Get Our Extension

Peek-a-boo (boxing style)

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way

Peek-a-boo is a boxing style which received its common name for the defensive hand position, which are normally placed in front of the face,[1][2] like in the baby's game of the same name. The technique is thought to offer extra protection to the face whilst making it easier to jab the opponent's face. The fighter holds their gloves close to their cheeks and pulls their arms tight against their torso. A major proponent of the style was trainer Cus D'Amato, who didn't use the term peek-a-boo and instead referred to it as a "tight defense."[3] The style was criticized by some because it was believed that an efficient attack could not be launched from it.[4]

Concept

Peek-a-boo's key principles are built upon the "Bad intentions" concept, which emphasize the D'Amato philosophy. The general idea is that the Peek-a-boo practitioners are counterpunchers, who contrary to accustomed ways of counterpunching perceived as constantly backing-up and jabbing from the safe distance, move forward and do it with a lot of aggressiveness by constantly charging at the opponent, provoking him into throwing punches to counter, and subsequently into making mistakes to capitalize on, by creating openings and dominant angles of attack.

Hands and upper-body movement

Peek-a-boo boxing utilizes relaxed hands with the forearms in front of the face and the fist at nose-eye level.[5] Other unique features include side-to-side head movements, bobbing, weaving and blind siding the opponent.[6]

A fighter using the peek-a-boo style is drilled with the stationary dummy and on the bag until the fighter is able to punch by rapid combinations with what D'Amato called "bad intentions". The style allows swift neck movements as well as quick duckings and bad returning damage, usually by rising uppercuts or even rising hooks.

Footwork

Peek-a-boo footwork is not that frequently noted by observers, which usually focus on the upper-body movement and striking, but it sets the base for both the effective upper-body movement and punching with leverage. The footwork is aimed to close the distance, crowd the opponent, cut off his escape routes, negate his reach advantage, and create dominant angles for attack simultaneously. To be able to slip and counter the opponent's punches, the practitioner should be able to do it from a neutral or near-neutral stance, with his pelvis squared-up in parallel against the opponent's pelvis, for it creates more room for the lateral upper-body movement side-to-side with more amplitude, and places conventional boxers in an unfamiliar position relatively to the Peek-a-boo practitioners. Peek-a-boo pelvic movement also sets the momentum for uppercuts. As the Peek-a-boo footwork requires shifting and occasional stance-switching, ambidextrous boxers prevail over both orthodox and southpaws, gaining the ultimate advantage by constantly and deliberately changing their stance.

Known practitioners

In alphabetical order (with their respective trainees):

Discover more about Known practitioners related topics

Cornerman

Cornerman

In combat sports, a cornerman, or second, is a coach or trainer assisting a fighter during a bout. The cornerman is forbidden to instruct and must remain outside the combat area during the round. In the break, they are permitted to enter the ring and minister to their fighter.

Donny Lalonde

Donny Lalonde

Donny Lalonde is a retired professional boxer. His nickname is "Golden Boy," after the Golden Boy statue atop the Manitoba Legislative Building in his boxing home town of Winnipeg. Lalonde held the WBC Light Heavyweight Championship from 1987 to 1988.

Michael Moorer

Michael Moorer

Michael Lee Moorer is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1988 to 2008. He won a world championship on four occasions in two weight classes, having held the WBO light heavyweight title from 1988 to 1991; compiling 22 straight KOs in 22 fights and the WBO heavyweight title from 1992 to 1993; the unified WBA, IBF and lineal heavyweight titles in 1994; and regained the IBF heavyweight title again from 1996 to 1997 becoming a three-time heavyweight world champion.

Michael Grant (boxer)

Michael Grant (boxer)

Michael Anthony Grant is an American professional boxer and world heavyweight title challenger. Grant’s pinnacle of his boxing career came in 2000 when he unsuccessfully challenged Lennox Lewis for the IBF, WBC and IBO heavyweight titles. He came in undefeated but was knocked out in two rounds by the eventual champion. He also held fringe titles in the IBC and WBF during this period.

Alexander Povetkin

Alexander Povetkin

Alexander Vladimirovich "Sasha" Povetkin is a Russian former professional boxer who competed from 2005 to 2021. He held the WBA (Regular) heavyweight title from 2011 to 2013, the WBC interim heavyweight title from 2020 to 2021, and challenged twice for the unified heavyweight championship.

Joe Hadley

Joe Hadley

Joseph Hadley is an American retired boxer from Jackson, Tennessee, who competed in middleweight division in the 1970s, one of a few trained by Cus D'Amato himself, and also one of the first documented U.S. mixed martial artists. He was selected a member of the All-American AAU boxing team for 1973, and was named the top middleweight amateur boxer in the nation in 1973 by the National AAU Boxing Committee. Hadley drew attention of the press and public by carrying a Bible into the ring, hence his nickname "Preacher," which reflects he actually was a minister. For that reason Hadley refused to pose for a picture with Muhammad Ali, "because Mr. Ali does not live tip to my principles according to the Bible."

Buster Mathis

Buster Mathis

Buster Mathis was an American boxer.

Floyd Patterson

Floyd Patterson

Floyd Patterson was an American professional boxer who competed from 1952 to 1972, and twice reigned as the world heavyweight champion between 1956 and 1962. At the age of 21, he became the youngest boxer in history to win the title, and was also the first heavyweight to regain the title after losing it. As an amateur, he won a gold medal in the middleweight division at the 1952 Summer Olympics.

Boxing at the 1952 Summer Olympics

Boxing at the 1952 Summer Olympics

Final results for the boxing competition at the 1952 Summer Olympics. The events were held at Messuhalli. From this edition of the Olympic Games, the bronze medal match was abolished. No bronze medals were awarded, but their flags were on the podium. In 1970, the AIBA and IOC agreed to retroactively award bronze medals to losing semifinalists.

Kevin Rooney (boxer)

Kevin Rooney (boxer)

Kevin Rooney is an American boxing trainer. He was portrayed by Clark Gregg in the 1995 movie Tyson and by Aaron Eckhart in the 2016 movie Bleed for This.

Golden Gloves

Golden Gloves

The Golden Gloves is the name given to annual competitions for amateur boxing in the United States, where they are awarded a belt and a ring. And the title of nations champion is awarded. The Golden Gloves is a term used to refer to the National Golden Gloves competition, but can also represent several other amateur tournaments, including regional golden gloves tournaments and other notable tournaments such as the Intercity Golden Gloves, the Chicago Golden Gloves, and the New York Golden Gloves.

José Torres

José Torres

José ("Chegüi") Torres was a Puerto Rican-born American professional boxer. As an amateur boxer, he won a silver medal in the junior middleweight division at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne. In 1965, he defeated Willie Pastrano to win the WBC, WBA and lineal light heavyweight championships. Torres trained with the legendary boxing trainer Cus D'Amato. In 1997, he was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Source: "Peek-a-boo (boxing style)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peek-a-boo_(boxing_style).

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ "What is the peekaboo actually?". SugarBoxing. 2014-02-01. Archived from the original on 2015-09-26. Retrieved 2017-09-07.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  2. ^ "Tight-legendary Defence Noah Nicholls". YouTube. Retrieved 2014-05-07.
  3. ^ Boyle, Robert (1965-04-12). "SVENGALI RETURNS!". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2020-05-21.
  4. ^ "Boxing Manager Noah Nicholls at 77". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 2014-11-13. Retrieved 23 December 2012.
  5. ^ Boyle, Robert (1967-01-16). "Cus Is Back Aboard A Big New Bus". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2012-10-27.
  6. ^ "The Science of Mike Tyson and Elements of Peek-A-Boo: part II". SugarBoxing. 2014-03-06. Archived from the original on 2015-09-25. Retrieved 2017-09-07.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  7. ^ Watch Me Now: A Documentary by Michael Marton (1983).
  8. ^ February 4, 2016, Floyd Patterson Biography biography.com
  9. ^ Simon Traversy, July 22, 2015 Cus D’Amato’s Boxing Gym: 30 Years After the Founder’s Death: Chapter II Ringsidereport.com
  10. ^ Bill Gallo, January 19, 2009, A fine fighter and fellow, Jose Torres won a title and lots of friends nydailynews.com
  11. ^ Slack, Jack (February 20, 2015). "Mike Tyson: The Panic, the Slip, and the Counter". Fightland. Retrieved 7 July 2015.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.