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Oda Buldigilu (Ethiopian District)

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Oda Buldigilu is one of the 20 Districts of Ethiopia, or woredas, in the Benishangul-Gumuz Region of Ethiopia. Part of the Asosa Zone, it is bordered by the Kamashi Zone in the north and east, by Oromia Region in the south, by Bambasi in the southwest, by Asosa in the west, and by Menge in the northwest. The major settlement in this woreda is Oda Buldigilu.

This woreda is located on the eastern slopes of the Dabus River, with elevations ranging from approximately 2000 meters above sea level in the east to just under 1000 meters at the bottom of the Dabus valley.

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Districts of Ethiopia

Districts of Ethiopia

Districts of Ethiopia, also called woredas, are the third level of the administrative divisions of Ethiopia – after zones and the regional states.

Benishangul-Gumuz Region

Benishangul-Gumuz Region

Benishangul-Gumuz is a regional state in northwestern Ethiopia to the border of Sudan. It was previously known as Region 6. The region's capital is Assosa. Following the adoption of the 1995 constitution, the region was created from the westernmost portion of the Gojjam province, and the northwestern portion of the Welega Province. The name of the region comes from two peoples – Berta and Gumuz.

Ethiopia

Ethiopia

Ethiopia, officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, is a landlocked country in the Horn of Africa. It shares borders with Eritrea to the north, Djibouti to the northeast, Somalia to the east and northeast, Kenya to the south, South Sudan to the west, and Sudan to the northwest. Ethiopia has a total area of 1,100,000 square kilometres. As of 2022, it is home to around 113.5 million inhabitants, making it the 13th-most populous country in the world and the 2nd-most populous in Africa after Nigeria. The national capital and largest city, Addis Ababa, lies several kilometres west of the East African Rift that splits the country into the African and Somali tectonic plates.

Asosa Zone

Asosa Zone

Assosa is a zone in Benishangul-Gumuz Region of Ethiopia. This Zone was named after the Assosa Sultanate, which had approximately the same boundaries. Assosa is bordered on the south by the Mao-Komo special woreda, on the west by Sudan, and on the northeast by the Kamashi. The largest town in this zone is Assosa. Its highest point is Mount Bambasi, located in the woreda of the same name. The majority ethnic group in the zone is the Berta people.

Kamashi Zone

Kamashi Zone

Kamashi is one of the three Zones in the Benishangul-Gumuz Region of Ethiopia. It covers part of the southern bank of the Abay and the valley of the Didessa Rivers. The Zone is bordered on the south and east by the Oromia Region, on the west by the Asosa and Sudan, and on the north by Metekel and the Amhara Region, which lie on the further bank of the Abay. The majority ethnic group in the zone is the Gumuz people, with significant Oromo and Amhara minorities as well.

Asosa (woreda)

Asosa (woreda)

Asosa is a woreda in Benishangul-Gumuz Region, Ethiopia. Part of the Asosa Zone, it is bordered by Kurmuk and Komesha in the north, by Menge in the northeast, by Oda Buldigilu in the east, by Bambasi in the southeast, by Mao-Komo special woreda in the south and by Sudan in the west. This Woreda is named after its largest settlement, Asosa. Rivers include the Yabus and its tributary the Buldidine. One of the highest points in Asosa is Mount Bange.

Menge (Ethiopian District)

Menge (Ethiopian District)

Menge is one of the 20 Districts of Ethiopia, or woredas, in the Benishangul-Gumuz Region of Ethiopia. Part of the Asosa Zone, it is bordered by Asosa in the southwest, by Komesha in the west, by Sherkole in the north, by Kamashi Zone in the northeast, and by the Dabus River on the east which separates it from Oda Buldigilu. This woreda is named after its only town, Menge.

Dabus River

Dabus River

The Dabus River is a north-flowing tributary of the Abay River in southwestern Ethiopia; it joins its parent stream at 10°36′38″N 35°8′58″E. The Dabus has a drainage area of about 21,032 square kilometers.

Demographics

The 2007 national census reported a total population for this woreda of 54,584, of whom 28,885 were men and 25,699 were women; 3,165 or 5.8% of its population were urban dwellers. The majority of the inhabitants said they were Moslem, with 67.53% of the population reporting they observed this belief, while 27.37% of the population were Protestant and 4.14% practised Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity.[1]

Based on figures from the Central Statistical Agency in 2005, this woreda has an estimated total population of 29,604, of whom 15,282 are men and 14,322 are women. With an estimated area of 1,387.19 square kilometers, Oda Godere has a population density of 21.3 people per square kilometer which is greater than the Zone average of 19.95.[2]

The 1994 national census reported a total population for this woreda of 22,320 in 4,743 households, of whom 11,573 were men and 10,747 were women; no urban dwellers were recorded in this woreda. The three largest ethnic groups reported in Oda Godere were the Berta (77.7%), the Oromo (18.6%), and the Gumuz (3.4%); all other ethnic groups made up 0.3% of the population. Berta is spoken as a first language by 77.4%, 20% speak Oromiffa, and 2.4% speak Gumuz; the remaining 0.2% spoke all other primary languages reported. The majority of the inhabitants were Muslim, with 70% of the population stating that they embraced that faith, while 14.8% were Protestants, and 11.5% professed Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity. Concerning education, 2.73% of the population were considered literate, which is less than the Zone average of 18.49%; only 0.55% of children aged 7–12 were in primary school, while none of the children aged 13–14 were in junior secondary school, nor were any of the inhabitants aged 15–18 in senior secondary school. Concerning sanitary conditions, 3.7% of all houses had access to safe drinking water, and 2.7% had toilet facilities at the time of the census.[3]

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Islam in Ethiopia

Islam in Ethiopia

Islam is the second-largest religion in Ethiopia behind Christianity, with 31.3 to 35.9 percent of the total population of around 113.5 million people professing the religion as of 2022.

P'ent'ay

P'ent'ay

P'ent'ay is an originally Amharic–Tigrinya language term for Pentecostal and other Eastern-oriented Protestant Christians within Ethiopia and Eritrea, and the Ethiopian and Eritrean diaspora. Today, the term refers to all Evangelical Protestant denominations and organisations in Ethiopian and Eritrean societies as Ethiopian–Eritrean Evangelicalism or the Ethiopian–Eritrean Evangelical Church. Sometimes the denominations and organizations are also known as Wenigēlawī.

Berta people

Berta people

The Berta (Bertha) or Funj are an ethnic group living along the border of Sudan and Ethiopia. They speak a Nilo-Saharan language that is not related to those of their Nilo-Saharan neighbors. Their total Ethiopian population is about 183,000 people.

Oromo people

Oromo people

The Oromo are a Cushitic ethnic group native to the Oromia region of Ethiopia and parts of Northern Kenya, who speak the Oromo language, which is part of the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family. They are one of the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia.

Gumuz people

Gumuz people

The Gumuz are an ethnic group speaking a Nilo-Saharan language inhabiting the Benishangul-Gumuz Region and the Qwara woreda in western Ethiopia, as well as the Fazogli region in Sudan. They speak the Gumuz language, which belongs to the Nilo-Saharan family. The Gumuz number around 200,000 individuals.

Berta language

Berta language

Berta proper, a.k.a. Gebeto, is spoken by the Berta in Sudan and Ethiopia.

Oromo language

Oromo language

Oromo, in the linguistic literature of the early 20th century also called Galla, is an Afroasiatic language that belongs to the Cushitic branch. It is native to the Ethiopian state of Oromia and Northern Kenya and is spoken predominantly by the Oromo people and neighboring ethnic groups in the Horn of Africa. It is used as a lingua franca particularly in the Oromia Region and northeastern Kenya.

Gumuz language

Gumuz language

Gumuz is a dialect cluster spoken along the border of Ethiopia and Sudan. It has been tentatively classified within the Nilo-Saharan family. Most Ethiopian speakers live in Kamashi Zone and Metekel Zone of the Benishangul-Gumuz Region, although a group of 1,000 reportedly live outside the town of Welkite. The Sudanese speakers live in the area east of Er Roseires, around Famaka and Fazoglo on the Blue Nile, extending north along the border. Dimmendaal et al. (2019) suspect that the poorly attested varieties spoken along the river constitute a distinct language, Kadallu.

Education in Ethiopia

Education in Ethiopia

Education in Ethiopia was dominated by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church for many centuries until secular education was adopted in the early 1900s. Prior to 1974, Ethiopia had an estimated illiteracy rate below 50% and compared poorly with the rest of Africa in the provision of schools and universities. After the Ethiopian Revolution, emphasis was placed on increasing literacy in rural areas. Practical subjects were stressed, as was the teaching of socialism. By 2015, the literacy rate had increased to 49.1%, still poor compared to most of the rest of Africa.

Water supply and sanitation in Ethiopia

Water supply and sanitation in Ethiopia

Access to water supply and sanitation in Ethiopia is amongst the lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa and the entire world. While access has increased substantially with funding from foreign aid, much still remains to be done. Some factors inhibiting the achievement of these goals are the limited capacity of water bureaus in the country's nine regions, two city administrations and water desks in the 770 districts of Ethiopia (woredas); insufficient cost recovery for proper operation and maintenance; and different policies and procedures used by various donors, notwithstanding the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness.

Source: "Oda Buldigilu (Ethiopian District)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oda_Buldigilu_(Ethiopian_District).

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Notes
  1. ^ Census 2007 Tables: Benishangul-Gumuz Region Archived 2015-09-23 at the Wayback Machine, Tables 2.1 and 3.4
  2. ^ CSA 2005 National Statistics , Table B.3 Archived November 23, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ 1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Benishangul-Gumuz Region, Vol. 1 Archived 2015-09-23 at the Wayback Machine, Tables 2.1, 2.9, 2.12, 2.15, 2.19, 3.5, 3.7, 6.11, 6.13 (accessed 5 January 2009)

Coordinates: 10°10′N 35°10′E / 10.167°N 35.167°E / 10.167; 35.167

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