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Pacific Tigers football

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Pacific Tigers football
Pacific university athletics old logo.png
First season1895
Last season1995
Athletic directorBob Lee
Head coachChuck Shelton
StadiumStagg Memorial Stadium
(capacity: 28,000)
Field surfaceGrass
LocationStockton, California
NCAA divisionDivision I-A
ConferenceBig West Conference
All-time record346–403–24 (.463)
Bowl record3–2–1 (.583)
Conference titles7 (1 CCC, 5 FWC, 1 CCAA)
RivalriesSan Jose State (Battle for the Victor's Bell)
Fresno State
Santa Clara
Sacramento State
ColorsBlack and orange[1]
   
Fight songTiger Fight Song ("Hungry Tigers")
MascotPowercat

The Pacific Tigers football team represented the University of the Pacific in NCAA Division I-A (now FBS) college football. The team competed in the Big West Conference during their last season in 1995. They played their home games at Stagg Memorial Stadium in Stockton, California. On December 19, 1995, the Board of Regents voted to disband the team in order to save money for the athletic program, which was reported to have gone over $400,000 in debt. All scholarships were honored for current players of the team.[2][3]


The 1943 Pacific Tigers football team was an independent during the 1943 college football season. In their 11th season under head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, the Tigers compiled a record of 7–2 and finished the season ranked No. 19 in the AP Poll.[4] The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton. The Tigers beat a strong UCLA Bruins team, the No. 20 ranked Cal Bears and No. 10 ranked Saint Mary's Gaels. This led the 1943 Tigers Defensive Line to be rated 'the strongest in the West.' The team was at one time ranked No. 6 in the nation by the Associated Press The 1943 team produced Pacific's 1st All-Americans in Tackle Al McCaffrey and Running Back John Podesto. Amos Alonzo Stagg was also named "Coach of the Year" by the American Football Coaches Association and the Football Writers Association of America[5]


The 1949 Pacific Tigers football team was an independent during the 1949 college football season. In their third season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled an undefeated and untied 11–0 record, were ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 575 to 66. The Tigers' victories included wins over Cincinnati, San Diego State, San Jose State, Fresno State, Nevada, Hawaii, and Utah.

Quarterback Eddie LeBaron was selected by both the Associated Press and International News Service as a first-team player on the 1949 All-Pacific Coast football team.[6][7] Don Campora and Eddie LeBaron were both selected in the following 1950 NFL draft

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1943 Pacific Tigers football team

1943 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1943 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as an independent during the 1943 college football season. In their 11th season under head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, the Tigers compiled a record of 7–2 and finished the season ranked No. 19 in the AP Poll. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

1943 college football season

1943 college football season

The 1943 college football season was the 75th season of intercollegiate football in the United States. Competition included schools from the Big Ten Conference, the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC), the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the Big Six Conference, the Southwestern Conference, and numerous smaller conferences and independent programs. The season was played during World War II.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

1943 UCLA Bruins football team

1943 UCLA Bruins football team

The 1943 UCLA Bruins football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Los Angeles during the 1943 college football season. In their fifth year under head coach Edwin C. Horrell, the Bruins compiled a 1–8 record and finished in last place in the Pacific Coast Conference.

1943 California Golden Bears football team

1943 California Golden Bears football team

The 1943 California Golden Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of California, Berkeley as a member of the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) during the 1943 college football season. Led by ninth-year head coach Stub Allison, the team compiled an overall record of 4–6 with a 2–2 mark in conference play, finishing second in the PCC.

American Football Coaches Association

American Football Coaches Association

The American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) is an association of over 11,000 American football coaches and staff on all levels. According to its constitution, some of the main goals of the American Football Coaches Association are to "maintain the highest possible standards in football and the profession of coaching football," and to "provide a forum for the discussion and study of all matters pertaining to football and coaching." The AFCA, along with USA Today, is responsible for the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision Coaches Poll. The AFCA is also responsible for the Top 25 poll for Division II and Division III football.

1949 Pacific Tigers football team

1949 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1949 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as an independent during the 1949 college football season. In their third season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled an undefeated 11–0 record, were ranked No. 10 in the final AP Poll, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 575 to 66. The Tigers' victories included a 34–7 besting of Cincinnati, a 62–14 victory over San Diego State, and a 45–6 victory over Utah.

1949 college football season

1949 college football season

The 1949 college football season finished with four teams that were unbeaten and untied-- Notre Dame, Oklahoma, California, and Army had won all their games at season's end. Notre Dame, however, was the overwhelming choice for national champion in the AP Poll, with 172 of 208 first place votes. The Fighting Irish did not participate in the New Year's Day bowl games, which were played on January 2, 1950.

1949 Cincinnati Bearcats football team

1949 Cincinnati Bearcats football team

The 1949 Cincinnati Bearcats football team was an American football team that represented the University of Cincinnati as a member of the Mid-American Conference (MAC) during the 1949 college football season. The Bearcats were led by first-year head coach Sid Gillman and compiled a 7–4 record and were named MAC champions. The Bearcats would win against Toledo in the Glass Bowl.

1949 San Diego State Aztecs football team

1949 San Diego State Aztecs football team

The 1949 San Diego State Aztecs football team represented San Diego State College during the 1949 college football season.

1949 San Jose State Spartans football team

1949 San Jose State Spartans football team

The 1949 San Jose State Spartans football team represented San Jose State College during the 1949 college football season.

1949 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

1949 Fresno State Bulldogs football team

The 1949 Fresno State Bulldogs football team represented Fresno State College—now known as California State University, Fresno—as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1949 college football season. The team was led by head coach Alvin Pierson in his second one-year stint in the position. He had previously been head coach in 1945. The Bulldogs played home games at Ratcliffe Stadium on the campus of Fresno City College in Fresno, California. They finished the season with a record of three wins and eight losses. The Bulldogs were outscored 156–344 for the season.

Conference affiliations

Conference championships

Offensive formation in 1972
Offensive formation in 1972
Coach Chester Caddas (left) during a 1972 game
Coach Chester Caddas (left) during a 1972 game
1976 complete roster
1976 complete roster
Season Conference Coach Overall
Record
Conference
Record
1923 California Coast Erwin Righter 7–0–0 4–0
1936 Far West Amos Stagg 5–4–1 4–0
1938 Far West Amos Stagg 7–3 4–0
1940 Far West Amos Stagg 4–5 2–0
1941 Far West Amos Stagg 4–7 3–0
1942 Far West Amos Stagg 2–6–1 2–0
1947 California Collegiate Larry Siemering 10–1 5–0

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1923 Pacific Tigers football team

1923 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1923 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the California Coast Conference (CCC) during the 1923 college football season. The team was led by third-year head coach Erwin Righter and played home games at a field on campus in Stockton. Pacific compiled an overall record of 7–0 with a conference mark of 4–0. The Tigers dominated their opponents, outscoring them 171–12 for the season, and had five shutouts in the seven games.

California Coast Conference

California Coast Conference

The California Coast Conference was a short-lived intercollegiate athletic football conference that existed from 1922 to 1928. The league had members in California. All of the two-year schools that were in the conference are now members of a conference within the California Community College Athletic Association. Of the four-year schools, Fresno State Normal, State Teachers College at San Jose, Chico State Teachers College, and College of the Pacific (CA) left the conference and joined the Far Western Conference. Cal Poly did not become a 4-year school until 1941, and played as an independent after leaving the CCC. Loyola (CA) joined the West Coast Conference, while Santa Barbara State Teachers College joined the California Collegiate Athletic Association.

Erwin Righter

Erwin Righter

Cornelius Erwin "Swede" Righter was an American college football and college basketball player and coach, and a rugby union player who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics.

1936 Pacific Tigers football team

1936 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1936 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the Far Western Conference (FWC) during the 1936 college football season. Led by fourth-year head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific compiled an overall record of 5–4–1 with a mark of 4–0 in conference play, winning the FWC title. The team outscored its opponents 107 to 63 for the season. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

1938 Pacific Tigers football team

1938 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1938 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the Far Western Conference (FWC) during the 1938 college football season. Led by sixth-year head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific compiled an overall record of 7–3 with a mark of 4–0 in conference play, winning the FWC title. The team outscored its opponents 203 to 103 for the season. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

1940 Pacific Tigers football team

1940 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1940 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the Far Western Conference (FWC) during the 1940 college football season. Led by eighth-year head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific compiled an overall record of 4–5 with a mark of 2–0 in conference play, winning the FWC title. The team was outscored by its opponents 94 to 81 for the season. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

1941 Pacific Tigers football team

1941 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1941 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the Far Western Conference (FWC) during the 1941 college football season. Led by ninth-year head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific compiled an overall record of 4–7 with a mark of 3–0 in conference play, winning the FWC title. The team was outscored by its opponents 100 to 72 for the season. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

1942 Pacific Tigers football team

1942 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1942 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the Far Western Conference (FWC) during the 1942 college football season. Led by tenth-year head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, Pacific compiled an overall record of 2–6–1 with a mark of 2–0 in conference play, winning the FWC title. The team was outscored by its opponents 141 to 58 for the season and was shut out in five games. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

1947 Pacific Tigers football team

1947 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1947 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1947 college football season. In their first season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled an overall record of 10–1 with a mark 5–0 in conference play, winning the CCAA title. They outscored all opponents by a combined total of 373 to 111. At the end of the season, the Tigers were invited to two different bowl games. The first was the Grape Bowl in Lodi, California versus Utah State. The second was a New Year's Day (1948) game, the Raisin Bowl in Fresno, California against Wichita. The Tigers were victorious in both of the bowl games.

California Collegiate Athletic Association

California Collegiate Athletic Association

The California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division II level. All of its current members are public universities, and upon UC San Diego's departure on July 1, 2020, all are members of the California State University system.

Larry Siemering

Larry Siemering

Lawrence Edwin Siemering was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of San Francisco and professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Boston Redskins in 1935 and 1936. Siemering served as the head football coach at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California from 1947 to 1951 and at Arizona State University in 1951, compiling a career college football coached record of 41–8–4. He also was the head coach of the Canadian Football League's Calgary Stampeders in 1954. In all, Siemering's football career as a player and coach lasted more than forty years. At the time of his death, he was the oldest surviving professional football player at 98 years of age.

Bowl games

The Pacific Tigers played in 6 bowl games total, but only 3 NCAA-sanctioned bowl games with a record of 2–1.[8]

Season Coach Bowl Opponent Result
1946 Amos Stagg Optimist Bowldagger North Texas L 13–14
1947 Larry Siemering Grape Bowldagger Utah State W 35–21
1947 Larry Siemering Raisin Bowl Wichita State W 26–14
1948 Larry Siemering Grape Bowldagger Hardin–Simmons T 35–35
1951 Ernie Jorge Sun Bowl Texas Tech L 14–25
1952 Ernie Jorge Sun Bowl Southern Miss W 26–7

† Not an NCAA-sanctioned bowl game[8]

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National Collegiate Athletic Association

National Collegiate Athletic Association

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a nonprofit organization that regulates student athletics among about 1,100 schools in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico. It also organizes the athletic programs of colleges and universities in the United States and Canada and helps over 500,000 college student athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

1946 Pacific Tigers football team

1946 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1946 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1946 college football season. They had previously competed in the Far Western Conference (FWC) from 1925 to 1942 and as an independent from 1943 to 1945. In their 14th and final season under head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, the Tigers compiled a record of 4–7 with mark of 2–2 in conference play, tying for second place in the CCAA. At the end of the season, the Tigers were invited to the first, and only Optimist Bowl in Houston, where they lost to North Texas State Teachers. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

1947 Pacific Tigers football team

1947 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1947 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1947 college football season. In their first season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled an overall record of 10–1 with a mark 5–0 in conference play, winning the CCAA title. They outscored all opponents by a combined total of 373 to 111. At the end of the season, the Tigers were invited to two different bowl games. The first was the Grape Bowl in Lodi, California versus Utah State. The second was a New Year's Day (1948) game, the Raisin Bowl in Fresno, California against Wichita. The Tigers were victorious in both of the bowl games.

Larry Siemering

Larry Siemering

Lawrence Edwin Siemering was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of San Francisco and professionally in the National Football League (NFL) with the Boston Redskins in 1935 and 1936. Siemering served as the head football coach at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California from 1947 to 1951 and at Arizona State University in 1951, compiling a career college football coached record of 41–8–4. He also was the head coach of the Canadian Football League's Calgary Stampeders in 1954. In all, Siemering's football career as a player and coach lasted more than forty years. At the time of his death, he was the oldest surviving professional football player at 98 years of age.

Grape Bowl

Grape Bowl

The Grape Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game played in 1947 and 1948. It was held at the Grape Bowl stadium, in Lodi, California.

1948 Pacific Tigers football team

1948 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1948 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1948 college football season. In their second season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled an overall record of 7–1–2 with a mark 4–1 in conference play, placing second in the CCAA. They outscored all opponents by a combined total of 356 to 147. At the end of the season, the Tigers were invited to the Grape Bowl in Lodi, California, where they tied Hardin–Simmons, 35–35.

Hardin–Simmons Cowboys football

Hardin–Simmons Cowboys football

The Hardin–Simmons Cowboys football team represents Hardin–Simmons University in the sport of college football.

1951 Pacific Tigers football team

1951 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1951 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific during the 1951 college football season. Pacific played home games in Pacific Memorial Stadium in Stockton, California.

Ernie Jorge

Ernie Jorge

Ernest L. Jorge was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California from 1951 to 1952, compiling a record of 13–8–1. Jorge led the Pacific Tigers to consecutive appearances in the Sun Bowl. Jorge played high school football at Turlock High School in Turlock, California and college football at Saint Mary's College of California. He began his coaching career at Christian Brothers High School in Sacramento, California and later moved to Modesto High School in Modesto, California. He joined the coaching staff at Pacific in 1947 as line coach under Larry Siemering. Jorge was found dead at a Holiday Inn in Kent, Ohio, on October 6, 1971. He was working as a college scout for the Houston Oilers of the National Football League (NFL) at the time of his death.

1952 Sun Bowl

1952 Sun Bowl

The 1952 Sun Bowl was a college football postseason bowl game that featured the Texas Tech Red Raiders and the Pacific Tigers.

1951 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

1951 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team

The 1951 Texas Tech Red Raiders football team represented Texas Technological College—now known as Texas Tech University—as a member of the Border Conference during the 1951 college football season. Led by first-year head coach DeWitt Weaver, the Red Raiders compiled an overall record of 7–4 with a mark of 4–0 in conference play, winning the Border Conference title. Texas Tech was invited to the Sun Bowl, where they beat the Pacific Tigers.

Home stadiums

  • 1895-1899
Cyclers' Park -San Jose, CA
  • 1919-1922
C.O.P. Field -San Jose, CA
  • 1923-1928
College of the Pacific Field -Stockton, CA
  • 1929-1949
Baxter Stadium -Stockton, CA
Capacity (12,000)
  • 1948-1949
Grape Bowl Stadium -Lodi, CA
Only 3 games Capacity (18,000)
  • 1950-1995
Amos Alonzo Stagg Memorial Stadium -Stockton, CA
Capacity (35,975- 28,000)


Amos Alonzo Stagg Memorial Stadium, previously known as Pacific Memorial Stadium, was a 28,000-seat outdoor multi-purpose stadium, located on the campus of the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. The home venue of the Pacific Tigers was constructed in 1950 for football and later hosted women's soccer; it was closed in 2012 and demolished two years later.

Pacific Memorial Stadium was built 73 years ago in 1950 after the successful fund drive which netted $165,000. Construction began on the earth-filled structure in May 1950. Astonishingly, it was finished on time for the home opener (fifth game of the season) on October 21,[9] a build time of less than six months. The field's approximate alignment was north-northwest to south-southeast. It has been reported and researched the stadium was built on a former Yokuts village. These remains found were discovered in 1923 and raised concern for when the stadium was set to be demolished.

The stadium originally seated 35,975 with room for expansion to over 44,000, but renovations reduced the capacity to a configuration of 28,000. It was the venue for a 1997 friendly soccer match between Brazil and Honduras; notable striker Ronaldo scored six goals and Brazil won 8–2.

"The Pacific Club", which was added to the east-side of the stadium in 1973, was donated by Alex Spanos at a cost of $250,000. It sat up to 300 people, featured glass walls and had great views of the stadium. When not in use for sporting events, it also held many university functions and gatherings. The scoreboard in the north end zone was erected in 1982 at a cost of $140,000 and measured 35 by 17 feet (10.7 by 5.2 m). Thanks to donations from athletic boosters, lighting power at the stadium was upgraded from 35 to 75 footcandles in August 1986.

Pacific Memorial Stadium was officially renamed Amos Alonzo Stagg Memorial Stadium on October 15, 1988, to honor Amos Alonzo Stagg (1862–1965).[10][11][12] He ended his head coaching career at "College of the Pacific" in 1946, and donated the land for the stadium to be built in 1950.

On February 26, 2012, the university announced it would close Stagg Memorial Stadium to conduct a feasibility study to assess needed repairs, upgrades and changes required to make the facility meet modern standards in conjunction with a financial assessment to determine if the stadium could be repaired or if it should be replaced.[13]

The university began removal of Stagg Memorial Stadium on February 24, 2014, to make room for new athletics facilities, including a dedicated tennis center with 12 courts and a clubhouse, and new fields for soccer and field hockey.[14] The first Pacific field hockey home game on the new turf field at University of the Pacific was played on September 12, 2014, versus the University of Albany.[15] The groundbreaking ceremony for the Eve Zimmerman Tennis Center was held on October 17, 2014.[16]

In April 2022 the Stagg Memorial Plaza was dedicated and open to the public on the grounds of the old stadium. The 9,000 sq. ft. plaza, located off of Larry Heller Drive across from the Alex G. Spanos Center, is "envisioned as a gathering place for alumni and students who will learn of the storied history of Pacific Football through the stories and statues encircling the plaza. The plaza will also serve as a campus destination hosting several tailgates and gatherings annually associated with athletic and campus events."[17]

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Multi-purpose stadium

Multi-purpose stadium

A multi-purpose stadium is a type of stadium designed to be easily used by multiple types of events. While any stadium could potentially host more than one type of sport or event, this concept usually refers to a specific design philosophy that stresses multifunctionality over specificity. It is used most commonly in Canada and the United States, where the two most popular outdoor team sports – Canadian football/American football and baseball – require radically different facilities. Football uses a rectangular field while baseball is played on a diamond and large outfield. Since Canadian football fields are larger than American ones, the design specifications for Canadian facilities is somewhat less demanding. The particular design to accommodate both is usually an oval, although some later designs use an octorad. While building stadiums in this way means that sports teams and governments can share costs, it also imposes some challenges.

Pacific Tigers

Pacific Tigers

The Pacific Tigers represent the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, in intercollegiate athletics. The Tigers compete in NCAA Division I, and are currently in their second stint as members of the West Coast Conference (WCC).

College soccer

College soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. It is very prominent in United States, Japan, South Korea, Canada, and as well as in South Africa and the Philippines. The United Kingdom also has a university league. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are mostly amateur and are not paid.

1950 Pacific Tigers football team

1950 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1950 Pacific Tigers football team represented the College of the Pacific as an independent during the 1950 college football season. In their fourth season under head coach Larry Siemering, the Tigers compiled a record of 7–3–1 and outscored their opponents 348–131. Debuting this season was the new Pacific Memorial Stadium, in Stockton, California, which was the Tigers' home until the football program was discontinued after the 1995 season.

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Honduras national football team

Honduras national football team

The Honduras national football team represents Honduras in men's international football. The team is governed by the Federación Nacional Autónoma de Fútbol de Honduras (FENAFUTH). They are nicknamed Los Catrachos, La Bicolor, or La H.

1973 Pacific Tigers football team

1973 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1973 Pacific Tigers football team represented the University of the Pacific (UOP) in the 1973 NCAA Division I football season as a member of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association.

Alex Spanos

Alex Spanos

Alexander Gus Spanos was an American billionaire real estate developer, founder of the A. G. Spanos Companies, and the majority owner of the San Diego / Los Angeles Chargers of the National Football League (NFL).

Foot-candle

Foot-candle

A foot-candle is a non-SI unit of illuminance or light intensity. The foot-candle is defined as one lumen per square foot. This unit is commonly used in lighting layouts in parts of the world where United States customary units are used, mainly the United States. Nearly all of the world uses the corresponding SI derived unit lux, defined as one lumen per square meter.

1986 Pacific Tigers football team

1986 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1986 Pacific Tigers football team represented the University of the Pacific (UOP) in the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season as a member of the Pacific Coast Athletic Association.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

1946 Pacific Tigers football team

1946 Pacific Tigers football team

The 1946 Pacific Tigers football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Pacific—now known as the University of the Pacific—in Stockton, California as a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) during the 1946 college football season. They had previously competed in the Far Western Conference (FWC) from 1925 to 1942 and as an independent from 1943 to 1945. In their 14th and final season under head coach Amos Alonzo Stagg, the Tigers compiled a record of 4–7 with mark of 2–2 in conference play, tying for second place in the CCAA. At the end of the season, the Tigers were invited to the first, and only Optimist Bowl in Houston, where they lost to North Texas State Teachers. The Tigers played home games at Baxter Stadium in Stockton.

Rivalries

San Jose State

Battle for the Victor's Bell

The now defunct, nearly 100 year, rivalry match up between the SJSU Spartans and the Pacific Tigers began in January 1896 and ended in 1995 when Pacific dropped its football program. The 'Spartan-Tiger Football Game' was played 72 times between 1896 and 1995.

Due to the "private vs. public" institutional competitiveness and the close geographical proximity of the two schools, a natural "cross-town" rivalry was born. University of the Pacific was founded in 1851 in Santa Clara, California, and claims to be the first institution of higher education in California.[18] San José State University was founded in 1857 and is California's first public institution of higher education.

In 1949, in a game which drew national attention, the "Victor's Bell" was unveiled.[19] The Victor's Bell would go to the winner of subsequent Tiger-Spartan games. The bell was two feet tall and waist-high on a rolling cart. The bell was half black with an orange "P" for Pacific and half blue with a gold "SJ" for San Jose.[20]

The Spartans led the series 43–23–6 when the rivalry ended at the close of the 1995 season.


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Final AP Poll rankings

Season Rank
1943 No. 19
1949 No. 10


National and Conference Award Winner

The Glenn "Pop" Warner Memorial Trophy was awarded annually by the Palo Club to the most valuable senior player on the West Coast. It was awarded from 1949 to 2004.: 113 [21] [22] Notably, all but 5 recipients played for Pac-8/Pac-10 institutions. The award is distinguished from the unaffiliated W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy, presented annually from 1951 to 1978 to the top player on the Pacific Coast regardless of class-year.

Pop Warner Trophy
Year Name Position
1949 Eddie LeBaron QB
  • Eddie LeBaron, was the inaugural Pop Warner Memorial Trophy recipient in 1949.


National Football Foundation Gold Medal
Year Name Position
1960 Amos Alonzo Stagg Head Coach

The National Football Foundation recognizes individuals who demonstrate outstanding support for promoting the game of amateur football. The NFF Gold Medal is the highest award offered by the National Football Foundation.


AFCA Coach of the Year
Year Name Position
1943 Amos Alonzo Stagg Head Coach


Football Writers Association of America Coach of the Year
Year Name Position
1943 Amos Alonzo Stagg Head Coach


Corbett Award
Year Name Position
2000 Cedric Dempsey Athletic Director
2015 Carl Miller Athletic Director

This honor is awarded annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA). It is presented "to the collegiate administrator who has most typified Corbett's devotion to intercollegiate athletics and worked unceasingly for its betterment."


NFF National Scholar-Athlete Award
Year Name Position
1979 Bruce Filarsky DL

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Senior (education)

Senior (education)

The term senior, in regard to education, has different meanings depending on the country.

West Coast of the United States

West Coast of the United States

The West Coast of the United States, also known as the Pacific Coast, Pacific states, and the western seaboard, is the coastline along which the Western United States meets the North Pacific Ocean. The term typically refers to the contiguous U.S. states of California, Oregon, and Washington, but sometimes includes Alaska and Hawaii, especially by the United States Census Bureau as a U.S. geographic division.

1949 college football season

1949 college football season

The 1949 college football season finished with four teams that were unbeaten and untied-- Notre Dame, Oklahoma, California, and Army had won all their games at season's end. Notre Dame, however, was the overwhelming choice for national champion in the AP Poll, with 172 of 208 first place votes. The Fighting Irish did not participate in the New Year's Day bowl games, which were played on January 2, 1950.

2004 NCAA Division I-A football season

2004 NCAA Division I-A football season

The 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The regular season began on August 28, 2004 and ended on December 4, 2004. The postseason concluded on January 4, 2005 with the Orange Bowl, which served as the season's BCS National Championship Game.

Pac-12 Conference

Pac-12 Conference

The Pac-12 Conference is a collegiate athletic conference, that operates in the Western United States, participating in 24 sports at the NCAA Division I level. Its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the highest level of college football in the nation.

W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy

W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy

The W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy was awarded by the Helms Athletic Foundation from 1951 to 1978 to the outstanding college football player on the Pacific Coast. The recipient was determined based on votes cast by West Coast football writers and later broadcasters as well. Award recipients include College Football Hall of Fame inductees, O. J. Simpson, Mike Garrett, Jim Plunkett, Joe Kapp, Craig Morton, Billy Kilmer, and Anthony Davis.

1951 college football season

1951 college football season

The 1951 college football season finished with seven unbeaten major college teams, of which five were unbeaten and untied. Ultimately, the Tennessee Volunteers were voted the best team by the Associated Press, followed by the Michigan State Spartans, with the Vols having a plurality of first place votes. Tennessee lost in the Sugar Bowl to the equally undefeated and untied No. 3 Maryland Terrapins, but the postseason games were not taken into account by the major polls. Tennessee, Michigan State, and Illinois all claim national championships for 1951.

1978 NCAA Division I-A football season

1978 NCAA Division I-A football season

The 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first season of Division I-A college football; Division I-A was created in 1978 when Division I was subdivided into Division I-A and Division I-AA for football only. With the exception of seven teams from the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC), Division I teams from the 1977 season played in Division I-A during the 1978 season. The SWAC teams, along with five conferences and five other teams formerly in Division II, played in Division I-AA.

Eddie LeBaron

Eddie LeBaron

Edward Wayne LeBaron Jr. was a Korean War veteran and an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the College of the Pacific. He also was an executive vice president of the Atlanta Falcons.

National Football Foundation Gold Medal winners

National Football Foundation Gold Medal winners

Each football season, the National Football Foundation and the College Football Hall of Fame pay tribute to a select few with awards of excellence for exhibiting superior qualities of scholarship, citizenship and leadership. The Foundation also recognizes individuals who demonstrate outstanding support for the NFF and its mission of promoting the game of amateur football. The NFF Gold Medal is the highest award offered by the NFF.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

Football Writers Association of America

Football Writers Association of America

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) is an organization of college football media members in the United States founded in 1941. It is composed of approximately 1,200 professional sports writers from both print and Internet media outlets. The membership includes journalists, broadcasters and publicists, as well as key executives in all the areas that involve the game.

Individual honors

Retired numbers

Dick Bass and Eddie LeBaron, two of the players whose numbers were retired by Pacific
Dick Bass and Eddie LeBaron, two of the players whose numbers were retired by Pacific
Dick Bass and Eddie LeBaron, two of the players whose numbers were retired by Pacific
No. Player Pos. Career No. ret. Ref.
22 Dick Bass RB 19551958 September 1984 [23]
39 Willard Harrell RB 1971–1974 May 1986 [23]
40 Eddie LeBaron QB 1946–1949 March 1950 [23]
41 Eddie Macon RB 1949–1951 April 2008 [23]

College Football Hall of Fame

College Football Hall of Fame
Name Position Year Inducted
Amos Stagg Coach 19331946 1951
Eddie LeBaron QB 19461949 1980
Wayne Hardin QB / HB / Coach 19461948, 1949, 1952 2013

Pro Football Hall of Fame

Pro Football Hall of Fame
Name Position Year Inducted
Tom Flores QB/ Coach 1957-1958, 1958 2021

All-Americans

Year Player Pos. Team
1943 Art McCaffray DT 1st Team/ UP-2nd Team
1943 John Podesto FB 1st Team/ AP-3rd Team
1943 John Podesto HB 1st Team
1949 Eddie LeBaron QB 1st Team/ UP-2nd Team
1953 Ken Buck DE 1st Team
1958 Dick Bass RB AP-2nd Team/ UPI-2nd Team
1973 Willie Viney G AP-3rd Team
1974 Willard Harrell RB AP-2nd Team
1985 Nick Holt LB Honorable Mention

Discover more about Individual honors related topics

List of NCAA football retired numbers

List of NCAA football retired numbers

Teams in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) retire jersey numbers of players who either are considered by the team to have made significant contributions to that team's success, or who have experienced untimely deaths during their playing career. As with other leagues, once a team retires a player's jersey number, it never issues the number to any other player, unless the player or team explicitly allows it.

Dick Bass

Dick Bass

Richard Lee Bass was an American football running back from who played for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL) from 1960 to 1969.

1955 college football season

1955 college football season

The 1955 college football season saw the Oklahoma Sooners win the national championship after going 10–0–0. Although the final poll was taken before the postseason bowl games, Oklahoma played against the nation's other unbeaten and untied (10–0–0) team, the Maryland Terrapins, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, and won 20–6.

1958 NCAA College Division football season

1958 NCAA College Division football season

The 1958 NCAA College Division football season was the third season of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the NCAA College Division level.

Eddie LeBaron

Eddie LeBaron

Edward Wayne LeBaron Jr. was a Korean War veteran and an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the College of the Pacific. He also was an executive vice president of the Atlanta Falcons.

Eddie Macon

Eddie Macon

Edwin Donald Macon was a professional American football halfback.

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg

Amos Alonzo Stagg was an American athlete and college coach in multiple sports, primarily American football. He served as the head football coach at the International YMCA Training School (1890–1891), the University of Chicago (1892–1932), and the College of the Pacific (1933–1946), compiling a career college football record of 314–199–35 (.605). His undefeated Chicago Maroons teams of 1905 and 1913 were recognized as national champions. He was also the head basketball coach for one season at Chicago (1920–1921), and the Maroons' head baseball coach for twenty seasons.

Coach (sport)

Coach (sport)

A sports coach is a person coaching in sport, involved in the direction, instruction and training of a sports team or athlete.

1933 college football season

1933 college football season

The 1933 college football season saw the Michigan Wolverines repeat as winners of the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy as national champion under the Dickinson System.

1946 college football season

1946 college football season

The 1946 college football season was the 78th season of intercollegiate football in the United States. Competition included schools from the Big Ten Conference, the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC), the Southeastern Conference (SEC), the Big Six Conference, the Southern Conference, the Southwestern Conference, and numerous smaller conferences and independent programs. The season saw the return of many programs which had suspended play during World War II, and also the enrollment of many veterans returning from the war.

1949 college football season

1949 college football season

The 1949 college football season finished with four teams that were unbeaten and untied-- Notre Dame, Oklahoma, California, and Army had won all their games at season's end. Notre Dame, however, was the overwhelming choice for national champion in the AP Poll, with 172 of 208 first place votes. The Fighting Irish did not participate in the New Year's Day bowl games, which were played on January 2, 1950.

Halfback (American football)

Halfback (American football)

A halfback (HB) is an offensive position in American football, whose duties involve lining up in the offensive backfield and carrying the ball on most rushing plays, i.e. a running back. When the principal ball carrier lines up deep in the backfield, and especially when that player is placed behind another player, as in the I formation, that player is instead referred to as a tailback.

Notable players and alumni

Discover more about Notable players and alumni related topics

Hue Jackson

Hue Jackson

Hue Jackson is an American football coach who is the head football coach at Grambling State University. An offensive assistant at both the collegiate and professional levels, he held coordinator positions in the National Football League (NFL) with the Washington Redskins in 2003, the Atlanta Falcons in 2007, the Oakland Raiders in 2010, and the Cincinnati Bengals from 2014 to 2015. He also served as the head coach of the Raiders in 2011 and Cleveland Browns from 2016 to 2018. Jackson compiled a 3–36–1 record with the Browns, including a winless season in 2017, which is the worst record among coaches who presided over an NFL team for at least 40 games.

Greg Robinson (American football coach)

Greg Robinson (American football coach)

Gregory McIntosh Robinson was an American college and professional football coach. Robinson served as the head football coach at Syracuse University from 2005 to 2008. He has served as an assistant coach with several other college football programs and for three teams in the National Football League (NFL): the New York Jets from 1990 to 1994, the Denver Broncos from 1995 to 2000, and the Kansas City Chiefs from 2001 to 2003. With the Broncos, Robinson was a member of two Super Bowl championship teams. In more recent years he has served as the defensive coordinator at the University of Texas at Austin, in 2004 and for part of the 2013 season, and at the University of Michigan, from 2009 to 2010.

Ed Donatell

Ed Donatell

Ed Donatell is an American football coach who last served as the defensive coordinator for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). Donatell has 42 years of coaching experience, including 31 seasons in the NFL. In addition to coaching defensive backs for Broncos Head Coach Vic Fangio for eight years with the Denver Broncos (2019–21), Chicago Bears (2015–18) and San Francisco 49ers (2011–14), he has been a defensive coordinator for eight seasons with Green Bay Packers (2000–03), Atlanta Falcons (2004–06), University of Washington (2008) and the Denver Broncos (2019–21).

Dante Scarnecchia

Dante Scarnecchia

Dante Scarnecchia is a former American football offensive line coach and assistant head coach. He worked for the New England Patriots of the National Football League for 34 years. Scarnecchia has spent the majority of his professional coaching career with the Patriots, joining them in 1982, only leaving in 1989 to coach with the Indianapolis Colts, before returning to the Patriots two years later. He remained with the team as a coach until his retirement following the 2013 season. He was rehired as the offensive line coach on February 16, 2016.

Bruce Coslet

Bruce Coslet

Bruce Coslet is a former American college and professional football player and professional football coach. A tight end, he played for the University of the Pacific and in 1969 debuted with the American Football League's Cincinnati Bengals. He played for the Bengals in the NFL through 1976.

Greg Seamon

Greg Seamon

Greg Seamon is an American football coach. He served as an assistant coach for the Dallas Cowboys in 2002 and for the Cleveland Browns from 2016 to 2018.

Brad Seely

Brad Seely

Brad Seely is a former American football coach.

Chester Caddas

Chester Caddas

Chester Caddas was an American football coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of the Pacific from 1972 to 1978 and at Colorado State University in 1981, compiling a career college football record of 38–44–2.

Bob Lee (quarterback)

Bob Lee (quarterback)

Robert Melville Lee is a former professional American football quarterback and punter. He played college football for Arizona State University and the University of the Pacific. He was selected 441st overall in the 1968 NFL/AFL draft by the Minnesota Vikings. He was nicknamed "General" Bob Lee during his brief period of success with the Atlanta Falcons. After his stint with the Falcons he rejoined the Vikings before ending his fourteen year career with the Los Angeles Rams.

Eddie LeBaron

Eddie LeBaron

Edward Wayne LeBaron Jr. was a Korean War veteran and an American football quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the College of the Pacific. He also was an executive vice president of the Atlanta Falcons.

Don Campora

Don Campora

Don Carlo Campora was an American gridiron football player and coach. He played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the San Francisco 49ers in 1950 and 1952 and for the Washington Redskins in 1953. In 1954, he played with the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League (CFL). Campora played college football at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California and served as the school's head football coach from 1964 to 1965. He was selected by the 49ers in the second round with the 23rd overall pick of the 1950 NFL Draft.

Bob Cope

Bob Cope

Bob Cope was an American football coach. In a 32-year career, he served as assistant coach at Vanderbilt, SMU, Arkansas, Ole Miss, Purdue, Pacific, USC, Baylor, and Kansas State. During his career, he coached 23 nationally ranked defenses and participated in eight bowl games.

Source: "Pacific Tigers football", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Tigers_football.

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References
  1. ^ Pacific Tigers Graphic Identity Sheet (PDF). October 18, 2017. Retrieved February 15, 2020.
  2. ^ "Pacific Decides to Drop Football". Los Angeles Times. 20 December 1995. Retrieved 18 October 2021.
  3. ^ Gilbert, Lori. "Ten years ago, the final horn sounded for Pacific". recordnet.com. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  4. ^ Marvin, Joe (May 2001). "Stagg at Pacific (1943-1946)". College Football Historical Society Newsletter. LA84 Foundation. 14 (3): 8–10. Retrieved May 2, 2022.
  5. ^ "Pacific Football Reunion and Hall of Fame Weekend".
  6. ^ "Carpenter Draws Most Votes in Winning Position ON Associate Press' 25th All-Coast Selection". The Corvallis Gazette-Times. November 25, 1949. p. 7.
  7. ^ Joe St. Amant (November 22, 1949). "Bears Pace All-Pacific Coast Football Eleven". El Paso Herald-Post. p. 10.
  8. ^ a b "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 2017-01-08.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Sawyer, George (October 23, 1950). "COP stadium dedication has everything -- except Tiger win". Lodi News-Sentinel. (California). p. 6.
  10. ^ "UOP to face San Jose: Stagg Stadium dedication". Lodi News-Sentinel. (California). October 15, 1988. p. 20.
  11. ^ "Spartans sock UOP, 35-17". Lodi News-Sentinel. (California). October 17, 1988. p. 17.
  12. ^ Kretzer, Dale (March 18, 1965). "Last whistle blows for famous coach". Lodi News Sentinel. (California). p. 1.
  13. ^ "Stagg Stadium to Close While University Conducts Feasiblity [sic] Study". Pacifictigers.com. Archived from the original on 23 June 2012. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  14. ^ "Stagg Stadium removal to begin; new Athletics facilities coming this fall". Pacific.edu. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  15. ^ "Field Hockey first home game on new field". University of the Pacific. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  16. ^ "Former Tiger Tennis ace helps celebrate new tennis complex". Pacific.edu. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  17. ^ "FPacific Football Legacy Project". Pacific.edu. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  18. ^ "Pacific's Mission". University of the Pacific. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved October 13, 2016.
  19. ^ Mountjoy, Nicole Grady (2021). The Campus History Series: The University of the Pacific. Arcadia publishing. ISBN 9781467107068.
  20. ^ "Spear the Spartans".
  21. ^ Pac-12 Conference Mar 3, 2005 (2005-03-03). "J.J. Arrington Wins Pop Warner Award". Pac-12. Retrieved 2017-06-02.
  22. ^ "Shaw receives Warner Trophy". Madera Tribune. 26 January 1955. Retrieved 2022-12-01.
  23. ^ a b c d RETIRED NUMBERS/JERSEYS at Pacifictigers.com
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