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Patricia Priest

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Patricia Priest
Alma materUniversity of Oxford
Scientific career
InstitutionsUniversity of Otago
ThesisAntibacterial use and antibacterial resistance in the community (2001)

Patricia Priest is a New Zealand public health scientist and epidemiologist who is Professor of Public Health in Medicine at the University of Otago. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, Priest served as an advisor to the New Zealand Ministry of Health. She was awarded an Ig Nobel Prize in 2010.

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University of Otago

University of Otago

The University of Otago is a public research collegiate university based in Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand. Founded in 1869, Otago is New Zealand’s oldest University and one of the oldest universities in Oceania.

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified from an outbreak in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Attempts to contain failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020 and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 24 November 2022, the pandemic had caused more than 639 million cases and 6.62 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

Ministry of Health (New Zealand)

Ministry of Health (New Zealand)

The Ministry of Health is the public service department of New Zealand responsible for healthcare in New Zealand. It came into existence in its current form in 1993.

Ig Nobel Prize

Ig Nobel Prize

The Ig Nobel Prize is a satiric prize awarded annually since 1991 to celebrate ten unusual or trivial achievements in scientific research. Its aim is to "honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think." The name of the award is a pun on the Nobel Prize, which it parodies, and on the word ignoble.

Early life and education

Priest was a doctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.[1] She investigated the relationship between prescribing antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the community.[2]

Research and career

Priest's research considers epidemiology and public health.[3] In 2010, Priest and two colleagues were jointly awarded an Ig Nobel Prize, which is awarded by Annals of Improbable Research for bizarre scientific discoveries.[4] They were recognised for their work that identified walking with socks over shoes resulted in a frosty floor feeling less slippery than people walking without socks.[4][5]

Priest studied the relationship between gardening and contracting Legionnaires' disease. She identified that Legionella longbeachae, which is present in compost and potting soil, could contribute to infection with Legionnaires' disease.[6]

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Priest was appointed to the New Zealand Ministry of Health Technical Advisory Group, where she oversaw activity on epidemiology.[7] She was responsible for advising the Ministry on surveillance and monitoring for COVID-19.[8] Early in 2020, Priest recommended that people wear masks to limit transmission of the virus.[9] She was worried that students would be responsible for spreading COVID-19.[10]

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Ig Nobel Prize

Ig Nobel Prize

The Ig Nobel Prize is a satiric prize awarded annually since 1991 to celebrate ten unusual or trivial achievements in scientific research. Its aim is to "honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think." The name of the award is a pun on the Nobel Prize, which it parodies, and on the word ignoble.

Annals of Improbable Research

Annals of Improbable Research

The Annals of Improbable Research (AIR) is a bimonthly magazine devoted to scientific humor, in the form of a satirical take on the standard academic journal. AIR, published six times a year since 1995, usually showcases at least one piece of scientific research being done on a strange or unexpected topic, but most of their articles concern real or fictional absurd experiments, such as a comparison of apples and oranges using infrared spectroscopy. Other features include such things as ratings of the cafeterias at scientific institutes, fake classifieds and advertisements for a medical plan called HMO-NO, and a very odd letters page. The magazine is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Legionnaires' disease

Legionnaires' disease

Legionnaires' disease is a form of atypical pneumonia caused by any species of Legionella bacteria, quite often Legionella pneumophila. Signs and symptoms include cough, shortness of breath, high fever, muscle pains, and headaches. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may also occur. This often begins 2–10 days after exposure.

Legionella longbeachae

Legionella longbeachae

Legionella longbeachae is one species of the family Legionellaceae. It was first isolated from a patient in Long Beach, California. It is found predominantly in potting soil and compost. In humans, the infection is sometimes called Pontiac fever. Human infection from L. longbeachae is particularly common in Australia, but cases have been documented in other countries including the United States, Japan, Greece and the UK.

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified from an outbreak in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Attempts to contain failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020 and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 24 November 2022, the pandemic had caused more than 639 million cases and 6.62 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

Ministry of Health (New Zealand)

Ministry of Health (New Zealand)

The Ministry of Health is the public service department of New Zealand responsible for healthcare in New Zealand. It came into existence in its current form in 1993.

COVID-19

COVID-19

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease caused by a virus, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The first known case was identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The disease quickly spread worldwide, resulting in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Selected publications

  • David R Murdoch; Sandy Slow; Stephen T Chambers; et al. (1 October 2012). "Effect of vitamin D3 supplementation on upper respiratory tract infections in healthy adults: the VIDARIS randomized controlled trial". JAMA. 308 (13): 1333–1339. doi:10.1001/JAMA.2012.12505. ISSN 0098-7484. PMID 23032549. Wikidata Q34303576.
  • Sarah Jefferies; Nigel French; Charlotte Gilkison; et al. (October 2020). "COVID-19 in New Zealand and the impact of the national response: a descriptive epidemiological study". Lancet Public Health. doi:10.1016/S2468-2667(20)30225-5. ISSN 2468-2667. PMC 7553903. PMID 33065023. Wikidata Q100397055.
  • Irene Higginson; P Priest; M McCarthy (1 February 1994). "Are bereaved family members a valid proxy for a patient's assessment of dying?". Social Science & Medicine. 38 (4): 553–557. doi:10.1016/0277-9536(94)90251-8. ISSN 0277-9536. PMID 7514313. Wikidata Q51136627.

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Source: "Patricia Priest", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_Priest.

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References
  1. ^ "Antibacterial use and antibacterial resistance in the community | WorldCat.org". www.worldcat.org. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  2. ^ Otago, University of. "Inaugural Professorial Lecture – Professor Patricia Priest". University of Otago. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  3. ^ Medicine, Department of Preventive and Social. "Department of Preventive and Social Medicine staff profiles". www.otago.ac.nz. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  4. ^ a b Constantine, Ellie (2010-10-02). "Socks on ice a winner". Otago Daily Times Online News. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  5. ^ Abrahams, Marc (2015-01-20). "Kiwis and the sensible quest against toppling". improbable.com. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  6. ^ "Gardening this weekend? Beware of the compost". www.medicalnewstoday.com. 2017-06-24. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  7. ^ "New appointments to the Strategic COVID-19 Public Health Advisory Group". New Zealand Doctor. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  8. ^ Munro, Bruce (2020-06-13). "University research focused on pandemic". Otago Daily Times Online News. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  9. ^ feed, watermark (2020-10-16). "COVID-19 disease comparison masks vital differences". Australian Associated Press. Retrieved 2022-11-24.
  10. ^ Trump, Eric (2022-01-29). "Students likely Omicron vector: experts". Otago Daily Times Online News. Retrieved 2022-11-24.

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