Get Our Extension

Norman Selfe

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Norman Selfe
Bust-length black and white portrait of Selfe with long grey beard, looking into the distance.
Studio portrait of Selfe
Born(1839-12-09)9 December 1839
Teddington, England
Died15 October 1911(1911-10-15) (aged 71)
Sydney, Australia
OccupationCivil engineer
Board member ofPresident, Board of Technical Education (1887–1889)
Spouses
Emily Ann Booth
(m. 1872⁠–⁠1902)
Marion Bolton
(m. 1906⁠–⁠1911)
RelativesMaybanke Anderson (sister)
Harry Wolstenholme (nephew)

Norman Selfe (9 December 1839 – 15 October 1911) was an Australian engineer, naval architect, inventor, urban planner and outspoken advocate of technical education. After emigrating to Sydney with his family from England as a boy he became an apprentice engineer, following his father's trade. Selfe designed many bridges, docks, boats, and much precision machinery for the city. He also introduced new refrigeration, hydraulic, electrical and transport systems. For these achievements he received international acclaim during his lifetime. Decades before the Sydney Harbour Bridge was built, the city came close to building a Selfe-designed steel cantilever bridge across the harbour after he won the second public competition for a bridge design.

Selfe was honoured during his life by the name of the Sydney suburb of Normanhurst, where his grand house Gilligaloola is a local landmark. He was energetically involved in organisations such as the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts and the Australian Historical Society. As president of the Board of Technical Education, he fought consistently for the establishment of an independent system of technical education to serve the needs of a rapidly industrialising society. He was acknowledged upon his death as one of the best-known people in, and greatest individual influences upon, the city of Sydney.[1]

Discover more about Norman Selfe related topics

Urban planning

Urban planning

Urban planning, also known as town planning, city planning, regional planning, or rural planning, is a technical and political process that is focused on the development and design of land use and the built environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks and their accessibility. Traditionally, urban planning followed a top-down approach in master planning the physical layout of human settlements. The primary concern was the public welfare, which included considerations of efficiency, sanitation, protection and use of the environment, as well as effects of the master plans on the social and economic activities. Over time, urban planning has adopted a focus on the social and environmental bottom-lines that focus on planning as a tool to improve the health and well-being of people while maintaining sustainability standards. Sustainable development was added as one of the main goals of all planning endeavors in the late 20th century when the detrimental economic and the environmental impacts of the previous models of planning had become apparent. Similarly, in the early 21st century, Jane Jacob's writings on legal and political perspectives to emphasize the interests of residents, businesses and communities effectively influenced urban planners to take into broader consideration of resident experiences and needs while planning.

Sydney

Sydney

Sydney is the capital city of the state of New South Wales, and the most populous city in both Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Sydney Harbour and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, spread across 33 local government areas. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". The 2021 census recorded the population of Greater Sydney as 5,231,150, meaning the city is home to approximately 66% of the state's population. Nicknames of the city include the 'Emerald City' and the 'Harbour City'.

Sydney Harbour Bridge

Sydney Harbour Bridge

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge in Sydney, spanning Sydney Harbour from the central business district (CBD) to the North Shore. The view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is widely regarded as an iconic image of Sydney, and of Australia itself. Nicknamed "The Coathanger" because of its arch-based design, the bridge carries rail, vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian traffic.

Cantilever bridge

Cantilever bridge

A cantilever bridge is a bridge built using structures that project horizontally into space, supported on only one end. For small footbridges, the cantilevers may be simple beams; however, large cantilever bridges designed to handle road or rail traffic use trusses built from structural steel, or box girders built from prestressed concrete.

Normanhurst, New South Wales

Normanhurst, New South Wales

Normanhurst is a suburb in the Northern Sydney region, or Upper North Shore of Sydney in the state of New South Wales, Australia, 22 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of Hornsby Shire.

Gilligaloola

Gilligaloola

Gilligaloola is a heritage-listed residence located at 82-84 Pennant Hills Road, Normanhurst in the Hornsby Shire local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Norman Selfe who was involved in the design, and built during 1893. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

The Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts (SMSA) is the longest running School of Arts and the oldest continuous lending library in Australia.

Family background and apprenticeship

Selfe came from a long line of inventors and engineers. Both sides of his family came from Kingston upon Thames in London, where one grandfather had owned a plumbing and engineering works.[2] His father Henry was a plumber and inventor, whose high-pressure fire-fighting hose was displayed at The Great Exhibition in London's Crystal Palace in 1851.[3] Selfe's cousin Edward Muggeridge grew up in the same town but moved to the United States in 1855, restyled himself Eadweard Muybridge, and achieved global fame as a pioneer in the new field of photography.[4]

It so happened that at the time of my visit to that cottage at the Quay that [Maybanke's] two clever brothers, Norman and Harry, had just completed the first "bike" ever made in Australia, known as a velocipede in those days, and these two young engineers were proudly just going "down the street" on their foot-worked machine, with the knowledge they were the first here to travel in such a contraption ...

Letter to the editor, Sydney Morning Herald, 26 April 1927[5]

The Selfe family landed at Sydney's Semi-circular Quay in January 1855, when Norman was 15 years old.[1] One of the reasons they emigrated to the colony of New South Wales was to enable him and his brother Harry to undertake engineering apprenticeships without having to pay the heavy premium required by large firms in London.[6] They initially resided in the nearby Rocks district in a small house that had previously been the first Sydney home of Mary Reibey, a former convict who became Australia's first businesswoman.[7] Selfe's parents had high expectations of their children, particularly of Norman, whose ability in mathematics and draughtsmanship was apparent from a young age. The brothers earned a reputation for innovation during their youth, and were the first to construct a velocipede in the country.[5]

Selfe very quickly began his career as an engineer, taking articles of apprenticeship to the ironmaster Peter Nicol Russell, at whose firm he worked in several departments and eventually became its chief draughtsman.[1] He would remain there until 1864.[8] In 1859, when PN Russell & Co expanded to a site in Barker Street near the head of Darling Harbour, Selfe drew up plans for the new works and the wharf, and oversaw their construction. In an address to the Engineering Section of the Royal Society of New South Wales in 1900, Selfe recalled his work for Russell's:

While there [I] prepared plans for numbers of flour mills, and for the first ice-making machines, designing machinery for the multifarious requirements of colonial industries, many of which (such as sheep-washing and boiling down) no longer exist on the old lines.[9]

While at Russell's, Selfe made several innovations in the design and construction of dredges for "deeping our harbours and rivers" – something of crucial importance to industry in early Sydney. He later recalled the success of Pluto, one of his dredges purchased by the government:

[I]n this there were several novelties introduced, and among them, the ladder was lifted by hydraulic power instead of by a chain from a winch ... The day of the official trial ... was a proud one for [me], because during the course of the little festivities which followed their formal approval and official acceptance, [head engineer] Mr Dunlop pointedly remarked that "as she was all right, the credit must be given to his boy in the drawing office".[10]

Discover more about Family background and apprenticeship related topics

Kingston upon Thames

Kingston upon Thames

Kingston upon Thames is a town in the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, southwest London, England. It is situated on the River Thames and 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Charing Cross. It is notable as the ancient market town in which Saxon kings were crowned and today is the administrative centre of the Royal Borough.

Fire hose

Fire hose

A fire hose is a high-pressure hose that carries water or other fire retardant to a fire to extinguish it. Outdoors, it attaches either to a fire engine, fire hydrant, or a portable fire pump. Indoors, it can permanently attach to a building's standpipe or plumbing system.

Eadweard Muybridge

Eadweard Muybridge

Eadweard Muybridge was an English photographer known for his pioneering work in photographic studies of motion, and early work in motion-picture projection. He adopted the first name "Eadweard" as the original Anglo-Saxon form of "Edward", and the surname "Muybridge", believing it to be similarly archaic.

Photography

Photography

Photography is the art, application, and practice of creating durable images by recording light, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film. It is employed in many fields of science, manufacturing, and business, as well as its more direct uses for art, film and video production, recreational purposes, hobby, and mass communication.

New South Wales

New South Wales

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Coral and Tasman Seas to the east. The Australian Capital Territory and Jervis Bay Territory are enclaves within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In December 2021, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.3 million, live in the Greater Sydney area.

Mary Reibey

Mary Reibey

Mary Reibey née Haydock was an English-born merchant, shipowner and trader who was transported to Australia as a convict. After gaining her freedom, she was viewed by her contemporaries as a community role model and became legendary as a successful businesswoman in the colony.

Articled clerk

Articled clerk

Articled clerk is a title used in Commonwealth countries for one who is studying to be an accountant or a lawyer. In doing so, they are put under the supervision of someone already in the profession, now usually for two years, but previously three to five years was common. This can be compared as being an intern for a company. Trainees are obligated to sign a contract agreeing to the terms of being an articled clerk. The articled clerk signs a contract, known as "articles of clerkship", committing to a fixed period of employment. Wharton's Law Lexicon defines an articled clerk as "a pupil of a solicitor, who undertakes, by articles of clerkship, continuing covenants, mutually binding, to instruct him in the principles and practice of the profession". The contract is with a specific partner in the firm and not with the firm as a whole.

Peter Nicol Russell

Peter Nicol Russell

Sir Peter Nicol Russell, commonly referred to as P. N. Russell, was an Australian foundry owner, manufacturing engineer, and benefactor of the University of Sydney.

Darling Harbour

Darling Harbour

Darling Harbour is a harbour adjacent to the city centre of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia that is made up of a large recreational and pedestrian precinct that is situated on western outskirts of the Sydney central business district.

Royal Society of New South Wales

Royal Society of New South Wales

The Royal Society of New South Wales is a learned society based in Sydney, Australia. The Governor of New South Wales is the vice-regal patron of the Society.

Boiling down

Boiling down

Boiling down was the term used in Australia for the process of rendering the fat from animal carcasses to produce tallow. It was a common activity on farms and pastoral properties to produce tallow to be made into soap and candles for domestic use.

Dredging

Dredging

Dredging is the excavation of material from a water environment. Possible reasons for dredging include improving existing water features; reshaping land and water features to alter drainage, navigability, and commercial use; constructing dams, dikes, and other controls for streams and shorelines; and recovering valuable mineral deposits or marine life having commercial value. In all but a few situations the excavation is undertaken by a specialist floating plant, known as a dredger.

Inventor and engineer

Selfe achieved international recognition in 1861 when leading British journal The Engineer published illustrations of his designs for one of the first refrigerating machines. One such machine was installed behind the Royal Hotel in George Street in Sydney's ice-works – one of the world's earliest commercial refrigeration plants.[11] The decades following Selfe's arrival in Australia were watershed years in the development of refrigeration technology, and he was closely involved with its evolution. The introduction of refrigeration to the colony revolutionised farming, allowing the expansion of settlement, and made possible the export of meat and dairy products. In Sydney itself, refrigeration changed commercial practices and led to the eventual demise of city dairies. Selfe became an international authority on refrigeration engineering; he wrote articles and eventually a definitive textbook on the subject, published in the US in 1900.[12]

Illustration of the SS Governor Blackall
Illustration of the SS Governor Blackall

After leaving Russell's, Selfe went into partnership with his former employer James Dunlop. They designed and built major installations for the Australasian Mineral Oil Company, the Western Kerosene Oil Company and the Australian Gas Light Company.[13] In 1869 Selfe was appointed to the senior post of "chief draftsman and scientific engineer" at Mort's Dock and Engineering Company in Balmain.[1][14] In this role he oversaw the design and construction of the mail ship SS Governor Blackall, personally commissioned for the Queensland government by the Premier Charles Lilley in 1869.[15] The Sydney-built but Queensland-owned ship was an attempt to break what was later described as the "capricious monopoly" of the Australasian Steam Navigation Company on coastal trade and mail delivery from England. However, it ultimately caused the political downfall of Lilley as he had undertaken the contract without consulting his colleagues.[16]

Tourists ride in a coal skip on the "scenic railway", 1915
Tourists ride in a coal skip on the "scenic railway", 1915

Selfe left Mort's in 1877 to practise as a consulting engineer at 141 Pitt Street, gaining a reputation for versatility and originality. Upon his return from an overseas trip through America, Britain and continental Europe in 1884–85, where he visited engineering works and technical education facilities in search of new ideas to take back to Sydney, Selfe set up a new office in Lloyd's Chambers at 348 George Street.[11] He would later move to No. 279 where he operated the consultancy until his death in 1911. In the late 1890s he employed William Dixson as an engineer, who would later make a major donation of Australiana to the State Library of New South Wales.[17] The collection of Selfe's own papers and drawings have since been donated to the same library that his former employee greatly augmented.[18]

Selfe designed the hulls or the machinery for some 50 steam vessels, including two torpedo boats for the New South Wales government, which he claimed were the fastest boats on the harbour for 20 years,[19] and the SS Wallaby, Sydney Harbour's first double-ended screw ferry.[1][20] Double-ended hulls remain the design of Sydney's current Freshwater-class ferries. He designed the first concrete quay wall in Sydney Harbour, and wharves for deep-sea vessels. He also designed the first ice-making machines in New South Wales, introduced the first lifts, patented an improved system of baling wool which increased capacity fourfold, and oversaw hydraulic and electric light installations in the city and the carriages on its railway network.[1][13] He planned mills, waterworks and pumping stations, including the high-level pumps at the reservoir on Crown Street. He made major electric light installations at the Anthony Hordern & Sons department store and the Hotel Australia, and provided a hot-water system for the hotel.[20] He designed machinery for factories, dairies and railways, including, in 1878, the incline of what is now the Scenic Railway attraction at Katoomba in the Blue Mountains – which claims to be the world's steepest.[21] Its original purpose was the transportation of coal[22] from the Jamison Valley to the cliff-top.[23]

During his lifetime Selfe received both local and international recognition for his engineering skill. He had been president of both the Australian mechanical engineers' and naval architects' institutes as well as a member of both the British equivalent organisations. He was also elected a full member of the English Institution of Civil Engineers and, by virtue of his writings also being published in Chicago, also an honorary member of an American engineering association.[1]

Discover more about Inventor and engineer related topics

George Street, Sydney

George Street, Sydney

George Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney.

James Dunlop

James Dunlop

James Dunlop FRSE was a Scottish astronomer, noted for his work in Australia. He was employed by Sir Thomas Brisbane to work as astronomer's assistant at his private observatory, once located at Paramatta, New South Wales, about 23 kilometres (14 mi) west of Sydney during the 1820s and 1830s. Dunlop was mostly a visual observer, doing stellar astrometry work for Brisbane, and after its completion, then independently discovered and catalogued many new telescopic southern double stars and deep-sky objects. He later became the Superintendent of Paramatta Observatory when it was finally sold to the New South Wales Government.

Australian Gas Light Company

Australian Gas Light Company

The Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) was an Australian gas and electricity retailer. It was formed in Sydney in 1837 and supplied town gas for the first public lighting of a street lamp in Sydney in 1841. AGL was the second company to list on the Sydney Stock Exchange. The company gradually diversified into electricity and into a number of different locations. After a combination of a merger and demerger with Alinta in 2006, it was replaced by AGL Energy.

Charles Lilley

Charles Lilley

Sir Charles Lilley was a Premier and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Queensland. He had a significant influence on the form and spirit of state education in colonial Queensland which lasted well into the 20th century.

Australasian Steam Navigation Company

Australasian Steam Navigation Company

The Australasian Steam Navigation Company was a shipping company of Australia which operated between 1839 and 1887.

Skip (container)

Skip (container)

A skip is a large open-topped waste container designed for loading onto a special type of lorry. Typically skip bins have a distinctive shape: the longitudinal cross-section of the skip bin is either a trapezium or two stacked trapezia. The lower trapezium has the smaller edge at the bottom of the skip bin, and a longer edge at the top. The smaller edge on either end is lower which makes it easier to load. Where there is an upper trapezium, it has the smaller edge at the top. There is a sloping floor or wall at each end. There are usually two lugs on each side of the bin onto which chains can be attached, permitting the heavy skip bin to be lifted onto and off a skip lorry or skip truck. A special skip-carrying lorry or crane is used.

Australiana

Australiana

Australiana includes the items, people, places, flora, fauna and events of Australian origins. Anything pertaining to Australian culture, society, geography and ecology can fall under the term Australiana, especially if it is endemic to Australia. Australiana often borrows from Australian Aboriginal culture, or the stereotypical Australian culture of the early 1900s.

State Library of New South Wales

State Library of New South Wales

The State Library of New South Wales, part of which is known as the Mitchell Library, is a large heritage-listed special collections, reference and research library open to the public and is one of the oldest libraries in Australia. Established in 1869 its collections date back to the Australian Subscription Library established in the colony of New South Wales in 1826. The library is located on the corner of Macquarie Street and Shakespeare Place, in the Sydney central business district adjacent to the Domain and the Royal Botanic Gardens, in the City of Sydney. The library is a member of the National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) consortium.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Freshwater-class ferry

Freshwater-class ferry

The Freshwater class is a class of ferry operating the Manly ferry service between Circular Quay and Manly on Sydney Harbour. The ferries are owned by the Government of New South Wales and operated by Transdev Sydney Ferries under the government's Sydney Ferries brand.

Elevator

Elevator

An elevator or lift is a cable-assisted, hydraulic cylinder-assisted, or roller-track assisted machine that vertically transports people or freight between floors, levels, or decks of a building, vessel, or other structure. They are typically powered by electric motors that drive traction cables and counterweight systems such as a hoist, although some pump hydraulic fluid to raise a cylindrical piston like a jack.

Railways in Sydney

Railways in Sydney

Sydney, the largest city in Australia, has an extensive network of passenger and freight railways. The passenger system includes an extensive suburban railway network, operated by Sydney Trains, a metro network and a light rail network. A dedicated freight network also exists. Future expansion of the light rail network includes the Parramatta Light Rail. Existing light rail services are the Inner West Light Rail and the CBD & South East Light Rail.

Sydney

Selfe's capacity for invention was not limited to the realm of machinery – he was also an energetic civic and urban reformer. He had high hopes for Sydney:

Selfe's 1891 scheme for remodelling transport in The Rocks
Selfe's 1891 scheme for remodelling transport in The Rocks

"Every well wisher of Sydney, who sees and understands what magnificent latent possibilities there are before her must hope that she will for all time be the Queen City of the Southern Hemisphere; and that the new century will open finding old ways departed from, and a glorious new era of progress, prosperity, morality and cleanliness installed in our midst. When that day arrives, we shall look back with curiosity and wonder at the continued blindness and negligence from which our city – so highly gifted by nature – had suffered so long."[24]

From the time of Selfe's return in 1886 from two years' travel in the United States and Europe, he campaigned for improvements to the city of Sydney. These included proposals for a city railway loop, the redevelopment of the Rocks, and a bridge to the North Shore.[25] His obituary in The Sydney Morning Herald noted, "Mr. Selfe for over twenty years was a strenuous advocate of a circular city railway that should connect up the eastern, western, and northern suburbs of the city with the marine suburbs of the harbour, and stations adjacent to the ferries".[1] He published plans and proposals elaborating on his ideas, and produced major articles with titles like "Sydney: past, present and possible"[26] and "Sydney and its institutions, as they are, and might be from an engineer's point of view".[27]

In 1887 Selfe published proposals for a city underground railway, with stations at Wynyard, the Rocks and Circular Quay, and a loop to Woolloomooloo and the eastern suburbs. The proposal included a bridge across Sydney Harbour for trains, vehicles and pedestrians. He presented these schemes to the Royal Commission on City and Suburban Railways in 1890; but nothing was to come of it, largely because the 1890s depression brought public works initiatives to a standstill.[25]

In 1908–09 he served as one of 11 expert commissioners to the Royal Commission for the Improvement of the City of Sydney and its Suburbs. Selfe's proposals included an overhead railway station at Circular Quay and major landscaping works at Belmore Park opposite Central Railway Station.[28] Both of these visions were later realised, but not in his lifetime.[29]

Sydney Harbour Bridge

Selfe's winning design for the proposed Harbour Bridge c. 1903
Selfe's winning design for the proposed Harbour Bridge c. 1903

By the late 1890s a harbour crossing and a city railway extension were again on the agenda. The Lyne government committed to building the new Central Railway Station, and organised a worldwide competition for the design and construction of a Harbour Bridge. Selfe submitted a design for a suspension bridge estimated to cost £1,128,000 and won the second prize of £500. The first prize went to C. E. W. Crutwell, of Westminster with a design estimated to cost more than twice as much.[30] After the outcome of the competition had become mired in controversy, in 1902 Selfe won a second competition outright, with a design for a steel cantilever bridge stretching from Dawes Point to McMahons Point. The selection board were unanimous, commenting that "The structural lines are correct and in true proportion, and ... the outline is graceful".[31]

Construction of Selfe's version of the Sydney harbour bridge never started due to an economic slowdown and a change of government at the 1904 state election. Much to Selfe's outrage, the Department of Public Works kept his calculations and drawings, and also copied and printed them. Eventually in 1907, the department contacted Selfe and asked him to collect his drawings, but refused to return the calculations. Selfe was never given the £1,100 prize, nor was he paid for his subsequent work which he estimated to be worth more than £20,000.[32]

One of Selfe's proposal blueprints, now held at the Mitchell Library
One of Selfe's proposal blueprints, now held at the Mitchell Library

Among the Selfe family papers in Mitchell Library there is a large collection of postcards featuring bridges from across the world.[33] Some were sent to Selfe by friends and relatives from Japan, Italy, New Zealand, and Switzerland. Others, un-postmarked, were collected on his travels in 1884–85. These would have formed a research catalogue of contemporary international bridge-building practices for Selfe's own designs.

In 1908, Selfe presented new proposals based upon the old design to the Royal Commission on Communication between Sydney and North Sydney. However, this time the commissioners preferred a tunnel scheme; again, no work proceeded. Agitation for a bridge was renewed with the election of a Labor government at the 1910 state election. But with Selfe's death in 1911, it was time for a new generation of bridge builders. In 1912 the government appointed J.J. Bradfield as "engineer-in-chief of Sydney Harbour Bridge and City Transit"; the call for tenders for constructing the bridge was not made until a decade later.[34] Over the following decades, versions of what Selfe had much earlier articulated for a city circle railway link and a bridge to the north shore were realised. Selfe's contribution received little public or formal recognition.[35][36]

Discover more about Sydney related topics

City Circle

City Circle

The City Circle is a mostly-underground railway line located in the Sydney central business district and Haymarket, in New South Wales, Australia, that forms the core of Sydney's passenger rail network. The lines are owned by the Transport Asset Holding Entity, a State government agency, and operated under Transport for NSW's Sydney Trains brand. Despite its name, the City Circle is of a horseshoe shape, with trains operating in a U-shaped pattern. The constituent stations of the Circle are (clockwise): Central, Town Hall, Wynyard, Circular Quay, St James, Museum and back to Central.

North Shore (Sydney)

North Shore (Sydney)

The North Shore is a region within Northern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, generally referring to suburbs located on the northern side of Sydney Harbour up to Wahroonga, and suburbs between Middle Harbour and the Lane Cove River.

Circular Quay railway station

Circular Quay railway station

Circular Quay railway station is a heritage-listed elevated commuter rail station that is located on the City Circle route, serving the Circular Quay precinct of the Sydney central business district in New South Wales, Australia. It is served by Sydney Trains T2 Inner West & Leppington, T3 Bankstown and T8 Airport & South line services.

Belmore Park

Belmore Park

Belmore Park is a public park at the southern end of the Sydney central business district in the Australian state of New South Wales. Adjacent to the Central railway station, the park is bounded by Hay Street, Eddy Avenue, Elizabeth Street and Pitt Street. The area was previously known as Police Paddock and was part of a section of Crown land which included the Police Barracks, Devonshire Street Cemetery, Female Refuge of the Good Samaritan, Benevolent Asylum and a common.

Lyne ministry

Lyne ministry

The Lyne ministry was the 29th ministry of the Colony of New South Wales, and was led by the 13th Premier, Sir William Lyne, KCMG.

Cantilever bridge

Cantilever bridge

A cantilever bridge is a bridge built using structures that project horizontally into space, supported on only one end. For small footbridges, the cantilevers may be simple beams; however, large cantilever bridges designed to handle road or rail traffic use trusses built from structural steel, or box girders built from prestressed concrete.

Dawes Point, New South Wales

Dawes Point, New South Wales

Dawes Point is a suburb of the City of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Dawes Point is located on the north-western edge of the Sydney central business district, at the southern end of Sydney Harbour Bridge, adjacent to The Rocks. At times Dawes Point has been considered to be part of The Rocks, or known as West Rocks, part of Millers Point, or part of it known as Walsh Bay.

1904 New South Wales state election

1904 New South Wales state election

The 1904 New South Wales state election was held on 6 August 1904 for all of the 90 seats in the 20th New South Wales Legislative Assembly and it was conducted in single-member constituencies with a first past the post voting system. For the first time, women were entitled to vote. Both adult males and females were entitled to vote, but not Indigenous people. The 19th parliament of New South Wales was dissolved on 16 July 1904 by the Governor, Sir Harry Rawson, on the advice of the Premier, Thomas Waddell.

NSW Public Works

NSW Public Works

NSW Public Works, an agency of the Government of New South Wales, was responsible for providing expert advice to government and professional services to government agency clients in New South Wales, Australia.

Blueprint

Blueprint

A blueprint is a reproduction of a technical drawing or engineering drawing using a contact print process on light-sensitive sheets. Introduced by Sir John Herschel in 1842, the process allowed rapid and accurate production of an unlimited number of copies. It was widely used for over a century for the reproduction of specification drawings used in construction and industry. The blueprint process was characterized by white lines on a blue background, a negative of the original. The process was not able to reproduce color or shades of grey.

State Library of New South Wales

State Library of New South Wales

The State Library of New South Wales, part of which is known as the Mitchell Library, is a large heritage-listed special collections, reference and research library open to the public and is one of the oldest libraries in Australia. Established in 1869 its collections date back to the Australian Subscription Library established in the colony of New South Wales in 1826. The library is located on the corner of Macquarie Street and Shakespeare Place, in the Sydney central business district adjacent to the Domain and the Royal Botanic Gardens, in the City of Sydney. The library is a member of the National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) consortium.

Postmark

Postmark

A postmark is a postal marking made on an envelope, parcel, postcard or the like, indicating the place, date and time that the item was delivered into the care of a postal service, or sometimes indicating where and when received or in transit. Modern postmarks are often applied simultaneously with the cancellation or killer that marks postage stamps as having been used. Sometimes a postmark alone is used to cancel stamps, and the two terms are often used interchangeably. Postmarks may be applied by handstamp or machine, using methods such as rollers or inkjets, while digital postmarks are a recent innovation.

Historian

Selfe was founding vice-president of the Australian Historical Society in 1901, serving with president Andrew Houison and patron David Scott Mitchell (after whom the Mitchell wing of the State Library of New South Wales is named).[37] He remained actively involved in the society for 10 years, despite what he called "the evident lack of interest ... taken in the proceedings of the Society" by the general public in the early years.[38] The society got off to a shaky start, with low attendance of lectures and meetings.[39] Early papers delivered by Selfe included "A century of Sydney Cove"[40] and "Some notes on the Sydney windmills".[41] Slowly, interest increased, and by 1905 membership had reached 100.[42] Known as the Royal Australian Historical Society (RAHS) since 1918, and housed in a grand Victorian style townhouse on Macquarie Street, the organisation is Australia's oldest historical society; Selfe is celebrated as one of its pioneers.[39]

Discover more about Historian related topics

Royal Australian Historical Society

Royal Australian Historical Society

The Royal Australian Historical Society, formerly Australian Historical Society, is a voluntary organisation founded in Sydney, Australia in 1901 with Andrew Houison as founding president. Its goals are to encourage the study of and interest in Australian history. It has a membership throughout Australia and many of its activities and facilities are funded by contributions from its members and benefactors.

Andrew Houison

Andrew Houison

Andrew Houison was a Sydney medical practitioner, amateur historian and philatelist. He was one of the "Fathers of Philately" entered on the Roll of Distinguished Philatelists in 1921.

David Scott Mitchell

David Scott Mitchell

David Scott Mitchell was a collector of Australian books, founder and benefactor of the Mitchell Library, at the State Library of New South Wales, Sydney.

Townhouse

Townhouse

A townhouse, townhome, town house, or town home, is a type of terraced housing. A modern townhouse is often one with a small footprint on multiple floors. In a different British usage, the term originally referred to any type of city residence of someone whose main or largest residence was a country house.

Macquarie Street, Sydney

Macquarie Street, Sydney

Macquarie Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. Macquarie Street extends from Hyde Park at its southern end to the Sydney Opera House at its northern end. Apart from connecting these two major landmarks, the key government institutions of the state of New South Wales are all located on this street.

Technical education

Selfe was a key figure in the history of technical education in New South Wales. He advocated a more utilitarian and less literary education system, to produce a skilled workforce that could realise Australia's potential as an efficient industrial state. He was utopian in his vision:

There is no doubt that it is on the work of tools directed by brains that the future of Australia depends more than anything else. With tools our Australian deserts may be turned into gardens ... They will pluck the hidden treasure from the bowels of the earth, enable us to soar in the air, or explore the depths of the water. They will weave a network of communication over our island continent, dot it with the homes of a happy people, and minister to our wants in providing not only the necessities and comforts of life, but the most refined luxuries that are needed to satisfy the novel and exacting wants which arise every day, as the standard of intellectual and technical cultivation is raised and extended among us ...[43]

Selfe believed an overhaul of education was needed, from kindergarten to tertiary study. His concept of technical education encompassed Friedrich Fröbel's kindergarten activities based around play and occupations; the teaching of drawing, manual work and science in schools; and specialised practical training of workmen and professionals in technical colleges.[44] He argued for the establishment of a new kind of university – an "industrial university", less theory-oriented and more concerned with the practical and the useful.[45] He saw technical education as a distinct sphere of education to be administered and delivered by people with practical industry experience, not government officials or traditional teachers.[11]

Teacher

Sydney Technical College in Ultimo c. 1890
Sydney Technical College in Ultimo c. 1890

As early as 1865 Selfe gave regular classes in mechanical drawing to tradesmen at the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts in Pitt Street.[46] Selfe's class in mechanical drawing was the first technical, vocational offering at the School of Arts, and its popularity led to the introduction of other practical subjects.[47]

Due to the colony's rapidly expanding population and demand for skilled labour, there were increasing calls in the 1870s for a formal system of technical education. In 1870, Selfe helped found the Engineering Association of New South Wales which amalgamated into Engineers Australia in 1919.[48] He was its president from 1877 to 1879 and Engineers Australia annually awards the "Norman Selfe Medal" to a student at the Australian Maritime College.[49] In 1878, the association joined forces with the New South Wales Trades and Labour Council and the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts to form the Technical and Working Men's College. The college initially operated as an agency of the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts.[50] The college occupied premises in Pitt, Sussex and Castlereagh Streets, and rooms in the Royal Arcade, before it moved to Ultimo in 1889.[47] The college later became the Sydney Technical College out of which grew the University of New South Wales, the University of Technology, Sydney, and the National Art School. The Ultimo buildings still serve their original purpose, now as the main campus of the Sydney Institute of TAFE.[51]

In 1880, Selfe became vice president of the School of Arts. He supported the school's Working Men's College, but felt a more thorough focus on practical skills was needed. He rejected the non-technical, non-practical approach of the school's model and campaigned instead for the establishment of a proper institute of technical education, where instructors would be skilled tradesmen with practical industrial experience. He also pushed for the expansion of technical education facilities into the suburban and regional districts.[52]

Critic

On 1 August 1883 the New South Wales government made a proclamation which transferred control of the Technical and Working Men's College to an independent Board of Technical Education, to which Selfe was appointed, and assumed financial responsibility directly.[53] The government also provided funds to fit out workshops in Kent Street that opened in 1886.[54] This was an initiative driven by Selfe, who had admired the workshop teaching model abroad. It represented a major innovation in technical education in New South Wales.[55]

Many of the board's initiatives were based on observations made abroad by Selfe and board president Edward Combes, or recommendations made by the British Royal Commission into Technical Education of 1881–84. However, most of the board's schemes were frustrated by an unresponsive colonial government.[56] Norm Neill, historian of the early years of the Sydney Technical College, argues that the Board caused many of its own problems:

There was a marked lack of unity ... Members either resigned or became inactive [and the Board failed] to accept that its autonomy was more nominal than real. Any expansion of technical education was dependent on government funding and governments were unlikely to allocate resources to an organisation unwilling or unable to cooperate.[57]

Selfe was president of the Board from January 1887 until it was disbanded in 1889. During this time the relationship between the board and the government deteriorated with Selfe being overtly critical of two powerful institutions: the newly formed Department of Public Instruction and the University of Sydney.[58] Selfe strongly opposed the government's taking control of technical education, which had been underway since the government first declared its interest in doing so at a special meeting of the Sydney Mechanics School of Arts in September 1883.[59][60] He also did not support an alternative proposal that the University of Sydney should take over.[61] In an address at the annual presentation of prizes at Sydney Technical College in 1887, Selfe alienated the Minister of Public Instruction and others by being openly contemptuous of the traditional pursuits of schools and universities:

[T]he whole experience of the past goes to show that the learning of the schools has had little, if anything, to do with the material advancement of the world, and that while it may have produced intellectual giants, subjective teaching has not brought forth those men who have been inventors and manufacturers that have entirely changed the character of our civilisation.[45]

Selfe criticised the classical liberal arts education offered at the University of Sydney as elitist. In his 1888 address to Sydney Technical College students on prize night, he again caused affront to the establishment when he called for greater diversity of educational opportunities in the colony:

[I]t is not ... easy ... to see why the general public should pay so many thousands a year to make our future professional men in medicine and law in the colony, to form part of the so-called upper classes, when our "principles" will not allow us to pay just a little more in order to have, say, our locomotives made here, and when we are doing so very little, proportionately, to train and educate the artisans who make these locomotives, and who belong to a much less wealthy and influential level in society.[62]

In 1889 the colonial government, already in financial control, assumed direct operational control by abolishing the Board and placing the college within the Technical Education Branch of the Department of Public Instruction (now the New South Wales Department of Education).[63]

Reformer

In the early years of the 20th century, education remained a major political issue in New South Wales. While Selfe would not be drawn again into the centre of the fray, he supported the efforts of his sister Maybanke and her second husband Francis Anderson towards education reform.[58] Following the Knibbs-Turner Royal Commission into New South Wales Education in 1902, and the appointment of Peter Board as Director of Education in 1905, many of Selfe's ideas for technical education were implemented.[64] Ultimately, in 1949, a separate Department of Technical Education was created, and the New South Wales University of Technology (later the University of New South Wales) was established at Kensington.[65]

Les Mandelson, historian of Australia's education systems, categorises Selfe as "a nineteenth century protagonist for the New Education", who helped pave the way for the extensive reforms of the twentieth century. "Without him", he adds, "education in the late nineteenth century would have been decidedly more mundane". However, Mandelson sounds a critical note:

Selfe's contempt for the liberal arts tradition and the priority he accorded practical skill have certain implications which cannot be commended. These reflected and augmented ... one of the less attractive features of the Australian ethos – indifference to higher learning and advanced attainments, an indifference shading into contempt and suspicion ... Selfe may have lost a battle but before long, the liberal arts tradition faced still greater defeats. To these, Selfe certainly contributed, and what must be recognised is that in the vehemence of the struggle, and in the lauding of efficiency over culture, much that was valuable in the liberal arts tradition was lost.[66]

Biographer Stephen Murray-Smith is more generous in his assessment of Selfe's contribution to education debates around the turn of the twentieth century: "Selfe went beyond the concept of helping the working man to achieve a share of the good things hitherto reserved for others, towards the concept of leading him to create good things for himself."[67]

Selfe was a noted activist for the Federation of Australia being a member of the Central Federation League.[11] Edward Dowling, his colleague on the inaugural board of the Australian Historical Society, was also the Secretary of the Central League of the Australasian Federation League[68] and his former articled engineer John Jacob Cohen would later be elected at the 1898 New South Wales election in the seat of Petersham representing the National Federal Party.[69]

Discover more about Technical education related topics

Friedrich Fröbel

Friedrich Fröbel

Friedrich Wilhelm August Fröbel or Froebel was a German pedagogue, a student of Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, who laid the foundation for modern education based on the recognition that children have unique needs and capabilities. He created the concept of the kindergarten and coined the word, which soon entered the English language as well. He also developed the educational toys known as Froebel gifts.

Sydney Technical College

Sydney Technical College

The Sydney Technical College, now known as the TAFE New South Wales Sydney Institute, is a technical school established in 1878, that superseded the Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts. The college is one of Australia's oldest technical education institutions.

Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts

The Sydney Mechanics' School of Arts (SMSA) is the longest running School of Arts and the oldest continuous lending library in Australia.

Engineers Australia

Engineers Australia

Engineers Australia is a professional body and not-for-profit organisation dedicated to being the national forum for the advancement of the engineering field within Australia. It is a member of the Washington Accord. As of 2017, it has around 100,000 members in nine geographic Divisions and five international chapters from all engineering disciplines, including 41,000 Students, 4,400 Engineering Technologists and Engineering Associates, 55,600 Professional Engineers. The members all belong to one or more of nine Colleges covering the different fields of engineering practice. 20,000 members are Chartered Engineers.

Australian Maritime College

Australian Maritime College

The Australian Maritime College (AMC) is a tertiary education institution based in Launceston, Tasmania, established by the Maritime College Act 1978 (Cth). Tertiary education is provided and organised by the University of Tasmania (UTAS) as the Australian Maritime College at the University of Tasmania ([email protected]). However the college's educational curriculum is governed by the independent AMC Board. The AMC is Australia's national centre for maritime education, training and research. It has two campuses located within 50 kilometres (31 mi) of each other in Northern Tasmania, each with different facilities and residence.

Labor Council of New South Wales

Labor Council of New South Wales

The Labor Council of New South Wales, branded Unions NSW, is the peak body for trade unions in the state of New South Wales, Australia. As of 2005 there are 67 unions and 8 Rural and Regional Trades & Labor Councils affiliated to the Labor Council, representing 800,000 workers in NSW. It is registered as the State Peak Council of Employees under Section 215 of the Industrial Relations Act 1996 (NSW). The council is affiliated with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU).

University of New South Wales

University of New South Wales

The University of New South Wales (UNSW), also known as UNSW Sydney, is a public research university based in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is one of the founding members of Group of Eight, a coalition of Australian research-intensive universities.

National Art School

National Art School

The National Art School (NAS) is a tertiary level art school, located in Darlinghurst, an inner-city suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The school is an independent accredited higher education provider offering specialised study in studio arts practice across various disciplines.

Liberal arts education

Liberal arts education

Liberal arts education is the traditional academic course in Western higher education. Liberal arts takes the term art in the sense of a learned skill rather than specifically the fine arts. Liberal arts education can refer to studies in a liberal arts degree course or to a university education more generally. Such a course of study contrasts with those that are principally vocational, professional, or technical.

Maybanke Anderson

Maybanke Anderson

Maybanke Susannah Anderson was an Australian political reformer involved in women's suffrage and Australian federation.

Francis Anderson (philosopher)

Francis Anderson (philosopher)

Sir Francis Anderson was a Scottish-born Australian philosopher and educator.

Peter Board

Peter Board

Peter Board was an Australian educationist and public servant best known for his advocacy of education reform in New South Wales.

Personal life

When Selfe obtained a steady job after his apprenticeship, he brought his family with him from The Rocks to live at Balmain. Selfe bought waterfront land and built twin terraced houses called Normanton and Maybank, which are still at 21 and 23 Wharf Road, Birchgrove. It is likely that Selfe shared Normanton with his widowed mother. Next door lived his brother Harry, his sister Maybanke and his brother-in-law Edmund Wolstenholme.[7]

Selfe was a supportive brother, both emotionally and materially. His sister Maybanke bore seven children to her first husband Edmund, four of whom died as infants from tuberculosis.[7] He also provided financial support after Maybanke's marriage came to an end. Maybanke earned fame in her own right as a prominent suffragist and pioneer of education for women and girls. In the 1890s brother and sister campaigned together for education reform.[70]

Amesbury, designed by Selfe and built in 1888
Amesbury, designed by Selfe and built in 1888

On 10 October 1872 at St Mary's Church, Balmain Selfe married Emily Ann Booth, the daughter of John Booth, a well-known shipbuilder and Balmain's first mayor (and formerly the member for East Macquarie in the colonial parliament).[71] They lived for many years at Rockleigh in Donnelly Street, Balmain, a house that has since been demolished. In 1884 their first daughter Rhoda Jane was born, followed by a stillborn daughter in 1886,[72] and then Norma Catherine in 1888.[73] In 1885 Selfe bought land in Ashfield and designed a grand house called Amesbury. Described at the time as having "more novelties both externally and internally than any other house in the colony"[74] including terracotta lyrebird reliefs by artist Lucien Henry on the front wall, and a tower purpose-built for Selfe to pursue his hobby of astronomy.[75] Built around 1888 to honour the centenary of the colony, Amesbury still stands at 78 Alt Street and was used by Brahma Kumaris from 1986 as its Australian headquarters[76] until 2014 when it was auctioned for over $3.5 million.[77] As children, Rhoda and Norma attended their Aunt Maybanke's school in Dulwich Hill.[70] As adults, they trained in Italy with educator Maria Montessori and returned to Sydney to open a Montessori school of their own in the building known as Warwick on Bland Street, Ashfield.[78]

Around 1894, the family moved, this time to Hornsby Shire, where a new Selfe-designed house, Gilligaloola, was built on 11 acres (4.5 ha) purchased by Selfe ten years earlier. Situated at what is now 82 Pennant Hills Road, the house is still a local landmark, notable for its distinctive tower and twin chimneys.[79] Selfe was a committed citizen and a natural spokesman for the local community, to the extent that when the railways needed a name for the locality, the community chose Normanhurst (though Selfe himself felt that St Normans would have been "much more elegant and suggestive").[80]

On 12 May 1906, four years after the death of his first wife, Selfe married Marion Bolton at St Philip's Church, Sydney.[81]

Death

The Selfe-designed house Gilligaloola in which he lived from c. 1894 until his death
The Selfe-designed house Gilligaloola in which he lived from c. 1894 until his death

Selfe died suddenly on 15 October 1911. His death certificate states the cause of death as "heart failure brought on by exertion".[11] His daughter Norma offered some context to a journalist in 1957. She said:

"On the day of his death he climbed trees in the church grounds to lop branches, as the gardener was too nervous to climb so high. That night he died in his sleep."[82]

Norma reported that her father had been sanguine to the end, playful with his nephews and learning to play the oboe. However, other reports suggest that Selfe was concealing a bitter sense of disappointment at the end of his life, most particularly over the Harbour Bridge affair. His obituary in the journal Building concluded:

... [T]here is none today who can replace the noble personality, that keen energetic brain ever ready to give of its wonderful store of knowledge, and that happy spirit ever bright, ever optimistic, even though crushed beneath the cruel and unjust blow of the non-acceptance of his prize design for the North Shore bridge. "It will crown my life" he said. We will always remember the bright gleam in his eyes as they peered beyond the anxiety of today, looked afar to the future glory of his beloved Sydney where in his dreams he saw his mighty bridge spanning what he called "God's noblest waterway".[83]

Selfe's funeral was held at St Paul's Church, Wahroonga, where he had been a churchwarden. He was buried in Gore Hill cemetery in the presence of a large gathering of businessmen and representatives of the organisations he had been involved with.[84] He was survived by his two daughters from his first marriage, Rhoda and Norma, and his second wife, Marion. His estate was valued for probate at nearly £5000.[13] Twenty-one years later, on 11 March 1932 Marion's charred body was found in her new house, also in Normanhurst where she lived alone, having reportedly set fire to her clothes when lighting a candle.[85] Marion was buried alongside Norman in plot CE I:7. Rhoda's ashes were also placed nearby when she died aged 69 in 1954, still living in Gilligaloola.[86][87]

Discover more about Personal life related topics

Balmain, New South Wales

Balmain, New South Wales

Balmain is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Balmain is located 2 km (1.2 mi) west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Inner West Council.

Birchgrove, New South Wales

Birchgrove, New South Wales

Birchgrove is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Birchgrove is located five kilometres west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the Inner West Council.

Electoral district of East Macquarie

Electoral district of East Macquarie

East Macquarie was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales between 1859 and 1894, in the Bathurst region. It was represented by two members, with voters casting two votes and the first two candidates being elected.

Ashfield, New South Wales

Ashfield, New South Wales

Ashfield is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Ashfield is about 8 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district.

Lyrebird

Lyrebird

A lyrebird is either of two species of ground-dwelling Australian birds that compose the genus Menura, and the family Menuridae. They are most notable for their impressive ability to mimic natural and artificial sounds from their environment, and the striking beauty of the male bird's huge tail when it is fanned out in courtship display. Lyrebirds have unique plumes of neutral-coloured tailfeathers and are among Australia's best-known native birds.

Lucien Henry

Lucien Henry

Lucien Félix Henry born in Sisteron (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) on May 22, 1850 and died in Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat (Haute-Vienne) on March 10, 1896, was a French painter, who was active in Sydney.

Brahma Kumaris

Brahma Kumaris

The Brahma Kumaris are a spiritual movement that originated in Hyderabad, Sindh, during the 1930s. The Brahma Kumaris movement was founded by Lekhraj Kripalani. The organisation is known for the prominent role that women play in the movement.

Dulwich Hill, New South Wales

Dulwich Hill, New South Wales

Dulwich Hill is a suburb in the Inner West of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is 7.5 kilometres south-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of Inner West Council. Dulwich Hill stretches south to the shore of the Cooks River.

Maria Montessori

Maria Montessori

Maria Tecla Artemisia Montessori was an Italian physician and educator best known for the philosophy of education that bears her name, and her writing on scientific pedagogy. At an early age, Montessori enrolled in classes at an all-boys technical school, with hopes of becoming an engineer. She soon had a change of heart and began medical school at the Sapienza University of Rome, becoming one of the first women to attend medical school in Italy; she graduated with honors in 1896. Her educational method is in use today in many public and private schools globally.

Hornsby Shire

Hornsby Shire

Hornsby Shire is a local government area situated in Northern Sydney, as well as parts of the Hills District, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The shire stretches from the M2 Hills Motorway in the south to the Hawkesbury River town of Wisemans Ferry, some 53 kilometres (33 mi) to the north, making it the largest local government council in the Greater Sydney Metropolitan region by total area. As of the 2016 census the shire had an estimated population of 142,667.

Gilligaloola

Gilligaloola

Gilligaloola is a heritage-listed residence located at 82-84 Pennant Hills Road, Normanhurst in the Hornsby Shire local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Norman Selfe who was involved in the design, and built during 1893. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Building (magazine)

Building (magazine)

Building is one of the United Kingdom's oldest business-to-business magazines, launched as The Builder in 1843 by Joseph Aloysius Hansom – architect of Birmingham Town Hall and designer of the Hansom Cab. The journal was renamed Building in 1966 as it is still known today. Building is the only UK title to cover the entire building industry.

Source: "Norman Selfe", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Selfe.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "A Bridge Builder: Death of Norman Selfe, a distinguished career". The Sydney Morning Herald. 16 October 1911. p. 8. Retrieved 6 April 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ Mandelson, L.A. (1972). "IV: Norman Selfe and the Beginnings of Technical Education". In C. Turney (ed.). Pioneers of Australian Education. Vol. 2. Sydney: Sydney University Press. p. 105. ISBN 978-0-424-06440-6.
  3. ^ Roberts, Jan (1993). Maybanke Anderson: Sex, suffrage and social reform. Sydney: Hale & Iremonger. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-86806-495-6.
  4. ^ Anderson, Maybanke (2001). "My Sprig of Rosemary". In Roberts, Jan; Kingston, Beverley (eds.). Maybanke, A Woman's Voice: The collected work of Maybanke Selfe – Wolstenholme – Anderson, 1845–1927. Avalon Beach, New South Wales: Ruskin Rowe Press. pp. 24–25. ISBN 978-0-9587095-3-8.
  5. ^ a b "Maybanke Anderson". The Sydney Morning Herald. 26 April 1927. p. 8. Retrieved 31 January 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ Anderson 2001, p. 32.
  7. ^ a b c Roberts, Jan (2010). "Anderson, Maybanke". Dictionary of Sydney. Archived from the original on 22 February 2011. Retrieved 31 January 2013.
  8. ^ Roberts 1993, p. 22.
  9. ^ Selfe, Norman (1900). "Annual Address Delivered to the Engineering Section of the Royal Society of NS Wales, June 20, 1900". Journal of the Royal Society of New South Wales. 34: xxviii. ISSN 0035-9173. Cited in Freyne (2009).
  10. ^ Selfe 1900, p. xxx.
  11. ^ a b c d e Freyne, Catherine (2009). "Selfe, Norman". Dictionary of Sydney. Archived from the original on 24 June 2012. Retrieved 26 May 2012.
  12. ^ Arthur, Ian (2001). Norman Selfe, Man of the North Shore. unpublished essay submitted for the North Shore History Prize. pp. 3–6. Cited in Freyne (2009)
  13. ^ a b c Murray-Smith, Stephen (1976). Selfe, Norman (1839–1911). Australian Dictionary of Biography. Archived from the original on 20 April 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2012.
  14. ^ Roberts 1993, p. 33.
  15. ^ Pugh, Ann. "One hundred years ago – the Foundation of the Engineering Association of New South Wales". The Journal of the Institution of Engineers. 1970 (July–August): 86. ISSN 0020-3319.
  16. ^ "Famous ship". The Brisbane Courier. 5 August 1931. p. 16. Retrieved 4 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ Cook, B. Dixson, Sir William (1870–1952). Australian Dictionary of Biography. Archived from the original on 20 April 2013. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  18. ^ "Selfe family papers and pictorial material collection" (Series 1-10: Architectural and Technical Drawings; Graphic Materials; Textual Records). State Library of New South Wales. 1853–1948. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  19. ^ Arthur 2001, p. 7.
  20. ^ a b Norman Selfe, Memorandum of a few of the engineering works carried out in New South Wales by Norman Selfe, State Library of NSW, Mitchell Library manuscripts SS 3864 Box No 6
  21. ^ "Scenic Railway". Scenic World. 2013. Archived from the original on 20 January 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2013.
  22. ^ Burning Mists of Time ISBN 978 09775639 6 8 Pells/Hammon PAGE 66
  23. ^ Low, John (1994). "From Coal Mine to Scenic Railway". Blue Mountains: Pictural Memories. Alexandria, New South Wales: Kingsclear Books. pp. 88–89. ISBN 978-0-908272-37-2.
  24. ^ Selfe 1900, p. xiviii.
  25. ^ a b Arthur 2001, p. 18.
  26. ^ Selfe, Norman (1908). Sydney, past, present and possible: an address to the Australian Historical Society on November 27th, 1906. Sydney: D. S. Ford. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  27. ^ Selfe, Norman (April 1900). Sydney and its institutions: as they are and might be from an engineer's point of view. Vol. XV. Sydney: Engineering Association of New South Wales. p. 19. Archived from the original on 13 December 2013. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  28. ^ Report of the Royal Commission for the Improvement of Sydney and its Suburbs, New South Wales Parliamentary Papers, vol 5, 1909. Cited in Freyne (2009).
  29. ^ Arthur 2001, pp. 25–27.
  30. ^ "Cablegrams". Zeehan and Dundas Herald. 30 November 1900. p. 3. Retrieved 6 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  31. ^ Arthur 2001, pp. 21–24.
  32. ^ "The North Shore Bridge Competitions: Précis of Correspondence with the Government in the same, moved for in Parliament by Dr Arthur, printed under No 9 Report of Printing Committee, 18 Dec 1907", Papers of Adeline Hicking, State Library of New South Wales, Mitchell Library manuscripts 6537 Archived 19 February 2013 at archive.today. Cited in Freyne (2009)
  33. ^ Norma Selfe and Rhoda Selfe papers c1900–48, State Library of New South Wales, Mitchell Library manuscripts 3864, box 10 Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  34. ^ "Design tenders and proposals". Sydney Harbour Bridge. NSW Board of Studies. Archived from the original on 11 April 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  35. ^ "Late Mr. Norman Selfe". The Sydney Morning Herald. 27 May 1925. p. 18. Retrieved 2 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  36. ^ Arthur 2001, pp. 27–28.
  37. ^ "Founders – Office-Bearers, 1901". Royal Australian Historical Society. Archived from the original on 23 June 2012. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  38. ^ Minutes of meeting, 1 June 1903 RAHS, cited by Jacobs, Marjorie (2001). "Students of a Like Hobby: the Society 1900–1954". Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society. 87 (1): 19.
  39. ^ a b "History of the RAHS". Royal Australian Historical Society. Archived from the original on 19 February 2013. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  40. ^ Selfe, Norman (1902). "A Century of Sydney Cove". Journal and Proceedings of the Australian Historical Society. 1 (4).
  41. ^ Selfe, Norman (1902). "Some Notes on the Sydney Windmills". Journal and Proceedings of the Australian Historical Society. 1 (6).
  42. ^ Jacobs, Marjorie (2001). "Students of a Like Hobby: the Society 1900–1954". Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society. 87 (1): 19.
  43. ^ Selfe, Norman (1889). Three Addresses on Technical Education by Norman Selfe, MICE, MIME, etc, Vice-President and Acting President of the Board of Technical Education of New South Wales, delivered at the Annual Meetings of the Sydney Technical College in 1887, 1888 and 1889. Sydney: Board of Technical Education. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 18 February 2013. p. 10. Cited in L.A. Mandelson (1972) pp. 128–131
  44. ^ Mandelson 1972, p. 138.
  45. ^ a b Selfe 1889, p. 11.
  46. ^ Selfe 1889, pp. 14–15.
  47. ^ a b Neill, Norm (1991). Technically & Further: Sydney Technical College 1891–1991. Sydney: Hale & Iremonger. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-86806-426-0.
  48. ^ "Engineering Association of New South Wales (1870–1919)". Encyclopedia of Australian Science. Archived from the original on 9 April 2013. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  49. ^ "Category E – Awards to Tertiary Education Students". Awards. Engineers Australia. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 8 February 2013.
  50. ^ Mandelson 1972, pp. 107–108.
  51. ^ Freyne, Catherine (2010). "Sydney Technical College". Dictionary of Sydney. Archived from the original on 28 August 2012. Retrieved 2 December 2012.
  52. ^ Mandelson 1972, pp. 113–114.
  53. ^ NSW Government Gazette, No. 324, 1 August 1883, p. 4173
  54. ^ Neill 1991, p. 10.
  55. ^ Mandelson 1972, p. 121.
  56. ^ Mandelson 1972, pp. 121–123.
  57. ^ Neill 1991, p. 12.
  58. ^ a b Mandelson 1972, p. 136.
  59. ^ Dunn, Mark (2011). "Technical and Working Men's College". Dictionary of Sydney. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  60. ^ "Transfer of the Technical College to the Government". The Sydney Morning Herald. 19 September 1883. p. 6. Retrieved 7 April 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  61. ^ Mandelson 1972, pp. 127–128.
  62. ^ Selfe 1889, p. 16.
  63. ^ "Our history: The government steps in". About TAFE NSW. TAFE NSW. 2010. Archived from the original on 20 January 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  64. ^ Roberts 1993, p. 155.
  65. ^ Mandelson 1972, p. 137.
  66. ^ Mandelson 1972, pp. 137–138.
  67. ^ Murray-Smith, Steven (1966). A History of Technical Education in Australia (PhD Thesis). University of Melbourne. Cited in Arthur (2001) p.17
  68. ^ Jacobs, Marjorie (1988). "The Royal Australian Historical Society 1901–2001: Part I 'Students of a like hobby': the Society 1900–1954". Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society. 73 (4): 243–246. ISSN 0035-8762. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  69. ^ Holt, H.T.E. Cohen, John Jacob (1859–1939). Australian Dictionary of Biography. Archived from the original on 19 April 2013. Retrieved 6 February 2013.
  70. ^ a b Roberts 1993, p. 54.
  71. ^ "Family notices". The Empire. Sydney. 16 October 1872. p. 1. Retrieved 1 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  72. ^ "Family Notices". The Sydney Morning Herald. 6 October 1886. p. 1. Retrieved 7 April 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  73. ^ "Family Notices". The Sydney Morning Herald. NSW. 8 May 1888. p. 1. Retrieved 28 March 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  74. ^ "Ten-bedroom mansion with four-storey tower to fetch astronomic price". News.com.au. 15 August 2014. Archived from the original on 1 July 2016. Retrieved 11 May 2016.
  75. ^ Godden Mackay Logan. "Ashfield Heritage Study – 'Amesbury'" (PDF). Heritage Inventory. Ashfield Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  76. ^ "Locations near you". Brahma Kumaris. 2014. Archived from the original on 17 April 2014. Retrieved 11 May 2016.
  77. ^ "78 Alt Street Ashfield NSW 2131". realestatate.com.au. September 2014. Archived from the original on 3 June 2016. Retrieved 11 May 2016.
  78. ^ "Advertising". The Sydney Morning Herald. 26 January 1918. p. 6. Retrieved 4 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  79. ^ Arthur 2001, p. 35.
  80. ^ Selfe, Norman (July 1910) Some account of St Paul's Church, Hornsby (now Normanhurst and Wahroonga): with a few reminiscences of the old village of Hornsby, printed for the subscribers, p. 14. Cited in Freyne (2009)
  81. ^ "Family notices". The Sydney Morning Herald. 16 May 1906. p. 8. Retrieved 1 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  82. ^ Brodsky, Isadore (4 November 1957). "A man ahead of his time". The Sun. p. 27.
  83. ^ Obituary, Building, 16 October 1911, Cited in Arthur (2001) p.38
  84. ^ "Late Mr. Norman Selfe". The Sydney Morning Herald. 18 October 1911. p. 16. Retrieved 2 December 2012 – via National Library of Australia.
  85. ^ "Burnt to death". The Brisbane Courier. 12 March 1932. p. 5. Retrieved 31 January 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  86. ^ "Family notices". The Sydney Morning Herald. 19 January 1954. p. 24. Retrieved 5 February 2013 – via National Library of Australia.
  87. ^ "SAN-SMA". Gore Hill Cemetery: Graves Index. Willoughby City Council. Archived from the original on 10 May 2012. Retrieved 1 February 2013.
External links
This Wikipedia article is substantially built upon the essay "Selfe, Norman" in the Dictionary of Sydney
written by Catherine Freyne, 2009 and licensed under CC BY-SA. Imported on 10 May 2012.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.