Get Our Extension

North Carolina Symphony

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
North Carolina Symphony
Orchestra
North Carolina Symphony (logo).jpg
official logo
Founded1932
Concert hallMeymandi Concert Hall
Principal conductorGrant Llewellyn
Websitewww.ncsymphony.org

The North Carolina Symphony (NCS) is an American orchestra based in Raleigh, North Carolina, with sixty-six full-time musicians. The orchestra performs in Meymandi Concert Hall and performs occasionally with the Carolina Ballet and the Opera Company of North Carolina. In 2017–18, the organization celebrated its 85th anniversary season. Concert series are also performed across North Carolina in the cities of, Chapel Hill, Cary, Southern Pines, New Bern, Wilmington, and Fayetteville, among others.

Discover more about North Carolina Symphony related topics

Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital city of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. It is the second-most populous city in North Carolina, after Charlotte, the tenth-most populous city in the Southeast, the 41st-most populous city in the U.S., and the largest city of the Research Triangle metro area. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 147.6 sq mi (382 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau counted the city's population as 474,069 in 2020. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

Carolina Ballet

Carolina Ballet

Carolina Ballet is one of America’s premier arts organizations, programming traditional ballets by legendary masters and new works by contemporary choreographers. The Ballet was launched as a professional company in 1998 under the direction of Founding Artistic Director Robert Weiss. In 2019, Zalman Raffael became the Artistic Director/CEO joined by Michele Weathers as Executive Director. For more than 20 years, Carolina Ballet has garnered critical praise from the national and international media, staged over 100 world premiere ballets, and in 2018, chartered the School of Carolina Ballet. Since its inaugural season in 1998, Carolina Ballet and this community have accomplished something remarkable. The Company has grown from a budget of $1.2 million featuring sixteen dancers and five apprentices in three programs to a $6.0 million budget featuring 38 dancers in eight programs including the magical holiday tradition, The Nutcracker.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Chapel Hill is a town in Orange, Durham and Chatham counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Its population was 61,960 in the 2020 census, making Chapel Hill the 17th-largest municipality in the state. Chapel Hill, Durham, and the state capital, Raleigh, make up the corners of the Research Triangle, with a total population of 1,998,808.

Cary, North Carolina

Cary, North Carolina

Cary is a town in Wake and Chatham counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina and is part of the Raleigh–Cary, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area. According to the 2020 Census, its population was 174,721, making it the seventh largest municipality in North Carolina, and the 148th largest in the United States. In 2021, the town's population had increased to 176,987.

Southern Pines, North Carolina

Southern Pines, North Carolina

Southern Pines is a town in Moore County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 12,334 as of the 2010 United States Census.

New Bern, North Carolina

New Bern, North Carolina

New Bern, formerly called Newbern, is a city in Craven County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 29,524, which had risen to an estimated 29,994 as of 2019. It is the county seat of Craven County and the principal city of the New Bern Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Wilmington, North Carolina

Wilmington, North Carolina

Wilmington is a port city in and the county seat of New Hanover County in coastal southeastern North Carolina, United States.

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Fayetteville is a city in and the county seat of Cumberland County, North Carolina, United States. It is best known as the home of Fort Bragg, a major U.S. Army installation northwest of the city.

History

In 1932, Lamar Stringfield united a group of volunteers to form the North Carolina Symphony. They first performed in Hill Hall at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in North Carolina on May 14, 1932. The original musicians of the symphony were unpaid local musicians. By 1935, the North Carolina Symphony had performed in more than fifty cities and towns in North Carolina, in over 140 concerts. Dr. Benjamin Swalin, Music Director from 1939 to 1972, continued the orchestra's mission to reach as many North Carolina natives as possible.

In the 1940s, the North Carolina Symphony became the first orchestra to receive continuous state funding. The "Horn Tootin’ Bill", which asserted that state funds would be given to orchestras, was passed by the North Carolina State Legislature in March 1943. First Lady of North Carolina Alice Willson Broughton helped lobby for the legislation. The North Carolina Symphony continues to receive this state funding today. In 1942, the Symphony began to focus on education, bringing in young children and students into the concert hall to ask questions and hear the musicians play. The Symphony began coordinating with elementary schools, exposing many children to symphonic music at an early age.

In 1961 Governor Terry Sanford and First Lady Margaret Rose Sanford hosted the first annual North Carolina Symphony Ball, which serves as a fundraiser for the symphony.

The North Carolina Symphony is an orchestra with a reputation for playing many genres and types of music outside of classical concerts. In 2007, the Symphony toured western North Carolina, with a program featuring traditional North Carolina folk music; Cherokee flutist, fiddlers, banjo players, and clogging performed with the Symphony.

Since July 2004, Grant Llewellyn has been the orchestra's music director. His initial contract was for 4 years, and in November 2006, his contract was extended to 2012.[1] In 2013, Llewellyn's contract was extended through 2018. Llewellyn stepped down as music director during the pandemic-curtailed 2019-20 season but retains the title of Music Director Laureate. In June 2021, the orchestra announced that Mexican conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto will serve as Artistic Advisor for the orchestra's 2021-22 season. On February 23, 2022, the NCS announced the appointment of Prieto as its next Music Director. His initial four-year term as Music Director begins with the 2023-2024 season, and he will serve as Music Director Designate during the 2022-2023 season.

Discover more about History related topics

Lamar Stringfield

Lamar Stringfield

Lamar Edwin Stringfield was a classical composer, flutist, symphony conductor, and anthologist of American folk music.

North Carolina

North Carolina

North Carolina is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. The state is the 28th largest and 9th-most populous of the United States. It is bordered by Virginia to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Georgia and South Carolina to the south, and Tennessee to the west. Raleigh is the state's capital and Charlotte is its largest city. The Charlotte metropolitan area, with a population of 2,595,027 in 2020, is the most-populous metropolitan area in North Carolina, the 21st-most populous in the United States, and the largest banking center in the nation after New York City. The Raleigh-Durham-Cary combined statistical area is the second-largest metropolitan area in the state and 32nd-most populous in the United States, with a population of 2,043,867 in 2020, and is home to the largest research park in the United States, Research Triangle Park.

Alice Willson Broughton

Alice Willson Broughton

Alice Harper Willson Broughton was an American civic leader who served as the First Lady of North Carolina from 1941 to 1945 as the wife of Governor J. Melville Broughton. She and her husband were the first governor and first lady from Wake County to live in the North Carolina Executive Mansion. During World War II she was active in the war effort, promoting victory gardens across the state and establishing one at the governor's mansion, christening liberty ships including the SS Zebulon B. Vance and the SS Donald W. Bain, and donating rubber to the armed forces.

Terry Sanford

Terry Sanford

James Terry Sanford was an American lawyer and politician from North Carolina. A member of the Democratic Party, Sanford served as the 65th Governor of North Carolina from 1961 to 1965, was a two-time U.S. presidential candidate in the 1970s, and served as a U.S. senator from 1986 to 1993. He was a strong proponent of public education and introduced several reforms and new programs in North Carolina's schools and institutions of higher education as the state's governor. From 1970 to 1985, Sanford served as the president of Duke University.

Margaret Rose Sanford

Margaret Rose Sanford

Margaret Rose Sanford was an American civic leader, teacher, and philanthropist who, as the wife of Terry Sanford, served as First Lady of North Carolina from 1961 to 1965. Prior to entering public life, she worked as a teacher in North Carolina and Kentucky. As first lady, Sanford hosted the first annual North Carolina Symphony Ball in 1961, established a library of North Carolinian books at the North Carolina Executive Mansion, and planted a rose garden on the mansion's grounds. She was the first governor's wife to decorate the Governor's Western Residence in Asheville. Sanford sent her children to the first racially integrated public elementary school in Raleigh, North Carolina while the family lived in the executive mansion. She served on the board of the Methodist Home for Children, the North Carolina School of the Arts, the Stagville Plantation Restoration Board, and East Carolina University. She was also a member of the Education Commission of the States and the Defense Department Advisory Committee on Women in the Services. While Sanford's husband served as president of Duke University, she was appointed by Governor Jim Hunt to serve on a delegation of university faculty and administrators to China in 1975.

Native American flute

Native American flute

The Native American flute is a flute that is held in front of the player, has open finger holes, and has two chambers: one for collecting the breath of the player and a second chamber which creates sound. The player breathes into one end of the flute without the need for an embouchure. A block on the outside of the instrument directs the player's breath from the first chamber—called the slow air chamber—into the second chamber—called the sound chamber. The design of a sound hole at the proximal end of the sound chamber causes air from the player's breath to vibrate. This vibration causes a steady resonance of air pressure in the sound chamber that creates sound.

Banjo

Banjo

The banjo is a stringed instrument with a thin membrane stretched over a frame or cavity to form a resonator. The membrane is typically circular, and usually made of plastic, or occasionally animal skin. Early forms of the instrument were fashioned by African Americans in the United States. The banjo is frequently associated with folk, bluegrass and country music, and has also been used in some rock, pop and hip-hop. Several rock bands, such as the Eagles, Led Zeppelin, and the Grateful Dead, have used the five-string banjo in some of their songs. Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in Black American traditional music and the folk culture of rural whites before entering the mainstream via the minstrel shows of the 19th century. Along with the fiddle, the banjo is a mainstay of American styles of music, such as bluegrass and old-time music. It is also very frequently used in traditional ("trad") jazz. Banjo is also a common instrument for Caribbean genres like Biguine, Calypso and Mento.

Clogging

Clogging

Clogging is a type of folk dance practiced in the United States, in which the dancer's footwear is used percussively by striking the heel, the toe, or both against a floor or each other to create audible rhythms, usually to the downbeat with the heel keeping the rhythm.

Grant Llewellyn

Grant Llewellyn

Grant Llewellyn is a Welsh conductor and music director of the North Carolina Symphony and Orchestre National de Bretagne.

Carlos Miguel Prieto

Carlos Miguel Prieto

Carlos Miguel Prieto is a Mexican conductor. He is music director of the Orquesta Sinfonica Nacional de Mexico and the Orquesta Sinfonica de Mineria, of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra in New Orleans, and The Orchestra of the Americas in Washington, D.C..

Activities

The orchestra has released several albums, such as Britten's Cello Symphony and Sonata with cellist Zuill Bailey, which debuted at #1 on the Billboard Traditional Classical chart.

David Hartman, the host of the ABC television program Good Morning America, is the host for the North Carolina Symphony radio broadcasts.

As part of the orchestra's education program, around 50 of the orchestra's 200 annual performances during the year are devoted to students. To engage young people's interest in orchestral instruments, they include an "Instrument Zoo," where children have a hands-on opportunity to try various instruments.[2] In addition, the orchestra holds a Youth Concerto Competition, sponsors the Triangle Youth Philharmonic, and invites students to observe rehearsals.

Music directors

Grant Llewellyn,Music Director
Grant Llewellyn,Music Director

[3]

Source: "North Carolina Symphony", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Carolina_Symphony.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ Vivien Schweitzer (27 November 2006). "Grant Llewellyn Extends Contract as North Carolina Symphony Music Director". Playbill Arts. Retrieved 2008-04-16.
  2. ^ "Elementary School Programs | North Carolina Symphony".
  3. ^ nc symphony.org
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.