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North Shields

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North Shields
North Shields Fish Quay - geograph.org.uk - 1651356.jpg
North Shields Fish Quay
North Shields is located in Tyne and Wear
North Shields
North Shields
Location within Tyne and Wear
Population34,423 (2011 census North Tyneside wards of Chirton, Collingwood and Riverside)
OS grid referenceNZ3568
Metropolitan borough
Metropolitan county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townNORTH SHIELDS
Postcode districtNE29, NE30
Dialling code0191
PoliceNorthumbria
FireTyne and Wear
AmbulanceNorth East
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Tyne and Wear
55°00′35″N 1°26′41″W / 55.0097°N 1.4448°W / 55.0097; -1.4448Coordinates: 55°00′35″N 1°26′41″W / 55.0097°N 1.4448°W / 55.0097; -1.4448

North Shields (/ʃlz/ SHEELZ) is a town[1] in the Borough of North Tyneside in Tyne and Wear, England. It is 8 miles (13 km) north-east of Newcastle upon Tyne and borders nearby Wallsend and Tynemouth.[2]

Since 1974, it has been in the North Tyneside borough of Tyne and Wear: its historic administration was as part of the Castle ward in county of Northumberland. It was part of the Tynemouth County Borough; when abolished in 1974, the borough became an unparished area.[3]

It is on the northern bank of the River Tyne, opposite to South Shields on the other bank. The name derives from Middle English schele meaning "temporary sheds or huts used by fishermen".[4]

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North Tyneside

North Tyneside

North Tyneside is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear, England. It forms part of the greater Tyneside conurbation. North Tyneside Council is headquartered at Cobalt Park, Wallsend.

Tyne and Wear

Tyne and Wear

Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in North East England, situated around the mouths of the rivers Tyne and Wear. It was created in 1974, by the Local Government Act 1972, along with five metropolitan boroughs of Gateshead, Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland, North Tyneside and South Tyneside. It is bordered by Northumberland to the north and Durham to the south; the county boundary was formerly split between these counties with the border as the River Tyne.

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne, or simply Newcastle, is a city and metropolitan borough in Tyne and Wear, England. The city is located on the River Tyne's northern bank and forms the largest part of the Tyneside built-up area. Newcastle is also the most populous city of North East England. Newcastle developed around a Roman settlement called Pons Aelius and the settlement later took the name of a castle built in 1080 by William the Conqueror's eldest son, Robert Curthose.

Wallsend

Wallsend

Wallsend is a town in North Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England, at the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall. It has a population of 43,842 and lies 3+1⁄2 miles east of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Tynemouth

Tynemouth

Tynemouth is a coastal town in the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside, North East England. It is located on the north side of the mouth of the River Tyne, hence its name. It is 8 mi (13 km) east-northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. It is also home to Tynemouth Priory.

Northumberland

Northumberland

Northumberland is a county in Northern England, one of two counties in England which border with Scotland. Notable landmarks in the county include Alnwick Castle, Bamburgh Castle, Hadrian's Wall and Hexham Abbey.

Unparished area

Unparished area

In England, an unparished area is an area that is not covered by a civil parish. Most urbanised districts of England are either entirely or partly unparished. Many towns and some cities in otherwise rural districts are also unparished areas and therefore no longer have a town council or city council, and are instead directly managed by a higher local authority such as a district or county council.

South Shields

South Shields

South Shields is a coastal town in South Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England. It is on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne. Historically, it was known in Roman times as Arbeia, and as Caer Urfa by Early Middle Ages. According to the 2011 census, the town had a population of 75,337. It is the fourth largest settlement in Tyne and Wear; after Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland and Gateshead.

Middle English

Middle English

Middle English is a form of the English language that was spoken after the Norman Conquest of 1066, until the late 15th century. The English language underwent distinct variations and developments following the Old English period. Scholarly opinion varies, but the Oxford English Dictionary specifies the period when Middle English was spoken as being from 1150 to 1500. This stage of the development of the English language roughly followed the High to the Late Middle Ages.

History

North Shields 1828 (by Robert Salmon). From left-right: Shipping on the Tyne, New Low Light, Old Low Light, Clifford's Fort.
North Shields 1828 (by Robert Salmon). From left-right: Shipping on the Tyne, New Low Light, Old Low Light, Clifford's Fort.

Earliest records

North Shields is first recorded in 1225, when the Prior of Tynemouth, Germanus, decided to create a fishing port to provide fish for the Priory which was situated on the headland at the mouth of the River Tyne.[5] He also supplied ships anchored near the priory. A number of rudimentary houses or 'shiels' were erected at the mouth of the Pow Burn where the stream enters the Tyne, as well as wooden quays which were used to unload the fishing boats. The quays were also used to ship coal from local collieries owned by the Priory. Soon the population of the new township numbered 1,000. The burgesses of Newcastle upon Tyne were determined to preserve the custom rights that they had enjoyed up till then, which covered the whole length of the river. They successfully petitioned the king in 1290 and managed to suspend trade from the new settlement. It was forbidden to victual ships or to load and unload cargoes at North Shields. The opposition of the Newcastle burgesses remained for a considerable time but despite this, North Shields continued to develop as a centre for fishing and exporting salt, produced at local saltpans. For a considerable period the Newcastle burgesses, known as the Hostmen, who controlled the export of coal from the Tyne, resisted the export of this commodity from North Shields.[6][7]

Geographic development

New Quay, part of a riverside development built by the Duke of Northumberland in 1806
New Quay, part of a riverside development built by the Duke of Northumberland in 1806

The town was originated on a narrow strip of land alongside the river (around the present-day Clive Street) because of the steep bank which hemmed it in. Eventually becoming overcrowded, in the 18th century buildings began to be erected on the plateau 60 feet (20 m) above the old insanitary dwellings alongside the river. Prosperous businessmen and shipowners occupied the new town whereas working people remained in the lower part of town. The low, riverside part of the town was linked to the newer, higher part of the town by a series of stairs. These stairs were initially surrounded by slum dwellings, and although the houses have since been cleared the stairs remain.

One of the first developments of the new town was Dockwray Square, built in 1763, a set of elegant town houses that was populated by wealthy families. Due to the poor provision of water and drainage facilities, however, the wealthy families soon moved to the more central part of the new town, and particularly the new Northumberland Square.[8] Dockwray Square eventually deteriorated into slums. In the early twentieth century Stan Laurel lived at a house in Dockwray Square for a few years, before he became famous. The square has since been re-developed, initially in the 1960s, and again in the 1990s. A statue of Laurel stands in the middle to commemorate his stay there.[6]

The land on which the new town was built was largely owned by the Earl of Carlisle.[9] In 1796, John Wright produced plans that included a grand processional way, now Howard Street, leading to the Georgian Northumberland Square. A railway tunnel, built in the 1840s, left the west and south sides of the square largely unfinished, until a 1960s library building was constructed, somewhat out of keeping with the rest of the architecture.[9] In 1844–45, John Dobson built the town hall, on the corner of Howard and Saville Streets.[10]

Landmarks

Lights of North Shields

High and Low lights, new and old
High and Low lights, new and old

Because of the difficulty of navigating ships into the mouth of the river past the dangerous Black Midden rocks, buildings were erected in the 16th century with permanent lights burning to be used as a guide by the mariners. High and Low lights are pictured on a 1655 map of the river Tyne: a pair of square castellated towers. Both lights were rebuilt in 1727, and these buildings still stand today (albeit the Old Low Light was remodelled in 1830 to serve as an almshouse).[11] In 1810, the Old Lights were replaced by new High and Low Lights, placed respectively at the top and bottom of the steep bank alongside the river.[12] All these lights were owned and operated by Trinity House of Newcastle-upon-Tyne until they ceased operation. Today, the Old High Beacon, as well as the High and Low Lights, are private residences; they remain prominent landmarks. In 2014 the black-painted Old Low Light was opened to the public following a substantial refurbishment; it contains a café, shop, museum, viewing platform and event space.[13]

Fish Quay

In 1806, a market place was opened on New Quay. In 1870, work began on constructing a fish quay to provide shelter for the docked fishing boats. This quay is still in use today.[6] In 2017, a sculpture by artist Ray Lonsdale of a lone fisherman – made of corten steel and weighing over 2 tonnes – was installed on the quay.[14]

Clifford's Fort

Clifford's Fort, located on the Fish Quay, was built in the 17th century as a coastal defence against the Dutch.[5] The Fort played a role during the Napoleonic Wars and a significant role during WW1, being the birthplace of the Tyne Electrical Engineers. The fort was officially evacuated by the military in May 1928, was sold to Tynemouth Corporation (History of the Tyne Electrical Engineers 1884-1933, Chappter LX)and was used to build new fish processing facilities. Very little now remains of the original fort buildings, though the walls are intact.[6][15][16] The area has undergone considerable restoration, with most of the fish processing units demolished. The remaining excellent modern retail units are very popular. During restoration work, part of the foundations of the 18th century Master Gunner's House (demolished in 1973) were found below the concrete floor of a fish processing unit. Elsewhere on the site, part of the stone edging of Cable Tanks belonging to the Submarine Mining Depot (established at the fort in 1888) was uncovered.[17] The gun embrasures have been revealed, the ground resurfaced, and there are some traffic restrictions. The Old Low Light (1735, Grade 2 listed) within Clifford’s Fort, has been restored and operates as a Heritage Centre/cafe/community space.

Wooden Dolly

One of North Shields' oldest landmarks is the "Wooden Dolly" statue. In 1814, the female figurehead of a collier brig was placed at the entrance to Custom House Quay, on Liddell Street, and stood there until 1850, when it was vandalised. A second figurehead was placed on the same spot. The "Wooden Dolly", as the figurehead was known, was used by seafarers as a source of good-luck charms, by cutting pieces of wood from her to be taken with them on voyages.[5] Eventually the figurehead was defaced beyond repair and after 14 years was replaced by Wooden Dolly No. 3. This remained until 1901 when it was replaced with Wooden Dolly No. 4 in the shape of a fishwife. A fifth Wooden Dolly, also a fishwife, was placed in Northumberland Square in 1958 and was removed for restoration in December 2019. Once restoration has been completed it will be placed in the Library and a replacement figure installed in the square.[18] In 1992, a sixth Wooden Dolly was placed where the first four had been, at the entrance to Custom House Quay, and can still be seen there, next to the Prince of Wales public house.[19]

Gallery

Industry

In 1887, the town's businesses were listed as a marine engine, chain cable and anchor manufacturer, shipbuilding yards, roperies, salt-works, and an earthenware and stained glass manufacturer. Fishing was also a major industry of employment.[20] The Smith's Dock Company was another major employer for many years, eventually closing in 1987.[21]

Shipyards

Shipyards have been in existence in North Shields since near its founding. The smaller yards built the Northumbrian coble, a small inshore fishing vessel with a lug sail, well known in the North East. Larger yards built wooden sailing collier brigs, used to transport local coal to London. Eventually these small yards were replaced by larger yards such as the Tyne Dock and Engineering Company and the Smith's Dock Company. These yards produced iron vessels for various uses, including fishing and the coal trade. In later years the North Shields yards were used for ship repair work, with Smith's dock surviving until the 1990s.[22] None of these yards remain.[6]

Oil terminal

Esso formerly had an oil terminal on the banks of the Tyne, off Howdon Road. In April 1994, a bomb planted by the IRA exploded tearing a 3-foot square hole in one of the tanks. A second device, which did not detonate, was later found nearby. Six hundred gallons of crude oil leaked from the tank, but was caught in a channel designed to prevent leakages.[23] A second explosion occurred in June 1994, perpetrated by the same bombers.[24]

Culture

In 2009, seating inspired by Plasticine, the inventor of which was born in North Shields, was installed on Bedford Street in the town centre. The seats proved unpopular as their shape prevented rainwater draining off, so they were replaced by more traditional metal benches and moved to the Royal Quays Marina in 2011.[25]

YMCA

YMCA North Tyneside was founded in 1870 and was originally known as The Borough of Tynemouth YMCA. After an inaugural meeting on 7 June 1879, weekly meetings followed in the Sons of Temperance Hall, Norfolk Street, North Shields.[26] The YMCA grew in popularity. Within a year, larger premises were needed. Meetings moved to 53 Tyne Street, North Shields and in 1879 to Camden Street, North Shields. In 1920 the YMCA moved to a building in Bedford Street (which is still owned by the YMCA and now occupied by the Citizens Advice Bureau) where it remained until 1938, when it moved to the present building and the current registered office at Church Way, North Shields.[27]

Fish Quay Festival

Between 1987 and 2001, a community festival was organised on the fish quay, during which the fleet of fishing boats would be blessed and various local talents would entertain the crowds. At its peak, the festival attracted 600,000 visitors. A smaller-scale family festival, in order to save costs, was held annually between 2002 and 2006, before it too was scrapped as a money-saving measure.[28]

Regeneration

Meadow Well

Royal Quays Retail Park, an outlet shopping centre located at North Shields
Royal Quays Retail Park, an outlet shopping centre located at North Shields

Following the Meadow Well riots, in July 1992 the Government granted £37.5 million over five years to regenerate that area of the town, as part of the City Challenge scheme.[29]

Royal Quays

An extensive regeneration programme costing £16 million saw the revitalisation of the redundant Albert Edward docks.[30] Across an 80 hectare area, the former Tyne and Wear Development Corporation partnered with North Tyneside Council and the private sector to provide a mix of housing, leisure facilities, office space and industrial sites. The Wet N Wild indoor water park, an outlet shopping centre, a bowling alley, a soccer dome and a marina form the centrepiece to the Royal Quays development to the west of the town. Mark di Suvero's Tyne Anew (1999), his only large-scale public artwork in the UK, can be seen at Albert Edward Dock.[31]

Fish Quay

Similarly, major regeneration of the Fish Quay, on the riverside to the south-east of the town centre, has included the construction of luxury apartments and the conversion of existing buildings into restaurants and bars alongside the working quay. In November 2018, North Tyneside Council announced plans for further development to enhance the area as a food and drink destination.[32]

Smith's Docks

The site of the former Smith's Docks was acquired by the developer Places For People in 2007. In January 2015 they sought planning permission for the construction of homes on the site.[33] The first of those homes, including some designed by George Clarke, was sold in 2017 and as of April 2018, work continues on the site.[34] The second phase, the Smokehouses, was completed in autumn 2018.[35]

Town Centre

In September 2020, the North Tyneside Council published prospective plans for regeneration of the town centre, which include developing a distinctive route to the Fish Quay, pedestrianisation of key streets, consolidation of retail units, creation of a town square, renovation of Northumberland Square and the establishment of a transport hub.[36] At the time of publication, the plan was not financed and the council sought the views of local residents and business owners.

In summer 2020, work was being completed on the refurbishment of the terraced row to the north of Northumberland Square, as well as the development of a newly built row of homes on nearby Albion Road.[37] The newly restored Wooden Dolly was also returned to the Square.[38]

Heritage Action Zone

Having been awarded £900,000 through the High Street Heritage Action Zone programme, North Tyneside Council plans to add £1 million additional funding to revive the conservation area around Howard Street and Northumberland Square.[39] It will also see work done on the streetscape connecting to the main shopping thoroughfare of Bedford Street in order to better link the areas and decrease the dominance of motor vehicles.

Collingwood Grange

In 2017, North Tyneside Council granted planning permission for up to 400 new homes on formerly industrial land to the west of Norham Road. In April 2020, the developer, Miller Homes, announced that work had been halted by the Covid-19 pandemic and that plans may be altered as a result.[40] Work on the development recommenced in January 2021.[41]

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Robert Salmon

Robert Salmon

Robert Salmon was a maritime artist, active in both England and America. Salmon completed nearly 1,000 paintings, all save one of maritime scenes or seascapes. He is widely considered the Father of American Luminism.

River Tyne

River Tyne

The River Tyne is a river in North East England. Its length is 73 miles (118 km). It is formed by the North Tyne and the South Tyne, which converge at Warden Rock near Hexham in Northumberland at a place dubbed 'The Meeting of the Waters'.

Clifford's Fort

Clifford's Fort

Clifford's Fort was a defensive gun battery established near the mouth of the Tyne during the Anglo-Dutch Wars in the 17th century. It subsequently served as a submarine mining depot and survives today as a Scheduled Ancient Monument in the historic Fish Quay area of North Shields, Tyne and Wear, in North East England.

Tynemouth

Tynemouth

Tynemouth is a coastal town in the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside, North East England. It is located on the north side of the mouth of the River Tyne, hence its name. It is 8 mi (13 km) east-northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. It is also home to Tynemouth Priory.

Stan Laurel

Stan Laurel

Stan Laurel was an English comic actor, writer, and film director who was one half of the comedy duo Laurel and Hardy. He appeared with his comedy partner Oliver Hardy in 107 short films, feature films, and cameo roles.

Tynemouth Town Hall

Tynemouth Town Hall

Tynemouth Town Hall, also known as North Shields Town Hall, is a municipal building in Howard Street, North Shields, Tyne and Wear, England. The town hall, which was the headquarters of Tynemouth County Borough Council, is a Grade II listed building.

Newcastle-upon-Tyne Trinity House

Newcastle-upon-Tyne Trinity House

Newcastle-upon-Tyne Trinity House is a private corporation in Newcastle upon Tyne which emerged in the 16th century as a guild formed by the City's seafarers. For the past 500 years it has occupied premises in Broad Chare on the Newcastle's Quayside, from which it continues to provide a combination of professional and charitable maritime services. It remains one of only three bodies in England authorized for the examination and licensing of deep-sea pilots.

North Shields Fish Quay

North Shields Fish Quay

North Shields Fish Quay is a fishing port located close to the mouth of the River Tyne, in North Shields, Tyne and Wear, North East England, 8 miles (13 km) east of the city of Newcastle upon Tyne.

Netherlands

Netherlands

The Netherlands, informally Holland, is a country located in Northwestern Europe with overseas territories in the Caribbean. It is the largest of four constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Netherlands consists of twelve provinces; it borders Germany to the east, and Belgium to the south, with a North Sea coastline to the north and west. It shares maritime borders with the United Kingdom, Germany and Belgium in the North Sea. The country's official language is Dutch, with West Frisian as a secondary official language in the province of Friesland. Dutch, English and Papiamento are official in the Caribbean territories.

Napoleonic Wars

Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) was a series of European wars between the First French Empire (1804–1815) and allies, against various Imperial coalitions to end French domination of Continental Europe. The Napoleonic wars originated from political matters pending from the French Revolution (1789–1799) and from the French Revolutionary Wars (1792–1802), specifically the War of the First Coalition (1792–1797) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). There were seven Napoleonic Wars, five named after the imperial coalitions, and two named for the place of battle: (i) the War of the Third Coalition (1803–1806), (ii) the War of the Fourth Coalition (1806–1807), (iii) the War of the Fifth Coalition (1809), (iv) the War of the Sixth Coalition (1813–1814), (v) the Hundred Days (1815), (vi) the Peninsular War (1807–1814), and (vii) the French invasion of Russia (1812).

Smith's Dock Company

Smith's Dock Company

Smith's Dock Company, Limited, often referred to simply as Smith's Dock, was a British shipbuilding company.

Coble

Coble

The coble is a type of open traditional fishing boat which developed on the North East coast of England. The southernmost examples occur around Hull ; the type extends to Burnmouth just across the Scottish border.

Geography

The town is bounded to the north by Whitley Bay and to the south by the River Tyne. The town of Tynemouth is to its east and the A19 road marks the boundary between North Shields and Wallsend to the west of the town. It is part of the North Tyneside conurbation.

Norham Road, North Shields, Tyne and Wear
Norham Road, North Shields, Tyne and Wear

Over the years, North Shields has grown from a small fishing village to incorporate the nearby areas of Chirton, Preston, Billy Mill, Percy Main, East Howdon and Marden estate.

The 2011 definition of the town of Tynemouth includes North Shields, which means a population figure can only be given as a combination of wards rather than as a USD.

Meadow Well

A large council estate, Meadow Well (alternatively spelt Meadowell or Meadowwell on local signs) to the west of the town, was constructed in the 1930s to house residents displaced by the clearance of the Dockwray Square and Low Town slum areas.[42] These flats were replaced with better quality homes in the 1960s and 70s.[43] Meadow Well was formerly known as the Ridges[44] Estate – a name occasionally used today – since it was built on the site of the Ridges farm. Its present name is derived from a well situated in a meadow upon which the estate was built.

On Monday, 9 September 1991, Meadow Well was featured heavily in the news across the UK as riots broke out[43] which continued for three days. Many properties were damaged,[45] cars burned out and the local community centre burned down. As a result of the riots, the local housing was gradually improved by the council over the next three years through demolition and rebuilding, as well as renovation.[43] A number of community development organisations, including the Cedarwood Trust, Meadow Well Connected and the Phoenix Detached Youth Project, have worked in the area for many years.[46]

The film Dream On (1991) is set on the estate.[47]

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Whitley Bay

Whitley Bay

Whitley Bay is a seaside town in the North Tyneside borough in Tyne and Wear, England. It formerly governed as part of Northumberland and has been part of Tyne and Wear since 1974. It is part of the wider Tyneside built-up area, being around 10 miles (16 km) east of Newcastle upon Tyne. Two notable landmarks are the Spanish City and St. Mary's Lighthouse, the latter on a small island near the town.

River Tyne

River Tyne

The River Tyne is a river in North East England. Its length is 73 miles (118 km). It is formed by the North Tyne and the South Tyne, which converge at Warden Rock near Hexham in Northumberland at a place dubbed 'The Meeting of the Waters'.

Tynemouth

Tynemouth

Tynemouth is a coastal town in the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside, North East England. It is located on the north side of the mouth of the River Tyne, hence its name. It is 8 mi (13 km) east-northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. It is also home to Tynemouth Priory.

A19 road

A19 road

The A19 is a major road in England running approximately parallel to and east of the A1 road. Although the two roads meet at the northern end of the A19, the two roads originally met at the southern end of the A19 in Doncaster, but the old route of the A1 was changed to the A638. From Sunderland northwards, the route was formerly the A108. In the past the route was known as the East of Snaith-York-Thirsk-Stockton-on-Tees-Sunderland Trunk Road. Most traffic joins the A19, heading for Teesside, from the A168 at Dishforth Interchange.

Wallsend

Wallsend

Wallsend is a town in North Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England, at the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall. It has a population of 43,842 and lies 3+1⁄2 miles east of Newcastle upon Tyne.

North Tyneside

North Tyneside

North Tyneside is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear, England. It forms part of the greater Tyneside conurbation. North Tyneside Council is headquartered at Cobalt Park, Wallsend.

Conurbation

Conurbation

A conurbation is a region comprising a number of metropolises, cities, large towns, and other urban areas which through population growth and physical expansion, have merged to form one continuous urban or industrially developed area. In most cases, a conurbation is a polycentric urbanised area in which transportation has developed to link areas. They create a single urban labour market or travel to work area.

Preston, Tyne and Wear

Preston, Tyne and Wear

Preston is a suburb about a mile north of North Shields, North Tyneside. Its population was recorded at 8419 in the 2011 census. Historically a separate entity, it has slowly been absorbed into the town to the south and expanded as to form a continuous urban area north to Monkseaton.

Percy Main

Percy Main

Percy Main is a small village absorbed into North Shields, North East England. Historically in Northumberland, it is now part of Tyne and Wear.

Meadow Well

Meadow Well

Meadow Well, also known as Meadowell or the Ridges, is a district of North Shields, North East England. Historically in Northumberland, it is now part of the Tyne and Wear Metropolitan county. The population in 2016 was approximately 11,000.

Industry

Maritime

With its fishing industry and shipbuilding history, a number of maritime related companies remain in the town. John Lilley and Gillie Ltd, a marine equipment manufacturer is headquartered there.[48]

Mining

Collieries in the town were located at three of the outlying villages since incorporated into the town, at Preston, at the location of the present cemetery gates, Percy Main and New York.[49]

Office and business parks

Following the demise of coal mining and shipbuilding in the area, several business parks, industrial estates and trading estates were established providing alternative employment. The biggest of these are The Silverlink and Cobalt Park, the UK's largest office park. Atmel had a plant located at Silverlink, previously occupied by Siemens but the plant is now demolished apart from the office building, now home to Cobalt Business Exchange. Cobalt is home to an Orange call centre. The town's association with the early days of the railways is recognised at the Stephenson Railway Museum on Middle Engine Lane near The Silverlink.[50]

Other industries

Potts Print, based in Cramlington since 2006, was originally founded in North Shields in 1875.[51] They occupied various sites in the town over the years.

Spicers has a large factory in the town, producing tea. It bought the site from Twinings in 2012.[52]

Donald Campbell's Bluebird K7, which crashed during a water speed record attempt on Coniston Water, was restored in a workshop in the town by local engineer Bill Smith.[53]

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John Lilley and Gillie Ltd

John Lilley and Gillie Ltd

John Lilley & Gillie Ltd are a developer, manufacturer and supplier of Marine Navigation Equipment headquartered in North Shields in the North East of England.

Preston, Tyne and Wear

Preston, Tyne and Wear

Preston is a suburb about a mile north of North Shields, North Tyneside. Its population was recorded at 8419 in the 2011 census. Historically a separate entity, it has slowly been absorbed into the town to the south and expanded as to form a continuous urban area north to Monkseaton.

Percy Main

Percy Main

Percy Main is a small village absorbed into North Shields, North East England. Historically in Northumberland, it is now part of Tyne and Wear.

New York, Tyne and Wear

New York, Tyne and Wear

New York is a suburban village in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear, North East England. Approximately 4 miles from Whitley Bay, and 5 miles from the town of Tynemouth, it locally governed as part of the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside. It was named after New York, following the British capture of the city in 1777.

Coal mining

Coal mining

Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content and since the 1880s has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine is called a 'pit', and the above-ground structures are a 'pit head'. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine.

Shipbuilding

Shipbuilding

Shipbuilding is the construction of ships and other floating vessels. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history.

Business park

Business park

A business park or office park is a designated area of land in which many office buildings are grouped together. These types of developments are often located in suburban areas where land and building costs are more affordable, and are typically situated near major highways or roads for easy access.

Cobalt Park

Cobalt Park

Cobalt Park is a business park located in North Tyneside, England. It is one of the largest business parks in the United Kingdom.

Atmel

Atmel

Atmel Corporation was a creator and manufacturer of semiconductors before being subsumed by Microchip Technology in 2016. Atmel was founded in 1984. The company focused on embedded systems built around microcontrollers. Its products included microcontrollers radio-frequency (RF) devices including Wi-Fi, EEPROM, and flash memory devices, symmetric and asymmetric security chips, touch sensors and controllers, and application-specific products. Atmel supplies its devices as standard products, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), or application-specific standard product (ASSPs) depending on the requirements of its customers.

Call centre

Call centre

A call centre or call center is a managed capability that can be centralised or remote that is used for receiving or transmitting a large volume of enquiries by telephone. An inbound call centre is operated by a company to administer incoming product or service support or information enquiries from consumers. Outbound call centres are usually operated for sales purposes such as telemarketing, for solicitation of charitable or political donations, debt collection, market research, emergency notifications, and urgent/critical needs blood banks. A contact centre is a further extension to call centres telephony based capabilities, administers centralised handling of individual communications, including letters, faxes, live support software, social media, instant message, and email.

Donald Campbell

Donald Campbell

Donald Malcolm Campbell, was a British speed record breaker who broke eight absolute world speed records on water and on land in the 1950s and 1960s. He remains the only person to set both world land and water speed records in the same year (1964). He died during a water speed record attempt at Coniston Water in the Lake District, England.

Bluebird K7

Bluebird K7

Bluebird K7 is a jet engined hydroplane which Britain's Donald Campbell set seven world water speed records between 1955 and 1967. K7 was the first successful jet-powered hydroplane, and was considered revolutionary when launched in January 1955. Campbell and K7 were responsible for adding almost 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) to the water speed record, taking it from existing mark of 178 miles per hour (286 km/h) to just over 276 miles per hour (444 km/h). Donald Campbell was killed in an accident with a much modified K7, on 4 January 1967, whilst making a bid for his eighth water speed record, with his aim to raise the record to over 300 miles per hour (480 km/h) on Coniston Water.

Transport

North Shields Metro Station
North Shields Metro Station
Royal Quays Marina
Royal Quays Marina

Rail (Tyne and Wear Metro)

The Newcastle and North Shields Railway opened in 1839. In 1847, the railway was extended to Tynemouth when a railway station was built in Oxford Street, off Tynemouth Road. Eventually, it was replaced by a new station further away from the river after new rail lines were developed.[54] The riverside tracks were removed for the creation of Hadrian's Way, part of the national cycle network, but the remaining tracks were absorbed in the Tyne and Wear Metro system in 1982. The town centre station, originally constructed for the Newcastle and North Shields Railway, was redeveloped between 1980 and 1982 for the Metro. It was subsequently refurbished in 2012.[55] The Tyne and Wear Metro links North Shields to Newcastle city centre, and to other destinations in Tyne and Wear including Whitley Bay, Newcastle Airport and Sunderland. The town is also served by stations in Percy Main and Meadow Well.

The Tyneside Tramways and Tramroads Company also operated an electric tramway service in the town.[56]

Shipping

Local ferry

A half-hourly ferry service connects North Shields to the town of South Shields on the opposite bank of the Tyne.[57] The present Shields Ferry was established in 1972. Its first female skipper was appointed in 2016.[58] Shieldsman, a former ferry retired in 2007, has since been moved to Shoreham, West Sussex, and transformed into a houseboat.[59]

From June to October, river trips by ferry operate.

In November 2018, the local council announced plans to consider the feasibility of moving the ferry landing.[32] In July 2021 it was announced that the planned relocation was delayed until 2023.[60]

International ferry

From the International Ferry Terminal, based at Royal Quays, the Danish company DFDS Seaways operates a daily service to IJmuiden.[61]

The ferry service to Gothenburg, Sweden (run by DFDS Seaways), ceased operation at the end of October 2006.[62] DFDS Seaways' sister company, DFDS Tor Line, continues to run scheduled freight ships between Gothenburg and several English ports, including Newcastle, but these have limited capacity for passengers and do not carry private vehicles.

Port of Tyne International Passenger Terminal

The passenger terminal regularly welcomes tourists travelling on cruises that call at North Shields as an access point for Newcastle upon Tyne and the wider North East of England. In 2017, 52 ships docked, bringing 120,000 visitors to the region.[63] A number of "dudes" - red and blue powder coated figures designed by artist Perminder Kaur - can be seen on a grassy mound at the entrance to the terminal.[64]

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Newcastle and North Shields Railway

Newcastle and North Shields Railway

The Newcastle & North Shields Railway opened in June 1839 from a temporary terminus in Carliol Square in Newcastle upon Tyne to North Shields. The railway was absorbed by the Newcastle & Berwick Railway in November 1844. The Newcastle & Berwick Railway was itself absorbed by the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway, and this became part of the North Eastern Railway in 1854.

North Shields Metro station

North Shields Metro station

North Shields is a Tyne and Wear Metro station, serving the coastal town of North Shields, North Tyneside in Tyne and Wear, England. It joined the network on 14 November 1982, following the opening of the fourth phase of the network, between Tynemouth and St James via Wallsend.

Tyne and Wear Metro

Tyne and Wear Metro

The Tyne and Wear Metro is an overground and underground light rail rapid transit system serving Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, and the City of Sunderland. The network opened in stages from August 1980 and now serves a total of 60 stations, with two lines covering 77.5 km (48.2 mi) of track. The Metro can be accessed from a mixture of under ground and above ground stations. It has been described as the "first modern light rail system in the United Kingdom". The system is currently owned and operated by the Tyne and Wear Passenger Transport Executive, thus is fully under public ownership and operation.

Tyne and Wear

Tyne and Wear

Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in North East England, situated around the mouths of the rivers Tyne and Wear. It was created in 1974, by the Local Government Act 1972, along with five metropolitan boroughs of Gateshead, Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland, North Tyneside and South Tyneside. It is bordered by Northumberland to the north and Durham to the south; the county boundary was formerly split between these counties with the border as the River Tyne.

Newcastle International Airport

Newcastle International Airport

Newcastle International Airport is an international airport in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK. Located approximately 7.7 mi (12.4 km) from Newcastle City Centre, it is the primary and busiest airport in North East England, and the second busiest in Northern England. As of 2017, Newcastle International handled just under 5.2 million passengers annually.

Percy Main Metro station

Percy Main Metro station

Percy Main is a Tyne and Wear Metro station, serving the suburb of Percy Main, North Tyneside in Tyne and Wear, England. It joined the network on 14 November 1982, following the opening of the fourth phase of the network, between Tynemouth and St James via Wallsend.

Meadow Well Metro station

Meadow Well Metro station

Meadow Well is a Tyne and Wear Metro station, serving the suburbs of Chirton and Meadow Well, North Tyneside in Tyne and Wear, England. It joined the network as Smith's Park on 14 November 1982, following the opening of the fourth phase of the network, between Tynemouth and St James via Wallsend.

South Shields

South Shields

South Shields is a coastal town in South Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England. It is on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne. Historically, it was known in Roman times as Arbeia, and as Caer Urfa by Early Middle Ages. According to the 2011 census, the town had a population of 75,337. It is the fourth largest settlement in Tyne and Wear; after Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland and Gateshead.

Denmark

Denmark

Denmark is a Nordic country in Northern Europe. It is the most populous and politically central constituent of the Kingdom of Denmark, a constitutionally unitary state that includes the autonomous territories of the Faroe Islands and Greenland in the North Atlantic Ocean. Metropolitan Denmark is the southernmost of the Scandinavian countries, lying south-west of Sweden, south of Norway, and north of Germany.

DFDS Seaways

DFDS Seaways

DFDS Seaways is a Danish shipping company that operates passenger and freight services across northern Europe. Following the acquisition of Norfolkline in 2010, DFDS restructured its other shipping divisions into the previously passenger-only operation of DFDS Seaways.

IJmuiden

IJmuiden

IJmuiden is a port city in the Dutch province of North Holland. It is the main town in the municipality of Velsen which lies mainly to the south-east. Including its large sea locks, it straddles the mouth of the North Sea Canal to Amsterdam. To the south it abuts a large reserve of plant-covered dunes, the Zuid-Kennemerland National Park. The city is on the south bank; the north bank is otherwise a steel plant and Velsen-Noord.

Gothenburg

Gothenburg

Gothenburg is the second-largest city in Sweden, fifth-largest in the Nordic countries, and capital of the Västra Götaland County. It is situated by the Kattegat, on the west coast of Sweden, and has a population of approximately 590,000 in the city proper and about 1.1 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area.

Education

The town's schools are part of a three-tiered system:

Nursery schools[65]

  • Sir James Knott Nursery School[66]

Primary schools[65]

  • Christ Church Church of England Primary School[67]
  • Collingwood Primary School[68]
  • King Edward Primary School[69]
  • Kings Priory School[70]
  • Monkhouse Primary School[71]
  • Percy Main Primary School[72]
  • Preston Grange Primary School[73]
  • Riverside Primary School[74]
  • Spring Gardens Primary School[75]
  • St Cuthberts Roman Catholic Primary School[76]
  • St Josephs Roman Catholic Primary School[77]
  • Waterville Primary School[78]
  • Whitehouse Primary School[79]

Secondary schools[80]

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Religion

North Shields has a number of churches and religious groups:

Christian churches

Denomination Name Location Denominational Affiliation Notes
Church of England Christ Church Preston Road Tynemouth Deanery in the Diocese of Newcastle Now the parish church of North Shields but originally consecrated as Tynemouth Parish Church on Sunday 5 July 1668 (enlarged 1792).[85] Part of the North Shields Team Ministry, with St Augustin's.
St Augustin's[86] Jackson Street Part of the North Shields Team Ministry with Christ Church. The building was designed by Robert Rowand Anderson, originally as a replica of St Andrew's Episcopalian Church in Fife, but ultimately modified during construction. The foundation was laid in 1881 and the church opened in 1884.[87]
St Peter's[88] Central Avenue, Balkwell The building was designed by North Shields architect William Stockdale and opened in 1937. As of 2019, the church shares a priest with St John's.
The Church of the Holy Saviour[89] Crossway, Tynemouth The building was consecrated by the Bishop of Durham in 1841, as a chapel of ease to Christ Church. It was formally separated in 1861.
St John's[90] St John's Terrace, Percy Main Shares a priest with St Peter's. Built in 1862, the building was reordered in 2000 to provide adaptable space for use as a community centre as well as for worship.[91]
St Aidan's[92] Billy Mill Lane, Billy Mill Dedicated in 1958.
St Hilda's[93] Stanton Road, Preston Gate Dedicated in 1966, it is a daughter church of St George's, Cullercoats.
Roman Catholic Church St Cuthbert's[94] Albion Road West Roman Catholic Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle The building, opened on 22 December 1975, replaced a much earlier church, over the road from the present site, which was itself completed around 1820.[95] As of 2020, the church shares a priest with St Joseph's.
St Joseph's[96] Wallsend Road, Chirton The building was opened in 1955, replacing temporary buildings that had been erected in 1935 on the site of J. Ord's old market garden.[97] As of 2020, the church shares a priest with St Cuthbert's.
United Reformed Church St Columba's[98] Northumberland Square Northern Synod The building was designed by architect John Dobson.[99]
Methodist Church North Shields Methodist Church Hawkey's Lane The building was opened in 1932. Methodists in the town had previously met in a building that stills stands in Saville Street, as of 2020 housing Frank's flooring store but for many years a branch of Woolworths. After the Methodists' departure, the top floor of the building was removed before the store opened. A war memorial originally installed in the Saville Street building, and commemorating those who fought and died in World War One, was transferred to the Hawkey's Lane site.[100] The present building was extended in 1997.[101]
Baptist Union of Great Britain Filipino International Church Howard Street Member Churches of the Northern Baptist Association Meeting at North Shields Baptist Church's building.
North Shields Baptist Church[102] Howard Street The church was established in 1798 and has met in a number of different buildings in the town.[103] The present building was purpose-built, having been designed under the direction of Dobson.[104] The interior, which was expanded into the adjoining terraced house at some point, was subsequently substantially refurbished in the late 1990s and again in 2012.[105] In 1851, the church had 238 members, making it the second largest Baptist church in the North East.[103] A decade later, that had risen to 300.[103]
Preston Grange Community Church[106] Preston Grange The church meets in the Preston Grange Community Centre. It was originally an outreach congregation of Whitley Bay Baptist Church, begun in 1998, before being established in its own right in 2011.[103]
Salvation Army North Shields Salvation Army Corps[107] Howard Street The building was constructed in 1811 as the Scotch Church and was also designed by John Dobson.[108]
Non-denominational North Shields Evangelical Church George Street Member of the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches Formed in the early 1980s by the joining together of The Evangelistic Mission and The People's Mission, two former free churches in the town, and initially known as The People's Evangelistic Mission.

Many are members of the ecumenical Churches Together in North Shields, itself a member of Churches Together in England.[109]

Other organisations

  • North Shields Fishermen's Mission, 42-47 Fish Quay[110] - Based in North Shields, the organisation covers the North East coast from Amble to Redcar.
  • The Cedarwood Trust, Avon Avenue[111] - A Christian ethos community development organisation based in Meadow Well, initially established through a partnership of the Church of England and North Tyneside Council.

Both are associate members of Churches Together in North Shields.

Other religious groups

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Church of England

Church of England

The Church of England is the established Christian church in England and the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the 3rd century and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury. Its adherents are called Anglicans.

Christ Church, North Shields

Christ Church, North Shields

Christ Church, North Shields, Tyne and Wear, England is an Anglican church in the parish of North Shields Christ Church, Diocese of Newcastle. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building,

Diocese of Newcastle

Diocese of Newcastle

The Diocese of Newcastle is a Church of England diocese based in Newcastle upon Tyne, covering the historic county of Northumberland, as well as the area of Alston Moor in Cumbria.

Chapel of ease

Chapel of ease

A chapel of ease is a church building other than the parish church, built within the bounds of a parish for the attendance of those who cannot reach the parish church conveniently.

Catholic Church

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptized Catholics worldwide as of 2019. It is among the world's oldest and largest international institutions, and has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilization. The church consists of 24 sui iuris churches, including the Latin Church and 23 Eastern Catholic Churches, which comprise almost 3,500 dioceses and eparchies located around the world. The pope, who is the bishop of Rome, is the chief pastor of the church. The bishopric of Rome, known as the Holy See, is the central governing authority of the church. The administrative body of the Holy See, the Roman Curia, has its principal offices in Vatican City, a small enclave of the Italian city of Rome, of which the pope is head of state.

John Dobson (architect)

John Dobson (architect)

John Dobson was a 19th-century English architect in the neoclassical tradition. He became the most noted architect in the North of England. Churches and houses by him dot the North East – Nunnykirk Hall, Meldon Park, Mitford Hall, Lilburn Tower, St John the Baptist Church in Otterburn, Northumberland, and Beaufront Castle among them. During his career he designed more than 50 churches and 100 private houses. He is best known for designing Newcastle railway station and for his work with Richard Grainger developing the centre of Newcastle in a neoclassical style.

Baptists Together

Baptists Together

Baptists Together is a Baptist Christian denomination in England and Wales. It is affiliated with the Baptist World Alliance and Churches Together in England. The headquarters is in Didcot.

Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches

Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches

The Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches (FIEC) is a network of 639 independent evangelical churches mainly in the United Kingdom.

Churches Together in England

Churches Together in England

Churches Together in England (CTE) is an ecumenical organisation and the national instrument for the Christian Churches in England. It helps its Member Churches work better together.

Fishermen's Mission

Fishermen's Mission

Fishermen's Mission - the full name of which is The Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen - is a British charitable organisation founded and run on Christian principles. The mission also welcomes the participation and support of persons of other faiths or none.

Iglesia ni Cristo

Iglesia ni Cristo

Iglesia ni Cristo is an independent Nontrinitarian Christian church, founded in 1913 and registered by Felix Y. Manalo in 1914 as a unipersonal religious corporation to the Insular Government of the Philippines.

Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses is a millenarian restorationist Christian denomination with nontrinitarian beliefs distinct from mainstream Christianity. The group reports a worldwide membership of approximately 8.5 million adherents involved in evangelism and an annual Memorial attendance of over 19.7 million. Jehovah's Witnesses are directed by the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses, a group of elders in Warwick, New York, United States, which establishes all doctrines based on its interpretations of the Bible. They believe that the destruction of the present world system at Armageddon is imminent, and that the establishment of God's kingdom over the earth is the only solution for all problems faced by humanity.

Economy

Retail

Town Centre

A significant part of the town centre is pedestrianised and it is dominated by the Beacon, a partly-covered shopping mall which was constructed in the late 1970s and originally named The Bedford Centre.[115]

As with many British high streets, a number of large chains have closed their branches in the town in recent years, including Littlewoods, Woolworths and McDonald's. As of 2019, Wilko has a large store in the Beacon, alongside high street regulars such as Specsavers, Superdrug and Boots. A number of discount retailers including B & M, Home Bargains, Peacocks and Heron Foods have branches in the town centre, as well as numerous charity stores.

Greggs, Cooplands, and Costa Coffee have outlets. Charities YMCA North Tyneside, Age UK and Operation Veteran both have independent coffee shops. Barista Boho, opened in 2022 in the former Alnwick Castle public house, also serves local coffee blends and hosts musicians.[116] There are numerous independent butchers in the town centre, as well as a local independent bakery, Canatrice, located nearby.

Asda acquired a former Netto store in the town centre in 2011.[117] The Co-op has a number of branches in the town, including convenience stores in Tynemouth and Preston. Morrisons also has a large store in Preston.

Other shopping centres

There are three further shopping centres in the town, as well as parades of shops in Balkwell, Preston and Chirton.

The Royal Quays Outlet Centre is home to a number of discount stores including outlets for Next, Clarks and Mountain Warehouse, as well as independent retailers such as a photographic studio and pet shop.[118] The closures of a Marks & Spencer Outlet and, in late 2019, the Nike store have somewhat diminished the centre. In January 2020, Thorntons posted notices announcing the closure of their shop and coffee shop. Costa Coffee, The Body Shop, Cotton Traders, Dreams, Edinburgh Woollen Mill, Moss, Tog 24, Trespass and Poundland also had branches in early 2020.

The Coast Road Retail Park is adjacent to a large Tesco supermarket and, as of 2020, home to Dunelm, B & M, Pets at Home, Carpetright and The Food Warehouse stores.

The Silverlink Shopping Park, as of 2020, includes branches of Boots, Next, H&M, Halfords, Marks and Spencer and River Island. In September 2016, a large expansion of the retail park opened.[119] Odeon also has a multi-screen cinema at the park, alongside restaurants including McDonald's, Frankie and Benny's, Nando's and Pizza Hut.

Business

Over 100 businesses in the town are members of The North Shields Chamber of Trade and Commerce.[120]

The Mercantile Building Society, established in the town and formerly headquartered at the Silverlink Business Park, merged with the Leeds Building Society in 2006.[121]

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McDonald's

McDonald's

McDonald's Corporation is an American multinational fast food chain, founded in 1940 as a restaurant operated by Richard and Maurice McDonald, in San Bernardino, California, United States. They rechristened their business as a hamburger stand, and later turned the company into a franchise, with the Golden Arches logo being introduced in 1953 at a location in Phoenix, Arizona. In 1955, Ray Kroc, a businessman, joined the company as a franchise agent and proceeded to purchase the chain from the McDonald brothers. McDonald's had its previous headquarters in Oak Brook, Illinois, but moved its global headquarters to Chicago in June 2018.

Home Bargains

Home Bargains

Home Bargains is a British variety store chain founded in 1976 by Tom Morris in Liverpool, England, as Home and Bargain. It is the trading name of TJ Morris Ltd.

Heron Foods

Heron Foods

Heron Foods Ltd. is an English retail chain founded in 1979 and based in Melton with 293 stores as of 1 July 2020.

Greggs

Greggs

Greggs plc is a British bakery chain. It specialises in savoury products such as bakes, sausage rolls, sandwiches and sweet items including doughnuts and vanilla slices. It is headquartered in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange, and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index. Originally a high street chain, it has since entered the convenience and drive-thru markets, this achieved mainly through its partnership with EG Group.

Cooplands

Cooplands

Cooplands is the second largest bakery chain in the UK with over 160 outlets and 12 cafes located primarily across Yorkshire, County Durham and Lincolnshire in the United Kingdom. Cooplands produces takeaway food chiefly for the lunch-time trade, specialising in sandwiches, pasties, desserts, cakes, and bread. It competes with other local cafés and takeaway outlets, and national and international high street food chains and franchises.

Costa Coffee

Costa Coffee

Costa Coffee is a British coffeehouse chain with headquarters in Dunstable, England.

Asda

Asda

Asda Stores Ltd. is a British supermarket chain. Its headquarters are in Leeds, England. The company was founded in 1949 when the Asquith family merged their retail business with the Associated Dairies company of Yorkshire. It expanded into Southern England during the 1970s and 1980s, and acquired Allied Carpets, 61 large Gateway Supermarkets and other businesses, such as MFI Group. It sold these acquisitions during the 1990s to concentrate on the supermarkets. It was listed on the London Stock Exchange until 1999 when it was acquired by Walmart for £6.7 billion. Asda was the second-largest supermarket chain in the United Kingdom between 2003 and 2014 by market share, at which point it fell into third place.

Netto (store)

Netto (store)

Netto is a Danish discount supermarket operating in Denmark, Germany, Poland, and previously in Sweden and the United Kingdom, both as a stand-alone venture, until its sale in 2010 to Asda, and via a joint venture with Sainsbury's between 2014 and 2016. Netto is owned by Salling Group.

Co-op Food

Co-op Food

Co-op Food is a brand used for the food retail business of The Co-operative Group in the United Kingdom.

Morrisons

Morrisons

Wm Morrison Supermarkets, trading as Morrisons, is the fifth largest supermarket chain in the United Kingdom. As of 2021, the company had 497 supermarkets across England, Wales and Scotland, as well as one in Gibraltar. The company is headquartered in Bradford, England.

Marks & Spencer

Marks & Spencer

Marks and Spencer Group plc is a major British multinational retailer with headquarters in Paddington, London that specialises in selling clothing, beauty, home products and food products. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 250 Index; it had previously been in the FTSE 100 Index from its creation until 2019.

Cotton Traders

Cotton Traders

Cotton Traders is an English clothing company, specialising in rugby apparel and leisurewear, based in Altrincham, Greater Manchester, England. It was founded in 1987 by former England national rugby union team captains Fran Cotton and Steve Smith.

Recreation

In 2000, the local authority established more than 30 miles (48 km) of walking routes, primarily following the paths of 19th-century waggonways. A Tynemouth walk begins from the Metro station in the town centre and drops down on to the fish quay before following a route to Tynemouth, while the Royal Quays walk begins from the Meadowell Metro station and completes a route around the redeveloped riverside area including the marina, before ending at Percy Main Metro station.[122]

Sport

The town is home to the non-League football club North Shields F.C. Founded in 1896, the team competes in Northern Football League and plays home games at Daren Persson Stadium (formerly Ralph Gardner Park). The team has twice played at Wembley Stadium, winning 2–1 on both occasions: against Sutton United on 12 April 1969 at the old Wembley to win the FA Amateur Cup[123] and against Glossop North End at the new stadium on 9 May 2015 to win the FA Vase, the Amateur Cup's successor.[124] The stadium is presently named as such because of a sponsorship by a local funeral director.

Leisure facilities

The Parks Sports Centre was opened in 1998, after the construction of the Royal Quays. It has a large sports hall, gym, multi-sensory room, outdoor football pitches, indoor and outdoor bowls facilities and a cafe.[125]

Royal Quays facilities

The Wet'n'Wild indoor water park was constructed in 1992 and opened in summer 1993 as part of the Royal Quays development. It was originally designed with rides: six speed slides, five conventional flumes and one "lazy river" ride. The "Twister", a speed slide, was 85 metres (279 ft) long, and started from a height of 12.5 metres (41 ft).[126] It closed in 2013 after its owner entered administration, but was reopened in 2014, having been bought by another company. In 2020, the owner announced that it would not reopen after the winter, citing financial losses due to poor visitor numbers.[127]

A bowling alley, originally Star Bowl, also forms part of the development. In 2019, having been closed for some time, it was reopened as Gutterball.[128]

A trampoline park, Xtreme Bounce, was opened in 2017 in an air-locked dome in the outlet centre's car park.[129] In 2019, the Inflatanation chain took over the site and reopened the venue with inflatables replacing the trampolines.[130]

In 2019, a leisure hub housed in the health and fitness section of the former JJB Soccerdome adjacent to the outlet centre, was announced.[131] Everyone Entertained was to feature climbing walls, soft play, laser tag and adventure golf, and employ 100 people. As of May 2020, the venue remains unopened.[132] The pitches and bar were reopened as The Evolution Football Centre in autumn 2018.[133] In early 2020, it was announced that the centre was to close having proved financially nonviable.

Parks

There are a number of parks and play areas in the town.

Northumberland Park

Northumberland Park lies on the border of North Shields and Tynemouth and was set out around 1885, in an area formerly known as Spittal Dene. In 2015, North Tyneside Council completed a major project to revive and restore parts of the park. The multi-million pound scheme saw archaeological investigations carried out around the medieval St Leonard's Hospital and the restoration historical features that had been lost over the years. Iron railings, park furniture, fountains were installed amid historic planting schemes. A pavilion housing a cafe and toilet facilities as well as offices and storage for the park staff was also opened.[134]

There is a children's play area at the south end of the park, bowling greens on the western border and a historical pet cemetery[135] to the north. A number of trees along a pathway in the northern half feature plaques commemorating their planting by various local dignitaries.

West End Park and Linear Park, Chirton Dene

West End Park lies adjacent to The Parks sports centre and was laid out prior to the 1940s. To its south, Linear Park runs down to the Royal Quays Marina and was created as part of the Royal Quays development in the mid-1990s.[136]

Redburn Dene

As with Linear Park, Redburn Dene was created as part of the 1990s redevelopment of former industrial and dockland areas, following a natural water course. It features sculptures made from reclaimed staithes. The park was given a Green Flag award in 2020.[137]

Play areas

Pearson Park located to the east of the town centre was laid in 2000, as a millennium project.[138] Alexander Scott Park is to the east of the town centre.[139] The Holmlands playsite lies within Haswell Gardens, an estate developed on the site of the former Preston Hospital.[140] A further playsite and multi-use games area (MUGA) are adjacent to Norham High School.[141] In Percy Main, a playground lies just off Nelson Terrace.[142] East Howdon has a playsite and MUGA too.[143][144] There is a playground adjacent to Tynemouth Pool.[145] Finally, there is a further playsite on Tynemouth's sea front.[146]

Library

The town's main library is in Northumberland Square. It originally included a lecture hall, which was expected to be used for musical performances too. Construction began in 1973, and the building is mounted on rubber springs to minimize noise and vibration from the Metro tunnel underneath. It was the first building to use PTFE to reduce weight drag on horizontal restraints.[147] The library was refurbished in 2013, with the lecture hall redeveloped for additional book storage and computer workstation capacity.[148]

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Non-League football

Non-League football

Non-League football describes football leagues played outside the top leagues of a country. Usually, it describes leagues which are not fully professional. The term is primarily used for football in England, where it is specifically used to describe all football played at levels below those of the Premier League and the three divisions of the English Football League. Currently, a non-League team would be any club playing in the National League or below that level. Typically, non-League clubs are either semi-professional or amateur in status, although the majority of clubs in the National League are fully professional, some of which are former EFL clubs who have suffered relegation.

North Shields F.C.

North Shields F.C.

North Shields Football Club is a football club based in North Shields, Tyne and Wear, England. They have reached the 1st round of the FA Cup twice in their history: in 1933–34 and 1982–83. Following their promotion from Northern League Division Two, they achieved promotion to Northern League Division One from which they were promoted from in 2022 as Champions to the Northern Premier League Division One East. They also won the FA Amateur Cup at Wembley in 1969, beating Sutton United. During the 2014–15 season, North Shields repeated their 1969 success by defeating Glossop North End 2-1 AET at Wembley in the final of the FA Vase.

Northern Football League

Northern Football League

The Northern League is a men's football league in north east England. Having been founded in 1889, it is the second-oldest football league in the world still in existence after the English Football League.

Wembley Stadium

Wembley Stadium

Wembley Stadium is a football stadium in Wembley, London. It opened in 2007 on the site of the original Wembley Stadium, which was demolished from 2002 to 2003. The stadium hosts major football matches including home matches of the England national football team, and the FA Cup Final. Wembley Stadium is owned by the governing body of English football, the Football Association, whose headquarters are in the stadium, through its subsidiary Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL). With 90,000 seats, it is the largest stadium in the UK and the second-largest stadium in Europe.

Sutton United F.C.

Sutton United F.C.

Sutton United Football Club is a professional football club in Sutton, South London, England, who play in League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. They play home games at Gander Green Lane in Sutton about 11 miles south-southwest of central London.

Wembley Stadium (1923)

Wembley Stadium (1923)

The original Wembley Stadium was a stadium in Wembley, London, best known for hosting important football matches. It stood on the same site now occupied by its successor.

FA Amateur Cup

FA Amateur Cup

The FA Amateur Cup was an English football competition for amateur clubs. It commenced in 1893 and ended in 1974 when the Football Association abolished official amateur status.

FA Vase

FA Vase

The Football Association Challenge Vase, usually referred to as the FA Vase, is an annual football competition for teams playing in Steps 5 and 6 of the English National League System. For the 2017–18 season 619 entrants were accepted, with two qualifying rounds preceding the six proper rounds, semi-finals and final to be played at Wembley Stadium.

Polytetrafluoroethylene

Polytetrafluoroethylene

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a synthetic fluoropolymer of tetrafluoroethylene that has numerous applications. It is one of the best-known and widely applied PFAS. The commonly known brand name of PTFE-based composition is Teflon by Chemours, a spin-off from DuPont, which originally discovered the compound in 1938.

Governance

The former Tynemouth Town Hall in Howard Street
The former Tynemouth Town Hall in Howard Street

Since April 1974, North Shields has been part of the Metropolitan Borough of North Tyneside, formerly having been part of the County Borough of Tynemouth, which was based at Tynemouth Town Hall, in Howard Street, North Shields. Parts of the town are within the Tynemouth and North Tyneside parliamentary constituencies.

North Shields County Court and North Tyneside Magistrates' Court are also in the town.[149][150] The county court houses the Employment Tribunals Office.

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Culture

Art

Fiddler's Green, a steel sculpture that serves as a memorial to fishermen lost at sea, was unveiled in 2017.[151]

A number of pieces were installed as part of the Royal Quays development. Located in Chirton Dene, Redburn Dene, by the marina, and near the shopping outlet, they include works by Richard Broderick, Graham Robinson, Linda France, Alec Peever, Gilly Rogers, Mark di Suvero, Perminder Kaur and Andy Plant.

In film

Dream On (1991) was produced by Amber Films and filmed on location in Meadow Well. Its original release was around the time of the Meadow Well riots.[152]

On television

The BBC series When the Boat Comes In, though set in the fictional Gallowshield, was essentially set in North Shields and filmed on location around the town.[153] Various episodes of the series Spender, which starred Jimmy Nail, and Vera, with Brenda Blethyn,[154] were also filmed there.

In songs

Sweden's foremost troubadour of the 20th century, Evert Taube, wrote the song "Mary Strand", which is set in North Shields in 1909. Mary Strand is the proprietress of the cigar shop Tiger Brand on Dock Street and hides a young sailor from the police. The song is based on Taube's own experience, when he ran away from the steamship Australic in Newcastle upon Tyne.[155]

Twin town

In 2017, the town was twinned with Merthyr Tydfil, in Wales, as part of the Carnegie Twin Towns Project.[156][157] The project aimed to pair towns that had similar characteristics, and socio-economic challenges, in order to consider how they might make positive changes to their communities.

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Linda France

Linda France

Linda France is a British poet, writer and editor. She has published eight full-length poetry collections, a number of pamphlets, and was editor of the influential anthology, Sixty Women Poets. France is the author of The Toast of the Kit-Cat Club, a verse biography of the eighteenth-century traveler and social rebel, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. She has won numerous awards and fellowships, including the National Poetry Competition in 2013.

Mark di Suvero

Mark di Suvero

Marco Polo di Suvero, better known as Mark di Suvero, is an abstract expressionist sculptor and 2010 National Medal of Arts recipient.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

When the Boat Comes In

When the Boat Comes In

When the Boat Comes In is a British television period drama produced by the BBC between 1976 and 1981. The series stars James Bolam as Jack Ford, a First World War veteran who returns to his poverty-stricken (fictional) town of Gallowshield in the North East of England. The series dramatises the interwar political struggles of the 1920s and 1930s and explores the impact of national and international politics upon Ford and the people around him.

Spender

Spender

Spender is a British television police procedural drama, created by Ian La Frenais and Jimmy Nail, that first broadcast on 8 January 1991 on BBC1. The series, which also starred Nail as the titular character, ran for three series between 1991 and 1993, finishing with a feature-length special, The French Collection, broadcast on 29 December 1993. A total of twenty-one episodes were produced. The first and second series were produced by Martin McKeand, while the third and final series was produced by Paul Raphael and Peter McAleese.

Jimmy Nail

Jimmy Nail

James Michael Aloysius Bradford, known as Jimmy Nail, is an English singer-songwriter, actor, film producer, and television writer. He played the role of Leonard "Oz" Osborne in the television show Auf Wiedersehen, Pet and the title role in Spender. He also recorded a 1992 number one single, "Ain't No Doubt". His role as Agustin, the oily crooner in the 1996 film Evita, gave him international recognition.

Vera (TV series)

Vera (TV series)

Vera is a British crime drama series based on the Vera Stanhope series of novels written by crime writer Ann Cleeves. It was first broadcast on ITV on 1 May 2011, and to date, twelve series have aired, with the latest debuting on 29 January 2023. The series stars Brenda Blethyn as the principal character, Detective Chief Inspector Vera Stanhope.

Brenda Blethyn

Brenda Blethyn

Brenda Blethyn is an English actress. She is the recipient of several accolades, including a Golden Globe, a BAFTA, a Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actress, and two Academy Award nominations.

Evert Taube

Evert Taube

Axel Evert Taube was a Swedish author, artist, composer and singer. He is widely regarded as one of Sweden's most respected musicians and the foremost troubadour of the Swedish ballad tradition in the 20th century.

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne, or simply Newcastle, is a city and metropolitan borough in Tyne and Wear, England. The city is located on the River Tyne's northern bank and forms the largest part of the Tyneside built-up area. Newcastle is also the most populous city of North East England. Newcastle developed around a Roman settlement called Pons Aelius and the settlement later took the name of a castle built in 1080 by William the Conqueror's eldest son, Robert Curthose.

Merthyr Tydfil

Merthyr Tydfil

Merthyr Tydfil is the main town in Merthyr Tydfil County Borough, Wales, administered by Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council. It is about 23 miles (37 km) north of Cardiff. Often called just Merthyr, it is said to be named after Tydfil, daughter of King Brychan of Brycheiniog, who according to legend was slain at Merthyr by pagans about 480 CE. Merthyr generally means "martyr" in modern Welsh, but here closer to the Latin martyrium: a place of worship built over a martyr's relics. Similar place names in south Wales are Merthyr Cynog, Merthyr Dyfan and Merthyr Mawr.

Wales

Wales

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, the Celtic Sea to the south west and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2021 of 3,107,500 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate. The capital and largest city is Cardiff.

Notable people

Prominent locals include Ralph Gardner, who opposed Newcastle when it attempted to prevent the docking of coal ships in North Shields. Gardner was imprisoned in 1653 for refusing to close his brewery which supplied provisions to the ships. In 1655, he petitioned Parliament against what he claimed were the unfair demands of Newcastle. Gardner, regarded as a local hero, had a High School named in his honour in 1933[158] near the former site of his cottage. The school, nicknamed 'Ralphies' /ˈræfiz/ RAF-eez by its students closed in 1994 and was redeveloped into the Gardner Park housing estate. A monument to Gardner was erected near the school.[159]

The family of Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood (1748–1810), a notable naval commander, and Edward Collingwood (1734–1806), a barrister who ordered the construction of Dissington Hall, had their seat at Chirton Hall in Chirton, now a western suburb of North Shields.[160][161] The Collingwood Arms, a public house, was later built on part of that land before being demolished in early 2005 to make way for a retirement home.[162]

Academia

Architecture

Arts

Business

Cinema, television, and theatre

Fashion

Industry

Law

Literature

Medicine

Media

Military

Music

Politics

Religion

Sport

Discover more about Notable people related topics

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne, or simply Newcastle, is a city and metropolitan borough in Tyne and Wear, England. The city is located on the River Tyne's northern bank and forms the largest part of the Tyneside built-up area. Newcastle is also the most populous city of North East England. Newcastle developed around a Roman settlement called Pons Aelius and the settlement later took the name of a castle built in 1080 by William the Conqueror's eldest son, Robert Curthose.

Cottage

Cottage

A cottage, during England's feudal period, was the holding by a cottager of a small house with enough garden to feed a family and in return for the cottage, the cottager had to provide some form of service to the manorial lord. However, in time cottage just became the general term for a small house. In modern usage, a cottage is usually a modest, often cosy dwelling, typically in a rural or semi-rural location and not necessarily in England. The cottage orné, often quite large and grand residences built by the nobility, dates back to a movement of "rustic" stylised cottages of the late 18th and early 19th century during the Romantic movement.

Nickname

Nickname

A nickname is a substitute for the proper name of a familiar person, place or thing. Commonly used to express affection, a form of endearment, and sometimes amusement, it can also be used to express defamation of character. As a concept, it is distinct from both pseudonym and stage name, and also from a title, although there may be overlap in these concepts.

Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood

Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood

Vice Admiral Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood was an admiral of the Royal Navy, notable as a partner with Lord Nelson in several of the British victories of the Napoleonic Wars, and frequently as Nelson's successor in commands.

Dissington Hall

Dissington Hall

Dissington Hall is a privately owned country mansion situated on the banks of the River Pont at North Dissington, Ponteland, Northumberland, England. It is a Grade II* listed building.

Chirton Hall

Chirton Hall

Chirton Hall or Chirton House, occasionally spelled Churton and originally Cheuton, was a country house in Chirton, in what is now a western suburb of North Shields, Tyne and Wear, North East England. Historically, the house was in the county of Northumberland.

Alan Johnson (political theorist)

Alan Johnson (political theorist)

Alan Johnson is a British political theorist and activist. He is a senior research fellow at the Britain Israel Communications and Research Centre. Previously he was Professor of Democratic Theory and Practice at Edge Hill University.

James Egan Moulton

James Egan Moulton

James Egan Moulton was an English-born Australian Methodist minister and headmaster and school president.

John Dobson (architect)

John Dobson (architect)

John Dobson was a 19th-century English architect in the neoclassical tradition. He became the most noted architect in the North of England. Churches and houses by him dot the North East – Nunnykirk Hall, Meldon Park, Mitford Hall, Lilburn Tower, St John the Baptist Church in Otterburn, Northumberland, and Beaufront Castle among them. During his career he designed more than 50 churches and 100 private houses. He is best known for designing Newcastle railway station and for his work with Richard Grainger developing the centre of Newcastle in a neoclassical style.

George Balmer

George Balmer

George Balmer was an English landscape and marine painter and illustrator.

John Chambers (artist)

John Chambers (artist)

John Chambers was a landscape, seascape and portrait painter in oil, tempera and watercolour, and an etcher and illustrator.

John Charlton (artist)

John Charlton (artist)

John Charlton (1849–1917) was an English painter and illustrator of historical and especially battle scenes, mainly from contemporary history.

Source: "North Shields", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 31st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Shields.

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