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Obluchensky District

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Obluchensky District
Облученский район
Obluch'e town, Obluchensky District
Obluch'e town, Obluchensky District
Coat of arms of Obluchensky District
Location of Obluchensky District in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast
Coordinates: 49°00′N 131°03′E / 49.000°N 131.050°E / 49.000; 131.050Coordinates: 49°00′N 131°03′E / 49.000°N 131.050°E / 49.000; 131.050
CountryRussia
Federal subjectJewish Autonomous Oblast[1]
Established1945Edit this on Wikidata
Administrative centerObluchye[1]
Area
 • Total13,300 km2 (5,100 sq mi)
Population
 • Total29,035
 • Estimate 
(2018)[4]
25,513 (−12.1%)
 • Density2.2/km2 (5.7/sq mi)
 • Urban
85.9%
 • Rural
14.1%
Administrative structure
 • Inhabited localities[1]1 Cities/towns, 7 Urban-type settlements[5], 19 Rural localities
Municipal structure
 • Municipally incorporated asObluchensky Municipal District[6]
 • Municipal divisions[7]6 Urban settlements, 1 Rural settlements
Time zoneUTC+10 (MSK+7 Edit this on Wikidata[8])
OKTMO ID99620000
Websitehttp://obl-raion.ru/

Obluchensky District (Russian: Облученский райо́н) is an administrative[1] and municipal[6] district (raion), one of the five in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia. It is located in the north, east, and center of the autonomous oblast. The area of the district is 13,300 square kilometers (5,100 sq mi).[2] Its administrative center is the town of Obluchye.[1] Population: 29,035 (2010 Census);[3] 36,515 (2002 Census);[9] 43,062 (1989 Census).[10] The population of Obluchye accounts for 32.3% of the district's total population.[3]

Discover more about Obluchensky District related topics

Russian language

Russian language

Russian Russian [ˈruskʲɪj jɪˈzɨk] is an East Slavic language mainly spoken across Russia. It is the native language of the Russians, and belongs to the Indo-European language family. It is one of four living East Slavic languages, and is also a part of the larger Balto-Slavic languages. Besides Russia itself, Russian is an official language in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan, and is used widely as a lingua franca throughout Ukraine, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and to some extent in the Baltic states. It was the de facto language of the former Soviet Union, and continues to be used in public life with varying proficiency in all of the post-Soviet states.

Raion

Raion

A raion is a type of administrative unit of several post-Soviet states. The term is used for both a type of subnational entity and a division of a city. The word is from the French rayon, and is commonly translated as "district" in English.

Administrative divisions of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Administrative divisions of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Jewish Autonomous Oblast

The Jewish Autonomous Oblast is a federal subject of Russia in the Russian Far East, bordering Khabarovsk Krai and Amur Oblast in Russia and Heilongjiang province in China. Its administrative center is the town of Birobidzhan.

Russia

Russia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. It is the largest country in the world, covering over 17,098,246 square kilometres (6,601,670 sq mi), and encompassing one-eighth of Earth's inhabitable landmass. Russia extends across eleven time zones and shares land boundaries with fourteen countries, more than any other country but China. It is the world's ninth-most populous country and Europe's most populous country, with a population of 146 million people. The country's capital and largest city is Moscow, the largest city entirely within Europe. Saint Petersburg is Russia's cultural centre and second-largest city. Other major urban areas include Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg, Nizhny Novgorod, and Kazan.

Obluchye, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Obluchye, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Obluchye is a town and the administrative center of Obluchensky District in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia, located on the Khingan River, 159 kilometers (99 mi) west of Birobidzhan, the administrative center of the autonomous oblast. Population: 9,379 (2010 Census); 11,069 (2002 Census); 12,016 (1989 Census).

Russian Census (2010)

Russian Census (2010)

The Russian Census of 2010 was the second census of the Russian Federation population after the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Preparations for the census began in 2007 and it took place between October 14 and October 25.

Russian Census (2002)

Russian Census (2002)

The Russian Census of 2002 was the first census of the Russian Federation since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, carried out on October 9 through October 16, 2002. It was carried out by the Russian Federal Service of State Statistics (Rosstat).

Soviet Census (1989)

Soviet Census (1989)

The 1989 Soviet census, conducted between 12 and 19 January of that year, was the last one that took place in the Soviet Union. The census found the total population to be 286,730,819 inhabitants. In 1989, the Soviet Union ranked as the third most populous in the world, above the United States, although it was well below China and India.

Geography

Obluchensky District is located in the northwest region of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast; it is the largest district in the oblast. About 50 km of the Amur River runs along the western border of Obluchensky. The district is dominated by mountain ranges such as the Bureya Range with 1,421 metres (4,662 ft) high Mount Studencheskaya, the highest point of the oblast,[11] and the Lesser Khingan, through which flow the upper and middle reaches of the Bira River. The Bira basin runs west-to-east through the middle of the district, and is relatively narrow. Most of the larger towns of the district are along the Bira. The southeastern area of the district lies on the lowlands and plains of the Amur itself. The district is about 150 km west of the city of Khabarovsk, and the area measures 90 km (north-south) by 190 km (west-east).[2] The Bastak Nature Reserve is located in Obluchensky and Biroidzhansky Districts.[2]

The district is bordered on the north and east by Khabarovsk Krai, on the west by China across the Amur, and on the south by Birobidzhansky District, Leninsky District, and Oktyabrsky District.

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Bureya Range

Bureya Range

The Bureya Range is a mountain range in the Khabarovsk Krai and Jewish Autonomous Oblast in the southern part of the Russian Far East.

Mount Studencheskaya

Mount Studencheskaya

Mount Studencheskaya is a peak in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia. It is the highest point of the oblast.

Lesser Khingan

Lesser Khingan

Lesser Khingan is a mountain range in China's Heilongjiang province and the adjacent parts of Russia's Amur Oblast and Jewish Autonomous Oblast.

Khabarovsk

Khabarovsk

Khabarovsk is the largest city and the administrative centre of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia, located 30 kilometers (19 mi) from the China–Russia border, at the confluence of the Amur and Ussuri Rivers, about 800 kilometers (500 mi) north of Vladivostok. With a 2010 population of 577,441 it is Russia's easternmost city with more than half a million inhabitants. The city was the administrative center of the Far Eastern Federal District of Russia from 2002 until December 2018, when Vladivostok took over that role. It is the largest city in the Russian Far East, having overtaken Vladivostok in 2015. It was known as Khabarovka until 1893. As is typical of the interior of the Russian Far East, Khabarovsk has an extreme climate with very strong seasonal swings resulting in strong cold winters and relatively hot and humid summers.

Bastak Nature Reserve

Bastak Nature Reserve

Bastak Nature Reserve is a Russian 'zapovednik' located in the Amur River basin in the Russian Far East. The reserve's territory covers the south-eastern spurs Bureya Range and the northern outskirts of the Sredneamurskaya lowlands. The reserve is situated in about 10 km north of the city of Birobidzhan in the Birobidzhansky District, and is the only national reserve in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast.

Khabarovsk Krai

Khabarovsk Krai

Khabarovsk Krai is a federal subject of Russia. It is geographically located in the Russian Far East and is a part of the Far Eastern Federal District. The administrative centre of the krai is the city of Khabarovsk, which is home to roughly half of the krai's population and the largest city in the Russian Far East. Khabarovsk Krai is the fourth-largest federal subject by area, and has a population of 1,343,869 as of 2010.

Birobidzhansky District

Birobidzhansky District

Birobidzhansky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the five in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia. It is located in the center of the autonomous oblast. The area of the district is 4,442.56 square kilometers (1,715.28 sq mi). Its administrative center is the town of Birobidzhan. Population: 11,907 ; 13,018 (2002 Census); 15,437 (1989 Census).

Leninsky District, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Leninsky District, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Leninsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the five in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia. It is located in the south and center of the autonomous oblast. The area of the district is 6,068 square kilometers (2,343 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Leninskoye. Population: 20,684 ; 22,844 (2002 Census); 28,464 (1989 Census). The population of Leninskoye accounts for 29.5% of the district's total population.

Oktyabrsky District, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Oktyabrsky District, Jewish Autonomous Oblast

Oktyabrsky District is an administrative and municipal district (raion), one of the five in the Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Russia. It is located in the west and southwest of the autonomous oblast. The area of the district is 6,400 square kilometers (2,500 sq mi). Its administrative center is the rural locality of Amurzet. Population: 11,354 ; 13,095 (2002 Census); 15,599 (1989 Census). The population of Amurzet accounts for 44.5% of the district's total population.

Source: "Obluchensky District", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obluchensky_District.

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References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e Law #982-OZ
  2. ^ a b c d "General Information" (in Russian). Obluchensky District. Retrieved August 31, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Russian Federal State Statistics Service (2011). Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года. Том 1 [2010 All-Russian Population Census, vol. 1]. Всероссийская перепись населения 2010 года [2010 All-Russia Population Census] (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service.
  4. ^ "26. Численность постоянного населения Российской Федерации по муниципальным образованиям на 1 января 2018 года". Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  5. ^ The count of urban-type settlements may include the work settlements, the resort settlements, the suburban (dacha) settlements, as well as urban-type settlements proper.
  6. ^ a b Law #229-OZ
  7. ^ Law #338-OZ
  8. ^ "Об исчислении времени". Официальный интернет-портал правовой информации (in Russian). 3 June 2011. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  9. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (21 May 2004). Численность населения России, субъектов Российской Федерации в составе федеральных округов, районов, городских поселений, сельских населённых пунктов – районных центров и сельских населённых пунктов с населением 3 тысячи и более человек [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities—Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000] (XLS). Всероссийская перепись населения 2002 года [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  10. ^ Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 г. Численность наличного населения союзных и автономных республик, автономных областей и округов, краёв, областей, районов, городских поселений и сёл-райцентров [All Union Population Census of 1989: Present Population of Union and Autonomous Republics, Autonomous Oblasts and Okrugs, Krais, Oblasts, Districts, Urban Settlements, and Villages Serving as District Administrative Centers]. Всесоюзная перепись населения 1989 года [All-Union Population Census of 1989] (in Russian). Институт демографии Национального исследовательского университета: Высшая школа экономики [Institute of Demography at the National Research University: Higher School of Economics]. 1989 – via Demoscope Weekly.
  11. ^ География Новой Земли

Sources

  • Законодательное Собрание Еврейской автономной области. Закон №982-ОЗ от 20 июля 2011 г. «Об административно-территориальном устройстве Еврейской автономной области». Вступил в силу через 10 дней после дня официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Биробиджанская звезда", №54, 29 июля 2011 г. (Legislative Assembly of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast. Law #982-OZ of July 20, 2011 On the Administrative-Territorial Structure of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast. Effective as of the day which is 10 days after the day of the official publication.).
  • Законодательное Собрание Еврейской автономной области. Закон №229-ОЗ от 26 ноября 2003 г. «О статусе и границе Облученского муниципального района», в ред. Закона №760-ОЗ от 26 мая 2010 г. «О внесении изменений в некоторые Законы Еврейской автономной области». Вступил в силу через 10 дней после официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Биробиджанская звезда", №93, 23 декабря 2003 г. (Legislative Assembly of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast. Law #229-OZ of November 26, 2003 On the Status and Borders of Obluchensky Municipal District, as amended by the Law #760-OZ of May 26, 2010 On Amending Various Laws of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast. Effective as of the day which is 10 days after the official publication.).
  • Законодательное Собрание Еврейской автономной области. Закон №338-ОЗ от 2 ноября 2004 г. «О границах и статусе городских, сельских поселений в составе Облученского муниципального района», в ред. Закона №312-ОЗ от 5 июня 2013 г. «О преобразовании муниципальных образований "Пашковское сельское поселение" и "Раддевское сельское поселение" в составе Облученского муниципального района Еврейской автономной области и о внесении изменений в Закон Еврейской автономной области "О границах и статусе городских, сельских поселений в составе Облученского муниципального района"». Вступил в силу через 10 дней после дня официального опубликования. Опубликован: "Биробиджанер штерн", №92, 23 декабря 2004 г. (Legislative Assembly of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast. Law #338-OZ of November 2, 2004 On the Borders and Status of the Urban, Rural Settlements Within Obluchensky Municipal District, as amended by the Law #312-OZ of June 5, 2013 On the Transformation of the Municipal Formations of "Pashkovskoye Rural Settlement" and "Raddevskoye Rural Settlement" Within Obluchensky Municipal District of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast and on Amending the Law of the Jewish Autonomous Oblast "On the Borders and Status of the Urban, Rural Settlements Within Obluchensky Municipal District". Effective as of the day which is 10 days after the day of the official publication.).

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