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Mjolnir and Stormbreaker

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Mjolnir and Stormbreaker
Love wields Stormbreaker and Thor wields Mjolnir.png
Scene from Thor: Love and Thunder, in which Love wields the axe, Stormbreaker and Thor wields the hammer, Mjolnir.
First appearanceIron Man 2 (2010) (Mjolnir)
Avengers: Infinity War (2018) (Stormbreaker)
Based on
Mjolnir
by
Adapted by
In-universe information
CreatorsDwarves
Used by
Made ofUru

Mjölnir (commonly written without diacritics as Mjolnir) and Stormbreaker, in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), are sentient enchanted weapons of choice used by Thor, the Norse god of Thunder. Both are melee weapons and were created out of Uru metal forged with the heat of a dying star in the Dwarven kingdom of Nidavellir, with the assistance of the dwarf king and master weapon-maker Eitri. Mjolnir is a hammer, and was enchanted by Thor's father, Odin, so that only those the hammer deemed "worthy" are capable of wielding or even lifting it. Stormbreaker is an axe, and although it does not have such a worthiness enchantment, its power is such that a mere mortal attempting to wield it would be driven mad.

Mjolnir first appeared in the post-credits scene in Iron Man 2 (2010), and has appeared thereafter in every film featuring Thor except for one, those being Thor (2011), The Avengers (2012), Thor: The Dark World (2013), Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Doctor Strange (2016), Thor: Ragnarok (2017), Avengers: Infinity War (2018), Avengers: Endgame (2019), and Thor: Love and Thunder (2022). Stormbreaker first appears in Avengers: Infinity War (2018)—also the only MCU film in which Thor does not wield Mjolnir at all—and appears again in Avengers: Endgame, and Thor: Love and Thunder. Conversely, the post-credit scene in Iron Man 2 and a scene from the second episode of the Disney+ TV series What If...? are the only MCU media in which Mjolnir appears while Thor does not.

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Marvel Cinematic Universe

Marvel Cinematic Universe

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) is an American media franchise and shared universe centered on a series of superhero films produced by Marvel Studios. The films are based on characters that appear in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The franchise also includes television series, short films, digital series, and literature. The shared universe, much like the original Marvel Universe in comic books, was established by crossing over common plot elements, settings, cast, and characters.

Norse mythology

Norse mythology

Norse, Nordic, or Scandinavian mythology is the body of myths belonging to the North Germanic peoples, stemming from Old Norse religion and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia, and into the Nordic folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology and stemming from Proto-Germanic folklore, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition. The source texts mention numerous gods such as the thunder-god Thor, the raven-flanked god Odin, the goddess Freyja, and numerous other deities.

Melee weapon

Melee weapon

A melee weapon, hand weapon or close combat weapon is any handheld weapon used in hand-to-hand combat, i.e. for use within the direct physical reach of the weapon itself, essentially functioning as an additional extension of the user's limbs. By contrast, a ranged weapon is any other weapon capable of engaging targets at a distance beyond immediate physical contact.

Hammer

Hammer

A hammer is a tool, most often a hand tool, consisting of a weighted "head" fixed to a long handle that is swung to deliver an impact to a small area of an object. This can be, for example, to drive nails into wood, to shape metal, or to crush rock. Hammers are used for a wide range of driving, shaping, breaking and non-destructive striking applications. Traditional disciplines include carpentry, blacksmithing, warfare, and percussive musicianship.

Axe

Axe

An axe is an implement that has been used for millennia to shape, split and cut wood, to harvest timber, as a weapon, and as a ceremonial or heraldic symbol. The axe has many forms and specialised uses but generally consists of an axe head with a handle, or helve.

Iron Man 2

Iron Man 2

Iron Man 2 is a 2010 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Iron Man. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures, it is the sequel to Iron Man (2008) and the third film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Directed by Jon Favreau and written by Justin Theroux, the film stars Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark / Iron Man alongside Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Sam Rockwell, Mickey Rourke, and Samuel L. Jackson. Six months after Iron Man, Tony Stark resists calls from the United States government to hand over the Iron Man technology, which is causing his declining health. Meanwhile, Russian scientist Ivan Vanko (Rourke) uses his own version of the technology to pursue a vendetta against the Stark family.

The Avengers (2012 film)

The Avengers (2012 film)

Marvel's The Avengers, or simply The Avengers, is a 2012 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the sixth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Written and directed by Joss Whedon, the film features an ensemble cast including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, and Jeremy Renner as the Avengers, alongside Tom Hiddleston, Stellan Skarsgård, and Samuel L. Jackson. In the film, Nick Fury and the spy agency S.H.I.E.L.D. recruit Tony Stark, Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, Thor, Natasha Romanoff, and Clint Barton to form a team capable of stopping Thor's brother Loki from subjugating Earth.

Avengers: Age of Ultron

Avengers: Age of Ultron

Avengers: Age of Ultron is a 2015 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team the Avengers. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the sequel to The Avengers (2012) and the 11th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Written and directed by Joss Whedon, the film features an ensemble cast including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Don Cheadle, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Bettany, Cobie Smulders, Anthony Mackie, Hayley Atwell, Idris Elba, Linda Cardellini, Stellan Skarsgård, James Spader, and Samuel L. Jackson. In the film, the Avengers fight Ultron (Spader), who is an artificial intelligence created by Tony Stark (Downey) and Bruce Banner (Ruffalo) who plans to bring about world peace by causing human extinction.

Doctor Strange (2016 film)

Doctor Strange (2016 film)

Doctor Strange is a 2016 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the 14th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was directed by Scott Derrickson from a screenplay he wrote with Jon Spaihts and C. Robert Cargill, and stars Benedict Cumberbatch as neurosurgeon Stephen Strange along with Chiwetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Benedict Wong, Michael Stuhlbarg, Benjamin Bratt, Scott Adkins, Mads Mikkelsen, and Tilda Swinton. In the film, Strange learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car crash.

Avengers: Infinity War

Avengers: Infinity War

Avengers: Infinity War is a 2018 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team the Avengers. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the sequel to The Avengers (2012) and Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), and the 19th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo and written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, the film features an ensemble cast including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Benedict Cumberbatch, Don Cheadle, Tom Holland, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Bettany, Elizabeth Olsen, Anthony Mackie, Sebastian Stan, Danai Gurira, Letitia Wright, Dave Bautista, Zoe Saldaña, Josh Brolin, and Chris Pratt. In the film, the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy attempt to prevent Thanos from collecting the six all-powerful Infinity Stones as part of his quest to kill half of all life in the universe.

Avengers: Endgame

Avengers: Endgame

Avengers: Endgame is a 2019 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team the Avengers. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the direct sequel to Avengers: Infinity War (2018) and the 22nd film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo and written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, the film features an ensemble cast including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, Don Cheadle, Paul Rudd, Brie Larson, Karen Gillan, Danai Gurira, Benedict Wong, Jon Favreau, Bradley Cooper, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Josh Brolin. In the film, the surviving members of the Avengers and their allies attempt to reverse Thanos's actions in Infinity War.

Thor: Love and Thunder

Thor: Love and Thunder

Thor: Love and Thunder is a 2022 American superhero film based on Marvel Comics featuring the character Thor. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the sequel to Thor: Ragnarok (2017) and the 29th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was directed by Taika Waititi, who co-wrote the screenplay with Jennifer Kaytin Robinson, and stars Chris Hemsworth as Thor alongside Christian Bale, Tessa Thompson, Jaimie Alexander, Waititi, Russell Crowe, and Natalie Portman. In the film, Thor attempts to find inner peace, but must return to action and recruit Valkyrie (Thompson), Korg (Waititi), and Jane Foster (Portman)—who is now the Mighty Thor—to stop Gorr the God Butcher (Bale) from eliminating all gods.

Conceptual history

Mjolnir, wielded by Thor, as depicted in an 1895 illustration of a battle between Thor and Loki
Mjolnir, wielded by Thor, as depicted in an 1895 illustration of a battle between Thor and Loki

Mjolnir debuted in print in the Marvel Comics title Journey into Mystery #83 (Aug. 1962), being the means by which physician Donald Blake transformed into thunder god Thor Odinson (by striking it on the ground). The first use of the hammer's name was in the "Tales of Asgard" feature in Thor #135 (Dec. 1966) in a story by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. The weapon's origin is eventually revealed in Thor Annual #11 (1983), with another version presented in Thor vol. 2, #80 (Aug. 2004).

Mjolnir's origin in the Marvel Comics continuity mirrors the original Norse legend. The hammer is created when Odin's adopted son Loki cuts off the hair of the goddess Sif as part of a cruel jest, and, when threatened with violence by Thor, promises to fetch replacement hair from the dwarf smiths. Loki commissions the hair from the Sons of Ivaldi, and the obliging dwarves create the hair and other gifts for the gods. Loki is convinced that no one can match their workmanship, and challenges a dwarf named Eitri to make finer treasures. After creating some other magical items, Eitri begins work on a hammer. Loki panics, fearing that he will lose the wager, and transforms himself into a moth to bother Eitri (in the original myth, Loki becomes a gadfly and stings Eitri's assistant). As a result, the hammer's handle is shorter in length than Eitri intended, meaning that it could only be wielded one-handed. Despite the error, the Norse gods consider Eitri to have forged the greater treasures, and Loki loses the bet.[1]

In a 2002 documentary with Kevin Smith, Lee says his brother and co-creator Larry Lieber originally referred to Mjolnir as the "Uru Hammer".[2] Writer Roy Thomas eventually changed the name of the hammer to the mythologically correct name of "Mjolnir" but maintained the Larry Lieber concept of it being composed of fictional metal "uru".[3]

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Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is an American comic book publisher and the flagship property of Marvel Entertainment, a division of The Walt Disney Company since September 1, 2009. Evolving from Timely Comics in 1939, Magazine Management/Atlas Comics in 1951 and its predecessor, Marvel Mystery Comics, the Marvel Comics title/name/brand was first used in June 1961.

Journey into Mystery

Journey into Mystery

Journey into Mystery is an American comic book series initially published by Atlas Comics, then by its successor, Marvel Comics. Initially a horror comics anthology, it changed to giant-monster and science fiction stories in the late 1950s. Beginning with issue #83, it ran the superhero feature "The Mighty Thor", created by writers Stan Lee and Larry Lieber and artist Jack Kirby, and inspired by the mythological Norse thunder god. The series, which was renamed for its superhero star with issue #126, has been revived three times: in the 1970s as a horror anthology, and in the 1990s and 2010s with characters from Marvel's Thor mythos. The title was also used in 2019 for a limited series as part of the "War of the Realms" storyline.

Thor (Marvel Comics)

Thor (Marvel Comics)

Thor Odinson is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is based on the Norse mythological god of the same name, the Asgardian god of thunder whose enchanted hammer Mjolnir enables him to fly and manipulate weather, among his other superhuman attributes. A founding member of the superhero team the Avengers, Thor has a host of supporting characters and enemies.

Norse mythology

Norse mythology

Norse, Nordic, or Scandinavian mythology is the body of myths belonging to the North Germanic peoples, stemming from Old Norse religion and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia, and into the Nordic folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology and stemming from Proto-Germanic folklore, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition. The source texts mention numerous gods such as the thunder-god Thor, the raven-flanked god Odin, the goddess Freyja, and numerous other deities.

Odin (Marvel Comics)

Odin (Marvel Comics)

Odin Borson, the All-Father is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. First mentioned in Journey into Mystery #85, the character first appears in Journey into Mystery #86, and was adapted from the Odin of Norse mythology by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. The character is depicted as the father of Thor and former king of Asgard.

Loki (Marvel Comics)

Loki (Marvel Comics)

Loki Laufeyson is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. While the character first appeared in Venus #6, the characterization that has persisted to the modern day, created by writer Stan Lee, scripter Larry Lieber, and penciller Jack Kirby, first appeared in Journey into Mystery #85. The character, which is based on the Norse deity of the same name, is the Asgardian "God of Mischief", the adopted son of Odin and the adopted brother of the superhero Thor. Loki has been portrayed as both a supervillain and antihero.

Horse-fly

Horse-fly

Horse-flies or horseflies are true flies in the family Tabanidae in the insect order Diptera. They are often large and agile in flight, and only the female horseflies bite animals, including humans, to obtain blood. They prefer to fly in sunlight, avoiding dark and shady areas, and are inactive at night. They are found all over the world except for some islands and the polar regions. Both horse-flies and botflies (Oestridae) are sometimes referred to as gadflies.

Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith

Kevin Patrick Smith is an American filmmaker, actor, comedian, comic book writer, author, YouTuber, and podcaster. He came to prominence with the low-budget comedy buddy film Clerks (1994), which he wrote, directed, co-produced, and acted in as the character Silent Bob of stoner duo Jay and Silent Bob, characters who also appeared in Smith's later films Mallrats (1995), Chasing Amy (1997), Dogma (1999), Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001), Clerks II (2006), Jay and Silent Bob Reboot (2019), and Clerks III (2022) which are set primarily in his home state of New Jersey. While not strictly sequential, the films have crossover plot elements, character references, and a shared canon known as the "View Askewniverse", named after Smith's production company View Askew Productions, which he co-founded with Scott Mosier.

Larry Lieber

Larry Lieber

Lawrence D. Lieber is an American comic book artist and writer best known as co-creator of the Marvel Comics superheroes Iron Man, Thor, and Ant-Man; for his long stint both writing and drawing the Marvel Western Rawhide Kid; and for illustrating the newspaper comic strip The Amazing Spider-Man from 1986 to September 2018. From 1974 to 1975, he was editor of Atlas/Seaboard Comics. Lieber is the younger brother of the late Marvel Comics writer, editor, and publisher Stan Lee.

Film design

Visual Development Supervisor Charlie Wen was tasked with designing Thor's appearance for the films, and focused on mixing elements from the comic books with Norse mythology, "trying to maintain the Norse side of things" as much as possible.[4] The first design element that Wen attempted was Mjolnir, for which Wen created a number of possible alternatives, incorporating designs including "the traditional Thor hammer with the short handle as well as the Ultimates versions", from which the one director Kenneth Branagh chose "was the most traditional one".[4] In a 2018 interview with Jimmy Kimmel, Thor actor Chris Hemsworth revealed that he has kept a number of the prop hammers created for the film.[5]

The concept artist tasked with designing the MCU version of Stormbreaker, Ryan Meinerding, decided to deviate substantially from the design of Stormbreaker used in the comics, feeling that "the original Stormbreaker looked a bit too much like the original Mjolnir".[6] Consequently, Stormbreaker "more closely resembles the Mjolnir from the Ultimate Marvel run than the original Stormbreaker hammer bestowed upon Thor's rival turned ally Beta Ray Bill".[6] Meinerding intentionally made Stormbreaker comparatively oversized and overpowered, to convey that the wielder of the weapon must also be someone incredibly powerful.[6]

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Kenneth Branagh

Kenneth Branagh

Sir Kenneth Charles Branagh is a British actor and filmmaker. Branagh trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London and has served as its president since 2015. He has won an Academy Award, four BAFTAs, two Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, and an Olivier Award. He was appointed a Knight Bachelor in the 2012 Birthday Honours. He was made a Freeman of his native city of Belfast in January 2018. In 2020, he was listed at number 20 on The Irish Times list of Ireland's greatest film actors.

Jimmy Kimmel

Jimmy Kimmel

James Christian Kimmel is an American television host, comedian, writer, and producer. He is the host and executive producer of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, a late-night talk show which premiered on ABC on January 26, 2003, at Hollywood Masonic Temple in Hollywood, California; and on April 1, 2019, at a secondary home, the Zappos Theater on the Las Vegas Strip. Kimmel hosted the Primetime Emmy Awards in 2012, 2016 and 2020. He also hosted the Academy Awards in 2017, 2018 and will emcee the show in 2023.

Chris Hemsworth

Chris Hemsworth

Christopher Hemsworth is an Australian actor. He rose to prominence playing Kim Hyde in the Australian television series Home and Away (2004–2007) before beginning a film career in Hollywood. In the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), Hemsworth started playing Thor with the 2011 film of the same name and most recently reprised the role in Thor: Love and Thunder (2022), which established him among the world's highest-paid actors.

Ultimate Marvel

Ultimate Marvel

Ultimate Marvel, later known as Ultimate Comics, was an imprint of comic books published by Marvel Comics, featuring re-imagined and modernized versions of the company's superhero characters from the Ultimate Marvel Universe. Those characters include Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Ultimates, the Fantastic Four, and others. The imprint was launched in 2000 with the publication of the series Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimate X-Men in 2001, followed by The Ultimates and Ultimate Fantastic Four in 2002 and 2004 respectively providing new origin stories for the characters. The reality of Ultimate Marvel is designated as Earth-1610 as part of the Marvel Comics Multiverse.

Beta Ray Bill

Beta Ray Bill

Beta Ray Bill is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Debuting in the Bronze Age of Comic Books, the character was initially intended to be a surprise; an apparent monster who unexpectedly turns out to be a great hero. As such, Bill is the first being outside the Marvel Universe's Norse pantheon to be introduced as being worthy to wield Thor's hammer, Mjolnir. After an initial rivalry for possession of the weapon, the alien warrior was granted a war hammer of his own, called Stormbreaker, and the two reconciled as staunch allies, going on to fight side by side.

Powers and characteristics

Both weapons can be summoned by Thor, and will return to his hand after being thrown.[7] Both weapons also enable Thor to fly, and to channel his power to summon lightning.[7] Stormbreaker has the additional power to summon the Bifröst, allowing Thor to teleport anywhere in the Nine Realms.[7] Screen Rant has identified Stormbreaker as the more powerful of the two, based on this ability, as well as it being a much larger and edged weapon.[7] Both weapons also appear to have a degree of sentience, with Stormbreaker apparently being envious of Thor's affection for Mjolnir,[8] a characteristic director Taika Waititi attributed to the handle being made from the arm of the adolescent Groot, and carrying over some of that character's moodiness at that age.[9]

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Promotion and merchandise

Mjolnir also appears in a June 2014 poster advertising the upcoming film, Ant-Man, with the protagonist in his miniaturized form standing on the hammer, though it does not appear in the film itself.[10]

Fictional history

Origins and enchantment of Mjolnir

In the MCU, Mjolnir initially belonged to Thor's sister Hela, who used it in battle alongside her own weaponry to subjugate the Nine Realms alongside Odin. However, Odin banished her to Hel once his expansionist desires faded. Over one thousand years later, in Thor (2011), Mjolnir is seen in Odin's vault alongside other artifacts, and it is wielded by Thor against Frost Giants on Jotunheim. Thor re-ignites a war between the Frost Giants and Asgard, and Odin banishes him to Earth, stripped of superhuman abilities. Odin then enchants Mjolnir so that only those deemed worthy may lift it, and sends it to Earth. During a post-credits scene in Iron Man 2 (2010), S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson reports that it was found at the center of an impact crater in a New Mexican desert. Locals attempt to move it with various methods, including the pull of a pickup truck, though none are successful. Thor depicts Thor as being initially unable to lift the hammer as well, though he proves his worthiness by sacrificing himself against the Destroyer. Mjolnir heals Thor's injuries, and he uses it to battle his brother Loki, ultimately using it to destroy the Bifröst Bridge.

Thor uses Mjolnir in combat throughout The Avengers (2012). He wields it to battle against Tony Stark, Steve Rogers, Hulk, Loki, and Chitauri soldiers. During the Battle of New York, he uses it to bottleneck the portal above New York City, and uses the Chrysler Building to amplify the hammer's lightning in order to destroy Chitauri reinforcements and their Leviathans. In Thor: The Dark World (2013), Thor utilizes Mjolnir to battle Dark Elf king Malekith and his minions. Mjolnir sees continued use in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), where Thor uses it in tandem with Rogers' shield to defeat Hydra soldiers. Thor challenges other Avengers to lift the hammer at a party, and all fail except Rogers, who manages to slightly move it, surprising Thor. Stark and Banner create the Vision to counter Ultron, and while the Avengers are initially mistrustful of Vision, his ability to lift Mjolnir allows him to gain Thor's trust, and he later uses the hammer in battle. However, Stark and Rogers jest that Vision being an artificial intelligence prevents him from being truly 'worthy' of wielding Mjolnir.

Destruction of Mjolnir and forging of Stormbreaker

In Thor: Ragnarok (2017), Mjolnir is used by Thor to defeat Surtur and his minions. Upon the death of Odin, Hela escapes from her prison, and thwarts Thor's attempt to use Mjolnir against her by destroying it. In a vision, Odin tells Thor that Mjolnir was a means to harness his power rather than the source of it, and in Avengers: Infinity War (2018), Thor travels to Nidavellir with Guardians of the Galaxy members Rocket and Groot to request dwarf king Eitri forge a replacement for Mjolnir. Eitri reveals a plan to create Stormbreaker, an axe with powers similar to Mjolnir and the ability to summon the Bifröst. After Thor is nearly killed by helping Eitri restart the damaged forge to create the weapon, Groot completes Stormbreaker by using his own arm to bind the pieces together and create a handle. Thor uses it to defeat the Outriders in Wakanda, and to attack Thanos, overpowering a counterattack by his Infinity Gauntlet—which contains all six Infinity Stones—and wounding him with a blow to the chest. Nevertheless, Thanos is able to initiate the Blip, killing half of all life, and then escapes.

Recovery of alternate Mjolnir and use alongside Stormbreaker

Some weeks after the Blip, in Avengers: Endgame (2019), Thor uses Stormbreaker to decapitate Thanos in the Garden,[11] though as the Infinity Stones had been destroyed, the Blip cannot be undone. Five years later, Thor has become severely depressed. After Stark invents time travel, Thor participates in the Time Heist, travelling to an alternate Asgard from the time of Thor: The Dark World to retrieve the Reality Stone in hopes of reversing the Blip. While in the alternate Asgard, he summons the timeline's Mjolnir, proving his continued worthiness. He brings Mjolnir to the present and uses it alongside Stormbreaker against an alternate Thanos. Thor uses the weapons' lightning to supercharge Stark's Iron Man armor to assist him in the fight. Thanos gains hold of Stormbreaker and uses it to nearly kill Thor, though Rogers proves worthy to wield Mjolnir,[12] and uses it so save Thor, and is able to conjure lightning in tandem with his shield. Rogers uses Mjolnir and Thor uses Stormbreaker in the final battle against Thanos, the Children of Thanos, and his army. After Thanos is defeated, Rogers returns Mjolnir to the alternate timeline.

Restoration of Mjolnir

In January 2022, it was reported that promotional artwork for the forthcoming fourth Thor movie, Thor: Love and Thunder, showed that the destroyed version of Mjolnir had been remade (albeit with visible cracks), and was now being wielded by a worthy Jane Foster.[13] In the film, a flashback reveals that years earlier, Thor unknowingly enchanted Mjolnir to protect Foster. When Foster is diagnosed with terminal cancer, she researches the possibility that Mjolnir gives its wielder enhanced strength and stamina. She travels to New Asgard in search of the remnants of Mjolnir, which reassembles itself in Jane's presence and proclaims her worthy, surprising Thor when he meets her again as the new wielder of the hammer. Foster, thereby having the power of Thor, uses the alias of Mighty Thor and wields the reconstructed version of the hammer in battle against Gorr the God Butcher and his forces,[14] and against soldiers of Zeus while visiting Omnipotence City. The reconstructed hammer, when launched from its wielder, can separate into its fragments to hit multiple targets at once before reassembling. In one comedic moment, Thor tries to summon Mjolnir, but Stormbreaker enters the room, with Thor reacting as if Stormbreaker were jealous.

Thor, Foster, and Valkyrie pursue Gorr to the Shadow Realm, where Foster sees ancient drawings that depict Thor's battle-axe Stormbreaker as a way to summon the Bifrost to enter the realm of a godlike celestial called Eternity, who can grant Gorr's wish to destroy all gods. Foster deduces the trap laid out by Gorr and throws away Stormbreaker to prevent Gorr from accessing it, but Gorr overpowers the group and threatens to kill Foster, forcing Thor to summon Stormbreaker back. Gorr successfully steals Stormbreaker and injures Valkyrie before a weakened Foster collapses. Foster learns that use of Mjolnir is actually exacerbating her cancer by draining her life force. In the final confrontation with Gorr, she nevertheless uses Mjolnir to destroy the Necrosword, at the cost of her own life. Gorr succeeds in using Stormbreaker to reach Eternity, but Thor persuades Gorr to use his wish to revive his lost daughter, Love. Thor once again takes possession of Mjolnir following Foster's death. In the end, Thor adopts Love, who has been restored from death by Eternity, and Thor gives Love Stormbreaker while reclaiming use of the restored Mjölnir and wielding it for himself.

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Expansionism

Expansionism

Expansionism refers to states obtaining greater territory through military empire-building or colonialism.

Thor (film)

Thor (film)

Thor is a 2011 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures, it is the fourth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). It was directed by Kenneth Branagh, written by the writing team of Ashley Edward Miller and Zack Stentz along with Don Payne, and stars Chris Hemsworth as the title character alongside Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, Stellan Skarsgård, Kat Dennings, Clark Gregg, Colm Feore, Ray Stevenson, Idris Elba, Jaimie Alexander, Rene Russo, and Anthony Hopkins. After reigniting a dormant war, Thor is banished from Asgard to Earth, stripped of his powers and his hammer Mjölnir. As his brother Loki (Hiddleston) plots to take the Asgardian throne, Thor must prove himself worthy.

Post-credits scene

Post-credits scene

A post-credits scene or mid-credits scene is a short clip that appears after all or some of the closing credits have rolled and sometimes after a production logo of a film, TV series, or video game has run. It is usually included to reward the audience for watching through the credits sequence; it may be a scene written for humour or to set up a sequel.

Iron Man 2

Iron Man 2

Iron Man 2 is a 2010 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Iron Man. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Paramount Pictures, it is the sequel to Iron Man (2008) and the third film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Directed by Jon Favreau and written by Justin Theroux, the film stars Robert Downey Jr. as Tony Stark / Iron Man alongside Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Scarlett Johansson, Sam Rockwell, Mickey Rourke, and Samuel L. Jackson. Six months after Iron Man, Tony Stark resists calls from the United States government to hand over the Iron Man technology, which is causing his declining health. Meanwhile, Russian scientist Ivan Vanko (Rourke) uses his own version of the technology to pursue a vendetta against the Stark family.

Phil Coulson

Phil Coulson

Agent Phillip J. Coulson is a fictional character portrayed and voiced by Clark Gregg in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) media franchise. Coulson is depicted as a high-ranking member of the espionage agency S.H.I.E.L.D. and longtime partner of Nick Fury.

The Avengers (2012 film)

The Avengers (2012 film)

Marvel's The Avengers, or simply The Avengers, is a 2012 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name. Produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, it is the sixth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). Written and directed by Joss Whedon, the film features an ensemble cast including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, and Jeremy Renner as the Avengers, alongside Tom Hiddleston, Stellan Skarsgård, and Samuel L. Jackson. In the film, Nick Fury and the spy agency S.H.I.E.L.D. recruit Tony Stark, Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, Thor, Natasha Romanoff, and Clint Barton to form a team capable of stopping Thor's brother Loki from subjugating Earth.

Alternate versions

A broken, alternate version of Mjolnir owned by Throg appears in the fifth episode of Loki in the Void.[15] In the same episode, the Loki variant described as Boastful Loki "wields a hammer that looks an awful lot Mjolnir".[16]

Another alternate version of Mjolnir appears in the second episode of What If...? as part of the Collector's collection on Knowhere.[17] In the third episode, the hammer appears in the desert as it had in the film, Thor, but Thor is fatally wounded by an arrow from Clint Barton while trying to retrieve it.[18] Still another version appears in the seventh episode, which Thor uses to fight against Captain Marvel. For unexplained reasons, Thor remains the only one able to lift the hammer in this universe despite Odin never being shown enchanting it with the "worthy" spell.[19] Thor later uses the hammer to battle a multiverse-threatening version of Ultron.

The MCU TV series Hawkeye features a fictional in-universe performance of Rogers: The Musical, a Broadway musical featuring an actor playing Thor wielding a prop Mjolnir.[20][21]

Discover more about Alternate versions related topics

Journey into Mystery (Loki)

Journey into Mystery (Loki)

"Journey into Mystery" is the fifth episode of the first season of the American television series Loki, based on Marvel Comics featuring the character Loki. It follows alternate versions of the character who are sent to the end of time by the mysterious Time Variance Authority (TVA) and must work together to survive. The episode is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films of the franchise. It was written by Tom Kauffman and directed by Kate Herron.

Loki (TV series)

Loki (TV series)

Loki is an American television series created by Michael Waldron for the streaming service Disney+, based on Marvel Comics featuring the character of the same name. It is the third television series in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) produced by Marvel Studios, sharing continuity with the films of the franchise. The series takes place after the events of the film Avengers: Endgame (2019), in which an alternate version of Loki created a new timeline. Waldron served as head writer and Kate Herron directed the first season, with Eric Martin and the duo Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead serving as head writer and leading the directing team for the second season, respectively.

What If... T'Challa Became a Star-Lord?

What If... T'Challa Became a Star-Lord?

"What If... T'Challa Became a Star-Lord?" is the second episode of the first season of the American animated television series What If...?, based on the Marvel Comics series of the same name. It explores what would happen if the events of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) films Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) and Black Panther (2018) occurred differently, with Yondu Udonta and the Ravagers abducting a young T'Challa instead of Peter Quill. The episode was written by story editor Matthew Chauncey and directed by Bryan Andrews.

What If...? (TV series)

What If...? (TV series)

What If...? is an American animated anthology series created by A. C. Bradley for the streaming service Disney+, based on the Marvel Comics series of the same name. It is the fourth television series in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) produced by Marvel Studios Animation in their first animated series. The series explores alternate timelines in the multiverse that show what would happen if major moments from the MCU films occurred differently. Bradley serves as head writer for the first two seasons, with Bryan Andrews directing.

What If... the World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes?

What If... the World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes?

"What If... the World Lost Its Mightiest Heroes?" is the third episode of the first season of the American animated television series What If...?, based on the Marvel Comics series of the same name. It explores what would happen if the events of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) tie-in comic Fury's Big Week (2012) occurred differently, with Nick Fury's campaign to recruit the Avengers derailed by a string of deaths. The episode was written by head writer A.C. Bradley and story editor Matthew Chauncey, and directed by Bryan Andrews.

Clint Barton (Marvel Cinematic Universe)

Clint Barton (Marvel Cinematic Universe)

Clinton Francis Barton is a fictional character portrayed by Jeremy Renner in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) media franchise—based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name—more commonly known by his alias, Hawkeye. Barton is depicted as an expert marksman, archer and hand-to-hand combatant, with his preferred weapon being a recurve bow. Barton becomes an agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. and befriends Natasha Romanoff. Later, Barton is recruited by Steve Rogers and becomes a founding member of the Avengers. He aids the team in the Battle of New York, the HYDRA uprising, and the Ultron Offensive, in which he forms a close bond with Wanda Maximoff. Barton then aids Rogers in his effort to protect Bucky Barnes, alongside Sam Wilson, Maximoff, and Scott Lang. After Barton's family is decimated by The Blip, he becomes a vigilante and violently dismantles organized crime as Ronin. However, Romanoff finds him and brings him back to the team, where they quantum time travel to alternate timelines in order to undo the Blip. After they are successful, Barton participates in the Battle of Earth. Barton then returns to his family. On a family vacation, his time as Ronin causes continued conflicts with various elements of organized crime and he takes in a protégé named Kate Bishop.

What If... Thor Were an Only Child?

What If... Thor Were an Only Child?

"What If... Thor Were an Only Child?" is the seventh episode of the first season of the American animated television series What If...?, based on the Marvel Comics series of the same name. It explores what would happen if the events of the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) film Thor (2011) occurred differently, with Thor growing up without his adopted brother Loki and adopting a party lifestyle. The episode was written by head writer A.C. Bradley and directed by Bryan Andrews.

Carol Danvers (Marvel Cinematic Universe)

Carol Danvers (Marvel Cinematic Universe)

Carol Danvers is a fictional character portrayed primarily by Brie Larson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) media franchise—based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name—commonly known by her alias, Captain Marvel. Danvers is depicted as a former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot who was given superhuman abilities when a light-speed engine test went wrong and she was exposed to the cosmic energy of the Tesseract. She was subsequently transformed into a Human-Kree hybrid via blood transfusion and renamed Vers. Initially loyal to the Kree Empire, she serves as a member of the Starforce in their war against the Skrulls, but eventually returns to Earth where she regains her memories. She unlocks her dormant powers including superhuman strength, energy projection and absorption, and flight. She befriends Nick Fury, inspiring him to create the Avengers Initiative. Decades later, she joins the Avengers and participates in the battles against Thanos.

Hawkeye (2021 TV series)

Hawkeye (2021 TV series)

Hawkeye is an American television miniseries created by Jonathan Igla for the streaming service Disney+, based on Marvel Comics featuring the characters Clint Barton / Hawkeye and Kate Bishop / Hawkeye. It is the fifth television series in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) produced by Marvel Studios, sharing continuity with the films of the franchise and taking place after the events of the film Avengers: Endgame (2019). It sees Clint Barton as he partners with Kate Bishop to confront enemies from his past in order to be with his family in time for Christmas. Igla served as head writer with Rhys Thomas leading the directing team.

Source: "Mjolnir and Stormbreaker", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 30th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mjolnir_and_Stormbreaker.

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References
  1. ^ Thor Annual #11 (1983).
  2. ^ Stan Lee & Kevin Smith (6 November 2002). Stan Lee's Mutants, Monsters & Marvels (Video). DHG Productions. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  3. ^ Larry Lieber & Roy Thomas (Fall 1999). "Alter Ego 02 : A Conversation with Artist-Writer Larry Lieber". Alter Ego. No. 2. TwoMorrows Publishing.
  4. ^ a b Strom, Marc (May 25, 2011). "Art of Thor: Charlie Wen". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on April 5, 2012.
  5. ^ Schuhart, Jonah (February 8, 2022). "The Untold Truth Of Thor's Hammer Mjolnir". Looper.
  6. ^ a b c Lovett, Jamie (November 19, 2018). "'Avengers: Infinity War': Why Stormbreaker Looks More Like Ultimate Mjolnir and Not Beta Ray Bill's Hammer". Comicbook.com.
  7. ^ a b c d Elliott, Joshua (April 16, 2020). "Stormbreaker vs. Mjolnir: Which Of Thor's Weapons Is More Powerful". ScreenRant.
  8. ^ Dumaraog, Ana (December 2, 2019). "Thor: Why Anyone Can Lift Stormbreaker - But NOT Mjolnir". ScreenRant.
  9. ^ Provencher, Bo (July 7, 2022). "Groot's Avengers: Infinity War Sacrifice Led to a Major Thor 4 Plot Point". CBR.
  10. ^ Mendelson, Scott (June 11, 2015). "New 'Ant-Man' Avengers-Themed Character Posters Are 'Lilo And Stitch' Style Marketing". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 13, 2015. Retrieved June 11, 2015.
  11. ^ McMillan, Graeme (April 29, 2018). "How Thor's Big 'Avengers' Moment Played Out in the Comics". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  12. ^ Brian, Greg (15 August 2019). "Marvel Directors Confirm Captain America Was Always Worthy to Hold Thor's Hammer". cheatsheet.com. Retrieved 19 April 2021.
  13. ^ Adams, Timothy (January 4, 2022). "Thor: Love and Thunder Promo Art Confirms Reforged Mjolnir". Comicbook.com.
  14. ^ Chapman, Wilson (April 18, 2022). "'Thor: Love and Thunder' Teaser Reveals Natalie Portman as the New Thor". Variety. Archived from the original on April 18, 2022. Retrieved April 18, 2022.
  15. ^ Welch, Andy (July 7, 2021). "Loki episode five recap: glorious mystery with Richard E Grant". The Guardian. Archived from the original on July 7, 2021. Retrieved July 7, 2021.
  16. ^ Sarkisian, Jacob (July 7, 2021). "All the Loki variants explained, from Kid Loki to Alligator Loki to Tour de France Loki". Insider.
  17. ^ Elvy, Craig (August 18, 2021). "Every MCU Easter Egg In What If? Episode 2". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on August 18, 2021. Retrieved August 22, 2021.
  18. ^ Howard, Kristen (August 25, 2021). "What If…? Episode 3 Review: The Avengers Initiative Is DOA". Den of Geek. Archived from the original on August 25, 2021. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  19. ^ Collington, Faefyx (September 23, 2021). "The MCU Just Forgot Mjolnir's Rules". Screen Rant. Retrieved September 27, 2021.
  20. ^ Brook, Mitch (September 13, 2021). "Rogers The Musical: Which Avengers Are In Hawkeye's In-Universe Show". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on September 13, 2021. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  21. ^ Bojalad, Alec (November 24, 2021). "Hawkeye's Rogers: The Musical is a Surprisingly Rich Marvel Text". Den of Geek. Archived from the original on November 25, 2021. Retrieved November 25, 2021.

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