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Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)

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 Nostrand Avenue
 "3" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Nostrand Avenue IRT vc.jpg
Northbound platform
Station statistics
AddressNostrand Avenue & Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11216[1]
BoroughBrooklyn
LocaleCrown Heights
Coordinates40°40′11″N 73°57′02″W / 40.6698°N 73.95052°W / 40.6698; -73.95052Coordinates: 40°40′11″N 73°57′02″W / 40.6698°N 73.95052°W / 40.6698; -73.95052
DivisionA (IRT)[2]
LineIRT Eastern Parkway Line
Services   2 limited rush hour service in the reverse-peak direction (limited rush hour service in the reverse-peak direction)
   3 all except late nights (all except late nights)
   4 late nights, and limited rush hour service (late nights, and limited rush hour service)
   5 one weekday a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only (one weekday a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only)
TransitBus transport NYCT Bus: B44, B45[3]
StructureUnderground
Levels2
Platforms2 side platforms (1 on each level)
Tracks4 (2 on each level)
Other information
OpenedAugust 23, 1920; 102 years ago (August 23, 1920)
Opposite-
direction
transfer
Yes
Traffic
20191,370,372[5]Increase 9.6%
Rank313 out of 424[5]
Location
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line) is located in New York City Subway
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line) is located in New York City
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line) is located in New York
Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)
Track layout

Upper level
Lower level
Street map

Map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times except late nights
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only
Stops rush hours only Stops rush hours only
Stops weekdays only Stops weekdays only

The Nostrand Avenue station is a local station on the IRT Eastern Parkway Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Nostrand Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, it is served by the 3 train at all times except late nights, when the 4 train takes over service. There is also limited rush hour 2 and 5 service here.

The station opened on August 23, 1920, as part of an extension of the IRT Eastern Parkway Line by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company. The station's platforms were extended in the 1964—1965 fiscal year so they could accommodate ten-car trains.

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Metro station

Metro station

A metro station or subway station is a train station for a rapid transit system, which as a whole is usually called a "metro" or "subway". A station provides a means for passengers to purchase tickets, board trains, and evacuate the system in the case of an emergency. In the United Kingdom, they are known as underground stations, most commonly used in reference to the London Underground.

IRT Eastern Parkway Line

IRT Eastern Parkway Line

The Eastern Parkway Line is one of the lines of the A Division of the New York City Subway, stretching from Downtown Brooklyn south along Flatbush Avenue and east along Eastern Parkway to Crown Heights. After passing Utica Avenue, the line rises onto an elevated structure and becomes the New Lots Line to the end at New Lots Avenue in East New York, Brooklyn. The west end of the Eastern Parkway Line is at the Joralemon Street Tunnel under the East River.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

Crown Heights, Brooklyn

Crown Heights, Brooklyn

Crown Heights is a neighborhood in the central portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Crown Heights is bounded by Washington Avenue to the west, Atlantic Avenue to the north, Ralph Avenue to the east, and Empire Boulevard/East New York Avenue to the south. It is about one mile (1.6 km) wide and two miles (3.2 km) long. Neighborhoods bordering Crown Heights include Prospect Heights to the west, Flatbush and Prospect Lefferts Gardens to the south, Brownsville to the east, and Bedford–Stuyvesant to the north.

3 (New York City Subway service)

3 (New York City Subway service)

The 3 Seventh Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored red since it uses the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line through most of Manhattan.

4 (New York City Subway service)

4 (New York City Subway service)

The 4 Lexington Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored forest green since it uses the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan.

2 (New York City Subway service)

2 (New York City Subway service)

The 2 Seventh Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored red since it uses the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line through most of Manhattan.

5 (New York City Subway service)

5 (New York City Subway service)

The 5 Lexington Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored forest green since it uses the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan.

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

History

Mosaic name tablets
Mosaic name tablets

Background

Nostrand Avenue station was constructed as part of the Eastern Parkway Line. The line's section to Atlantic Avenue was part of Contract 2 of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT)'s plan to construct an extension of the original subway, Contract 1. Contract 2 extended the original line from City Hall in Manhattan to Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. The Board of Rapid Transit Commissioners approved the route on September 27, 1900,[6] and the contract was signed on September 11, 1902. Construction commenced on Contract 2 on March 4, 1903.[7] The first section opened on January 9, 1908, extending the subway from Bowling Green to Borough Hall.[8][9][10] On April 28, 1908, the IRT formally applied with the New York Public Service Commission for permission to open the final section of the Contract 2 line from Borough Hall to Atlantic Avenue near the Flatbush Avenue LIRR station. The application was approved, and the IRT extension opened on May 1, 1908.[11]: 194 [7]

On March 19, 1913, New York City, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, and the IRT reached an agreement, known as the Dual Contracts, to drastically expand subway service across New York City. As part of Contract 3 of the agreement, between New York City and the IRT, the original subway opened by the IRT in 1904 to City Hall,[12] and extended to Atlantic Avenue in 1908,[13] was to be extended eastward into Brooklyn.[14] The line was to be extended along Flatbush Avenue and Eastern Parkway to Buffalo Street as a four-track subway line, and then along East 98th Street and Livonia Avenue to New Lots Avenue as an elevated two-track line, with provisions for the addition of a third track. In addition, a two-track branch line along Nostrand Avenue branching off east of the Franklin Avenue station was to be constructed.[15] The underground portion of the line became known as the Eastern Parkway Line, or Route 12, while the elevated portion became known as the New Lots Line.[16]

Construction and opening

The IRT Eastern Parkway Line was built as part of Route 12 from 1915 to 1918.[17] On August 23, 1920, the Eastern Parkway Line was extended from Atlantic Avenue to Crown Heights–Utica Avenue, with the Nostrand Avenue station opening at this time. The new trains would be served by trains from Seventh Avenue.[18]

Later years

During the 1964–1965 fiscal year, the platforms at Kingston Avenue, along with those at four other stations on the Eastern Parkway Line, were lengthened to 525 feet (160 m) to accommodate a ten-car train of 51-foot (16 m) IRT cars.[19]

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Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

New York Public Service Commission

New York Public Service Commission

The New York Public Service Commission is the public utilities commission of the New York state government that regulates and oversees the electric, gas, water, and telecommunication industries in New York as part of the Department of Public Service. The department's regulations are compiled in title 16 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations. The current chairman of the Commission and chief executive of the Department is Rory M. Christian. His term began on June 10, 2021 and runs through February 1, 2027.

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

The Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT) was a public transit holding company formed in 1896 to acquire and consolidate railway lines in Brooklyn and Queens, New York City, United States. It was a prominent corporation and industry leader using the single-letter symbol B on the New York Stock Exchange.

Dual Contracts

Dual Contracts

The Dual Contracts, also known as the Dual Subway System, were contracts for the construction and/or rehabilitation and operation of rapid transit lines in the City of New York. The contracts were signed on March 19, 1913, by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. As part of the Dual Contracts, the IRT and BRT would build or upgrade several subway lines in New York City, then operate them for 49 years.

Early history of the IRT subway

Early history of the IRT subway

The first regularly operated subway in New York City was opened on October 27, 1904, and was operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT). The early IRT system consisted of a single trunk line below 96th Street in Manhattan, running under Broadway, 42nd Street, Park Avenue, and Lafayette Street. The line had three northern branches in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and a southern branch to Brooklyn. The system had four tracks between Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall and 96th Street, allowing for local and express service. The original line and early extensions consisted of:The IRT Eastern Parkway Line from Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center to Borough Hall The IRT Lexington Avenue Line from Borough Hall to Grand Central–42nd Street The IRT 42nd Street Shuttle from Grand Central–42nd Street to Times Square The IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line from Times Square to Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street The IRT Lenox Avenue Line from 96th Street to 145th Street The IRT White Plains Road Line from 142nd Street Junction to 180th Street–Bronx Park

City Hall station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

City Hall station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)

The City Hall station, also known as City Hall Loop, was a terminal station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. It was under City Hall Park next to New York City Hall in Civic Center, Manhattan.

Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center station

Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center station

The Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center station is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the BMT Fourth Avenue Line, the BMT Brighton Line and the IRT Eastern Parkway Line, located at Atlantic, Fourth, and Flatbush Avenues and Pacific Street in Downtown Brooklyn. The complex is served by the 2, 4, D, N, Q and R trains at all times; the 3 train at all times except late nights; the 5 and B trains during weekdays; and a few rush-hour W trains.

Flatbush Avenue

Flatbush Avenue

Flatbush Avenue is a major avenue in the New York City Borough of Brooklyn. It runs from the Manhattan Bridge south-southeastward to Jamaica Bay, where it joins the Marine Parkway–Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge, which connects Brooklyn to the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens. The north end was extended from Fulton Street to the Manhattan Bridge as "Flatbush Avenue Extension".

Eastern Parkway

Eastern Parkway

Eastern Parkway is a major road that runs through a portion of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, it was the world's first parkway, having been built between 1870 and 1874. At the time of its construction, Eastern Parkway went to the eastern edge of Brooklyn, hence its name.

Franklin Avenue/Botanic Garden station

Franklin Avenue/Botanic Garden station

The Franklin Avenue/Botanic Garden station is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IRT Eastern Parkway Line and the BMT Franklin Avenue Line. Located at the intersection of Franklin Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn, the complex consists of two distinct stations, connected by a passageway within fare control, and is named for its proximity to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. The Eastern Parkway Line station is served by the 2 and 4 trains at all times, the 3 train at all times except late nights, and the 5 train on weekdays only. The Franklin Avenue Line station is served by Franklin Avenue Shuttle (S) at all times.

Station layout

Street stair
Street stair
G Street level Exit/entrance
B1 Southbound express "4" train does not stop here →
"5" train does not stop here (select rush hour trips) →
Southbound local "3" train ("4" train late nights) toward New Lots Avenue (Kingston Avenue)
"2" train toward New Lots Avenue (select rush hour trips) (Kingston Avenue)
Side platform
Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard machines
B2 Northbound express "4" train does not stop here
"5" train does not stop here (select rush hour trips)
Northbound local "3" train toward Harlem–148th Street (Franklin Avenue–Medgar Evers College)
"4" train toward Woodlawn late nights (Franklin Avenue–Medgar Evers College)
"2" train toward Wakefield–241st Street (select rush hour trips) (Franklin Avenue–Medgar Evers College)
"5" train toward Eastchester–Dyre Avenue (one a.m. rush hour trip) (Franklin Avenue–Medgar Evers College)
Side platform

This underground station has two levels. The upper level serves New Lots Avenue-bound trains while the lower level serves Manhattan-bound trains. From north to south, each level has an express track, a local track, and one side platform.[20] The 3 train stops here at all times except late nights, when the 4 train takes over service. There is also limited rush hour 2 and 5 train service here. During all times except late nights, 4 trains run on the express track to the north of the local track on each level to bypass the station.[21][22][23][24]

Both platforms have their original Dual Contracts-era IRT trim line and name tablets. The trim line has a tan-yellow center, brown border, and a spec of blue in-between. "N" tablets on a blue background and brown border run along the trim line at regular intervals. The name tablets read "NOSTRAND AVE." in serif font in gold lettering on a blue and brown background, a gold center, and brown border.

The platform extensions at either end have signs reading "NOSTRAND AVE" in white sans serif lettering on a brown border. The center of the platforms has green I-beam columns at regular intervals with alternating ones having the standard black station name plate in white lettering.

West of this station (railroad north), the perpendicular IRT Nostrand Avenue Line merges with the IRT Eastern Parkway Line at the Rogers Avenue Junction. President Street–Medgar Evers College on that line is two blocks to the south.[25]

Exits

The upper level has one fare control at the center with two staircases going down to the lower level. It has a turnstile bank, token booth, and two staircases going up to the south side mall of Eastern Parkway (between the main and service roads) and Nostrand Avenue. One staircase goes to the southeast corner while the other goes to the southwest corner.[25]

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4 (New York City Subway service)

4 (New York City Subway service)

The 4 Lexington Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored forest green since it uses the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan.

5 (New York City Subway service)

5 (New York City Subway service)

The 5 Lexington Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored forest green since it uses the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan.

3 (New York City Subway service)

3 (New York City Subway service)

The 3 Seventh Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored red since it uses the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line through most of Manhattan.

New Lots Avenue station (IRT New Lots Line)

New Lots Avenue station (IRT New Lots Line)

The New Lots Avenue station is the eastern terminal of the IRT New Lots Line of the New York City Subway. It is the terminal for the 3 train at all times except late nights, when the 4 train takes over service. During rush hours, occasional 2, 4, and 5 trains also stop here.

Kingston Avenue station

Kingston Avenue station

The Kingston Avenue station is a local station on the IRT Eastern Parkway Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Kingston Avenue and Eastern Parkway in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, it is served by the 3 train at all times except late nights, when the 4 train takes over service. There is also limited rush hour 2 and 5 service here.

2 (New York City Subway service)

2 (New York City Subway service)

The 2 Seventh Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored red since it uses the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line through most of Manhattan.

Side platform

Side platform

A side platform is a platform positioned to the side of one or more railway tracks or guideways at a railway station, tram stop, or transitway. A station having dual side platforms, one for each direction of travel, is the basic design used for double-track railway lines. Side platforms may result in a wider overall footprint for the station compared with an island platform where a single width of platform can be shared by riders using either track.

MetroCard

MetroCard

The MetroCard is a magnetic stripe card used for fare payment on transportation in the New York City area. It is a payment method for the New York City Subway, New York City Transit buses and MTA buses. The MetroCard is also accepted by several partner agencies: Nassau Inter-County Express (NICE), the PATH train system, the Roosevelt Island Tramway, AirTrain JFK, and Westchester County's Bee-Line Bus System.

Harlem–148th Street station

Harlem–148th Street station

The Harlem–148th Street station is a New York City Subway station on the IRT Lenox Avenue Line in Harlem, Manhattan. It serves as the northern terminal station of the 3 train at all times as well as the Northern terminal of the IRT Lenox Avenue line. The entrance to the station is located at the intersection of 149th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard, which has historically been known as 7th Avenue. The station contains a pair of tracks and an island platform and is located at ground level. A parking structure for the adjacent Frederick Douglass Academy is located above the station, forming a roof above the platform and tracks.

Woodlawn station (IRT Jerome Avenue Line)

Woodlawn station (IRT Jerome Avenue Line)

The Woodlawn station is the northern terminal of the New York City Subway's IRT Jerome Avenue Line. The station is located at the intersection of Bainbridge and Jerome Avenues, outside Woodlawn Cemetery. Despite the station name, this intersection is in the Norwood section of the Bronx, and not in Woodlawn. It is served by the 4 train at all times. This station was constructed by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company as part of the Dual Contracts and opened in 1918.

Source: "Nostrand Avenue station (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 16th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nostrand_Avenue_station_(IRT_Eastern_Parkway_Line).

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References
  1. ^ "Borough of Brooklyn, New York City". Government of New York City. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  2. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). Vol. 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  3. ^ "Brooklyn Bus Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. October 2020. Retrieved December 1, 2020.
  4. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  6. ^ Report of the Public Service Commission for the First District of the State of New York for the Year Ending December 31, 1909 Vol. 1. New York State Public Service Commission. 1910. p. 195.
  7. ^ a b "Brooklyn Joyful Over New Subway". The New York Times. May 2, 1908. p. 1.
  8. ^ "Subway to Brooklyn Opened for Traffic; First Regular Passenger Train Went Under the East River Early This Morning. Not a Hitch in the Service. Gov. Hughes and Brooklyn Officials to Join in a Formal Celebration of Event To-day". the New York Times. January 9, 1908. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
  9. ^ "Brooklyn Joyful Over Its Tunnel". The New York Times. January 10, 1908. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  10. ^ Gasparini, D. A. (February 2006). "Battery-Joralemon Street Tunnel". Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities. American Society of Civil Engineers. 20 (1): 92–107. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0887-3828(2006)20:1(92).
  11. ^ Report of the Public Service Commission For The First District of the State of New York For The Year Ending December 31, 1908. New York State Public Service Commission. 1908.
  12. ^ "Exercises In City Hall.; Mayor Declares Subway Open -- Ovations for Parsons and McDonald". The New York Times. October 28, 1904. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  13. ^ "Brooklyn Joyful Over New Subway — Celebrates Opening of Extension with Big Parade and a Flow of Oratory — An Ode to August Belmont — Anonymous Poet Calls Him "the Brownie of the Caisson and Spade" — He Talks on Subways". The New York Times. May 2, 1908. p. 1. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  14. ^ "618 Miles of Track In The Dual System; City Will Have Invested $226,000,000 When Rapid Transit Project Is Completed". The New York Times. August 3, 1913. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  15. ^ Comptroller's Monthly Report For March 1916 And From January 1, 1916 To March 31, 1916. New York City Department of Finance. 1916. p. 121.
  16. ^ "Differ Over Assessment Plans in Transit Projects: Eastern Parkway Subway and Livonia Avenue Extension the Cause of Bitter Dissension Among Property Owners Uptown" (PDF). The Daily Standard Union. March 13, 1910. Retrieved August 14, 2016 – via Fulton History.
  17. ^ "More Interborough Service for Brooklyn 2 New Lines". pudl.princeton.edu. Interborough Rapid Transit Company. August 23, 1920. Retrieved September 19, 2016.
  18. ^ "Brooklyn Tube Extensions Open: I.R.T. Begins Service on Eastern Parkway and Nostrand Avenue Lines" (PDF). The New York Times. August 23, 1920. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
  19. ^ Annual Report 1964–1965. New York City Transit Authority. 1965.
  20. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  21. ^ "2 Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  22. ^ "3 Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  23. ^ "4 Subway Timetable, Effective December 4, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved February 6, 2023.
  24. ^ "5 Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  25. ^ a b "Nostrand Avenue Neighborhood Map". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 2018. Retrieved May 20, 2022.
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