADF and the Air Force.

World War II

World War II

World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a world war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It involved the vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis powers. World War II was a total war that directly involved more than 100 million personnel from more than 30 countries.

Military service

Cosgrove at the Centenary of the Kangaroo March launch in 2013.
Cosgrove at the Centenary of the Kangaroo March launch in 2013.

Cosgrove was appointed a probationary second lieutenant in August 1968 while attached to a regular army unit,[2] and was commissioned a lieutenant on 11 December 1968.[3] He was allotted to the Royal Australian Infantry. He arrived in South Vietnam on 3 August 1969 and was posted to 9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment on 20 August 1969. On 10 October 1969, Lieutenant Cosgrove was commanding 5 Platoon, B Company. The platoon located an occupied bunker system in an area where, because of the proximity of allied troops, indirect fire support was difficult to obtain. In spite of this, he led his platoon in an assault on the bunkers without indirect fire support, capturing the system and killing and wounding at least four enemy without sustaining any casualties. On 16 October 1969, 5 Platoon located another bunker system occupied by about a platoon of enemy. Lieutenant Cosgrove silently deployed his own platoon for an attack. His assault completely surprised the enemy causing them to flee, abandoning large quantities of food, stores and documents. The following day in the same bunker system a party of enemy approached his right forward section and was engaged by the sentry. Knowing that the remainder of the section was elsewhere on other tasks, Lieutenant Cosgrove ran to the contact area and personally conducted the fight against the enemy. As a result of his actions, two enemy were killed and three weapons and four packs containing rice were captured. He was awarded the Military Cross for these actions.[4][5]

Cosgrove was promoted to the temporary rank of captain on 21 September 1970,[6] and was appointed an aide-de-camp to the then-Governor-General Paul Hasluck on 20 December 1971.[7] He was promoted to substantive captain on 31 October 1974 (seniority from 13 July),[8] to temporary major on 2 January 1976 and to substantive major on 11 December 1978.[9][10] In 1980 he was awarded the National Medal,[11] and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel on 7 December 1981.[12] In the mid-1980s he commanded the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.[13]

Cosgrove came to national fame in 1999 when, as a major general, he led the international forces (INTERFET) in a peacekeeping mission to East Timor. The mission's success made him one of Australia's most respected and popular military leaders.[14] He returned to Australia in 2000 as Land Commander Australia,[15] was promoted to lieutenant general in July and appointed Chief of the Army and, in 2002, was advanced to general as Chief of the Defence Force.[16]

In 2004, the Foreign Minister Alexander Downer queried the judgement of Federal Police Commissioner Mick Keelty.[17] Following a joint interview with the then Defence Minister Robert Hill, Cosgrove was accused of "playing politics" when he said that, on this occasion, he disagreed with Keelty's point of view. However, Cosgrove expressed strong support for the Police Commissioner in his Australian best selling autobiography, My Story, published in 2006.[18] On 3 July 2005, Cosgrove's three-year appointment as Chief of the Defence Force was completed, and he was succeeded by then-Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Angus Houston.

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9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

The 9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment was a Regular light infantry battalion of the Australian Army. The battalion was raised in November 1967 and deployed to South Vietnam as part of Australia's commitment to the Vietnam War in November 1968. 9 RAR served a year-long tour of duty based out of Nui Dat conducting operations mainly in Phuoc Tuy Province as part of the 1st Australian Task Force. The Battalion returned to Australia in November 1969 and was reformed at Enoggera, Queensland in January 1970 as part of the 6th Task Force, attached to the 1st Division. On 31 November 1973, following the withdrawal of Australian forces from South Vietnam and subsequent reduction of the Australian Army, the battalion was linked with the 8th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment to form the 8th/9th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.

Military Cross

Military Cross

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

Aide-de-camp

Aide-de-camp

An aide-de-camp is a personal assistant or secretary to a person of high rank, usually a senior military, police or government officer, or to a member of a royal family or a head of state.

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment

1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment is a regular motorised infantry battalion of the Australian Army. 1 RAR was first formed as the 65th Australian Infantry Battalion of the 34th Brigade (Australia) on Balikpapan in 1945 and since then has been deployed on active service during the Korean War, the Malayan Emergency, the Vietnam War, Unified Task Force in Somalia, East Timor, Iraq War and Afghanistan. Additionally, the battalion has deployed on peacekeeping and other operations to a number of countries including Japan, Rifle Company Butterworth, Timor Leste, Solomon Islands, Tonga and the Philippines. 1 RAR remains one of the Australian Army's most heavily deployed units sending individuals and detachments to domestic, regional and other enduring operations. The battalion is currently based in Coral Lines at Lavarack Barracks, Townsville, Queensland, where it forms part of the 3rd Brigade.

International Force East Timor

International Force East Timor

The International Force East Timor (INTERFET) was a multinational non-United Nations peacemaking task force, organised and led by Australia in accordance with United Nations resolutions to address the humanitarian and security crisis that took place in East Timor from 1999–2000 until the arrival of UN peacekeepers. INTERFET was commanded by an Australian military officer, Major General Peter Cosgrove.

East Timor

East Timor

East Timor, also known as Timor-Leste, officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, is an island country in Southeast Asia. It comprises the eastern half of the island of Timor, the Oecusse exclave on the north-western half, and the minor islands of Atauro and Jaco. Australia is the country's southern neighbour, separated by the Timor Sea. The country's size is 14,874 square kilometres (5,743 sq mi). Dili is its capital city.

Forces Command (Australia)

Forces Command (Australia)

Forces Command (FORCOMD) is the largest command within the Australian Army responsible for the combat brigades, the enabling and training formations reporting to the Chief of the Army with approximately 85% of the Army’s personnel. The Command was formed on 1 July 2009 with the amalgamation of Land Command and Training Command, and is led by a major general as the Commander Forces Command.

Chief of Army (Australia)

Chief of Army (Australia)

The Chief of Army is the most senior appointment in the Australian Army, responsible to both the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary, Department of Defence (SECDEF). The rank associated with the position is lieutenant general (3-star).

General (Australia)

General (Australia)

General is the second-highest rank, and the highest active rank, of the Australian Army and was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of general; it is also considered a four-star rank.

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) is the highest-ranking and most senior military officer in the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and is the principal military advisor to the National Security Committee and the Minister for Defence. The current Chief of the Defence Force is General Angus Campbell, who took office on 6 July 2018.

Alexander Downer

Alexander Downer

Alexander John Gosse Downer is an Australian former politician and diplomat who was leader of the Liberal Party from 1994 to 1995, Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1996 to 2007, and High Commissioner to the United Kingdom from 2014 to 2018.

Mick Keelty

Mick Keelty

Michael Joseph Keelty AO is a retired Australian Police Commissioner of the Australian Federal Police from 2001 to 2009. He was also the inaugural chairperson of the Australian Crime Commission, now known as the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission.

Post-military career

Cyclone Larry Taskforce

On 23 March 2006, Cosgrove was selected to lead the Queensland Government taskforce of rebuilding communities damaged by Cyclone Larry, a Category 5 tropical cyclone that devastated the Innisfail region of northern Queensland.[19] "In recognition of the important contribution General Cosgrove made to the community of North Queensland following Cyclone Larry", on 11 October 2008, Queensland Premier Anna Bligh announced that a new residential suburb in the Bohle Plains area of Townsville would be named Cosgrove, formerly the site of an Abattoir for the cattle sale yards next to it.[20][21][22]

Corporate leadership and community organisations

Cosgrove served on the board of Australia's main airline Qantas between July 2005[23] and January 2014[24] and is on numerous other boards as chairman or member. He served as Chancellor of the Australian Catholic University between November 2010[25] and January 2014;[26] and is Honorary Patron in Chief of the ACT Veterans Rugby Club[27] and the Rosies Youth Mission.[28] Peter Cosgrove was appointed as Patron to the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association in 2015.

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Queensland Government

Queensland Government

The Queensland Government is the democratic administrative authority of the Australian state of Queensland. The Government of Queensland, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy was formed in 1859 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, Queensland has been a State of Australia, with the Constitution of Australia regulating the relationships between all state and territory governments and the Australian Government. Under the Australian Constitution, all states and territories ceded powers relating to certain matters to the federal government.

Cyclone Larry

Cyclone Larry

Severe Tropical Cyclone Larry was a tropical cyclone that made landfall in Australia during the 2005–06 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season. Larry originated as a low pressure system over the eastern Coral Sea on 16 March 2006, and was monitored by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Brisbane, Australia. The low-pressure area organized into a tropical cyclone two days later and quickly strengthened into a Category 4 storm on the Australian tropical cyclone scale. Larry made landfall in Far North Queensland close to Innisfail, on 20 March 2006, as a Category 5 tropical cyclone on the Australian scale, with wind gusts reaching 240 kilometres per hour (150 mph), before dissipating over land several days later.

Innisfail, Queensland

Innisfail, Queensland

Innisfail is a regional town and locality in the Cassowary Coast Region, Queensland, Australia. The town was originally called Geraldton until 1910. In the 2016 census, the town of Innisfail had a population of 7,236 people, while the locality of Innisfail had a population of 1,145 people.

Queensland

Queensland

Queensland is a state situated in northeastern Australia, and is the second-largest and third-most populous of the Australian states. It is bordered by the Northern Territory, South Australia and New South Wales to the west, southwest and south respectively. To the east, Queensland is bordered by the Coral Sea and the Pacific Ocean; to its north is the Torres Strait, separating the Australian mainland from Papua New Guinea. With an area of 1,852,642 square kilometres (715,309 sq mi), Queensland is the world's sixth-largest sub-national entity; it is larger than all but 15 countries. Due to its size, Queensland's geographical features and climates are diverse, including tropical rainforests, rivers, coral reefs, mountain ranges and sandy beaches in its tropical and sub-tropical coastal regions, as well as deserts and savanna in the semi-arid and desert climatic regions of its interior.

Premier of Queensland

Premier of Queensland

The premier of Queensland is the head of government in the Australian state of Queensland.

Anna Bligh

Anna Bligh

Anna Maria Bligh is a lobbyist and former Australian politician who served as the 37th Premier of Queensland, in office from 2007 to 2012 as leader of the Labor Party. She was the first woman to hold either position. In 2017, she was appointed CEO of the Australian Banking Association.

Bohle River Aerodrome

Bohle River Aerodrome

Bohle River Aerodrome was an aerodrome located 12.66 km (7.87 mi) west of Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

Qantas

Qantas

Qantas Airways Limited is the flag carrier of Australia and the country's largest airline by fleet size, international flights, and international destinations. It is the world's third-oldest airline still in operation, having been founded in November 1920; it began international passenger flights in May 1935. Qantas is an acronym of the airline's original name, Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services, as it originally served Queensland and the Northern Territory, and is popularly nicknamed "The Flying Kangaroo". Qantas is a founding member of the Oneworld airline alliance.

Chancellor (education)

Chancellor (education)

A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus within a university system.

Australian Catholic University

Australian Catholic University

Australian Catholic University (ACU) is a public university in Australia. It has seven Australian campuses and also maintains a campus in Rome.

ACT Veterans Rugby Club

ACT Veterans Rugby Club

The ACT Vets are a rugby union team based in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), whose players must be 35 years of age or older. Portsea Oval, at the Royal Military College, Duntroon is the club's home ground.

Governor-General

Swearing in as Governor-General
Swearing in as Governor-General

On 28 January 2014, Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced that the Queen Elizabeth II had accepted his advice to appoint Peter Cosgrove as the next Governor-General of Australia, to succeed Quentin Bryce in late March.[29] On 25 March, Abbott announced that the Queen had also approved the reinstatement of the grade of Knight or Dame in the Order of Australia (she had abolished it in 1986 on the advice of Bob Hawke), and that governors-general would be ex officio the Principal Knight or Dame of the Order.[30] The incumbent, Quentin Bryce, was immediately made the first new Dame of the Order. On 28 March Cosgrove succeeded Dame Quentin and was sworn in as Governor-General by Chief Justice Robert French,[31] becoming Sir Peter Cosgrove.[32] Former headmaster of Waverley College, Ray Paxton states “In choosing Sir Peter Cosgrove for Governor General, Australia has honoured a remarkable man”.

Prince George with his parents and Sir Peter Cosgrove at Admiralty House, Sydney, April 2014
Prince George with his parents and Sir Peter Cosgrove at Admiralty House, Sydney, April 2014

On 16 December 2018 Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that The Queen had approved the appointment of retired General David Hurley, the current Governor of New South Wales as the next Governor-General of Australia commencing in July 2019, and that Cosgrove's term would be extended until that time to ensure smooth transitions following the New South Wales election in March and federal election expected in May 2019.[33]

On 12 August 2019, during a post appointment call upon the Queen, Her Majesty appointed Cosgrove a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order.[34]

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Elizabeth II

Elizabeth II

Elizabeth II was Queen of the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms from 6 February 1952 until her death in 2022. She was queen regnant of 32 sovereign states during her lifetime, and was head of state of 15 realms at the time of her death. Her reign of 70 years and 214 days was the longest of any British monarch and the longest verified reign of any female monarch in history.

Governor-General of Australia

Governor-General of Australia

The governor-general of Australia is the representative of the monarch, currently King Charles III, in Australia. The governor-general is appointed by the monarch on the recommendation of government ministers. The governor-general has formal presidency over the Federal Executive Council and is commander-in-chief of the Australian Defence Force. The functions of the governor-general include appointing ministers, judges, and ambassadors; giving royal assent to legislation passed by parliament; issuing writs for election; and bestowing Australian honours.

Quentin Bryce

Quentin Bryce

Dame Quentin Alice Louise Bryce, is an Australian academic who served as the 25th governor-general of Australia from 2008 to 2014. She is the first woman to have held the position, and was previously the 24th Governor of Queensland from 2003 to 2008.

Order of Australia

Order of Australia

The Order of Australia is an honour that recognises Australian citizens and other persons for outstanding achievement and service. It was established on 14 February 1975 by Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, on the advice of the Australian Government. Before the establishment of the order, Australian citizens received British honours.

Bob Hawke

Bob Hawke

Robert James Lee Hawke was an Australian politician who served as the 23rd prime minister of Australia from 1983 to 1991, holding office as the leader of the Australian Labor Party (ALP).

Robert French

Robert French

Robert Shenton French is an Australian lawyer and judge who served as the twelfth Chief Justice of Australia, in office from 2008 to 2017. He has been the chancellor of the University of Western Australia since 2017.

Prince George of Wales

Prince George of Wales

Prince George of Wales is a member of the British royal family. He is the eldest child of William, Prince of Wales, and Catherine, Princess of Wales. George is the eldest grandchild of King Charles III and second in line of succession to the British throne behind his father.

Admiralty House, Sydney

Admiralty House, Sydney

Admiralty House is the Sydney official residence of the governor-general of Australia. It is located in the suburb of Kirribilli, on the northern foreshore of Sydney Harbour. This large Victorian Regency and Italianate sandstone manor, completed in stages based on designs by James Barnet and Walter Liberty Vernon, occupies the tip of Kirribilli Point. Once known as "Wotonga", it has commanding views across Sydney Harbour to the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Sydney Opera House.

David Hurley

David Hurley

General David John Hurley, is an Australian former senior officer in the Australian Army who has served as the 27th governor-general of Australia since 1 July 2019. He was previously the 38th governor of New South Wales, serving from 2014 to 2019.

Governor of New South Wales

Governor of New South Wales

The governor of New South Wales is the viceregal representative of the Australian monarch, King Charles III, in the state of New South Wales. In an analogous way to the governor-general of Australia at the national level, the governors of the Australian states perform constitutional and ceremonial functions at the state level. The governor is appointed by the king on the advice of the premier of New South Wales, and serves in office for an unfixed period of time—known as serving At His Majesty's pleasure—though five years is the general standard of office term. The current governor is retired jurist Margaret Beazley, who succeeded David Hurley on 2 May 2019.

2019 New South Wales state election

2019 New South Wales state election

The 2019 New South Wales state election was held on Saturday 23 March 2019 to elect the 57th Parliament of New South Wales, including all 93 seats in the Legislative Assembly and 21 of the 42 seats in the Legislative Council. The election was conducted by the New South Wales Electoral Commission (NSWEC).

2019 Australian federal election

2019 Australian federal election

The 2019 Australian federal election was held on Saturday 18 May 2019 to elect members of the 46th Parliament of Australia. The election had been called following the dissolution of the 45th Parliament as elected at the 2016 double dissolution federal election. All 151 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 of the 76 seats in the Senate were up for election.

Personal life

Cosgrove married Lynne Payne in 1976;[35] they have three sons[36] and four grandchildren, and lived in Sydney before taking up residence in Government House, Canberra. Cosgrove is a Roman Catholic and frequently attends Mass in the St Christopher's Cathedral parish in Canberra.

Cosgrove is a strong supporter and member of the Sydney Roosters. He is also a keen follower of cricket and rugby union.

His memoir You shouldn't have joined... was published by Allen & Unwin in 2020.[37]

Lady Cosgrove in 2017
Lady Cosgrove in 2017

Discover more about Personal life related topics

Government House, Canberra

Government House, Canberra

Government House, in the suburb of Yarralumla, is the official residence of the governor-general of Australia. It is located in the suburb of Yarralumla, in the City of Canberra, in the Australian Capital Territory. The house is set amid 54 hectares of parkland. The house and associated grounds were added to the Commonwealth Heritage List on 22 June 2004.

Sydney Roosters

Sydney Roosters

The Sydney Roosters are an Australian professional Rugby League Football Club based in the Eastern Suburbs (Sydney) and parts of inner Sydney. The club competes in the National Rugby League (NRL) competition. The Roosters have won fifteen New South Wales Rugby League (NSWRL) and National Rugby League titles, and several other competitions. First founded as the Eastern Suburbs District Rugby League Football Club (ESDRLFC), it is the only club to have played in each and every season at the elite level, and since the 1970s has often been dubbed the glamour club of the league. The Sydney Roosters have won 15 premierships, equal to the record of the St George Dragons. Only the South Sydney Rabbitohs have won more premierships. The club holds the record for having won more matches than any other in the league, the most Minor Premierships and the most World Club Challenge trophies. The Sydney Roosters are one of only two clubs to finish runners-up in their inaugural season. Currently coached by Trent Robinson and captained by James Tedesco, the Roosters play home games at the Sydney Football Stadium.

Cricket

Cricket

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 22-yard (20-metre) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at one of the wickets with the bat and then running between the wickets, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each batter. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side either catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground, or hitting a wicket with the ball before a batter can cross the crease in front of the wicket. When ten batters have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Rugby union

Rugby union

Rugby union, commonly known simply as rugby, is a close-contact team sport that originated at Rugby School in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is played between two teams of 15 players each, using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field called a pitch. The field has H-shaped goalposts at both ends.

Honours and awards

OrderAustraliaRibbon.png Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png
UK Royal Victorian Order ribbon.svg Military Cross ribbon.png Order of St John (UK) ribbon -vector.svg Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 ribbon.png
Vietnam Medal BAR.svg Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png INTERFET Medal ribbon.png Australian Service Medal 1945-1975 ribbon.png
AUS Centenary Medal ribbon.svg DFSM with Fed Star.png National Medal (Australia) ribbon.jpg Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon, with 60- clasp.svg New Zealand Order of Merit ribbon.svg US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Tong-il Medal (South Korea) ribbon.png
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg PRT Order of Prince Henry - Grand Cross BAR.svg Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon.png Order of Timor-Leste.png
GC.OrdineS.GregorioMagno.png Order of the Crown of Tonga - ribbon bar.gif ARG Order of the Liberator San Martin - Grand Cross BAR.png PRT Order of Liberty - Grand Cross BAR.png

OrderAustraliaRibbon.png Knight of the Order of Australia (AK) 28 March 2014 [38][39]
Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) 25 March 2000
(Military division)
For eminent service to the Australian Defence Force as the Commander of the International Force East Timor[14]
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) 26 January 1985
(Military division)
In recognition of service as Commanding Officer 1st Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment[13]
UK Royal Victorian Order ribbon.svg Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (CVO) 12 August 2019 [34]
Military Cross ribbon.png Military Cross (MC) 12 February 1971 Infantry – 9 RAR – Vietnam[40][41]
Order of St John (UK) ribbon -vector.svg Knight of the Order of St John 28 March 2014 [38][42]
Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975 with Vietnam clasp
Vietnam Medal BAR.svg Vietnam Medal [43]
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal with East Timor clasp[43]
INTERFET Medal ribbon.png International Force East Timor Medal (INTERFET)[43]
Australian Service Medal 1945-1975 ribbon.png Australian Service Medal 1945–1975 [43]
AUS Centenary Medal ribbon.svg Centenary Medal 1 January 2001 For service to Australian society as Chief of the Defence Force[16]
DFSM with Fed Star.png Defence Force Service Medal with Federation Star 40–44 years service[43]
National Medal (Australia) ribbon.jpg National Medal 16 October 1980 For diligent long service to the community in hazardous circumstances, including in times of emergency and national disaster, in direct protection of life and property[43]
Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png Australian Defence Medal [43]
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon, with 60- clasp.svg Vietnam Campaign Medal Republic of Vietnam[43]
New Zealand Order of Merit ribbon.svg Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit 5 June 2000 New Zealand[44]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Commander of the Legion of Merit United States[43]
Tong-il Medal (South Korea) ribbon.png Tong-il Medal of the Order of National Security Merit South Korea[43]
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg Officer of the Legion of Honour France[43]
PRT Order of Prince Henry - Grand Cross BAR.svg Grand Cross of the Order of Prince Henry 28 May 2002 Portugal[45]
Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon.png Distinguished Service Order 7 September 2004 Singapore[46]
Order of Timor-Leste.png Collar of the Order of Timor-Leste 30 August 2009 Timor-Leste[47]
GC.OrdineS.GregorioMagno.png Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St. Gregory the Great 7 February 2013 Holy See[48]
Order of the Crown of Tonga - ribbon bar.gif Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown of Tonga 3 July 2015 Tonga[49]
ARG Order of the Liberator San Martin - Grand Cross BAR.png Collar of the Order of the Liberator General San Martín 9 August 2016 Argentina[50]
PRT Order of Liberty - Grand Cross BAR.svg Grand Cross of the Order of Liberty 6 July 2018 Portugal[51]
Infantry Combat Badge
Other awards
Australian of the Year 26 January 2001 He accepted his Australian of the Year award on behalf of all those Australians who served in East Timor: "I did a lot of the talking, they did all the working."[52]

Honorary appointments

Honorary degrees

Victoria:

Named in his honour

Discover more about Honours and awards related topics

Military Cross

Military Cross

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975

Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975

The Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975 recognises the service of Australian Defence Force and certain other persons in prescribed warlike operations in the period after World War II, and prior to February 1975. The medal was established in December 1997. The Australian Active Service Medal recognises warlike service after February 1975 until 2012 when the Australian Operational Service Medal was instituted.

Australian Active Service Medal

Australian Active Service Medal

The Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) is an Australian military decoration. It was authorised on 13 September 1988 to recognise prescribed service in "warlike" operations, backdated to February 1975. It is awarded with a clasp to denote the prescribed operation and subsequent awards of the medal are made in the form of additional clasps. In 2012, it was announced that the medal would no longer be issued for future operations, with the AASM and the Australian Service Medal being replaced by the Australian Operational Service Medal.

International Force East Timor Medal

International Force East Timor Medal

The International Force East Timor (INTERFET) Medal recognises members of the Australian Defence Force who served for 30 days in East Timor during the INTERFET campaign. The qualifying area comprises East Timor and the sea adjacent to East Timor out to a distance of 12 nautical miles (22 km) from the low water mark.

Australian Service Medal 1945–1975

Australian Service Medal 1945–1975

The Australian Service Medal 1945–1975 recognises service in peacekeeping or non-warlike operations in the 30-year period following World War II, and prior to February 1975. The medal was established on 22 February 1995. The Australian Service Medal recognises non-warlike service after February 1975.

Centenary Medal

Centenary Medal

The Centenary Medal is an award which was created by the Australian Government in 2001. It was established to commemorate the centenary of the Federation of Australia and to recognise "people who made a contribution to Australian society or government". It was also awarded to centenarians, Australian citizens born on or before 31 December 1901 who lived to celebrate the centenary of federation on 1 January 2001. Nominations were assessed by a panel chaired by historian Geoffrey Blainey.

Defence Force Service Medal

Defence Force Service Medal

The Defence Force Service Medal (DFSM) is an Australian Military award given for long service by permanent members of the Australian Defence Force. It is part of the suite of defence force service awards introduced in 1982, which also included the Reserve Force Decoration and the Reserve Force Medal.

National Medal (Australia)

National Medal (Australia)

The National Medal is an Australian award given for long service by operational members of specified eligible organisations. It was introduced in 1975, as an original component of the new Australian honours system, and replaced a range of medals available to military and civilian uniformed services for long service and good conduct. The eligible groups have in common that their members serve or protect the community at the risk of death, injury or trauma, hence it is only available to members of the eligible organisations who are operationally deployed. In the case of corrective services, eligibility is restricted to officers with custodial duties.

Australian Defence Medal

Australian Defence Medal

The Australian Defence Medal is an Australian military decoration which recognises current and former Australian Defence Force personnel who completed an initial enlistment period, or four years' service. It was established on 20 March 2006; however, it recognises qualifying efficient service of current and former Australian Defence Force Regular and Reserve personnel, including National Servicemen, who have served since 3 September 1945. It is estimated that up to one million current and ex-serving personnel are eligible for the award. At 30 June 2010, a total of 242,576 had been awarded.

South Vietnam

South Vietnam

South Vietnam, officially the Republic of Vietnam, was a country in Southeast Asia that existed from 1955 to 1975, the period when the southern portion of Vietnam was a member of the Western Bloc during part of the Cold War after the 1954 division of Vietnam. It first received international recognition in 1949 as the State of Vietnam within the French Union, with its capital at Saigon, before becoming a republic in 1955. South Vietnam was bordered by North Vietnam to the north, Laos to the northwest, Cambodia to the southwest, and Thailand across the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest. Its sovereignty was recognized by the United States and 87 other nations, though it failed to gain admission into the United Nations as a result of a Soviet veto in 1957. It was succeeded by the Republic of South Vietnam in 1975.

2000 Birthday Honours (New Zealand)

2000 Birthday Honours (New Zealand)

The 2000 Queen's Birthday Honours in New Zealand, celebrating the official birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, were appointments made by the Queen in her right as Queen of New Zealand, on the advice of the New Zealand government, to various orders and honours to reward and highlight good works by New Zealanders. They also incorporated gallantry awards, and a special honours list recognising military operational and other service in East Timor. They were announced on 5 June 2000.

Legion of Merit

Legion of Merit

The Legion of Merit (LOM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued to members of the eight uniformed services of the United States as well as to military and political figures of foreign governments.

Source: "Peter Cosgrove", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Cosgrove.

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See also
References
  1. ^ Governor-general Sir Peter Cosgrove’s mischievous ‘uncle Bill’ a beloved World War II hero
  2. ^ "Royal Military College - Corps of Staff Cadets". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. No. 72. 29 August 1968. p. 4853. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. No. 19. 27 February 1969. p. 1253. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  4. ^ "Text of Citation for award of Military Cross to Lieutenant Peter J. Cosgrove" (PDF). 9rar.org.au. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 February 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  5. ^ "No. 45302". The London Gazette. 12 February 1971. p. 1343.
  6. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. No. 97. 5 November 1970. p. 7385. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  7. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Commonwealth of Australia Gazette. No. 3. 20 January 1972. p. 13. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  8. ^ "Australian Military Forces". Australian Government Gazette, General. No. G2. 14 January 1975. p. 39. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  9. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Australian Government Gazette, General (National). No. G45. 18 November 1975. p. 20. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  10. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Australian Government Gazette, General (National). No. G9. 6 March 1979. p. 26. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  11. ^ "Search: COSGROVE, Peter John: National Medal". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. 16 October 1980. Archived from the original on 20 August 2017. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  12. ^ "Australian Regular Army". Australian Government Gazette, General (National). No. G3. 19 January 1982. p. 30. Retrieved 21 June 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Search: COSGROVE, Peter John: Member of the Order of Australia". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. 26 January 1985. Archived from the original on 26 May 2011. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  14. ^ a b "Search: Cosgrove, Peter John: Companion of the Order of Australia". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. 25 March 2000. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  15. ^ Barker, Geoffrey (2 May 2000). "General Cosgrove to be New Army Chief". Financial Review. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  16. ^ a b "Search: COSGROVE, Peter John: Centenary Medal". It's an Honour. Commonwealth of Australia. 1 January 2001. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016.
  17. ^ Grattan, Michelle; Forbes, Mark (18 March 2004). "Honest copper emerges victor". The Age. During a "doorstop" interview, Downer said Mr Keelty was "expressing a view which reflects a lot of the propaganda we're getting from al-Qaeda"
  18. ^ Cosgrove, Peter John (2006). My Story. Australia: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-7322-8384-1.
  19. ^ Beattie, Peter (23 March 2006). "General Cosgrove to lead Cyclone Larry taskforce" (Press release). Premier of Queensland. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  20. ^ "Townsville suburb named in honour of General Cosgrove". ABC News. Australia. 11 October 2008. Retrieved 11 October 2008.
  21. ^ Ryan, Lendl (11 October 2008). "Townsville "Cosgrove" storm". Townsville Bulletin. News Limited. Retrieved 11 October 2008.
  22. ^ "Townsville suburb named after Cosgrove". The Sydney Morning Herald. AAP. 11 October 2008. Retrieved 11 October 2008.
  23. ^ "Board of Directors". Annual Report. Qantas Limited. 2013. p. 51. Archived from the original on 27 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014.
  24. ^ "Resignation of General Peter Cosgrove" (Press release). Qantas Limited. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014.
  25. ^ "General Peter Cosgrove appointed Chancellor of ACU". Australian Catholic University. 25 May 2010. Archived from the original on 27 November 2012. Retrieved 12 July 2013.
  26. ^ "General Peter Cosgrove Australia's Next Governor-General". Catholic Communications. Archdiocese of Sydney. 28 January 2014. Archived from the original on 4 October 2017. Retrieved 2 February 2014.
  27. ^ "ACT Veterans Rugby". Archived from the original on 23 June 2014.
  28. ^ Rosies Youth Mission. Inc. "Organisational Structure". Retrieved 21 May 2014.
  29. ^ Governor-General-designate to be sworn in Archived 27 February 2014 at the Wayback Machine – Office of the Prime Minister of Australia, 24 February 2014.
  30. ^ "'Pre-eminent' Australians could be made Knight or Dame under a new award, PM Tony Abbott says". ABC News. 25 March 2014.
  31. ^ "Former Defence Force Chief General Peter Cosgrove sworn in as Australia's 26th Governor General". news.com.au. 28 March 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2015.
  32. ^ "Peter Cosgrove announced as next Governor-General". News.com.au. AAP. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014.
  33. ^ Crowe, David (16 December 2018). "Scott Morrison picks former general David Hurley to be Australia's next governor-general". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  34. ^ a b "Court Circular: Balmoral Castle". The Times. 13 August 2019. Retrieved 18 August 2019.
  35. ^ "Biographies of Peter and Lynne Cosgrove". Governor-General of Australia. Australian Government. Archived from the original on 29 March 2014. Retrieved 30 March 2014.
  36. ^ "General Peter John Cosgrove, AC, MC". People profiles. Australian War Memorial. Retrieved 28 January 2014.
  37. ^ Cosgrove, Peter (Peter J.) (27 October 2020). You shouldn't have joined... : a memoir. Sydney, N.S.W. ISBN 978-1-76087-852-8. OCLC 1200259235.
  38. ^ a b c Automatic upon taking office as Governor-General
  39. ^ "General Peter Cosgrove to be sworn in as governor-general at ceremony in Canberra". ABC News. Australia. 28 March 2014. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  40. ^ "No. 45302". The London Gazette. 12 February 1971. p. 1343.
  41. ^ "Search: COSGROVE, Peter John: Military Cross". It's an Honour. 12 February 1971. Archived from the original on 26 May 2011.
  42. ^ "Order of St John". London Gazette. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 24 May 2014.
  43. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Thomsen, Simon. "EXECUTIVE LIFE Here Are The Honours Our New Governor-General, His Excellency Sir Peter Cosgrove, AC MC, Already Has". Business Insider Australia. Retrieved 12 April 2014.
  44. ^ "Queen's Birthday honours list 2000 (including special list for East Timor)". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 5 June 2000. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  45. ^ Annual Portuguese Honorary Orders, Foreign citizens 1910–2006, 2006, retrieved 19 April 2008, p111. (in Portuguese) Archived 14 March 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  46. ^ MINDEF Singapore, President Nathan Confers Top Military Award on Chief of the Australian Defence Force, 7 September 2004. Retrieved 19 April 2008.
  47. ^ Retired General Peter Cosgrove is presented with the collar of the Order of East Timor by East Timor President, His Excellency, Dr Jose Ramos Horta at the 10th Anniversary of Popular Consultation Awards Ceremony held at the New Presidential Palace in Dili Archived 13 February 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Defence image gallery – Order of East Timor medal presentations, 4 September 2009
  48. ^ "Cardinal Confers Papal Awards on Three Outstanding Australians". Catholic Communications. Archdiocese of Sydney. 7 February 2013. Archived from the original on 16 May 2017. Retrieved 2 February 2014.
  49. ^ ADC, RAAF (5 July 2015). "Visit to Tonga". www.gg.gov.au. Archived from the original on 28 June 2019. Retrieved 19 April 2018.
  50. ^ "Buenos Aires, Argentina". Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia. Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia. 9 August 2016. Archived from the original on 27 May 2019. Retrieved 21 September 2016.
  51. ^ "Facebook post". Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia. Governor General of the Commonwealth of Australia. 6 July 2018. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  52. ^ "General Peter Cosgrove AC MC". Australian of the Year 2001. National Australia Day Committee. Retrieved 9 February 2022.
  53. ^ "Understanding the Most Venerable Order of St John" (PDF). St John South Australia. St John South Australia. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  54. ^ Groves, Sam (25 May 2016). "Address to the Graduates of the Faculty of Engineering". gg.gov.au. Archived from the original on 21 December 2016. Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  55. ^ "Cosgrove – suburb in Townsville City (entry 44586)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 24 July 2017.
External links
Military offices
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Chief of the Defence Force
2002–2005
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Chief of Army
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Land Commander Australia
2000
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Commander 1st Division
1998–1999
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Preceded by
Lieutenant Colonel Barry Caligari
Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment
1983–1984
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Awards
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2001
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Academic offices
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Chancellor of the Australian Catholic University
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Non-profit organization positions
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