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New York City Subway rolling stock

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
The "Holiday Shopper's Special", a train of R1, R4, R6, R7A, and R9 subway cars running in special service at the 23rd Street station on the IND Sixth Avenue Line
The "Holiday Shopper's Special", a train of R1, R4, R6, R7A, and R9 subway cars running in special service at the 23rd Street station on the IND Sixth Avenue Line
An R142A series car interior in service on the 4 route
An R142A series car interior in service on the 4 route
A Vaktrak track vacuuming train[1]
A Vaktrak track vacuuming train[1]

The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system and has a large fleet of rolling stock. As of November 2016, the New York City Subway has 6418 cars on the roster.

The system maintains two separate fleets of passenger cars: one for the A Division (numbered) routes, the other for the B Division (lettered) routes. All A Division equipment is approximately 8 feet 9 inches (2.67 m) wide and 51 feet (15.54 m) long. B Division cars, on the other hand, are about 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and either 60 feet 6 inches (18.44 m) or 75 feet 6 inches (23.01 m) long. The A Division and B Division trains operate only in their own division; operating in the other division is not allowed. All rolling stock, in both the A and B Divisions, run on the same 4 foot 8.5 inches (1,435 mm) standard gauge and use the same third-rail geometry and voltage. A typical revenue train consists of 8 to 10 cars, although in practice they can range between 2 and 11 cars.

The subway's rolling stock have operated under various companies: the Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT), Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit (BMT), and Independent Subway System (IND), all of which have since merged into the New York City Transit Authority. Cars purchased by the City of New York since the inception of the IND and for the other divisions beginning in 1948 are identified by the letter "R" followed by a number. Various kinds of cars are also used for maintenance work, including flatcars and vacuum trains.

Discover more about New York City Subway rolling stock related topics

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

Rapid transit

Rapid transit

Rapid transit or mass rapid transit (MRT), also known as heavy rail or metro, is a type of high-capacity public transport generally found in urban areas. A rapid transit system that primarily or traditionally runs below the surface may be called a subway, tube, or underground. Unlike buses or trams, rapid transit systems are railways, usually electric, that operate on an exclusive right-of-way, which cannot be accessed by pedestrians or other vehicles. They are often grade-separated in tunnels or on elevated railways.

Rolling stock

Rolling stock

The term rolling stock in the rail transport industry refers to railway vehicles, including both powered and unpowered vehicles: for example, locomotives, freight and passenger cars, and non-revenue cars. Passenger vehicles can be un-powered, or self-propelled, single or multiple units. A connected series of railway vehicles is a train.

A Division (New York City Subway)

A Division (New York City Subway)

The A Division, also known as the IRT Division, is a division of the New York City Subway, consisting of the lines operated with services designated by numbers and the 42nd Street Shuttle. These lines and services were operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company before the 1940 city takeover. A Division cars are narrower, shorter, and lighter than those of the B Division, measuring 8.6 by 51 feet.

B Division (New York City Subway)

B Division (New York City Subway)

The New York City Subway's B Division consists of the lines that operate with lettered services, as well as the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park Shuttles. These lines and services were operated by the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and city-owned Independent Subway System (IND) before the 1940 city takeover of the BMT. B Division rolling stock is wider, longer, and heavier than those of the A Division, measuring 10 or 9.75 ft by 60 or 75 ft.

Independent Subway System

Independent Subway System

The Independent Subway System, formerly known as the Independent City-Owned Subway System (ICOSS) or the Independent City-Owned Rapid Transit Railroad (ICORTR), was a rapid transit rail system in New York City that is now part of the New York City Subway. It was first constructed as the Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan in 1932.

New York City Transit Authority

New York City Transit Authority

The New York City Transit Authority is a public-benefit corporation in the U.S. state of New York that operates public transportation in New York City. Part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the busiest and largest transit system in North America, the NYCTA has a daily ridership of 8 million trips.

Flatcar

Flatcar

A flatcar (US) is a piece of rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair of bogies under each end. The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.

Total fleet

As of November 2016, the New York City Subway has 6418 cars on the roster.[2][a] The system maintains two separate fleets of passenger cars: one for the A Division routes, the other for the B Division routes. All A Division equipment is approximately 8 feet 9 inches (2.67 m) wide and 51 feet (15.54 m) long. B Division cars, on the other hand, are about 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and either 60 feet 6 inches (18.44 m) or 75 feet 6 inches (23.01 m) long. The 75-foot cars, the R44s, R46s, R68s, and R68As, are not permitted on BMT Eastern Division – the J, L, M, and Z trains – because of sharper curves on those tracks.

All rolling stock, in both the A and B Divisions, run on the same 4 foot 8.5 inches (1,435 mm) standard gauge and use the same third-rail geometry and voltage. However, trains operate only in their own division; operating in the other division is not allowed. A Division sections have narrower tunnel segments, tighter curves, and tighter platform clearances than the B Division sections, so B Division trains cannot fit in the A Division tunnels and stations, while A Division trains would have an unacceptably large gap between the platform and train if they were allowed in service on B Division lines. Also, the safety train stop (trip cock) mechanism is not compatible between divisions, being located on opposite sides of the track and train in each division. However, service and maintenance trains are composed of A Division-sized cars, so they can operate with either division's clearances and have safety train stops installed on both sides of the trucks.

A typical revenue train consists of 8 or 10 cars. The exceptions are the Franklin Avenue Shuttle, which runs 2-car trains; the Rockaway Park Shuttle, which runs 4-car trains; the 42nd Street Shuttle, which runs 6-car trains; the G, which runs 5-car trains; and the 7, which runs 11-car trains.

When the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company entered into agreements to operate some of the new subway lines, they decided to design a new type of car, 10 feet (3.05 m) wide and 67 feet (20.42 m) long. The subject of several patents, the car's larger profile was similar to that of steam railroad coaches, permitting greater passenger capacity, more comfortable seating, and other advantages. The BRT unveiled its design, designated BMT Standard, to the public in 1913 and received such wide acceptance that all future subway lines, whether built for the BRT, the IRT, or eventually the IND, were built to handle the wider cars.

When the R44s and R46s were rebuilt, the rollsigns on the side of the cars were replaced with electronic LCD signs while the front service sign remained as a rollsign. In sharp contrast, the rebuilt R32s and R38s retained rollsigns on the sides, but a flip-dot display was placed in the front. The MTA has been incorporating newer subway cars into its stock in the past two decades. Since 1999, the R142s, R142As, R143s, R160s, R179s, and R188s have been added into service.[3][4] All cars built since 1992 (including the now out-of-service R110As and R110Bs) are equipped with digital signs on the front, sides, and interior (except for the R110Bs, which had rollsigns on the front).

Old cars, some from the original companies (IRT, BMT, and IND), are preserved at the New York Transit Museum, while others have been sold to private individuals and/or other railway/trolley museums. Private companies include Railway Preservation Corp., whose equipment is often used on New York Transit Museum-sponsored excursions.

Between 1984 and 1989, some of the IRT trains were painted red, giving them the name Redbirds.[b] By January 2022, various older B Division cars, such as the entire fleets of R32s, R38s, R40s, R40As, R42s, and NYCT-built R44s, were similarly retired and replaced by newer models, including the R160s and R179s.

General Overhaul Program

The General Overhaul Program (GOH) was a mid-life overhaul program for neglected subway cars, which involved a thorough rebuilding of the fleet. Since the completion of the GOH program, the new Scheduled Maintenance System (SMS) program has replaced the GOH program by ensuring that trains do not reach a state in which they would need such an overhaul. The car types, which were part of the MTA NYCT GOH program, are the IRT Redbirds (R26, R28, R29, R33, R33S, R36), as well as IND/BMT cars (R30 GE, R32, R38, R40, R40A, R42, R44, and R46). These cars were rebuilt between 1985 and 1993. Some cars in various classes from R10 to R46 were also given lighter overhauls during this period.

"R"-prefixed orders

Cars purchased by the City of New York since the inception of the IND and for the other divisions beginning in 1948 are identified by the letter "R" followed by a number; e.g.: R46. This number is the contract number under which the cars were purchased. Cars with nearby contract numbers (e.g.: R1 through R10, or R21 through R36, or R143 through R179) may be virtually identical, simply being purchased under different contracts.

The New York City Board of Transportation settled on a system of documentation that is still in place under MTA New York City Transit. This included a prefix letter or letters that indicated the Department that the specific documentation, followed by a series of numbers of a length defined by the specific department concerned. For example, the Surface Department used the letter "S", while the Rapid Transit Department used the letter "R". A new R- number is assigned for any vehicle purchase involving a bidding process. Since the 1970s, the system has suffered from "R- inflation" going through only 46 R- numbers in its first 40 years, but over 114 in its subsequent 30. Possible reasons include an increased number of specialized maintenance vehicles that were previously made in house or a lower floor for requiring a formal bidding process to reduce waste and abuse.

Disposal at sea

Retired subway cars being transported to the ocean, where they will be dropped into the water to create an artificial reef
Retired subway cars being transported to the ocean, where they will be dropped into the water to create an artificial reef

In 2001, the New York City Transit Authority started disposing of retired subway cars by dumping them at sea to create artificial reefs, with the intention of promoting marine life. This option was chosen because it was less expensive than removing asbestos from the cars; the asbestos was determined to not be a hazard in the ocean.[5] Further, the artificial reefs would provide environmental and economic benefits, such as providing shelter for marine animals and creating new fishing opportunities. The first reef constructed was Redbird Reef in Delaware. Eventually, multiple states received retired subway cars for reefs.[6] The program was discontinued in 2010, after more than 2,500 cars were reefed, because newer cars contained more plastic, which was too expensive to economically remove before reefing.[7][8]

Discover more about Total fleet related topics

A Division (New York City Subway)

A Division (New York City Subway)

The A Division, also known as the IRT Division, is a division of the New York City Subway, consisting of the lines operated with services designated by numbers and the 42nd Street Shuttle. These lines and services were operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company before the 1940 city takeover. A Division cars are narrower, shorter, and lighter than those of the B Division, measuring 8.6 by 51 feet.

B Division (New York City Subway)

B Division (New York City Subway)

The New York City Subway's B Division consists of the lines that operate with lettered services, as well as the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park Shuttles. These lines and services were operated by the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and city-owned Independent Subway System (IND) before the 1940 city takeover of the BMT. B Division rolling stock is wider, longer, and heavier than those of the A Division, measuring 10 or 9.75 ft by 60 or 75 ft.

R44 (New York City Subway car)

R44 (New York City Subway car)

The R44 is a New York City Subway car model built by the St. Louis Car Company from 1971 to 1973 for the B Division and the Staten Island Railway (SIR). The cars replaced many R1-R9 series cars, and all remaining 1925 Standard Steel built SIRTOA ME-1 trains, providing Staten Island with a new fleet of railcars. The R44 fleet originally consisted of 352 cars, of which 61 remain in service, all on the Staten Island Railway.

R46 (New York City Subway car)

R46 (New York City Subway car)

The R46 is a New York City Subway car model that was built by the Pullman Standard Company from 1975 to 1978 for the IND/BMT B Division. They replaced all remaining Arnine cars and General Electric-powered R16s, and some R10s. The R46 order initially consisted of 754 single cars, each 75 feet (23 m) long, and was the largest single order of passenger cars in United States railroad history at the point of the fleet's completion. The R46 was the second order of 75-foot cars to be ordered for the New York City Subway, after the R44s.

R68 (New York City Subway car)

R68 (New York City Subway car)

The R68 is a B Division New York City Subway car order consisting of 425 cars built by the Westinghouse-Amrail Company, a joint venture of Westinghouse, ANF Industrie, Jeumont Schneider, and Alsthom. The cars were built in France from 1986 to 1988 and shipped through New York Harbor. Of the cars in the fleet, 416 are arranged in four-car sets while the other nine are single cars.

R68A (New York City Subway car)

R68A (New York City Subway car)

The R68A is a B Division New York City Subway car order consisting of 200 cars built between 1988 and 1989 by Kawasaki Railcar Company in Kobe, Japan, with final assembly done at the Kawasaki plant in Yonkers, New York. A total of 200 cars were built, arranged in four-car sets.

J/Z (New York City Subway service)

J/Z (New York City Subway service)

The J Nassau Street Local and Z Nassau Street Express are two rapid transit services in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored brown since they use the BMT Nassau Street Line in Lower Manhattan.

L (New York City Subway service)

L (New York City Subway service)

The L 14th Street–Canarsie Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored medium gray since it serves the BMT Canarsie Line.

M (New York City Subway service)

M (New York City Subway service)

The M Queens Boulevard/Sixth Avenue Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored orange since it uses the IND Sixth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

Engineering tolerance

Engineering tolerance

Engineering tolerance is the permissible limit or limits of variation in:a physical dimension; a measured value or physical property of a material, manufactured object, system, or service; other measured values ; in engineering and safety, a physical distance or space (tolerance), as in a truck (lorry), train or boat under a bridge as well as a train in a tunnel ; in mechanical engineering, the space between a bolt and a nut or a hole, etc.

7 (New York City Subway service)

7 (New York City Subway service)

The 7 Flushing Local and <7> Flushing Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway, providing local and express services along the full length of the IRT Flushing Line. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored purple, since they serve the Flushing Line.

Passenger

Passenger

A passenger is a person who travels in a vehicle, but does not bear any responsibility for the tasks required for that vehicle to arrive at its destination or otherwise operate the vehicle, and is not a steward. The vehicles may be bicycles, buses, passenger trains, airliners, ships, ferryboats, and other methods of transportation.

Current fleet

Contract # Division Year Built Builder Car
Length[c]
Car
Width
Photograph Fleet numbers
(Total ordered)
Number in service CBTC Assigned Services Yard
assignment
Notes
R44 B 1971–1973 St. Louis Car 75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA Staten Island Railway local train at Oakwood Heights.jpg
  • 388–435
  • 436–466 (even
    numbers only)
    (352 total)
61
SIR only
No NYCS-bull-trans-SIR-Std.svg – 61 cars
  • Single cars; even numbered cars ("A" cars) have single full-width cabs, odd numbered cars ("B" cars) have blind ends.
  • New York City Subway car numbers were originally 100–387 and renumbered 5202–5479 (see here).
  • New York City Subway cars retired.
  • Staten Island Railway car 402 wrecked and scrapped from a 2008 Tottenville accident.
  • Car 399 retired 2017. Car 466 retired 2015.
R46 1975–1978 Pullman Company
  • 5482–6207
    (4-car sets)
  • 6208–6258
    (even numbers only)
    (754 total)
748 No "A" train –
216 cars (27 trains, a.m. rush)
224 cars (28 trains, p.m. rush)
"C" train –
72 cars (9 trains, a.m. rush)
64 cars (8 trains, p.m. rush)
"N" train "W" train – 176 cars (22 trains)
"Q" train – 168 cars (21 trains)
Rockaway Park Shuttle – 8 cars (2 trains)[9][10]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • 5482–6207 are in A-B-B-A configuration as 4-car sets.
    • Even numbered cars have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars
    • Odd numbered cars have blind ends, and are known as "B" cars.
  • 6208–6258 are in A-A configuration (even numbers only).
  • Car numbers were originally 500–1227 and 1228–1278 (even numbers only).
  • Two cars (941 & 1054) wrecked and scrapped prior to General Overhaul.
  • Three cars (6062[11] and 6150–6151[12]) wrecked after General Overhaul.
  • 6214 out of service.[13]
R62 A 1983–1985 Kawasaki 51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) New Lots ShenanigansR62 (3) Train.jpg 1301–1625
(325 total)
315 No "3" train – 260 cars (26 trains)[14][15]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • Originally single cars, now 5-car sets.
  • 10 cars (1366–1370, 1435–1437, 1439–1440) retired.
    • 1366–1370 were wrecked in 2000 due to an accident. Car 1369 was scrapped in 2005. Car 1366 and half of car 1370 are at the FDNY Randall's Island training center. Cars 1367 and 1368 were reefed in 2008.
    • 1435–1437 and 1439–1440 were wrecked in 1991 due to a derailment. 1437 and 1439–1440 were scrapped in 2001. Car 1436 was reefed in 2008. 1438 is now part of a 5-car set with 1431–1434.
R62A 1984–1987 Bombardier MTA NYC Subway 1 train leaving 125th St.jpg 1651–2475
(825 total)
824 No "1" train – 310 cars (31 trains)
"6" train – 370 cars (37 trains)
42nd Street Shuttle – 12 cars (2 trains)[16][17]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • Originally single cars, most cars linked in 5 or 6-car sets.
    • 1651–1905, 1961–2475, and select other 1900s have full-width cabs at ends of sets.
  • 1909 was wrecked and scrapped.[18]
R68 B 1986–1988 Westinghouse-Amrail Company 75 feet (22.9 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) Diligent on West End.jpg 2500–2924
(425 total)
425 No "B" train –
48 cars (6 trains, a.m. rush)
40 cars (5 trains, p.m. rush)
"D" train –
232 cars (29 trains, a.m. rush)
224 cars (28 trains, p.m. rush)
"N" train "W" train – 72 cars (9 trains)
"Q" train – 8 cars (1 train, p.m. rush, used in B service in the a.m. rush)
Franklin Avenue Shuttle – 4 cars (2 trains)[19][20]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • 2500–2915 originally single cars, now in 4-car sets.
  • 2916–2924 still single cars; used for the Franklin Avenue Shuttle.
R68A 1988–1989 Kawasaki MTA NYC Subway N train arriving at 36th Ave.jpg 5001–5200
(200 total)
200 No "A" train – 8 cars (1 train, p.m. rush, used in B service in the a.m. rush)
"B" train –
152 cars (19 trains, a.m. rush)
144 cars (18 trains, p.m. rush)
"N" train "W" train – 16 cars (2 trains)[21][22][23]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • Originally single cars, now in 4-car sets.
R142 A 1999–2003 Bombardier 51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) NYCSubway6476.jpg 1101–1250,
6301–7180
(1,030 total)
1,025 Future installation[24] "2" train –
360 cars (36 trains, a.m. rush)
350 cars (35 trains, p.m. rush)
"4" train – 180 cars (18 trains, a.m. rush)
170 cars (17 trains, p.m. rush)
"5" train –
350 cars (35 trains, a.m. rush)
360 cars (36 trains, p.m. rush)[25][26]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
    • Cars ending in 1, 5, 6, and 0 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
  • Cars 6346–6350 were taken out of service after suffering fire damage in an arson attack.[27][28]
R142A 1999–2004 Kawasaki Woodlawn Bound (2).jpg 7591–7810
(220 total)
220 "4" train –
170 cars (17 trains, a.m. rush)
160 cars (16 trains, p.m. rush)[29][30]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
    • Cars ending in 1, 5, 6, and 0 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
  • Original order was 7211–7810; cars 7211–7590 were converted to R188s between 2011 & 2016 for the IRT Flushing Line.[31]
R143 B 2001–2003 60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) Manhattan bound R143 L train at New Lots.jpg 8101–8312
(212 total)
212 Yes "L" train – 176 cars (22 trains)[32][33]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration.
  • Cars with single full-width cabs are known as A cars.
  • Cars with no cab are known as B cars.
R160 2005–2010 Alstom (R160A)
Kawasaki (R160B)
MTA NYC Subway F train arriving at Avenue P.JPG 8313–9974
(1,662 total)
1,662 8313-8376 (Siemens); 8377-9942 (Thales); future installation for remaining cars 9943-9974 (Thales)[34] "J" train "Z" train –
88 cars (11 trains, a.m. rush)
80 cars (10 trains, p.m. rush)
"L" train – 16 cars (2 trains)
"M" train –
192 cars (24 trains, a.m. rush)
184 cars (23 trains, p.m. rush)[35][36]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
"E" train – 260 cars (26 trains)
"F" train – 450 cars (45 trains, a.m. rush)
460 cars (46 trains, p.m. rush)
"G" train – 65 cars (13 trains)
"R" train – 310 cars (31 trains, 1 train is also used in Q service during the morning rush hour, but is shown in the R assignment)[37][38]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • 4 car sets (8313–8652, 9943–9974) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration. All are classified under R160A-1 and are powered by Alstom ONIX 800 IGBT–VVVF.
  • 5 car sets (8653–9942) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration.
    • 8653–8712, 9233–9802 are classified under R160A-2 and are powered by Alstom ONIX 800 IGBT–VVVF.
    • 8713–8842, 9103–9232, 9803–9942 are classified under R160B-1 and are powered by Alstom ONIX 800 IGBT–VVVF.
    • 8843–9102 are classified under R160B-2 and are powered by Siemens SITRAC IGBT–VVVF.
  • Cars with single full-width cabs are known as "A" cars.
  • Cars with no cabs are known as "B" cars.
R188 A 2011–2016 Kawasaki 51 feet (15.5 m) 8 feet 9 inches (2.7 m) R188 7 train.jpg 7211–7590,
7811–7936
(506 total)
506 Yes "7" train –
418 cars (38 trains, a.m. rush)
396 cars (36 trains, p.m. rush)[39][40]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • All cars are in 5-car or 6-car sets to form 11-car trains for IRT Flushing Line service.
  • Order consists of a combination of 126 new cars & R142A conversions by the manufacturer, totaling 380 car conversions.[31][41]
    • Conversion sets numbered 7211–7590 are numbered as follows:
      • Cars ending in 0, 1, 5, and 6 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
      • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
    • Cars 7811–7898 are eight new 11-car trains (split into four 5-car trains and four 6-car trains), with cars sequentially numbered.
      • Cars whose numbers give a remainder of 0, 1, 5, and 6 when divided by 11 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
      • Cars whose numbers give other remainders when divided by 11 have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
    • Cars 7899–7936 are "C" cars that are linked with converted R142A sets expand the sets to six cars.
R179 B 2016–2019 Bombardier 60 feet (18.3 m) 10 feet (3.0 m) MTA NYC Subway A train arriving at Broad Channel.jpg 3010–3327
(318 total)
318 Future installation[42][d] "A" train – 110 cars (11 trains)
"C" train – 72 cars (9 trains)
"J" train "Z" train – 72 cars (9 trains)
Rockaway Park Shuttle – 5 cars (1 train)[43][44]
Assignments as of December 19, 2021
  • 4-car sets (3050–3237) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-A configuration.
  • 5-car sets (3010–3049, 3238–3327) are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration.
  • Cars will single full-width cabs are known as A cars.
  • Cars with no cab are known as B cars.
R211A 2021–present Kawasaki R211A14thstreet.jpg 4060–4499
(440 total)[45]
10 Yes "A" train – 10 cars (1 train)
  • All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
    • Cars ending in 0, 4, 5, and 9 have single full-width cabs and are known as "A" cars.
    • Cars ending in all other digits have no cabs and are known as "B" cars.
R211T 2022–present R211T Ride - 52667573213.jpg 4040–4059
(20 total)[45]
0
(testing)
Yes TBD

Discover more about Current fleet related topics

Communications-based train control

Communications-based train control

Communications-based train control (CBTC) is a railway signaling system that uses telecommunications between the train and track equipment for traffic management and infrastructure control. CBTC allows a train's position to be known more accurately than with traditional signaling systems. This makes railway traffic management safer and more efficient. Metros are able to reduce headways while maintaining or even improving safety.

R44 (New York City Subway car)

R44 (New York City Subway car)

The R44 is a New York City Subway car model built by the St. Louis Car Company from 1971 to 1973 for the B Division and the Staten Island Railway (SIR). The cars replaced many R1-R9 series cars, and all remaining 1925 Standard Steel built SIRTOA ME-1 trains, providing Staten Island with a new fleet of railcars. The R44 fleet originally consisted of 352 cars, of which 61 remain in service, all on the Staten Island Railway.

B Division (New York City Subway)

B Division (New York City Subway)

The New York City Subway's B Division consists of the lines that operate with lettered services, as well as the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park Shuttles. These lines and services were operated by the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and city-owned Independent Subway System (IND) before the 1940 city takeover of the BMT. B Division rolling stock is wider, longer, and heavier than those of the A Division, measuring 10 or 9.75 ft by 60 or 75 ft.

R46 (New York City Subway car)

R46 (New York City Subway car)

The R46 is a New York City Subway car model that was built by the Pullman Standard Company from 1975 to 1978 for the IND/BMT B Division. They replaced all remaining Arnine cars and General Electric-powered R16s, and some R10s. The R46 order initially consisted of 754 single cars, each 75 feet (23 m) long, and was the largest single order of passenger cars in United States railroad history at the point of the fleet's completion. The R46 was the second order of 75-foot cars to be ordered for the New York City Subway, after the R44s.

Pullman Company

Pullman Company

The Pullman Company, founded by George Pullman, was a manufacturer of railroad cars in the mid-to-late 19th century through the first half of the 20th century, during the boom of railroads in the United States. Through rapid late-19th century development of mass production and takeover of rivals, the company developed a virtual monopoly on production and ownership of sleeper cars. During a severe economic downturn, the 1894 Pullman Strike by company workers proved a transforming moment in American labor history. At the company's peak in the early 20th century, its cars accommodated 26 million people a year, and it in effect operated "the largest hotel in the world". Its production workers initially lived in a planned worker community named Pullman, Chicago.

A (New York City Subway service)

A (New York City Subway service)

The A Eighth Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

C (New York City Subway service)

C (New York City Subway service)

The C Eighth Avenue Local is a 19-mile-long (31 km) rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Midtown Manhattan.

N (New York City Subway service)

N (New York City Subway service)

The N Broadway Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet," is colored yellow, since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

Q (New York City Subway service)

Q (New York City Subway service)

The Q Second Avenue/Broadway Express/Brighton Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored yellow since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

R62 (New York City Subway car)

R62 (New York City Subway car)

The R62 is a New York City Subway car model built between 1983 and 1985 by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Kobe, Japan, for the A Division. A total of 325 cars were built, originally as single car units. When the reliability of the fleet improved, they were converted to five-car sets. The cars replaced the remaining R12s, R14s, and R15s, which were all retired by the end of 1984.

A Division (New York City Subway)

A Division (New York City Subway)

The A Division, also known as the IRT Division, is a division of the New York City Subway, consisting of the lines operated with services designated by numbers and the 42nd Street Shuttle. These lines and services were operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company before the 1940 city takeover. A Division cars are narrower, shorter, and lighter than those of the B Division, measuring 8.6 by 51 feet.

3 (New York City Subway service)

3 (New York City Subway service)

The 3 Seventh Avenue Express is a rapid transit service in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored red since it uses the IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line through most of Manhattan.

Maintenance vehicles

Various kinds of cars are used for maintenance work, including flatcars and vacuum trains.[46]

Track geometry car

There are four track geometry cars on the New York City Subway that measure the system's track geometry to ensure that safe train operation is maintained. The cars are numbered TGC1–TGC4. TGC1 was ordered under contract R59 in 1984 for $1.4 million,[47] TGC2 was ordered under contract R63 and cost $2.5 million,.[48][49] Contract R-34152 purchasing TGC3 was awarded on December 29, 2004 for $9,610,963 and, after additional funding was later authorized by the Board, Modification 1 exercising the Option for TGC4 was awarded on January 18, 2006 for $9,622,858. Subsequent modifications added newer equipment, such as a more advanced laser scanner, to TGC4 prior to its delivery to NYCTA.[50] The cars use sensors, measuring systems, and data management systems to get a profile of the tracks. The train crew consists of two-track equipment maintainers, one maintenance supervisor, and two to three engineers. The trains typically operate during off-peak weekday daytime hours so as to not interfere with more frequent rush hour service. A single car weighs 45 tons.[49] The cars measure:

  • Alignment – "Alignment is the projection of the track geometry of each rail or the track center line onto the horizontal plane," (FRA Definition).[51] Also known as the "straightness" of the tracks.
  • Crosslevel – The variation in the cant of the track over the length of a predetermined "chord" length (generally 62 feet or 18.90 meters). On straight or tangent track, ideally, there should be no variation, while on curves, a cant is generally desired.
  • Curvature – The amount by which the rail deviates from being straight or tangent. The geometry car checks the actual curvature (in Degree of curvature) of a curve versus its design curvature.
  • Rail gauge – The distance between the rails. Over time, rail may become too wide or too narrow. In North America and most of the world, standard gauge is 4 ft 8½ in (1,435 mm).
  • Rail profile – Looks for rail wear and deviations from standard profile.
  • Warp – The maximum change in crosslevel over a predetermined chord length (generally sixty-two feet).[52]
  • Corrugation of running rail surface
  • Tunnel and station platform clearances
  • Third rail height and gauge
  • Vertical gap between third rail and protective board [53]

The track geometry car typically checks each stretch of track about 6 times a year; the car is manually operated, and there are no plans to automate inspection of the track geometry, which is done manually with the help of high-tech equipment aboard the car.[54]

Discover more about Maintenance vehicles related topics

Flatcar

Flatcar

A flatcar (US) is a piece of rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair of bogies under each end. The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.

Track geometry car

Track geometry car

A track geometry car is an automated track inspection vehicle on a rail transport system used to test several parameters of the track geometry without obstructing normal railroad operations. Some of the parameters generally measured include position, curvature, alignment of the track, smoothness, and the crosslevel of the two rails. The cars use a variety of sensors, measuring systems, and data management systems to create a profile of the track being inspected.

Track geometry

Track geometry

Track geometry is concerned with the properties and relations of points, lines, curves, and surfaces in the three-dimensional positioning of railroad track. The term is also applied to measurements used in design, construction and maintenance of track. Track geometry involves standards, speed limits and other regulations in the areas of track gauge, alignment, elevation, curvature and track surface. Standards are usually separately expressed for horizontal and vertical layouts although track geometry is three-dimensional.

Cant (road/rail)

Cant (road/rail)

The cant of a railway track or camber of a road is the rate of change in elevation (height) between the two rails or edges. This is normally greater where the railway or road is curved; raising the outer rail or the outer edge of the road creates a banked turn, thus allowing vehicles to maneuver through the curve at higher speeds than would otherwise be possible were the surface flat or level.

Degree of curvature

Degree of curvature

Degree of curve or degree of curvature is a measure of curvature of a circular arc used in civil engineering for its easy use in layout surveying.

Rail profile

Rail profile

The rail profile is the cross sectional shape of a railway rail, perpendicular to its length.

Structure gauge

Structure gauge

A structure gauge, also called the minimum clearance outline, is a diagram or physical structure that sets limits to the extent that bridges, tunnels and other infrastructure can encroach on rail vehicles. It specifies the height and width of platforms, tunnels and bridges, and the width of the doors that allow access to a warehouse from a rail siding. Specifications may include the minimum distance from rail vehicles to railway platforms, buildings, electrical equipment boxes, signal equipment, third rails or supports for overhead lines.

Third rail

Third rail

A third rail, also known as a live rail, electric rail or conductor rail, is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track. It is used typically in a mass transit or rapid transit system, which has alignments in its own corridors, fully or almost fully segregated from the outside environment. Third rail systems are usually supplied from direct current electricity.

Future fleet

Contract # Division Year Built Builder Total Photograph
(mock-up or rendering)
Notes
R262 A 2025–2030 (projected) TBA 504 cars (proposed); 1,364 cars (all options) R262 Prototype Rendering (49579487123).png To replace all R62s and R62As, and to expand the fleet. CBTC-equipped. All cars are expected to feature open gangways.[24]: 25 

Originally, 168 additional cars were proposed to be built and provided for service on the E, G, L, and N services between 2015 and 2019; the contract number for these growth cars was unknown, but they were not delivered prior to 2019. It is unclear if these cars are still scheduled to be built.

Discover more about Future fleet related topics

R262 (New York City Subway car)

R262 (New York City Subway car)

The R262 is a proposed New Technology Train-series subway car for the New York City Subway. It is expected to replace the current R62 and R62A rolling stock, which are used on the subway's A Division and were built in the mid-1980s.

A Division (New York City Subway)

A Division (New York City Subway)

The A Division, also known as the IRT Division, is a division of the New York City Subway, consisting of the lines operated with services designated by numbers and the 42nd Street Shuttle. These lines and services were operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company before the 1940 city takeover. A Division cars are narrower, shorter, and lighter than those of the B Division, measuring 8.6 by 51 feet.

R62 (New York City Subway car)

R62 (New York City Subway car)

The R62 is a New York City Subway car model built between 1983 and 1985 by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Kobe, Japan, for the A Division. A total of 325 cars were built, originally as single car units. When the reliability of the fleet improved, they were converted to five-car sets. The cars replaced the remaining R12s, R14s, and R15s, which were all retired by the end of 1984.

R62A (New York City Subway car)

R62A (New York City Subway car)

The R62A is a New York City Subway car model built between 1984 and 1987 by Bombardier Transportation for the A Division. The cars were built in La Pocatière, Quebec, with final assembly done in Auburn, New York and Barre, Vermont, under a license from Kawasaki Heavy Industries, manufacturer of the previous R62 order. A total of 825 cars were built, arranged as sets of three, four, or five cars per set. The cars replaced the remaining R17s, R21s, and R22s, which were all retired by early 1988.

E (New York City Subway service)

E (New York City Subway service)

The E Eighth Avenue Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.

G (New York City Subway service)

G (New York City Subway service)

The G Brooklyn-Queens Crosstown Local is an 11.4-mile-long (18.3 km) rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored light green since it uses the IND Crosstown Line.

L (New York City Subway service)

L (New York City Subway service)

The L 14th Street–Canarsie Local is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored medium gray since it serves the BMT Canarsie Line.

N (New York City Subway service)

N (New York City Subway service)

The N Broadway Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet," is colored yellow, since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

Retired fleet

IRT Pre-Unification listing

Designation Year built Builder Fleet total Car numbers Year
retired
Denotes
Composite 1903–1904 Jewett,
St. Louis Car,
Stephenson,
Wason
500 2000–2159,
3000–3339
1916
1950
2000–2159: Non-powered trailers
Retired from subway service in 1916;
re-equipped with lightweight trucks and components and continued in elevated service until 1950.
Hi-V "Gibbs" 1904–1905 American Car & Foundry 300 3350–3649 1958
Hi-V "Deck Roof" 1907–1908 50 3650–3699
Hi-V "Hedley" 1910–1911 American Car & Foundry,
Standard Steel,
Pressed Steel
325 ACF: 3700–3809
SS: 3810–3849
PS: 3850–4024
1915 Pullman 292 4223–4514 Non-powered trailers
4223–4250 in their last years were motorized as blind motors with no controls.
Lo-V "Flivver" 178 4037–4214 1962 Were built with the original trucks and electrical components removed from the Composites.
Lo-V "Steinway" 1915–1916 113 4025–4036,
4215–4222,
4555–4576,
4700–4770
1963 Equipped with special gearing for the steep grades of the Steinway Tunnels.
Lo-V "Standard" 1916–1917 695 4515–4554,
4577–4699,
4771–5302
1964 4515–4554 and 4811–4965 were non-powered trailers
1922 100 5303–5402 1969 Non-powered trailers
5303–5377 equipped with air compressors for brakes
1924–1925 American Car & Foundry 225 5403–5627 1964
Lo-V "Steinway" 1925 25 5628–5652 1969 Equipped with special gearing for the steep grades of the Steinway Tunnels.
Lo-V "World's Fair" 1938 St. Louis Car 50 5653–5702 Single-ended cars used for the 1939 World's Fair.

BMT Pre-Unification listing

Designation Year built Builder Fleet
total
Car numbers Year
retired
Denotes
AB Standard 1914–1919 American Car & Foundry 600 2000–2599 1969
1920–1922 Pressed Steel 300 2600–2899
1924 50 4000–4049 Non-powered trailers
BMT-SIRT (ME-1) 1925–1926 Standard Steel 25 2900–2924 1961 25 motor cars purchased from the Staten Island Railway in 1953–1954.
D-type Triplex 1925–1928 Pressed Steel 121 6000–6120 1965
Green Hornet 1934 Pullman 1 7003 1942 Experimental unit; scrapped in 1942 for World War II.
Zephyr Budd 1 7029 1954 Experimental unit
Multi 1936 St. Louis Car 10 7004–7013 1961
Pullman 15 7014–7028
Bluebird 1938, 1940 Clark 6 8000–8005 1955

R-type listing

Contract # Year built Division Builder Fleet
total
Car numbers Year
retired
R1 1930–1931 IND American Car & Foundry 300 100–399 1976
R4 1932–1933 500 400–899 1977
R-6-3 1935–1936 250 900–1149
R-6-2 1936 Pullman 150 1150–1299
R-6-1 Pressed Steel 100 1300–1399
R7 1937 American Car & Foundry,

Pullman

150 ACF: 1400–1474,
Pullman: 1475–1549
R7A 1938 100 Pullman: 1550–1599,
ACF: 1600–1649
R9 1940 IND,

BMT

American Car & Foundry,

Pressed Steel

153 ACF: 1650–1701,
PS: 1702–1802
R10 1948–1949 American Car & Foundry 400 1803–1852[e]
3000–3349
1989
R11 1949 Budd 10 8010–8019 1976
Test trains; rebuilt into R34 cars in 1965.
R12 1948 IRT American Car & Foundry 100 5703–5802[f] 1981
R14 1949 150 5803–5952 1984
R15 1950 100 5953–5999,
6200–6252
R16 1954–1955 BMT,

IND

200 6300–6499 1987
R17 1954–1956 IRT St. Louis Car 400 6500–6899 1988
R21 1956–1957 250 7050–7299 1987
R22 1957–1958 450 7300–7749
R26 1959–1960 American Car & Foundry 110 7750–7859 2002
Semi-married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R27 1960–1961 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 230 8020–8249 1990
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R28 1960–1961 IRT American Car & Foundry 100 7860–7959 2002
Semi-married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R29 1962 IRT St. Louis Car 236 8570–8805 2002
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Rebuilt into R99 cars from 1985 to 1987.
R30 1961–1962 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 320 R30: 8250–8351
8412–8569
R30A: 8352–8411
1993
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R32 1964–1965 IND,

BMT

Budd Company 600 R32A: 3350–3649
R32: 3650–3949[g]
2022
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R33 1962–1963 IRT St. Louis Car 500 8806–9305 2003
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R33S 1963 IRT St. Louis Car 40 9306–9345 2003
single cars, built for IRT Flushing Line
R34 see R11
R36 1963–1964 IRT St. Louis Car 424 9346–9769 2003
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R38 1966–1967 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car 200 3950–4149 2009
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R39 Never built IRT,

BMT

Intended to replace old equipment running on the BMT Myrtle Avenue Line in Brooklyn and the IRT Third Avenue Line in The Bronx
Would have been built to IRT dimensions of the R38 and ordered in the late 1960s or early 1970s
Order scrapped when the Myrtle Avenue Line south of the junction with the BMT Jamaica Line was discontinued in 1969 and the remaining Third Avenue Line in 1973
The Budd Company used a possible outline of this car as U.S. Patent 3,151,538.
R40 1967–
1968
IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car Company 200 4150–4349 2009
Slanted ends, married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Car numbers were originally 4150–4249, 4350–4449
R40A 1968–1969 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
200 4350–4549 2009
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
Car numbers were originally 4250–4349 (straight ends),[55] 4450–4549 (slanted ends)[56]
R42 1969–1970 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
400 4550–4949 2020
Married pairs
Even numbered cars have motor-generator and battery, odd numbered cars have air compressor.
R44 (NYCT cars) 1971–1973 IND,

BMT

St. Louis Car
Company
288 100–387 2010 (NYCT cars)
4-car sets (A-B-B-A) formation. A cars have cabs on one end, while B cars have no cabs. Car numbers were originally 100–387. 278 cars were renumbered to 5202–5479 between 1991 & 1993.
R55 Never built IND,

BMT

The R55 was a proposed car[57] for the B Division (IND/BMT).
It was considered in the early 1980s, but never left the drawing board.
This order later evolved into the future R68.
R99 see R29
R110A 1992 IRT Kawasaki 10 8001–8010 1999
(Built as Contract R130)
New Technology demonstrator
Cars ending in 1, 5, 6, and 0 have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars.
Cars ending in 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9 have no cabs, and are known as "B" cars.
All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-B-B-A configuration as 5-car sets.
All cars were converted to pump train cars between 2013 and 2022.
R110B 1992 IND,

BMT

Bombardier 9 3001–3009 2000
(Built as Contract R131)
New Technology demonstrator, 67-foot (20 m) car
Cars 3002, 3005, and 3008 have no cabs and were known as "B" cars.
Other six cars have single full-width cabs, and are known as "A" cars.
All cars are sequentially numbered in A-B-A configuration as 3-car sets.
Cars 3002–3003, 3007, and 3009 are stored at 207th Street Yard as of 2022; remaining cars are used for training at various facilities.

Discover more about Retired fleet related topics

Composite (New York City Subway car)

Composite (New York City Subway car)

The Composite was a New York City Subway car class built from 1903 to 1904 by the Jewett, St. Louis, Wason, and John Stephenson companies for the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and its successor, the New York City Board of Transportation.

Jewett Car Company

Jewett Car Company

The Jewett Car Company was an early 20th-century American industrial company that manufactured streetcars and interurban cars.

St. Louis Car Company

St. Louis Car Company

The St. Louis Car Company was a major United States manufacturer of railroad passenger cars, streetcars, interurbans, trolleybuses and locomotives that existed from 1887 to 1974, based in St. Louis, Missouri.

John Stephenson Company

John Stephenson Company

The John Stephenson Car Company was an American manufacturer of carriages, horsecars, cable cars, and streetcars, based in New York City. It was founded by John Stephenson in 1831. John Stephenson invented the first streetcar to run on rails, building this in 1832, for the New York and Harlem Railroad. A reorganization in 1867 included shortening of the company's name to the John Stephenson Company. In the latter part of the 19th century, the company was a major builder of streetcars, constructing some 25,000 cars in the period 1876–1891 alone, including ones for export.

Gibbs Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

Gibbs Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

The Gibbs Hi-V was a New York City Subway car class built from 1904 to 1905 by American Car and Foundry for the IRT and its successors, the New York City Board of Transportation and the New York City Transit Authority. It was the first all-steel subway car ordered for New York City.

Deck Roof Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

Deck Roof Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

The Deck Roof Hi-V was a New York City Subway car class built from 1907 to 1908 by the American Car and Foundry for the IRT and its successors, the New York City Board of Transportation and the New York City Transit Authority.

Hedley Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

Hedley Hi-V (New York City Subway car)

The Hedley Hi-V was a New York City Subway car class built from 1910 to 1911, which were motor cars, and then in 1915 an order for trailers that were numbered 4223–4514. All were built by the American Car and Foundry, Standard Steel Car Company, Pressed Steel Car Company, and Pullman Company. These were the first cars built with center doors. They were also the last high voltage cars built for the system because high voltage cars were a hazard to both the train operators and track crews. Thus, all subway cars delivered afterward were low voltage cars.

Pressed Steel Car Company

Pressed Steel Car Company

The Pressed Steel Car Company was a builder of railroad cars and equipment based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that was founded in 1899, and had facilities in Pittsburgh and Chicago. It operated until 1956.

Pullman Company

Pullman Company

The Pullman Company, founded by George Pullman, was a manufacturer of railroad cars in the mid-to-late 19th century through the first half of the 20th century, during the boom of railroads in the United States. Through rapid late-19th century development of mass production and takeover of rivals, the company developed a virtual monopoly on production and ownership of sleeper cars. During a severe economic downturn, the 1894 Pullman Strike by company workers proved a transforming moment in American labor history. At the company's peak in the early 20th century, its cars accommodated 26 million people a year, and it in effect operated "the largest hotel in the world". Its production workers initially lived in a planned worker community named Pullman, Chicago.

Flivver Lo-V (New York City Subway car)

Flivver Lo-V (New York City Subway car)

The Flivver Lo-V was a New York City Subway car type built in 1915 by the Pullman Company for the IRT and its successors, which included the New York City Board of Transportation and the New York City Transit Authority. The name Flivver originates from a slang term of the same name used during the early part of the 20th century to refer to any small car that gave a rough ride.

Grade (slope)

Grade (slope)

The grade of a physical feature, landform or constructed line refers to the tangent of the angle of that surface to the horizontal. It is a special case of the slope, where zero indicates horizontality. A larger number indicates higher or steeper degree of "tilt". Often slope is calculated as a ratio of "rise" to "run", or as a fraction in which run is the horizontal distance and rise is the vertical distance.

Standard Lo-V (New York City Subway car)

Standard Lo-V (New York City Subway car)

The Standard Lo-V was a New York City Subway car type built from 1916 to 1925 by the Pressed Steel Car Company, American Car and Foundry, and Pullman Company for the IRT. A total of 1,020 cars were built, which consisted of 725 motors and 295 trailers. It was the third and most common "Lo-V" type car ordered for the IRT.

Miscellaneous

The "Train of Many Colors" makes another appearance on the 7 train in 2008, commemorating the last game at Shea Stadium
The "Train of Many Colors" makes another appearance on the 7 train in 2008, commemorating the last game at Shea Stadium
  • Air conditioning is standard on all cars R42 and later. R38s 4140–4149 and R40s 4350–4549 were also delivered with A/C, and all cars not equipped with A/C from classes R26–R40 (with the exception of the R27, R30, and R33S) were later retrofitted with A/C. All active cars are equipped with air conditioning, and cars with malfunctioning air conditioning are not supposed to be put into service.[58]
  • During World War II, a group of late-19th-century New York elevated cars was sent west to the San Francisco Bay Area by the United States Maritime Commission for use by the Shipyard Railway, a temporary wartime electric line transporting workers to the Kaiser Shipyards. After the war, most were sold to be used as units in a local motel, but their whereabouts afterward is unknown. Two of them, however, were acquired and have been restored by the Western Railway Museum in Rio Vista, California.[59]
  • There are many examples of rolling stock built under contract that are not intended for revenue services, such as the R95 money train, R65 pump train, R127/R134 garbage train, and R156 work locomotive.[60]
  • After the September 11th attacks, an American flag decal was added to every active subway car in the system. This practice continued with new car orders through the early 2020s.[61][62]
  • The table below shows what year the TA had expected to retire several car models in 1981.[63]

Discover more about Miscellaneous related topics

7 (New York City Subway service)

7 (New York City Subway service)

The 7 Flushing Local and <7> Flushing Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway, providing local and express services along the full length of the IRT Flushing Line. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored purple, since they serve the Flushing Line.

Shea Stadium

Shea Stadium

Shea Stadium, formally known as William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, was a multi-purpose stadium in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park, Queens, New York City. Opened in 1964, it was home to the New York Mets of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1964 to 2008, as well as the New York Jets of the National Football League (NFL) from 1964 to 1983.

Air conditioning

Air conditioning

Air conditioning, often abbreviated as A/C (US), AC (US), or air con (UK), is the process of removing heat from an enclosed space to achieve a more comfortable interior environment and in some cases also strictly controlling the humidity of internal air. Air conditioning can be achieved using a mechanical 'air conditioner' or alternatively a variety of other methods, including passive cooling or ventilative cooling. Air conditioning is a member of a family of systems and techniques that provide heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC). Heat pumps are similar in many ways to air conditioners, but use a reversing valve to allow them to heat and also cool an enclosed space.

San Francisco Bay Area

San Francisco Bay Area

The San Francisco Bay Area, often referred to as simply the Bay Area, is a populous metropolitan region surrounding the San Francisco, San Pablo, and Suisun Bay estuaries in Northern California. The Bay Area is defined by the Association of Bay Area Governments to include the nine counties that border the aforementioned estuaries: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, Sonoma, and San Francisco. Other definitions may be either smaller or larger, and may include neighboring counties that do not border the bay such as Santa Cruz and San Benito ; or San Joaquin, Merced, and Stanislaus. The core cities of the Bay Area are Oakland, San Francisco, and San Jose.

Shipyard Railway

Shipyard Railway

The Shipyard Railway was an electric commuter rail/interurban line that served workers at the Richmond Shipyards in Richmond, California, United States, during World War II. It was funded by the United States Maritime Commission and was built and operated by the Key System, which already operated similar lines in the East Bay. The line ran from a pair of stations on the Emeryville/Oakland border – where transfer could be made to other Key System lines – northwest through Emeryville, Berkeley, Albany, and Richmond to the shipyards. It operated partially on city streets and partially on a dedicated right-of-way paralleling the Southern Pacific Railroad mainline.

Kaiser Shipyards

Kaiser Shipyards

The Kaiser Shipyards were seven major shipbuilding yards located on the United States west coast during World War II. Kaiser ranked 20th among U.S. corporations in the value of wartime production contracts. The shipyards were owned by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, a creation of American industrialist Henry J. Kaiser (1882–1967), who established the shipbuilding company around 1939 in order to help meet the construction goals set by the United States Maritime Commission for merchant shipping.

Rio Vista, California

Rio Vista, California

Rio Vista is a city located in the eastern end of Solano County, California, in the Sacramento River Delta region of Northern California. The population was 7,360 at the 2010 census.

Money train

Money train

A money train is one or more railcars used to collect cash fare revenue from stations on a subway system and return it to a central location for processing. This train was typically used to carry money bags guarded by transit police to deter robberies.

R65 (New York City Subway car)

R65 (New York City Subway car)

The R65s are New York City Subway work service cars built around 1989 by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Kobe, Japan. They are similar-looking to the R62 and R62A passenger cars and built to IRT specifications, but can be found on either division. They are numbered PC01–PC03 and used to pump out water from flooded tunnels and open cut areas. Unlike their revenue service counterparts, the R65s cannot move under their own power; they are always propelled by diesel locomotives.

R127/R134 (New York City Subway car)

R127/R134 (New York City Subway car)

The R127 and R134 are New York City Subway cars purpose-built by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Kobe, Japan for work train service. The ten R127s were built in 1990–1991 while the eight R134s were built in 1994–1996.

MPI MP8AC-3

MPI MP8AC-3

The MPI MP8AC-3 is a light-weight diesel locomotive built by the MotivePower division of Wabtec. It was designed from scratch as a work train engine for the New York City Subway system, where it is designated the R156.

September 11 attacks

September 11 attacks

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamist extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States on September 11, 2001. That morning, nineteen terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners scheduled to travel from the East Coast to California. The hijackers crashed the first two planes into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and the third into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia near Washington, D.C. The fourth plane was similarly intended to hit a federal government building in D.C., but crashed in a field following a passenger revolt. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and instigated the global war on terror.

Source: "New York City Subway rolling stock", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 18th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_Subway_rolling_stock.

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Notes
  1. ^ See:
    • Korman, Joe (December 4, 2017). "IRT Car Assignments". JoeKorNer.
    • Korman, Joe (January 12, 2018). "BMT-IND Car Assignments". JoeKorNer.
  2. ^ Redbirds are R26, R28, R29, R33, and R36. All of these cars were replaced by more modern subway trains (R142/R142As) between 2001 and 2003, though many R33 cars are still in use as work trains. Sometimes the term "Redbird" would also be used on the R27 and R30 cars as they were repainted Gunn red during the late 1980s and early 1990s before their retirement in 1993. These were known as the BMT Redbirds. Sixteen R17s were also given this paint scheme in 1985/86, but were retired by 1988, well before the name "Redbird" caught on.
  3. ^ All A Division cars are 51 feet (15.5 m) long; B Division cars are 60 feet (18.3 m) or 75 feet (22.9 m).
  4. ^ Some R179 cars have underwent or are currently undergoing CBTC installation in preparation for CBTC on the IND Eighth Avenue Line.
  5. ^ Car number series selected to bracket pre-unification BMT number series (1853–2999). Renumbered to 2950–2999 in 1970
  6. ^ Car number series to continue from pre-unification IRT number series (5702).
  7. ^ Car 3659 was renumbered to 3348 after being converted to an even-numbered car.
  8. ^ The New York City Subway R44s were retired in 2010. The Staten Island Railway R44s are still in service.
References
  1. ^ more photos at http://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/R-137_Vacuum_Train
  2. ^ "New York City Subway Car Fleet Jan 2012 through January 2016". TheJoeKorner. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  3. ^ "Showing Image 59931". www.nycsubway.org.
  4. ^ "Showing Image 59998". www.nycsubway.org.
  5. ^ Kennedy, Randy (August 22, 2001). "End of Line for Subway Cars: The Ocean Floor". New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  6. ^ Urbina, Ian (April 8, 2008). "Growing Pains for a Deep-Sea Home Built of Subway Cars". New York Times. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  7. ^ Parke, Phoebe (February 26, 2015). "Dumping subway trains into the ocean ... in a good way". CNN. New York: Warner Bros. Discovery. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  8. ^ "For Subway Cars, the Final Trip". New York Times. May 15, 2011. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  9. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  10. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  11. ^ Thomas Tracy; Rocco Pascandola; Wes Parnell; Clayton Guse. "Manhattan subway train derails after laughing saboteur puts metal clamps on tracks: police sources". New York Daily News. New York: Tribune Publishing. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  12. ^ "Subway Derailment In Harlem Caused By 'Human Error,' MTA Says". CBS News. New York: CBS News and Stations. June 27, 2017. Retrieved June 18, 2019.
  13. ^ "New York City Subway Car Update" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association, Incorporated. 63 (12): 20. November 2020.
  14. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required June 27, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (7): 2. July 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  15. ^ 'Subdivision 'A' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  16. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required June 27, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (7): 2. July 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  17. ^ 'Subdivision 'A' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  18. ^ Barron, James (November 21, 1997). "87 Are Hurt as Subway Train Runs Into Another in Queens". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 26, 2017.
  19. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  20. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  21. ^ https://erausa.org/pdf/bulletin/2020s/2020/2020-12-bulletin.pdf
  22. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  23. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  24. ^ a b "Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  25. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required June 27, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (7): 2. July 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  26. ^ 'Subdivision 'A' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  27. ^ Dan Rivoli [@danrivoli] (March 27, 2020). "The aftermath of the fatal subway fire" (Tweet). Retrieved March 27, 2020 – via Twitter.
  28. ^ Jose Martinez [@JMartinezNYC] (March 27, 2020). "Photos obtained by @THECITYNY of this morning's fatal subway fire at the Central Park North-110th Street station the level of destruction" (Tweet). Retrieved March 28, 2020 – via Twitter.
  29. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required June 27, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (7): 2. July 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  30. ^ 'Subdivision 'A' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  31. ^ a b http://i42.tinypic.com/r2oqb8.jpg
  32. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  33. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  34. ^ "Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting July 2017" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 24, 2017. p. 18. Retrieved October 28, 2017.
  35. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  36. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  37. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  38. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  39. ^ "Subdivision 'A' Car Assignments: Cars Required June 27, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (7): 2. July 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  40. ^ 'Subdivision 'A' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  41. ^ "Page 32 (Footnotes)" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 5, 2009. Retrieved February 16, 2009.
  42. ^ "New York City Transit and Bus Committee Meeting October 2018" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. October 19, 2018. pp. 188–189. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 20, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  43. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  44. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  45. ^ a b "MTA Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting: January 2016" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2016. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 29, 2016. Retrieved January 23, 2016.
  46. ^ "New Vacuum Trains Aim to Suck Trash Right in its Tracks". www.ny1.com.
  47. ^ Levine, Richard (February 13, 1987). "A SUBWAY WALKER SEARCHES THE LABYRINTH FOR PROBLEMS". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  48. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: Track Geometry and Inspection Cars". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  49. ^ a b Kennedy, Randy (February 19, 2004). Subwayland: Adventures in the World Beneath New York. Macmillan. ISBN 9780312324346.
  50. ^ NYCTA Contract R-34152
  51. ^ Track Safety Standards Compliance Manual. Federal Railroad Administration, 2009. Print, Web. Track Safety Standards Compliance Manual Archived July 2, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  52. ^ Uzarski, Dr. Don. CEE 409 - Railroad Track Engineering, Class Notes. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. Print.
  53. ^ "MTA | news | New York City Transit's Wonder Train Car!". www.mta.info. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  54. ^ Adam Clark Estes (May 6, 2014). "This Superheroic Train Keeps New York City's Subway Safe". Gizmodo. Gawker Media.
  55. ^ "Showing Image 5292". nycsubway.org.
  56. ^ "Showing Image 12845". nycsubway.org.
  57. ^ "Roster Summary By Type". Retrieved August 25, 2009.
  58. ^ Jaffe, Eric (August 15, 2012). "A Brief History of Air-Conditioning on the New York Subway". The Atlantic Cities. Retrieved August 15, 2012.
  59. ^ "Richmond Shipyard Railway 1943–1945" Retrieved on April 16, 2008 Archived July 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  60. ^ "www.nycsubway.org".
  61. ^ "Six-car 'pump train' helps get subways back on track in wake of Sandy superstorm". New York Daily News. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  62. ^ Frishberg, Hannah. "Brooklyn Movie Mistakes -- Saturday Night Fever, Do the Right Thing". Brownstoner. Retrieved November 14, 2022.
  63. ^ "www.nycsubway.org".
Further reading
External links

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