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N (New York City Subway service)

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"N" train symbol
Broadway Express
R46 N train leaving 30th Avenue.jpg
An Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard-bound N train of R46s leaving 30th Avenue
Map of the "N" train
Note: Dashed red line shows late night service via the Montague Street Tunnel. Dashed pink line shows limited rush hour service to/from 96th Street.
Northern end
Southern endConey Island–Stillwell Avenue
Stations28 (weekdays)
32 (weekends)
45 (late night service)
22 (limited service)
Rolling stock176 R46s (22 trains)
72 R68s (9 trains)
16 R68As (2 trains)
(Fleet shared with the "W" train)[1][2]
(Rolling stock assignments subject to change)
DepotConey Island Yard
Started serviceJune 22, 1915; 107 years ago (1915-06-22)
Route map

Down arrow  N  W 
Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard
Astoria Boulevard
30th Avenue
Broadway
36th Avenue
39th Avenue
Queensboro Plaza
Lexington Avenue–59th Street
Fifth Avenue–59th Street
Down arrow  Q 
( N   R  limited rush)
96th Street
86th Street
72nd Street
Lexington Avenue–63rd Street
57th Street–Seventh Avenue
49th Street
(Disabled access northbound)
Times Square–42nd Street
"N" train
switches to express
tracks during weekdays
34th Street–Herald Square Port Authority Trans-Hudson
28th Street
23rd Street
14th Street–Union Square
Eighth Street–New York University
Prince Street
"N" train
daytime via Manhattan Bridge
late nights via Lower Manhattan
Canal Street
City Hall
Cortlandt Street
Rector Street
Whitehall Street–South Ferry Staten Island Ferry
Up arrow  W  weekdays
(Down arrow  R  late nights)
no regular service via Nassau Street
Montague Tunnel
Court Street
Jay Street–MetroTech
DeKalb Avenue
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center MTA NYC logo.svg
Union Street
Ninth Street
Prospect Avenue
25th Street
36th Street
45th Street
53rd Street
59th Street
Eighth Avenue
(Disabled access northbound)
Fort Hamilton Parkway
New Utrecht Avenue
18th Avenue
20th Avenue
Bay Parkway
Kings Highway
Avenue U
86th Street
Up arrow  W 
(limited rush hours)
Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue
Up arrow
 N 
 D   F      Q 
Legend

Lines used by the "N" train and "W" train
Other services sharing tracks with the "N" train and "W" train
Unused lines, connections, or service patterns
 N 
Termini of services

Cross-platform interchange

Platforms on different levels

The N Broadway Express[3] is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet," is colored yellow, since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.[4]

The N operates at all times between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens, and Stillwell Avenue in Coney Island, Brooklyn, via the BMT Astoria Line in Queens, Broadway Line in Manhattan, the south side of the Manhattan Bridge, and the BMT Fourth Avenue and Sea Beach Lines in Brooklyn. North of 57th Street, limited rush hour service operates via the Second Avenue Subway, originating and terminating at 96th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan instead of Ditmars Boulevard.[5][a]

During the daytime on weekdays, the N runs express between 34th Street–Herald Square in Manhattan and 59th Street in Brooklyn and local elsewhere. Local service in Manhattan is provided by the R and W, which is internally staffed and scheduled as part of the N.[7] Select rush-hour N trains in the reverse-peak direction provide regular express service in Manhattan but stop at DeKalb Avenue and operate local on the Fourth Avenue Line in Brooklyn.[8][9][b] Weekend daytime service is the same as weekday service, except that the N makes all stops in Manhattan between Herald Square and Canal Street. During late nights, the N makes all stops along its entire route and uses the Montague Street Tunnel to travel between Manhattan and Brooklyn.[c]

The N was originally the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation's 4 service, running along the BMT Sea Beach Line to the Manhattan Bridge. The 4 used the BMT Nassau Street Line in Lower Manhattan from 1915 to 1917, after which it ran express on the BMT Broadway Line. The 4 became the N in 1961. The N ran local in Queens along the IND Queens Boulevard Line to Forest Hills–71st Avenue from 1976 until 1987, when it switched terminals with the R. From 1986 to 2004, reconstruction on the Manhattan Bridge forced the N to run local on the Broadway Line via the Montague Street Tunnel.

Discover more about N (New York City Subway service) related topics

B Division (New York City Subway)

B Division (New York City Subway)

The New York City Subway's B Division consists of the lines that operate with lettered services, as well as the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park Shuttles. These lines and services were operated by the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and city-owned Independent Subway System (IND) before the 1940 city takeover of the BMT. B Division rolling stock is wider, longer, and heavier than those of the A Division, measuring 10 or 9.75 ft by 60 or 75 ft.

BMT Broadway Line

BMT Broadway Line

The BMT Broadway Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan. As of November 2016, it is served by four services, all colored yellow: the N and ​Q trains on the express tracks and the R and ​W trains on the local tracks during weekdays. The line is often referred to as the "N and R", since those were the only services on the line from 1988 to 2001, when the Manhattan Bridge's southern tracks were closed for rebuilding. The Broadway Line was built to give the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company access to Midtown Manhattan.

Astoria, Queens

Astoria, Queens

Astoria is a neighborhood in the western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. Astoria is bounded by the East River and is adjacent to three other Queens neighborhoods: Long Island City to the southwest, Sunnyside to the southeast, and Woodside to the east. As of 2019, Astoria has an estimated population of 95,446.

Coney Island

Coney Island

Coney Island is a peninsular neighborhood and entertainment area in the southwestern section of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood is bounded by Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach to its east, Lower New York Bay to the south and west, and Gravesend to the north and includes the subsection of Sea Gate on its west. More broadly, the Coney Island peninsula consists of Coney Island proper, Brighton Beach, and Manhattan Beach. This was formerly the westernmost of the Outer Barrier islands on the southern shore of Long Island, but in the early 20th century it became a peninsula, connected to the rest of Long Island by land fill.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City's most populous borough, with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.

BMT Astoria Line

BMT Astoria Line

The BMT Astoria Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway, serving the Queens neighborhood of Astoria. It runs south from Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria to 39th Avenue in Long Island City above 31st Street. It then turns west and serves Queensboro Plaza over Queens Plaza.

BMT Fourth Avenue Line

BMT Fourth Avenue Line

The BMT Fourth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line of the New York City Subway, mainly running under Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn. The line is served by the D, N, and R at all times; the R typically runs local, while the D and N run express during the day and local at night. During rush hours, select W and northbound Q trains also serve the line. Limited rush-hour N trains operate local on the line in the reverse-peak direction. The line was originally built by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company and is now internally operated as part of the New York City Subway's B Division.

BMT Sea Beach Line

BMT Sea Beach Line

The BMT Sea Beach Line is a rapid transit line of the BMT division of the New York City Subway, connecting the BMT Fourth Avenue Line at 59th Street via a four-track wide open cut to Coney Island in Brooklyn. It has at times hosted the fastest express service between Manhattan and Coney Island, since there are no express stations along the entire stretch, but now carries only local trains on the N service, which serves the entire line at all times. During rush hours, select Q trains serve the full line in the northbound direction only, while several W trains serve the line north of 86th Street.

59th Street station (BMT Fourth Avenue Line)

59th Street station (BMT Fourth Avenue Line)

The 59th Street station is an express station on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at 59th Street and Fourth Avenue in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, it is served by the N and R trains at all times. During rush hours, several W and northbound Q trains also serve the station.

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) was an urban transit holding company, based in Brooklyn, New York City, United States, and incorporated in 1923. The system was sold to the city in 1940. Today, together with the IND subway system, it forms the B Division of the modern New York City Subway.

BMT Nassau Street Line

BMT Nassau Street Line

The BMT Nassau Street Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway system in Manhattan. It is a continuation of the BMT Jamaica Line in Brooklyn after crossing the Williamsburg Bridge into Manhattan; it continues to a junction with the BMT Broadway Line just before the Montague Street Tunnel. Afterwards, the line reenters Brooklyn. Although the tracks continue past Broad Street, there has been no regular service past that station since June 25, 2010. While the line is officially recognized as the Nassau Street Line, it only serves one station on Nassau Street: Fulton Street.

IND Queens Boulevard Line

IND Queens Boulevard Line

The IND Queens Boulevard Line, sometimes abbreviated as QBL, is a line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan and Queens, New York City, United States. The line, which is underground throughout its entire route, contains 23 stations. The core section between 50th Street in Hell's Kitchen, Manhattan, and 169th Street in Jamaica, Queens, was built by the Independent Subway System (IND) in stages between 1933 and 1940, with the Jamaica–179th Street terminus opening in 1950. As of 2015, it is among the system's busiest lines, with a weekday ridership of over 460,000 people.

Service history

R1 BMT 4.gif
Original designation for the Sea Beach Line

Before 1970

N Train (1967-1979).svg

1967–1979 bullet
NX Train (1967-1968).svg
NX bullet, used in 1967–1968
NYCS-bull-trans-Nd.svg
Diamond N bullet, used in 1979–1986 to note local service to Whitehall Street

The route that is now the N was originally BMT service 4, known as the Sea Beach Line or Sea Beach Express.[12]

On June 22, 1915, the current BMT Sea Beach Line opened, replacing a street level "el" that branched off of the Fifth Avenue El with the former BMT West End Line. Originally, it used the south tracks of the Manhattan Bridge, which at that time connected to the BMT Nassau Street Line.[13][14] Trains began running express between Pacific Street and 59th Street with the extension of the Fourth Avenue Line to 86th Street.[15]

On September 4, 1917, the first part of the BMT Broadway Line and the north side tracks of the Manhattan Bridge opened. Trains ran from 14th Street–Union Square to Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue, now using the bridge's northern tracks.[13][16] On January 15, 1918, service was extended to Times Square–42nd Street.[15]

Weekday and Saturday summer trains leaving Coney Island between 6:37 a.m. and 8:37 p.m. began running non-stop between Kings Highway and 59th Street on August 1, 1920. Trains that started at Kings Highway made local stops. On November 14, 1920, weekday rush hour trains, and Saturday AM rush hour trains began skipping Myrtle Avenue and DeKalb Avenue.[15]

Between 1924 and 1926, trains skipped Myrtle Avenue and DeKalb Avenue during weekday rush hours, and on Saturday southbound between 12:01 p.m. and 6:57 p.m. Between 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. weekdays, and 12:01 p.m. to 6:57 p.m. Southbound on Saturdays, the rear two cars at Canal Street were restricted to boarding only (no exiting the train). In June 1931, trains skipped Myrtle Avenue and DeKalb Avenue between 7 a.m. and 12:30 a.m. weekdays, and between 10:30 a.m. Sunday to 12:30 a.m. Monday. Trains skipped 36th Street during the morning rush hour in the northbound direction. Between 1933 and 1937, the hours in which trains skipped Myrtle Avenue and DeKalb Avenue were 7 a.m. and 12:00 a.m. weekdays.[15]

On June 29, 1950, trains began running express in Brooklyn during late nights. As of June 28, 1951, every other morning rush hour train no longer terminated at Kings Highway.[15]

On May 2, 1957, service was extended north via the express tracks from Times Square to 57th Street–Seventh Avenue, and trains stopped bypassing 36th Street during the AM rush hour. In fall 1959, trains began stopping at DeKalb Avenue during midday hours. Previously, they bypassed DeKalb Avenue at all times except late nights. Beginning on January 1, 1961, trains bypassed DeKalb Avenue during rush hours only. In addition, on weekday and Saturday evenings, late nights, and all day Sundays, they ran local on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line.[15]

The N designation began to appear when R27 subway cars were moved to the service in April 1961.[12][13]

Poster advertising a new NX service
Poster advertising a new NX service
Poster advertising the NX service's discontinuation
Poster advertising the NX service's discontinuation

The NX designation was used for a rush hour peak-direction "super-express" service along the express tracks of the Sea Beach Line, beginning in the AM rush hour at Brighton Beach on the BMT Brighton Line, running through Coney Island, and then following the N route to 57th Street–Seventh Avenue. (Reverse in the PM rush hour.) This short-lived service began on November 27, 1967 (with the opening of the Chrystie Street Connection)[17] and ended April 12, 1968 due to low ridership. Starting on Monday, April 15, 1968, the five NX trips instead ran as N trips.[12][13][18][15]

On December 31, 1972, all late night trains began running local in Brooklyn. Late weekday evening trains, weekend southbound trains, and northbound early weekday trains began stopping at 53rd Street and 45th Street.[15]

1970–1980

On August 30, 1976, weekday N service was extended north over the BMT 60th Street Tunnel Connection to Forest Hills–71st Avenue to replace the discontinued EE. While many N trains ran the full route from Coney Island to 71st Avenue, via the Manhattan Bridge and Broadway Express, some trains ran local during the rush hours only (southbound in the AM rush hour, and northbound in the PM rush hour) between Whitehall Street–South Ferry in Lower Manhattan and Forest Hills–71st Avenue, which had been the former EE route;[19] these trains were noted with diamond N bullets from 1979. Trains stopped terminating at Kings Highway in the AM rush hour.[15]

On January 24, 1977, as part of a series of NYCTA service cuts to save $13 million, many subway lines began running shorter trains during middays. As part of the change, N trains began running with four cars between 9:30 a.m. and 2:15 p.m.[20] On August 27, 1977, N service was cut back during late nights, only operating between 36th Street and Coney Island.[21] Northbound trains ran express between 59th Street and 36th Street while southbound trains ran local.[15]

1980–1990

On November 26, 1984, evening rush hour trains that terminated at Kings Highway were extended to Coney Island.[22]

Reconstruction of the Manhattan Bridge between 1986 and 2004 disrupted N service, usually rerouting it via the Montague Street Tunnel. On April 26, 1986, the north side tracks (leading to the IND Sixth Avenue Line) were closed and services that normally ran on them were moved to the south side, running via the BMT Broadway Line. Because of the large amount of train traffic now running on those tracks, rush hour and midday N service was rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel, making local stops in Manhattan and Brooklyn, though evening, night and weekend trains continued to use the bridge and express tracks in Brooklyn.[12][13] Late evening trains that ran via the bridge also ran local in Brooklyn heading southbound. Six trains only ran between Continental Avenue and Whitehall Street in the AM rush hour, while six trains only ran between Canal Street and Continental Avenue in the PM rush hour.[22] The M, which was rerouted from the BMT Brighton Line to the BMT West End Line, replaced the N as the weekday express on the Fourth Avenue Line.[13][23] Starting on April 28, 1986, one Q train ran to Continental Avenue at 7:05 a.m., and returned in service as an N train, and an N train arriving at Continental Avenue at 3:25 p.m. began returning in service as a B train. These special B and Q trips no longer ran after May 23, 1987.[22]

As part of the New York City Transit Authority's proposed service plan to serve the new Archer Avenue Line upper level, the N would have been extended to Jamaica Center during weekdays. When N trains terminated at 71st Avenue or 57th Street–Seventh Avenue during weekends and evenings, G trains would have been extended to Jamaica Center, and during late nights a G train shuttle would have run between Jamaica Center and Van Wyck Boulevard. This service plan would have allowed E and F trains to remain on the Queens Boulevard mainline toward 179th Street.[24][25][26] The final service plan, which took effect on December 11, 1988, had the extension served by E trains, with R trains extended to 179th Street.[27]

On May 24, 1987, the N swapped northern terminals with the R. The N was switched to Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard, while the R went to Forest Hills–71st Avenue.[28]: 16  This was done to give the R direct access to Jamaica Yard; previously, the N had direct access to both Jamaica Yard and Coney Island Yard, and the R, running from Bay Ridge to Astoria, lacked direct access to any yard.[29] This change was intended to improve the appearance and reliability of service on the R, since all trains on the Astoria and Broadway Lines were part of the graffiti-free program.[28]: 16  Trains ran via the Manhattan Bridge during late nights and weekends. Some trains began went into service at 86th Street during the AM rush hour put-ins.[22] Between November 23, 1987 and May 13, 1988, one D train arrived at Ditmars Boulevard at 7:12 a.m. and returned in service as an N train.[22]

When the north side of the Manhattan Bridge reopened and the south side was closed on December 11, 1988, the N began running local in Manhattan and via the Montague Tunnel at all times. In order to replace B service to Ditmars Boulevard, additional N service was provided during rush hours. Trains continued to run express in Brooklyn between Pacific Street and 59th Street/Fourth Avenue evenings and weekends.[30][31][22]

On June 11, 1990, trains that were put into service at Queensboro Plaza in the PM rush hour were discontinued. Between June 10, 1990 and July 25, 1992, due to construction work in the 60th Street Tunnel, trains had to use a single track. Trains operated either between Ditmars Boulevard and Canal Street, or between 57th Street and Coney Island.[22]

The Transit Authority and politicians pressured the New York State Department of Transportation to resume N train service on the bridge's south side on September 30, 1990, despite warnings from engineers that the structure was unsafe and major repairs still had to be made. Trains ran express on Broadway in Manhattan (stopping at 49th Street) and Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn at all times except late nights (10 p.m. to 5 a.m.). Southbound Brooklyn expresses ran until late evenings on Saturday, not running on Sunday morning any more. Between early morning and early evenings, trains skipped DeKalb Avenue. Several trains after the AM rush hour went out of service at Kings Highway.[22] On December 27, state inspectors forced N service to be rerouted via the Montague Street Tunnel again after discovery of corroded support beams and missing steel plates, running local on its entire route at all times.[32][13]

1990–2000

An N train of R68s at Broadway
An N train of R68s at Broadway
An N train of R68As at 36th Avenue
An N train of R68As at 36th Avenue

In November 1993, before the Manhattan Bridge's renovation was completed, the MTA proposed restoring express N service along the Fourth Avenue Line for a six-month trial period, with the M making local stops between Pacific Street and 36th Street. Some residents of Sunset Park, Brooklyn, opposed the proposal, which they claimed would negatively impact about 7,000 daily riders at the 45th Street and 53rd Street stations.[33] On May 31, 1994, the N began running express in Brooklyn between Pacific Street and 59th Street–Fourth Avenue during weekday midday and rush hours, with the M running local during those times.[34][13][35] From 1994 to May 22, 1995, the southern terminal of the N was 86th Street due to rehabilitation work at Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue.[36][37] On November 4, 2001, it was cut back again as the terminal's reconstruction project continued.[13]

From April 30, 1995 to November 12, 1995, the north side of the Manhattan Bridge was closed during weekday midday and weekends for structural repairs. Midday N service ran local in Brooklyn, replacing the M, which was cut back from 9th Avenue to Chambers Street. The N continued to run express during rush hours.[38][39][40]

2001–2010

After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Broadway Line service through Lower Manhattan was suspended; N service was also suspended and replaced by the W in Manhattan and Queens and the M in Brooklyn. On October 28, N service was restored, but Cortlandt Street remained closed until September 15, 2002.[41]

On September 8, 2002, because of the ongoing reconstruction of Coney Island terminal, weekend and late night N service was reduced to a shuttle between 86th and Pacific Streets, running express on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. In its place, the W was extended to Manhattan and Astoria, Queens at all times; this was because the W was the only route still serving Stillwell Avenue during this part of the reconstruction.[13][42][43]

On February 22, 2004, the Manhattan Bridge work was finally completed. The N returned to its full route in Manhattan and Queens at all times, and returned to using the Manhattan Bridge at all times except nights (via Fourth Avenue express, bypassing DeKalb Avenue). On weekdays, N trains ran express between 34th Street in Manhattan and 59th Street/Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn via the Manhattan Bridge, and local elsewhere; several trains ran express on the entire Broadway Line and short-turned at 57th Street–Seventh Avenue or Times Square during the morning rush hour. On weekends, it made local stops in Manhattan, but ran express in Brooklyn, using the Bridge. During late nights, it ran local along its entire route via the Montague Street Tunnel, replacing the R train.[12][13][44][45]

On May 29, 2005, the new Stillwell Avenue terminal was completed, and N service between 86th Street and Coney Island was restored.[13][46]

On June 28, 2010, the N began running local in Manhattan north of Canal Street at all times, replacing the W on weekdays which was discontinued due to budget problems, effectively adopting the weekend service pattern.[47][48] However, the handful of short-turn N trains continued to run express in Manhattan.[49][50][51][52]

2011–present

From August 2, 2013 to September 14, 2014, the Montague Street Tunnel was closed for Hurricane Sandy-related repairs. During this time, overnight N service was rerouted via the Manhattan Bridge, skipping six stations it normally served.[12][53]

On November 7, 2016, the MTA restored the BMT Broadway Line services to their 2004–2010 service pattern in preparation for the rerouting of the Q train to the Second Avenue Subway. As a result, the N train once again became a weekday express between 34th Street–Herald Square and Canal Street, with local service replaced by the restored W train.[54][55][56] The MTA approved the service change on May 23, 2016.[57][58] All short-turn N trains that originally terminated at 57th Street–Seventh Avenue were extended to 96th Street–Second Avenue on January 3, 2017 following the opening of the Second Avenue Subway.[7][59][60][61]

In January 2017, the MTA revealed plans to rehabilitate the tunnel structure above the BMT Fourth Avenue Line's express tracks between 36th Street and 59th Street. As a result, from July 30, 2018 to July 29, 2019, N trains ran local along that section at all times.[62][63][64][65] Between October 21, 2019 and May 4, 2020, N trains terminated at 86th Street so work could be completed to protect Coney Island Yard from flooding. An out-of-system transfer was available between the N at 86th Street and the F at Avenue X station.[66][67]

The N began running local in Manhattan in March 2020 after the W was temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic;[68] regular N and W service was restored in June.[69][70] In May 2020, the N began operating local along Fourth Avenue on most weekends to provide a transfer to the F at Fourth Avenue–Ninth Street, since the F was suspended south of Church Avenue due to construction on the IND Culver Line.[71] In 2021, the northbound trips to 96th Street-Second Avenue were officially reclassified as Q trains via Sea Beach; the southbound trips from 96th Street-Second Avenue remained unchanged.[72]

Discover more about Service history related topics

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) was an urban transit holding company, based in Brooklyn, New York City, United States, and incorporated in 1923. The system was sold to the city in 1940. Today, together with the IND subway system, it forms the B Division of the modern New York City Subway.

BMT Sea Beach Line

BMT Sea Beach Line

The BMT Sea Beach Line is a rapid transit line of the BMT division of the New York City Subway, connecting the BMT Fourth Avenue Line at 59th Street via a four-track wide open cut to Coney Island in Brooklyn. It has at times hosted the fastest express service between Manhattan and Coney Island, since there are no express stations along the entire stretch, but now carries only local trains on the N service, which serves the entire line at all times. During rush hours, select Q trains serve the full line in the northbound direction only, while several W trains serve the line north of 86th Street.

Fifth Avenue Line (Brooklyn elevated)

Fifth Avenue Line (Brooklyn elevated)

The Fifth Avenue Line, also called the Fifth Avenue Elevated or Fifth Avenue–Bay Ridge Line, was an elevated rail line in Brooklyn, New York City, United States. It ran above Hudson Avenue, Flatbush Avenue, Fifth Avenue, 38th Street, and Third Avenue from Downtown Brooklyn south to Bay Ridge. The portion on Third Avenue was called the Third Avenue Elevated to distinguish service from the elevated BMT West End Line; it was separate from the elevated IRT Third Avenue Line in Manhattan and the Bronx.

BMT West End Line

BMT West End Line

The BMT West End Line is a line of the New York City Subway, serving the Brooklyn communities of Sunset Park, Borough Park, New Utrecht, Bensonhurst, Bath Beach and Coney Island. The D train operates local on the entire line at all times. Although there is a center express track and three express stations along the line, there is no regular express service.

Manhattan Bridge

Manhattan Bridge

The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan at Canal Street with Downtown Brooklyn at the Flatbush Avenue Extension. The main span is 1,480 ft (451 m) long, with the suspension cables being 3,224 ft (983 m) long. The bridge's total length is 6,855 ft (2,089 m). It is one of four toll-free vehicular bridges connecting Manhattan Island to Long Island; the nearby Brooklyn Bridge is just slightly further downtown, while the Queensboro and Williamsburg bridges are to the north.

BMT Nassau Street Line

BMT Nassau Street Line

The BMT Nassau Street Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway system in Manhattan. It is a continuation of the BMT Jamaica Line in Brooklyn after crossing the Williamsburg Bridge into Manhattan; it continues to a junction with the BMT Broadway Line just before the Montague Street Tunnel. Afterwards, the line reenters Brooklyn. Although the tracks continue past Broad Street, there has been no regular service past that station since June 25, 2010. While the line is officially recognized as the Nassau Street Line, it only serves one station on Nassau Street: Fulton Street.

BMT Broadway Line

BMT Broadway Line

The BMT Broadway Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan. As of November 2016, it is served by four services, all colored yellow: the N and ​Q trains on the express tracks and the R and ​W trains on the local tracks during weekdays. The line is often referred to as the "N and R", since those were the only services on the line from 1988 to 2001, when the Manhattan Bridge's southern tracks were closed for rebuilding. The Broadway Line was built to give the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company access to Midtown Manhattan.

R27 (New York City Subway car)

R27 (New York City Subway car)

The R27 was a New York City Subway car model built by the St. Louis Car Company from 1960 to 1961 for the IND/BMT B Division. A total of 230 cars were built, arranged in married pairs. Two versions were manufactured: Westinghouse (WH)-powered cars and General Electric (GE)-powered cars.

Rush hour

Rush hour

A rush hour or peak hour is a part of the day during which traffic congestion on roads and crowding on public transport is at its highest. Normally, this happens twice every weekday: once in the morning and once in the afternoon or evening, the times during which the most people commute. The term is often used for a period of peak congestion that may last for more than one hour.

BMT Brighton Line

BMT Brighton Line

The BMT Brighton Line, also known as the Brighton Beach Line, is a rapid transit line in the B Division of the New York City Subway in Brooklyn, New York City, United States. Local service is provided at all times by the Q train, but is joined by the B express train on weekdays. The Q train runs the length of the entire line from Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue to the Manhattan Bridge south tracks. The B begins at Brighton Beach and runs via the bridge's north tracks.

Chrystie Street Connection

Chrystie Street Connection

The Chrystie Street Connection is a set of New York City Subway tunnels running the length of Chrystie Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. It is one of the few track connections between lines of the former Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and Independent Subway System (IND) divisions, which together constitute the system's B Division. A major branch of the IND Sixth Avenue Line, it connects the Sixth Avenue Line to the BMT Brighton Line and BMT Fourth Avenue Line via the north side of the Manhattan Bridge and to the BMT Jamaica Line over the Williamsburg Bridge. The project, opened in 1967 and 1968, also includes the Sixth Avenue Line's Grand Street and 57th Street stations, the latter of which is not part of the connection itself.

60th Street Tunnel Connection

60th Street Tunnel Connection

The 60th Street Tunnel Connection or 11th Street Cut is a short rapid transit line of the New York City Subway connecting the 60th Street Tunnel under the East River with the IND Queens Boulevard Line west of Queens Plaza in Long Island City, Queens, New York City, United States. The 11th Street Connection name comes from the street above the split from the 60th Street Tunnel. The line does not have any stations, and carries R trains at all times but late nights.

Route

Service pattern

The following table shows the lines used by the N, with shaded boxes indicating the route at the specified times:[73][5][6][8][9][11]

Line From To Tracks Times
rush hours week­days week­ends late nights
IND Second Avenue Line 96th Street 72nd Street all Limited service
BMT 63rd Street Line (full line) Lexington Avenue–63rd Street all
BMT Astoria Line (full line) Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard Queensboro Plaza local Most trains  
60th Street Tunnel all
BMT Broadway Line (full line) Lexington Avenue/59th Street Times Square–42nd Street local
57th Street–Seventh Avenue express Limited service      
34th Street–Herald Square Canal Street    
local        
City Hall Whitehall Street–South Ferry all   Most trains
Manhattan Bridge south       Very limited service
Montague Street Tunnel all       Most trains
BMT Fourth Avenue Line Court Street Jay Street–MetroTech all
DeKalb Avenue tunnel Limited service  
bypass Most trains  
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center 59th Street/Fourth Avenue express
local Limited service    
BMT Sea Beach Line (full line) Eighth Avenue Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue local      

Stations

For a more detailed station listing, see the articles on the lines listed above.[3]

Station service legend
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times except late nights
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only
Stops late nights and weekends Stops late nights and weekends only
Stops weekdays only Stops weekdays only
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Stops rush hours in the peak direction only
Station closed Station closed
Stops rush hours only Stops rush hours only (limited service)
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only (limited service)
Time period details
Disabled access Station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act
Disabled access ↑ Station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act
in the indicated direction only
Disabled access ↓
Aiga elevator.svg Elevator access to mezzanine only
N service to Astoria/Ditmars Boulevard
Ast.
N service to 96th Street
96th
Stations Disabled access Subway transfers Connections and notes
Manhattan
Second Avenue Line (limited rush hour service only)[59][74]
Stops rush hours only (limited service) 96th Street Disabled access Q all times M15 Select Bus Service
Stops rush hours only (limited service) 86th Street Disabled access Q all timesR one weekday a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only M15 Select Bus Service
M86 Select Bus Service
Stops rush hours only (limited service) 72nd Street Disabled access Q all timesR one weekday a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only M15 Select Bus Service
63rd Street Line (limited rush hour service only)[74]
Stops rush hours only (limited service) Lexington Avenue–63rd Street Disabled access F all times two rush hour trains, peak direction​​ ​Q all timesR one a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only
Out-of-system transfers with MetroCard/OMNY:
4 all times5 all times except late nights6 all times weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (IRT Lexington Avenue Line at 59th Street)
N all timesR all times except late nightsW weekdays only (BMT Broadway Line at Lexington Avenue/59th Street)
Queens
Astoria Line
Stops all times Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard W weekdays
Stops all times Astoria Boulevard Disabled access W weekdays M60 Select Bus Service to LaGuardia Airport
Columbia Transportation: Queens-Riverdale Commuter Route
Stops all times 30th Avenue W weekdays
Stops all times Broadway W weekdays
Stops all times 36th Avenue W weekdays
Stops all times 39th Avenue W weekdays
Stops all times Queensboro Plaza W weekdays
7 all times rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction​ (IRT Flushing Line)
Manhattan
Broadway Line
Stops all times Lexington Avenue/59th Street R all times except late nightsW weekdays only
4 all times5 all times except late nights6 all times weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (IRT Lexington Avenue Line at 59th Street)
Out-of-system transfer with MetroCard/OMNY:
F all times two rush hour trains, peak direction​​ N limited weekday rush hour service onlyQ all timesR one a.m. rush hour trip in the northbound direction only (63rd Street Lines at Lexington Avenue–63rd Street)
Roosevelt Island Tramway
Stops all times Fifth Avenue–59th Street R all times except late nightsW weekdays only
Services to 96th Street (Manhattan) and Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard (Queens) split
Broadway Line (Astoria and Second Avenue branches merge)
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 57th Street–Seventh Avenue Disabled access Q all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only
Stops all times | 49th Street Disabled access ↑ Q late nights onlyR all except late nightsW weekdays only Station is ADA-accessible in the northbound direction only.
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Times Square–42nd Street Disabled access Q all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only
1 all times2 all times3 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)
7 all times rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction​ (IRT Flushing Line)
A all timesC all except late nightsE all times (IND Eighth Avenue Line at 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal)
S all except late nights (42nd Street Shuttle)
B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D all timesF all times two rush hour trains, peak directionM weekdays until 9:00 p.m. (IND Sixth Avenue Line at 42nd Street–Bryant Park, daytime only)
Port Authority Bus Terminal
M34A Select Bus Service
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 34th Street–Herald Square Disabled access Q all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only
B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D all timesF all times two rush hour trains, peak directionM weekdays until 9:00 p.m. (IND Sixth Avenue Line)
M34 / M34A Select Bus Service
PATH at 33rd Street
Amtrak, LIRR, NJ Transit at Pennsylvania Station
Stops late nights and weekends | 28th Street Q late nights onlyR all except late nights
Stops late nights and weekends | 23rd Street Q late nights onlyR all except late nights M23 Select Bus Service
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 14th Street–Union Square Disabled access Q all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only
L all times (BMT Canarsie Line)
4 all times5 all times except late nights6 all times weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
M14A / M14D Select Bus Service
Stops late nights and weekends | Eighth Street–New York University Q late nights onlyR all except late nights
Stops late nights and weekends | Prince Street Q late nights onlyR all except late nights
Manhattan Bridge Branch
Stops all times except late nights Stops rush hours only (limited service) Canal Street–Broadway Elevator access to mezzanine only Q all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only
6 all times weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction​ (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
J all timesZ rush hours, peak direction (BMT Nassau Street Line)
Stops on the lower level, under Canal Street.
Lower Manhattan Branch (night service only)
Stops late nights only Canal Street Elevator access to mezzanine only Q all times
4 late nights6 all times (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
J all times (BMT Nassau Street Line)
Stops on the upper level, under Broadway.[d]
Stops late nights only City Hall
Stops late nights only Cortlandt Street Disabled access 2 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line at Park Place)
A all times (IND Eighth Avenue Line at Chambers Street)
E all times (IND Eighth Avenue Line at World Trade Center)
PATH at World Trade Center
Stops late nights only Rector Street
Stops late nights only Whitehall Street–South Ferry Elevator access to mezzanine only R all times
1 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line at South Ferry)
Staten Island Ferry at Whitehall Terminal
Brooklyn
Montague Street Branch
Stops late nights only Court Street Elevator access to mezzanine only R all times
2 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line at Borough Hall)
4 all times (IRT Eastern Parkway Line at Borough Hall)
Stops late nights only Jay Street–MetroTech Disabled access R all times
A all times F all times​ (IND Fulton Street and Culver Lines)
Fourth Avenue Line (tunnel and bridge branches merge)
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | DeKalb Avenue Disabled access B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D late nights ​​Q all timesR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center Disabled access D all times Q limited rush hour service onlyR all times W limited rush hour service only
B weekday rush hours, middays and early eveningsQ all times (BMT Brighton Line)
2 all times3 all except late nights4 all times5 weekdays only (IRT Eastern Parkway Line)
LIRR Atlantic Branch at Atlantic Terminal
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | Union Street D late nights ​​R all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | Ninth Street D late nights ​​R all timesW limited rush hour service only
F all timesG all times (IND Culver Line at Fourth Avenue)
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | Prospect Avenue D late nights ​​R all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | 25th Street D late nights ​​R all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 36th Street D all times Q limited rush hour service onlyR all times W limited rush hour service only
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | 45th Street Q limited rush hour service onlyR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops rush hours in the reverse-peak direction only Stops late nights only | 53rd Street Q limited rush hour service onlyR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 59th Street/Fourth Avenue Disabled access Q limited rush hour service onlyR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Sea Beach Line
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Eighth Avenue Disabled access ↑ Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips Station is ADA-accessible in the northbound direction only.
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Fort Hamilton Parkway Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) New Utrecht Avenue Disabled access Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
D all times (BMT West End Line at 62nd Street)
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 18th Avenue Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 20th Avenue Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Bay Parkway Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Kings Highway Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips B82 Select Bus Service
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Avenue U Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) 86th Street Q selected northbound rush-hour trips W selected rush-hour trips Southern terminal for select rush-hour trains[e]
Stops all times Stops rush hours only (limited service) Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue Disabled access Q selected northbound rush-hour trips
D all times (BMT West End Line)
F all times two rush hour trains, peak direction​ (IND Culver Line)
Q all times (BMT Brighton Line)

Discover more about Route related topics

Second Avenue Subway

Second Avenue Subway

The Second Avenue Subway is a New York City Subway line that runs under Second Avenue on the East Side of Manhattan. The first phase of this new line, with three new stations on Manhattan's Upper East Side, opened on January 1, 2017. The full Second Avenue Line, if and when it will be funded, will be built in three more phases to eventually connect Harlem–125th Street in Harlem to Hanover Square in Lower Manhattan. The proposed full line would be 8.5 miles (13.7 km) and 16 stations long, serve a projected 560,000 daily riders, and cost more than $17 billion.

BMT Astoria Line

BMT Astoria Line

The BMT Astoria Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway, serving the Queens neighborhood of Astoria. It runs south from Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria to 39th Avenue in Long Island City above 31st Street. It then turns west and serves Queensboro Plaza over Queens Plaza.

60th Street Tunnel

60th Street Tunnel

The 60th Street Tunnel carries the N, ​R, and ​W trains of the New York City Subway under the East River and Roosevelt Island between Manhattan and Queens.

BMT Broadway Line

BMT Broadway Line

The BMT Broadway Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway in Manhattan. As of November 2016, it is served by four services, all colored yellow: the N and ​Q trains on the express tracks and the R and ​W trains on the local tracks during weekdays. The line is often referred to as the "N and R", since those were the only services on the line from 1988 to 2001, when the Manhattan Bridge's southern tracks were closed for rebuilding. The Broadway Line was built to give the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company access to Midtown Manhattan.

Manhattan Bridge

Manhattan Bridge

The Manhattan Bridge is a suspension bridge that crosses the East River in New York City, connecting Lower Manhattan at Canal Street with Downtown Brooklyn at the Flatbush Avenue Extension. The main span is 1,480 ft (451 m) long, with the suspension cables being 3,224 ft (983 m) long. The bridge's total length is 6,855 ft (2,089 m). It is one of four toll-free vehicular bridges connecting Manhattan Island to Long Island; the nearby Brooklyn Bridge is just slightly further downtown, while the Queensboro and Williamsburg bridges are to the north.

Montague Street Tunnel

Montague Street Tunnel

The Montague Street Tunnel is a rail tunnel of the New York City Subway under the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn, connecting the BMT Broadway Line and BMT Fourth Avenue Line. The R uses the tunnel at all times, the N uses it during late nights, and during rush hours, several W trains per day in each direction use the tunnel.

BMT Fourth Avenue Line

BMT Fourth Avenue Line

The BMT Fourth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line of the New York City Subway, mainly running under Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn. The line is served by the D, N, and R at all times; the R typically runs local, while the D and N run express during the day and local at night. During rush hours, select W and northbound Q trains also serve the line. Limited rush-hour N trains operate local on the line in the reverse-peak direction. The line was originally built by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company and is now internally operated as part of the New York City Subway's B Division.

Source: "N (New York City Subway service)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 2nd), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N_(New_York_City_Subway_service).

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Notes
  1. ^ Northbound N trains via the Second Avenue Subway are scheduled as N trains but signed as Q trains.[3][6]
  2. ^ Only one N train with this service pattern provides peak-direction service, roughly an hour before the a.m. rush begins.[10]
  3. ^ One late-night N train travels north via the Manhattan Bridge instead, making local stops above Canal Street.[11]
  4. ^ One late-night N train via the Manhattan Bridge stops on the lower level.[11]
  5. ^ Eight trains in the a.m. rush and two trains in the p.m. rush originate from this station; two trains in the a.m. rush terminate here.
References
  1. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  2. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c "N Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  4. ^ "mta.info - Line Colors". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  5. ^ a b "8:45 AM - 9:47 AM Coney Island-Stillwell Av – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. July 29, 2021. Archived from the original on July 29, 2021. Retrieved July 29, 2021.
  6. ^ a b "7:36 AM - 8:40 AM 96 St – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. July 19, 2021. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved July 19, 2021.
  7. ^ a b "SUB-DIVISION B TRAIN OPERATOR/CONDUCTOR ROAD & NON-ROAD WORK PROGRAMS IN EFFECT: NOVEMBER 6, 2016" (PDF). progressiveaction.info. New York City Transit. July 29, 2016. Retrieved August 19, 2016.
  8. ^ a b "6:07 AM - 7:23 AM Coney Island-Stillwell Av – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. August 7, 2021. Archived from the original on August 7, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  9. ^ a b "9:22 PM - 10:39 PM Astoria-Ditmars Blvd – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. August 7, 2021. Archived from the original on August 7, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  10. ^ "5:19 AM - 6:35 AM Astoria-Ditmars Blvd – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. August 7, 2021. Archived from the original on August 7, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  11. ^ a b c "10:18 PM - 11:37 PM Astoria-Ditmars Blvd – OpenMobilityData". transitfeeds.com. August 7, 2021. Archived from the original on August 7, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Korman, Joseph D. "SUBWAY LINE NAMES". www.thejoekorner.com. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Bolden, Eric. "NYCT Line by Line History". erictb.info. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  14. ^ "Two Anniversaries–Sea Beach and Steinway Tunnel". New York Division Bulletin. New York Division, Electric Railroaders' Association. 58 (8). August 2015. Retrieved August 31, 2016 – via Issu.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Sea Beach Line" (PDF). New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 44 (3): 2–3, 17. March 2001.
  16. ^ "OPEN FIRST SECTION OF BROADWAY LINE; Train Carrying 1,000 Passengers Runs from Fourteenth Street to Coney Island. REGULAR SERVICE BEGINS New Road Is Expected to Relieve Old System of 15,000 Persons Daily in Rush Hours. Service Commissioners Jubliant. Schedule Not Fully Arranged". The New York Times. September 5, 1917. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 5, 2016.
  17. ^ service notice, effective November 27, 1967
  18. ^ service notice, effective April 15, 1968
  19. ^ "Service Adjustment on BMT and IND Lines Effective 1 A.M. Monday, Aug. 30". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. August 1976. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  20. ^ Cosgrove, Vincent (January 28, 1977). "Straphangers: Mini-Train Idea Comes Up Short". New York Daily News. Retrieved December 27, 2021.
  21. ^ "Service Adjustments on the BMT and IND Lines Effective Midnight, Saturday, August 27 New York City Transit Authority (1977)". Flickr - Photo Sharing!. New York City Transit Authority. August 1977. Retrieved June 9, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h Linder, Bernard (April 2001). "Sea Beach Line Schedule Changes" (PDF). New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 44 (4): 2–4.
  23. ^ "If You Ride These Subway Lines, You Know Something Drastic Has To Be Done". TheJoeKorNer.com. New York City Transit Authority. 1986. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  24. ^ "R46 Subway Car Rollsign". Photobucket. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  25. ^ "R46 Subway Car Rollsign". Photobucket. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved September 8, 2019.
  26. ^ "A view of the western car dropoff/pickup area. A sign outlining the proposed services following the opening of the Archer Avenue Subway can be seen - N trains, which served the Queens Boulevard Line until 1987, would have ran to Jamaica Center, along with the G, which served the Queens Boulevard Line until 2010. In addition, a sealed passage to the northwestern of Union Turnpike upper level and Queens Boulevard can be made out by the arched ceiling to the right of the subway sign". indsecondsystem.weebly.com. March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  27. ^ Polsky, Carol (December 11, 1988). "New Subway Line Finally Rolling Through Queens". Newsday.
  28. ^ a b Annual Report on ... Rapid Routes Schedules and Service Planning. New York City Transit Authority. 1989.
  29. ^ "Announcing Service Changes On The N and R Routes Beginning May 24, 1987 New Routes Mean Better Service". subwaynut.com. New York City Transit Authority. May 1987. Retrieved August 31, 2016.
  30. ^ "System-Wide Changes In Subway Service Effective Sunday, December 11, 1988". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1988. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  31. ^ Johnson, Kirk (December 9, 1988). "Big Changes For Subways Are to Begin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  32. ^ "Service Changes September 30, 1990" (PDF). subwaynut.com. New York City Transit Authority. September 30, 1990. Retrieved May 1, 2016.
  33. ^ Holloway, Lynette (November 14, 1993). "Neighborhood Report: Sunset Park; Subway Express Battle". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 30, 2022.
  34. ^ A customer timetable for New York City Subway Services on the N Train. New York City Transit. May 29, 1994.
  35. ^ "May 1994 Subway Map". Flickr. New York City Transit. May 1994. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  36. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 30, 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  37. ^ Special timetable for New York City subway services on the N train; Service between the Kings Hwy and Stillwell Av/Coney Island stations in Brooklyn. New York City Transit. May 22, 1995.
  38. ^ A customer timetable for New York City subway services on the N Train; Includes Manhattan Bridge Service Information. New York City Transit. April 30, 1995.
  39. ^ A customer timetable for New York City subway services on the N Train. New York City Transit. November 12, 1995.
  40. ^ Sullivan, Ronald (March 26, 1995). "Bridge Repairs to Disrupt Off-Peak Subway Service". The New York Times. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  41. ^ Korman, Joseph D. "Subway Line Names World Trade Center Terror - 9-11-2001". www.thejoekorner.com. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  42. ^ N Train Timetable. New York City Transit. September 2002.
  43. ^ "F N W Q Q Changes Sun, Sept 8, 2002 to Spring 2004 Reconstruction of Stillwell Avenue Terminal changes service in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens". The Subway Nut. New York City Transit. July 2002. Retrieved August 5, 2010.
  44. ^ "B D M N Q R W Weekday Service Manhattan Bridge Map" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 5, 2004. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  45. ^ "MTA NYC Transit Manhattan Bridge Information". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 5, 2004. Archived from the original on February 5, 2004. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  46. ^ "Noteworthy - N restored to Coney Island". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. May 7, 2005. Archived from the original on May 7, 2005. Retrieved September 18, 2016.
  47. ^ "MTA | Press Release | NYC Transit | Major Subway Changes Set for Monday". www.mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. June 24, 2010. Retrieved October 20, 2016.
  48. ^ "Evaluation of 2010 Service Reductions" (PDF). mta.info. New York City Transit. September 23, 2011. Retrieved October 20, 2016.
  49. ^ "N train timetable 6:41 Coney Island". boreumhillscott.com. June 2016. Archived from the original on September 21, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  50. ^ "N train timetable 7:47 86th Street". boreumhillscott.com. June 2016. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  51. ^ "N train timetable 8:06 Coney Island". boreumhillscott.com. June 2016. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  52. ^ "N train timetable 8:27 Coney Island". boreumhillscott.com. June 2016. Archived from the original on November 7, 2016. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  53. ^ "R Train To Resume Service Between Brooklyn And Manhattan Monday". cbslocal.com. CBS Local Media. September 24, 2014. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  54. ^ Kabak, Benjamin (February 19, 2016). "Ahead of 2nd Ave. Subway opening, MTA officially set to restore W service to Astoria". Second Ave. Sagas. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  55. ^ Martinez, Jose (February 19, 2016). "MTA Confirms W Train is Coming Back". TWC News NY1. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  56. ^ *"MTA | Press Release | NYC Transit | MTA Advances Work On Second Avenue Subway Service". www.mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  57. ^ Venugopal, Nikhita (May 25, 2016). "W Train's Return Is Now Official With Approval From MTA Board". DNAinfo New York. Archived from the original on August 5, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  58. ^ Lam, Katherine (October 23, 2016). "MTA flyers spotted for W train's return in November". PIX11. Retrieved October 24, 2016.
  59. ^ a b "N Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  60. ^ Siff, Andrew (December 19, 2016). "2nd Avenue Subway Service to Begin New Year's Day: Gov. Cuomo". NBC New York. NBC Universal Media. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  61. ^ Rivoli, Dan; Sandoval, Edgar; Greene, Leonard (December 18, 2016). "Cuomo promises Second Ave. subway will open Jan. 1". NY Daily News. Retrieved December 19, 2016.
  62. ^ "MTA Reveals Plans to Shut Down Part of N Subway Tunnel in Brooklyn Next Year". TWC News. January 21, 2017. Retrieved January 22, 2017.
  63. ^ Spivack, Caroline (January 20, 2017). "Express N tunnel will shut for one year of emergency repairs". Brooklyn Paper. Retrieved January 22, 2017.
  64. ^ Gordon, Aaron (July 30, 2019). "Monday Morning's Subway Mess Was Caused by an MTA Typo". The Village Voice. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
  65. ^ "Planned Service Changes for: Monday, July 29, 2019". mta.info. July 2019. Archived from the original on July 11, 2019. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
  66. ^ "Preparing for Climate Change: Protecting the Coney Island Yard". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 16, 2019. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  67. ^ "N Line - Planned Service Change Update". mymtaalerts.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
  68. ^ Guse, Clayton (March 24, 2020). "Coronavirus forces MTA to implement big cuts to NYC's mass transit". nydailynews.com. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  69. ^ Bascome, Erik (June 2, 2020). "Full service on MTA buses, subways set to return by June 8". silive. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  70. ^ Siff, Andrew (June 5, 2020). "MTA Resumes Regular Weekday Service; Overnight 4-Hour Closure Stays". NBC New York. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  71. ^ "Culver Line Signal Modernization: Alternate Service Options". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 27, 2020. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  72. ^ "Subway Timetable New York City Transit". Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
  73. ^ "Subway Service Guide" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
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External links

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