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Pecora alla cottora

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Pecora alla cottora
Pecora ajo cotturo Antrosano.jpg
Place of originItaly
Region or stateAbruzzo
Main ingredientsMutton or lamb

Pecora alla cottora o callara is an ancient recipe typical of the Abruzzo tradition, widespread above all in the mountains, particularly in the Marsican area, in the L'Aquila basin and in the Monti della Laga area[1].

Being a poor and typical dish of the mountains and open places, during cooking various aromatic herbs and smells are added that the shepherds had at their disposal or thyme, laurel, rosemary, onion, garlic, carrot, celery, juniper, pepper and chili. In the version that involves the use of tomato sauce, it will have to be slightly diluted with water and will thicken around the meat and herbs during cooking. If it is not used instead, a sort of broth will be formed.

In both cases the preparation lasts from about four to six hours, since a long cooking allows to make sure that the sheep meat, which is quite hard, softens almost reaching " dissolve".

The recipe calls for the meat to be cut into stew, placed in the callara (or in a tall and capacious tinned pot) and immersed in cold water with the possible addition of white wine. During cooking it will be necessary to constantly eliminate the foam that will form as the sheep's fat will tend to melt and form lumps. The preparation will be brought to the boil and left to cook over medium and constant heat for about an hour, after which it will be drained and new water will be added, cooking again for a variable time (usually two or three hours) until the softness of the desired meat. Once this operation is completed, add the final cooking water together with the herbs (previously chopped and fried separately), any ripe chopped tomatoes (for the sauce) and salt, cooking over a low heat for about an hour and a half. The dish should be served hot.[2]

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Recipe

Recipe

A recipe is a set of instructions that describes how to prepare or make something, especially a dish of prepared food. A sub-recipe or subrecipe is a recipe for an ingredient that will be called for in the instructions for the main recipe.

Thymus

Thymus

The thymus is a specialized primary lymphoid organ of the immune system. Within the thymus, thymus cell lymphocytes or T cells mature. T cells are critical to the adaptive immune system, where the body adapts specifically to foreign invaders. The thymus is located in the upper front part of the chest, in the anterior superior mediastinum, behind the sternum, and in front of the heart. It is made up of two lobes, each consisting of a central medulla and an outer cortex, surrounded by a capsule.

Laurus nobilis

Laurus nobilis

Laurus nobilis is an aromatic evergreen tree or large shrub with green, glabrous (smooth) leaves. It is in the flowering plant family Lauraceae. It is native to the Mediterranean region and is used as bay leaf for seasoning in cooking. Its common names include bay tree, bay laurel, sweet bay, true laurel, Grecian laurel, or simply laurel. Laurus nobilis figures prominently in classical Greco-Roman culture.

Daucus carota

Daucus carota

Daucus carota, whose common names include wild carrot, European wild carrot, bird's nest, bishop's lace, and Queen Anne's lace, is a flowering plant in the family Apiaceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Old World and was naturalized in the New World.

Juniper

Juniper

Junipers are coniferous trees and shrubs in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending on the taxonomy, between 50 and 67 species of junipers are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa, throughout parts of western, central and southern Asia, east to eastern Tibet in the Old World, and in the mountains of Central America. The highest-known juniper forest occurs at an altitude of 4,900 metres (16,100 ft) in southeastern Tibet and the northern Himalayas, creating one of the highest tree lines on earth.

Pepper

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Pepper or peppers may refer to:

Chili

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Broth

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Broth, also known as bouillon, is a savory liquid made of water in which meat, fish or vegetables have been simmered for a short period of time. It can be eaten alone, but it is most commonly used to prepare other dishes, such as soups, gravies, and sauces.

Stew

Stew

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. A stew needs to have raw ingredients added to the gravy. Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables and may include meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef, pork, lamb, poultry, sausages, and seafood. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, stock is also common. A small amount of red wine is sometimes added for flavour. Seasoning and flavourings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature, allowing flavours to mingle.

Source: "Pecora alla cottora", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pecora_alla_cottora.

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References
  1. ^ Dunham, Sam (October 10, 2020). "Shepherd's Bounty - Il Coatto / Pecora alla Callara". LifeInAbruzzo - Cherry-pick Abruzzo the Easy Way.
  2. ^ d'Abruzzo, Eccellenze (July 22, 2016). "La pecora alla callara".

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