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Pennsylvania Route 33

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Pennsylvania Route 33 marker

Pennsylvania Route 33

PA 33 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by PennDOT
Length27.738 mi[1] (44.640 km)
Existed1972[2]–present
Major junctions
South end I-78 in Lower Saucon Township
Major intersections
North end PA 611 in Stroud Township
Location
CountryUnited States
StatePennsylvania
CountiesNorthampton, Monroe
Highway system
PA 32 PA 34

Pennsylvania Route 33 (PA 33) is a 27.7-mile-long (44.6 km) limited-access state highway in eastern Pennsylvania. The highway runs from its interchange with Interstate 78 (I-78) south of Easton in the Lehigh Valley to I-80 and PA 611 west of Stroudsburg.

Until 2002, the route's southern terminus was at U.S. Route 22 (US 22), and the extension south of the US 22 interchange is known as the Gen. Anthony Clement McAuliffe Memorial Highway (named in honor of American World War II general Anthony McAuliffe). The route is commonly used as a hazmat bypass for the Pennsylvania Turnpike's Northeast Extension due to the restrictions in place on the Lehigh Tunnel. PA 33 provides a freeway connection between the Lehigh Valley and Pocono Mountains regions of Pennsylvania.

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State highway

State highway

A state highway, state road, or state route is usually a road that is either numbered or maintained by a sub-national state or province. A road numbered by a state or province falls below numbered national highways in the hierarchy. Roads maintained by a state or province include both nationally numbered highways and un-numbered state highways. Depending on the state, "state highway" may be used for one meaning and "state road" or "state route" for the other.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, Appalachian, and Great Lakes regions of the United States. It borders Delaware to its southeast, Maryland to its south, West Virginia to its southwest, Ohio to its west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to its northwest, New York state to its north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to its east.

Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 (I-78) is an east–west Interstate Highway stretching from Union Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, in the west to the Holland Tunnel and New York City in the east. In Pennsylvania, I-78 runs for about 78 miles (126 km) from the western terminus at I-81 in Union Township east to the New Jersey state line near Easton in Northampton County.

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton is a city in, and the county seat of, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The city's population was 28,127 as of the 2020 census. Easton is located at the confluence of the Lehigh River, a 109-mile-long (175 km) river that joins the Delaware River in Easton and serves as the city's eastern geographic boundary with Phillipsburg, New Jersey.

Lehigh Valley

Lehigh Valley

The Lehigh Valley, known colloquially as The Valley, is a geographic region formed by the Lehigh River in Lehigh County and Northampton County in eastern Pennsylvania. It is a component valley of the Great Appalachian Valley bound to the north by Blue Mountain, to the south by South Mountain, to the west by Lebanon Valley, and to the east by the Delaware River on Pennsylvania's eastern border with Warren County, New Jersey. The Valley is about 40 miles (64 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) wide. The Lehigh Valley's largest city is Allentown, the third largest city in Pennsylvania and the county seat of Lehigh County, with a population of 125,845 residents as of the 2020 census.

Interstate 80 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 80 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 80 (I-80) in the US state of Pennsylvania runs for 311.12 miles (500.70 km) across the northern part of the state. It is designated as the Keystone Shortway and officially as the Z.H. Confair Memorial Highway. This route was built mainly along a completely new alignment, not paralleling any earlier US Routes, as a shortcut to the tolled Pennsylvania Turnpike to the south and New York State Thruway to the north. It does not serve any major cities in Pennsylvania and is mainly as a cross-state route on the Ohio–New York City corridor. Most of I-80's path across the state goes through hilly and mountainous terrain, while the route passes through relatively flat areas toward the western part of the state.

Pennsylvania Route 611

Pennsylvania Route 611

Pennsylvania Route 611 is a state highway in eastern Pennsylvania running 109.7 mi (176.5 km) from Interstate 95 (I-95) in the southern part of the city of Philadelphia north to I-380 in Coolbaugh Township in the Pocono Mountains. In Philadelphia, PA 611 follows Broad Street, the main north-south street in Philadelphia, through most of the city. The route continues north through the northern suburbs of Philadelphia and serves Jenkintown, Willow Grove, and Doylestown, the latter of which it bypasses on a freeway. North of Doylestown, PA 611 heads through rural areas and runs along the west bank of the Delaware River to the city of Easton in the Lehigh Valley. The route continues back into rural land and passes through the Delaware Water Gap, at which point it enters the Pocono Mountains region. Here, PA 611 heads northwest through Stroudsburg and Mount Pocono toward its northern terminus.

Anthony McAuliffe

Anthony McAuliffe

Anthony Clement "Nuts" McAuliffe was a senior United States Army officer who earned fame as the acting commander of the 101st Airborne Division defending Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II. He is celebrated for his one-word reply to a German surrender ultimatum: "Nuts!"

Pennsylvania Turnpike

Pennsylvania Turnpike

The Pennsylvania Turnpike is a toll highway operated by the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. A controlled-access highway, it runs for 360 miles (580 km) across the state. The turnpike's western terminus is at the Ohio state line in Lawrence County, where the road continues west as the Ohio Turnpike. The eastern terminus is at the New Jersey state line at the Delaware River–Turnpike Toll Bridge over the Delaware River in Bucks County, where the road continues east as the Pearl Harbor Memorial Extension of the New Jersey Turnpike.

Interstate 476

Interstate 476

Interstate 476 (I-476) is a 132.1-mile (212.6 km) auxiliary Interstate Highway of I-76 in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The highway runs from I-95 near Chester north to I-81 near Scranton, serving as the primary north–south Interstate corridor through eastern Pennsylvania. It consists of both the 20-mile (32 km) Mid-County Expressway, locally referred to as the "Blue Route", through Delaware and Montgomery counties in the suburban Philadelphia area, and the tolled, 110.6-mile (178.0 km) Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, which connects the Delaware Valley with the Lehigh Valley, the Pocono Mountains, and the Wyoming Valley to the north.

Lehigh Tunnel

Lehigh Tunnel

The Lehigh Tunnel is a pair of road tunnels that carries the Pennsylvania Turnpike Northeast Extension under Blue Mountain north from U.S. Route 22 in the Lehigh Valley to the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area between mileposts 70.7 to 71.5.

Pocono Mountains

Pocono Mountains

The Pocono Mountains, commonly referred to as the Poconos, are a geographical, geological, and cultural region in Northeastern Pennsylvania. They overlook the Delaware River and Delaware Water Gap to the east, Lake Wallenpaupack to the north, Wyoming Valley and the Coal Region to the west, and the Lehigh Valley to the south. The name Pocono is derived from the Munsee word Pokawachne, which means "Creek Between Two Hills".

Route description

PA 33 northbound past the PA 191 interchange in Stockertown
PA 33 northbound past the PA 191 interchange in Stockertown

PA 33 begins at a trumpet interchange with I-78 in Lower Saucon Township in Northampton County, which is in the Lehigh Valley. From this interchange, the route heads northwest as a four-lane freeway onto the Gene Hartzell Memorial Bridge, passing over Norfolk Southern's Lehigh Line and the Lehigh River, where the highway briefly cuts through the southwestern tip of the city of Easton before crossing the Lehigh Canal into Bethlehem Township. Past the bridge, the freeway passes farm fields before it comes to a partial cloverleaf interchange with Freemansburg Avenue in a business area adjacent to St. Luke's Hospital–Anderson Campus. Following this, PA 33 curves north near commercial development and reaches a diamond interchange with William Penn Highway, with a park and ride lot located at the northwest quadrant of this interchange. The route heads near a mix of residential development and farmland, curving northeast before turning north and coming to a cloverleaf interchange with the US 22 freeway. After the US 22 interchange, the freeway crosses into Lower Nazareth Township and reaches a partial cloverleaf interchange with Hecktown Road. PA 33 continues north past farm fields and curves northeast as it comes to a partial cloverleaf interchange with PA 248 in a business area.[3][4]

PA 33 northbound in Plainfield Township
PA 33 northbound in Plainfield Township

Past this interchange, the route enters Palmer Township and runs through a mix of farm fields and industrial development, coming to a diamond interchange with Main Street that serves the borough of Tatamy to the east. The freeway curves north and crosses Bushkill Creek into the borough of Stockertown, where it passes over Norfolk Southern's Cement Secondary line and a railroad spur and turns northwest to reach a diamond interchange with PA 191. PA 33 continues past industrial areas and leaves Stockertown for Plainfield Township, passing over a Norfolk Southern railroad spur. The route heads into wooded areas and crosses into Bushkill Township, where it reaches a diamond interchange with Henry Road that serves the community of Belfast to the east. A park and ride lot is located within the southeast quadrant of this interchange. Past this interchange, the freeway heads east of the Jacobsburg Environmental Education Center as it continues through woodland with some farm fields and residential development. PA 33 turns north and crosses back into Plainfield Township, where it comes to a partial cloverleaf interchange with PA 512 in an area of businesses that serves the borough of Wind Gap. Past this interchange, the freeway passes through a corner of Wind Gap before it continues back into Plainfield Township and heads into forested areas, heading through a gap in the Blue Mountain ridge. The route turns northeast and comes to a southbound exit and northbound entrance with Broadway that provides access Wind Gap. At this interchange, the freeway passes over the Appalachian Trail.[3][4]

PA 33 northbound past Cherry Valley Road in Hamilton Township
PA 33 northbound past Cherry Valley Road in Hamilton Township

At the interchange with Broadway, PA 33 crosses into Hamilton Township in Monroe County, which is in the Pocono Mountains region of the state, and continues through forested areas, turning northwest and entering Ross Township. The freeway curves north and then northeast, crossing back into Hamilton Township and turning northwest. The route reaches the community of Saylorsburg, where a southbound exit and entrance connects to Wilkes Barre Turnpike and a northbound exit and entrance connects to Cherry Valley Road. From here, PA 33 turns northeast and runs through wooded areas with some fields and homes, soon making a curve to the north. The freeway comes to a trumpet interchange with US 209, at which point US 209 joins PA 33 in a concurrency on the freeway. The two routes continue north-northeast through woodland with some development, crossing McMichael Creek and coming to a diamond interchange with Manor Drive that serves the community of Snydersville. From here, the freeway passes west of Monroe County Correctional Facility and crosses Appenzell Creek before PA 33 exits from the US 209 freeway at a northbound exit and southbound entrance, with signs leading travelers to eastbound and from westbound I-80 via US 209. After this, PA 33 reaches a southbound exit and northbound entrance with US 209 Bus. that serves Snydersville. The route continues northeast through wooded areas, passing to the northwest of Snydersville Raceway before turning north. The freeway heads through forested areas with some homes, curving to the north-northeast and crossing Pocono Creek. The route comes to a partial interchange with I-80, with no access from northbound PA 33 to eastbound I-80 or from westbound I-80 to southbound PA 33, the missing movements having been provided by US 209 at the freeway split. Past this, PA 33 crosses into Stroud Township and reaches its northern terminus at an at-grade intersection with PA 611 in a business area.[3][5]

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Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 (I-78) is an east–west Interstate Highway stretching from Union Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, in the west to the Holland Tunnel and New York City in the east. In Pennsylvania, I-78 runs for about 78 miles (126 km) from the western terminus at I-81 in Union Township east to the New Jersey state line near Easton in Northampton County.

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Northampton County is a county in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 312,951. Its county seat is Easton. The county was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Its namesake was Northamptonshire, England. The county seat of Easton was named for the country house Easton Neston in that shire.

Lehigh Valley

Lehigh Valley

The Lehigh Valley, known colloquially as The Valley, is a geographic region formed by the Lehigh River in Lehigh County and Northampton County in eastern Pennsylvania. It is a component valley of the Great Appalachian Valley bound to the north by Blue Mountain, to the south by South Mountain, to the west by Lebanon Valley, and to the east by the Delaware River on Pennsylvania's eastern border with Warren County, New Jersey. The Valley is about 40 miles (64 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) wide. The Lehigh Valley's largest city is Allentown, the third largest city in Pennsylvania and the county seat of Lehigh County, with a population of 125,845 residents as of the 2020 census.

Lehigh Line (Norfolk Southern)

Lehigh Line (Norfolk Southern)

The Lehigh Line is a railroad line in central New Jersey, Northeastern Pennsylvania, and the Lehigh Valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. It is owned and operated by the Norfolk Southern Railway. The line runs west from the vicinity of the Port of New York and New Jersey via Conrail's Lehigh Line to the Susquehanna River valley at the south end of the Wyoming Valley Coal Region. Administratively, it is part of Norfolk Southern's Keystone Division and is part of the Crescent Corridor. As of 2021 the line is freight-only, although there are perennial proposals to restore passenger service over all or part of the line.

Lehigh River

Lehigh River

The Lehigh River is a 109-mile-long (175 km) tributary of the Delaware River in eastern Pennsylvania. The river flows in a generally southward pattern from The Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania through Allentown and much of the Lehigh Valley before enjoining the Delaware River in Easton.

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton is a city in, and the county seat of, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The city's population was 28,127 as of the 2020 census. Easton is located at the confluence of the Lehigh River, a 109-mile-long (175 km) river that joins the Delaware River in Easton and serves as the city's eastern geographic boundary with Phillipsburg, New Jersey.

Lehigh Canal

Lehigh Canal

The Lehigh Canal, or the Lehigh Navigation Canal, is a navigable canal that begins at the mouth of Nesquehoning Creek on the Lehigh River in eastern Pennsylvania. It was built in two sections over a span of twenty years, beginning in 1818. The lower section spanned the distance between Easton and present-day Jim Thorpe. In Easton, the canal met the Delaware and Morris Canals, which allowed goods to be transported further up the U.S. East Coast. At its height, the Lehigh Canal was 72 miles (116 km) long.

Bethlehem Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Bethlehem Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Bethlehem Township is a township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population of Bethlehem Township was 23,730 at the 2010 census. It is a suburb of Bethlehem and is part of the Lehigh Valley metropolitan statistical area, which had a population of 861,899 and was the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. as of the 2020 census.

Diamond interchange

Diamond interchange

A diamond interchange is a common type of road junction, used where a controlled-access highway crosses a minor road.

Park and ride

Park and ride

A park and ride, also known as incentive parking or a commuter lot, is a parking lot with public transport connections that allows commuters and other people heading to city centres to leave their vehicles and transfer to a bus, rail system, or carpool for the remainder of the journey. The vehicle is left in the parking lot during the day and retrieved when the owner returns. Park and rides are generally located in the suburbs of metropolitan areas or on the outer edges of large cities. A park and ride that only offers parking for meeting a carpool and not connections to public transport may also be called a park and pool.

Cloverleaf interchange

Cloverleaf interchange

A cloverleaf interchange is a two-level interchange in which all turns are handled by slip roads. To go left, vehicles first continue as one road passes over or under the other, then exit right onto a one-way three-fourths loop ramp (270°) and merge onto the intersecting road. The objective of a cloverleaf is to allow two highways to cross without the need for any traffic to be stopped by traffic lights. The limiting factor in the capacity of a cloverleaf interchange is traffic weaving.

Lower Nazareth Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Lower Nazareth Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Lower Nazareth Township is a township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The population of Lower Nazareth Township was 5,674 at the 2010 census. The township is located in the Lehigh Valley, which had a population of 861,899 and was thus the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. as of the 2020 census.

History

The construction of PA 33 started in 1959, and stretched from the PA 512 interchange to Saylorsburg. Construction finished in 1960. The stretch connecting the highway to I-80 was built and completed by 1964. Construction on PA 33 was not continued until 1969 when work began on the stretch from PA 512 in Wind Gap to Henry Road in Belfast. This stretch was completed by 1970. By 1972, the road had reached what is now PA 191 in Stockertown, and was extended down to its long-term southern terminus at US 22. The highway was left at that until 1999 when construction began on a final segment that would connect the US 22 interchange to I-78. The final three-mile (5 km) stretch opened in January 2002.

PA 33 northbound past the PA 512 interchange in Wind Gap, approaching Blue Mountain
PA 33 northbound past the PA 512 interchange in Wind Gap, approaching Blue Mountain

In January 2004, the expressway was shut down between Lower Nazareth Township (PA 248) and Stockertown (PA 191) because of a sinkhole that was in the area of the Bushkill Creek directly under a northbound bridge support beam. Crossovers were created, narrowing the highway to one lane in each direction through Stockertown. Studies were conducted, and came to the conclusion that the bridge was dangerous and could not be fixed. The northbound bridge was demolished in February of the same year. Just 21 days later, a sinkhole was discovered under the southbound bridge over the Bushkill Creek, and resulted in the demolition of the southbound bridge. Once the new northbound bridge was completed, another crossover was created, detouring southbound traffic onto the northbound side of the highway. On April 21, 2004, a depression formed under the new northbound bridge, and the highway was shut down once again to fill the area with bituminous material. The bridge re-opened within twenty minutes. By November 19, 2004, both bridges were completed and opened. All of this happened feet from the Bushkill Street Bridge connecting Stockertown and Palmer Township, which has been closed since 1999 because of numerous sinkholes causing the bridge to collapse.[6]

On March 21, 2009, a tractor-trailer carrying 32,000 pounds of hydrofluoric acid overturned on southbound PA 33 in Plainfield Township, prompting the evacuation of about 5,000 people. The truck, registered to the Honeywell company, flipped over at about 2:40 a.m. after the driver swerved to avoid a deer. Nobody was injured and the highway was reopened later that day. Hundreds of evacuees were taken to the Pen Argyl Area High School in nearby Pen Argyl.[7]

On January 31, 2013, ground was broken for a new interchange at Main Street in Palmer Township to the west of Tatamy, with Governor Tom Corbett in attendance. This interchange is being constructed to serve the Palmer Industrial Park and is expected to bring economic development to the area. Completion of this interchange, which is to cost $40 million, was originally planned for November 2014.[8] However, work on the project was halted during the winter of 2014-2015, with completion pushed back to June 2015.[9]

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Pennsylvania Route 512

Pennsylvania Route 512

Pennsylvania Route 512 is a 26.1-mile-long (42.0 km) state route in Northampton County in the Lehigh Valley region in eastern Pennsylvania. The southern terminus is at U.S. Route 22 north of Bethlehem in Hanover Township. The northern terminus is at PA 611 in Upper Mount Bethel Township. The route heads north from US 22 to Bath, where it intersects PA 248. From here, PA 512 continues northeast and intersects PA 946 in Moorestown before it reaches an interchange with the PA 33 freeway in Wind Gap. The route heads east through the northern Northampton County boroughs of Wind Gap, Pen Argyl, Bangor, and East Bangor, intersecting PA 191 in Bangor. Past here, PA 512 continues east to PA 611.

Interstate 80 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 80 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 80 (I-80) in the US state of Pennsylvania runs for 311.12 miles (500.70 km) across the northern part of the state. It is designated as the Keystone Shortway and officially as the Z.H. Confair Memorial Highway. This route was built mainly along a completely new alignment, not paralleling any earlier US Routes, as a shortcut to the tolled Pennsylvania Turnpike to the south and New York State Thruway to the north. It does not serve any major cities in Pennsylvania and is mainly as a cross-state route on the Ohio–New York City corridor. Most of I-80's path across the state goes through hilly and mountainous terrain, while the route passes through relatively flat areas toward the western part of the state.

Belfast, Pennsylvania

Belfast, Pennsylvania

Belfast is a census-designated place (CDP) in Plainfield Township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. It is part of the Lehigh Valley metropolitan area, which had a population of 861,899 and was the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. as of the 2020 census. As of the 2010 census, the village's population was 1,257.

Pennsylvania Route 191

Pennsylvania Route 191

Pennsylvania Route 191 is a 111.54 mi (179.51 km)-long state highway in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The route, a major non-freeway corridor connecting the Lehigh Valley to the Pocono Mountains in eastern Pennsylvania, is designated from U.S. Route 22 in Brodhead near the city of Bethlehem to the New York state line over the Delaware River at Hancock, New York.

Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania

Interstate 78 (I-78) is an east–west Interstate Highway stretching from Union Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, in the west to the Holland Tunnel and New York City in the east. In Pennsylvania, I-78 runs for about 78 miles (126 km) from the western terminus at I-81 in Union Township east to the New Jersey state line near Easton in Northampton County.

Lower Nazareth Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Lower Nazareth Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Lower Nazareth Township is a township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The population of Lower Nazareth Township was 5,674 at the 2010 census. The township is located in the Lehigh Valley, which had a population of 861,899 and was thus the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. as of the 2020 census.

Pennsylvania Route 248

Pennsylvania Route 248

Pennsylvania Route 248 is a 31.3 mi (50.4 km) long state highway in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The western terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 209 in Weissport East, a CDP in Franklin Township. The eastern terminus is at PA 611 in Easton. The route begins at US 209 in Carbon County and heads southeast parallel to the Lehigh River as a four-lane divided highway to Bowmanstown, where it becomes a freeway and heads through Palmerton. Upon crossing Lehigh Gap in Blue Mountain, PA 248 enters Northampton County and becomes a two-lane undivided highway that heads southeast through rural areas, serving Bath and Nazareth. From here, the route runs southeast through suburban areas to Wilson, where it turns east and follows city streets through Easton.

Palmer Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Palmer Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Palmer Township is a township in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The population of Palmer Township was 20,691 at the 2010 census.

Hydrofluoric acid

Hydrofluoric acid

Hydrofluoric acid is a solution of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in water. Solutions of HF are colourless, acidic and highly corrosive. It is used to make most fluorine-containing compounds; examples include the commonly used pharmaceutical antidepressant medication fluoxetine (Prozac) and the material PTFE (Teflon). Elemental fluorine is produced from it. It is commonly used to etch glass and silicon wafers.

Honeywell

Honeywell

Honeywell International Inc. is an American publicly traded, multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina. It primarily operates in four areas of business: aerospace, building technologies, performance materials and technologies (PMT), and safety and productivity solutions (SPS).

Pen Argyl Area High School

Pen Argyl Area High School

Pen Argyl Area High School is a for-year public high school located in Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania in the Lehigh Valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. It is the only high school in the Pen Argyl Area School District. As of the 2020-21 school year, the school had an enrollment of 507 students, according to National Center for Education Statistics data.

Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania

Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania

Pen Argyl is a borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The borough's population was 3,510 as of the 2020 census.

Exit list

All exits are unnumbered.

CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
NorthamptonLower Saucon Township0.0000.000 I-78 – New Jersey, New York City, Allentown, HarrisburgSouthern terminus; signs for PA 611 towards Philadelphia via I-78 east
Bethlehem Township1.1471.846Freemansburg Avenue
2.1483.457William Penn HighwayAccess to Easton Avenue
3.3245.349 US 22 – Easton, Bethlehem, AllentownSigns for LVI Airport via US 22 west
Lower Nazareth Township4.3156.944Hecktown Road
5.6789.138 PA 248 – Nazareth, WilsonNazareth signed northbound
Palmer Township7.62612.273TatamyAccess via Main Street
Stockertown8.81414.185 PA 191 – Stockertown, Bangor, NazarethBangor signed northbound; Nazareth signed southbound
Bushkill Township10.59817.056BelfastAccess via Henry Road
Plainfield Township14.60323.501 PA 512 – Bath, Wind Gap
Wind Gap16.73526.932Wind GapSouthbound exit and northbound entrance; access via Broadway
MonroeHamilton Township19.72731.748SaylorsburgAccess via Cherry Valley Road and Old PA 115
22.20935.742
US 209 south – Lehighton
To Sciota and Brodheadsville; south end of US 209 overlap
23.82138.336SnydersvilleAccess via Manor Drive
24.46539.373


US 209 north to I-80 east – Stroudsburg
Northbound exit and southbound entrance; north end of US 209 overlap
24.83839.973
US 209 Bus. – Snydersville
Southbound exit and northbound entrance; no tractor trailers
27.55844.350 I-80 – Hazleton, StroudsburgNo access from northbound PA 33 to eastbound I-80 or westbound I-80 to southbound PA 33, with missing movements provided by US 209; exit 302A/B on I-80
Stroud Township27.73844.640 PA 611 (North 9th Street) – Bartonsville, StroudsburgAt-grade intersection; northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

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Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Northampton County, Pennsylvania

Northampton County is a county in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. As of the 2020 census, the population was 312,951. Its county seat is Easton. The county was formed in 1752 from parts of Bucks County. Its namesake was Northamptonshire, England. The county seat of Easton was named for the country house Easton Neston in that shire.

New Jersey

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by Delaware Bay and the state of Delaware. At 7,354 square miles (19,050 km2), New Jersey is the fifth-smallest state in land area; but with close to 9.3 million residents, it ranks 11th in population and first in population density. The state capital is Trenton, and the most populous city is Newark. With the exception of Warren County, all of the state's 21 counties lie within the combined statistical areas of New York City or Philadelphia.

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the United States both by population and by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, entertainment, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Allentown, Pennsylvania

Allentown is a city in Lehigh County in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, United States. The city had a population of 125,845 at the 2020 census. Allentown is the fastest-growing major city in Pennsylvania and the state's third-largest city after Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. It is the largest city in both Lehigh County and the Lehigh Valley, which had a population of 861,899 and was the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the United States as of 2020. Allentown was founded in 1762 and is the county seat of Lehigh County.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Harrisburg is the capital city of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, United States, and the county seat of Dauphin County. With a population of 50,135 as of the 2021 census, Harrisburg is the 9th largest city and 15th largest municipality in Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania Route 611

Pennsylvania Route 611

Pennsylvania Route 611 is a state highway in eastern Pennsylvania running 109.7 mi (176.5 km) from Interstate 95 (I-95) in the southern part of the city of Philadelphia north to I-380 in Coolbaugh Township in the Pocono Mountains. In Philadelphia, PA 611 follows Broad Street, the main north-south street in Philadelphia, through most of the city. The route continues north through the northern suburbs of Philadelphia and serves Jenkintown, Willow Grove, and Doylestown, the latter of which it bypasses on a freeway. North of Doylestown, PA 611 heads through rural areas and runs along the west bank of the Delaware River to the city of Easton in the Lehigh Valley. The route continues back into rural land and passes through the Delaware Water Gap, at which point it enters the Pocono Mountains region. Here, PA 611 heads northwest through Stroudsburg and Mount Pocono toward its northern terminus.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, often called Philly, is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the second-largest city in both the Northeast megalopolis and Mid-Atlantic regions after New York City. It is one of the most historically significant cities in the United States, and once served as the nation's capital city until 1800. The city's population at the 2020 census was 1,603,797, and over 56 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of Philadelphia. Since 1854, the city has been coextensive with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the Delaware Valley, the nation's seventh-largest and one of the world's largest metropolitan regions with 6.245 million residents in 2020. Philadelphia is known both for its extensive contributions to American history and for its role in the life sciences, business and industry, art, literature, and music.

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton, Pennsylvania

Easton is a city in, and the county seat of, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, United States. The city's population was 28,127 as of the 2020 census. Easton is located at the confluence of the Lehigh River, a 109-mile-long (175 km) river that joins the Delaware River in Easton and serves as the city's eastern geographic boundary with Phillipsburg, New Jersey.

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

Bethlehem is a city in Northampton and Lehigh Counties in the Lehigh Valley region of eastern Pennsylvania, United States. As of the 2020 census, Bethlehem had a total population of 75,781. Of this, 55,639 were in Northampton County and 19,343 were in Lehigh County. It is Pennsylvania's seventh most populous city. The city is located along the Lehigh River, a 109-mile-long (175 km) tributary of the Delaware River.

Lehigh Valley International Airport

Lehigh Valley International Airport

Lehigh Valley International Airport, formerly Allentown–Bethlehem–Easton International Airport, is a domestic airport located in Hanover Township in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. Lehigh Valley International Airport is located in the center of the Lehigh Valley, roughly 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Allentown, 4 miles (6.4 km) northwest of Bethlehem, and 11 miles (18 km) southwest of Easton.

Pennsylvania Route 248

Pennsylvania Route 248

Pennsylvania Route 248 is a 31.3 mi (50.4 km) long state highway in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The western terminus of the route is at U.S. Route 209 in Weissport East, a CDP in Franklin Township. The eastern terminus is at PA 611 in Easton. The route begins at US 209 in Carbon County and heads southeast parallel to the Lehigh River as a four-lane divided highway to Bowmanstown, where it becomes a freeway and heads through Palmerton. Upon crossing Lehigh Gap in Blue Mountain, PA 248 enters Northampton County and becomes a two-lane undivided highway that heads southeast through rural areas, serving Bath and Nazareth. From here, the route runs southeast through suburban areas to Wilson, where it turns east and follows city streets through Easton.

Nazareth, Pennsylvania

Nazareth, Pennsylvania

Nazareth is a borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. The borough's population was 6,053 at the 2020 census. Nazareth is part of the Lehigh Valley metropolitan area, which had a population of 861,899 and was the 68th most populous metropolitan area in the U.S. as of 2020.

Source: "Pennsylvania Route 33", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Route_33.

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References
  1. ^ a b Bureau of Maintenance and Operations (January 2015). Roadway Management System Straight Line Diagrams (Report) (2015 ed.). Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. ^ "L. Nazareth Zone Changes Seen When Highway Opens". The Morning Call. August 30, 1972. p. 12. Retrieved January 23, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ a b c Google (October 22, 2019). "Pennsylvania Route 33" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Northampton County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  5. ^ Monroe County, Pennsylvania Highway Map (PDF) (Map). PennDOT. 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  6. ^ "Pennsylvania Highways: Pennsylvania Route 33". Archived from the original on October 21, 2006. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  7. ^ Cassi, Sarah (March 22, 2009). "5,000 forced to flee homes near Wind Gap after truck carrying chemicals overturns". The Express-Times. Archived from the original on October 2, 2011. Retrieved March 22, 2009.
  8. ^ Clark, Adam (February 2, 2013). "New Route 33 interchange to transform northern Palmer Township". The Morning Call. Allentown, PA. Archived from the original on January 9, 2015. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  9. ^ Landauer, Bill (January 8, 2015). "Completion of Route 33 interchange pushed back to June". The Morning Call. Allentown, PA. Archived from the original on January 9, 2015. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
External links

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