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Minister of National Defence (Canada)

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Minister of National Defence
Ministre de la Défense nationale
Anita Anand April 2022 (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Anita Anand
since 26 October 2021
Department of National Defence
Canadian Armed Forces
StyleThe Honourable
Member of
Reports to
AppointerMonarch (represented by the governor general);[3]
on the advice of the prime minister[4]
Term lengthAt His Majesty's pleasure
Precursor
Inaugural holderGeorge Perry Graham
Formation1 January 1923
SalaryCA$269,800 (2019)[5]
Websiteforces.gc.ca

The minister of national defence (MND; French: ministre de la défense nationale) is a minister of the Crown in the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the management and direction of all matters relating to the national defence of Canada.[6]

The Department of National Defence is headed by the deputy minister of national defence (the department's senior civil servant), while the Canadian Armed Forces are headed by the chief of the defence staff (the senior serving military officer).[7] Both are responsible to the minister of national defence. The King (represented by the governor general of Canada) is Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Forces and has final authority on all orders and laws for the "defence of the realm".[8][9]

The minister is responsible, through the tenets of responsible government, to Parliament for "the management and direction of the Canadian Forces". Any orders and instructions for the Canadian Armed Forces are issued by or through the chief of the defence staff.[10] The Department of National Defence exists to aid the minister in carrying out her responsibilities, and acts as the civilian support system for the Canadian Forces.[11][12]

The current minister of national defence is Anita Anand. The parliamentary secretary, who represents the minister when she is away from the House of Commons, is Bryan May.

Discover more about Minister of National Defence (Canada) related topics

French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Minister of the Crown

Minister of the Crown

Minister of the Crown is a formal constitutional term used in Commonwealth realms to describe a minister of the reigning sovereign or viceroy. The term indicates that the minister serves at His Majesty's pleasure, and advises the sovereign or viceroy on how to exercise the Crown prerogatives relating to the minister's department or ministry.

Cabinet of Canada

Cabinet of Canada

The Cabinet of Canada is a body of ministers of the Crown that, along with the Canadian monarch, and within the tenets of the Westminster system, forms the government of Canada. Chaired by the prime minister, the Cabinet is a committee of the King's Privy Council for Canada and the senior echelon of the Ministry, the membership of the Cabinet and Ministry often being co-terminal; as of November 2015 there were no members of the latter who were not also members of the former.

Department of National Defence (Canada)

Department of National Defence (Canada)

The Department of National Defence is the department of the Government of Canada which supports the Canadian Armed Forces in its role of defending Canadian national interests domestically and internationally. The department is a civilian organization, part of the public service, and supports the armed forces; however, as a civilian organization is separate and not part of the military itself. National Defence is the largest department of the Government of Canada in terms of budget, and it is the department with the largest number of buildings.

Canadian Armed Forces

Canadian Armed Forces

The Canadian Armed Forces are the unified military forces of Canada, including sea, land, and air elements referred to as the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force.

Chief of the Defence Staff (Canada)

Chief of the Defence Staff (Canada)

The chief of the Defence Staff is the professional head of the Canadian Armed Forces. As the senior military position, the chief of the Defence Staff advises the Cabinet, particularly the minister of national defence and the prime minister. The role is a Crown-in-Council appointment made by the viceroy on the advice of the prime minister.

Responsible government

Responsible government

Responsible government is a conception of a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability, the foundation of the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy. Governments in Westminster democracies are responsible to parliament rather than to the monarch, or, in a colonial context, to the imperial government, and in a republican context, to the president, either in full or in part. If the parliament is bicameral, then the government is responsible first to the parliament's lower house, which is more representative than the upper house, as it usually has more members and they are always directly elected.

Parliament of Canada

Parliament of Canada

The Parliament of Canada is the federal legislature of Canada, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, and is composed of three parts: the King, the Senate, and the House of Commons. By constitutional convention, the House of Commons is dominant, with the Senate rarely opposing its will. The Senate reviews legislation from a less partisan standpoint and may initiate certain bills. The monarch or his representative, normally the governor general, provides royal assent to make bills into law.

Anita Anand

Anita Anand

Anita Indira Anand is a Canadian lawyer and politician who has served as the minister of national defence since 2021. She has represented the riding of Oakville in the House of Commons since the 2019 federal election, sitting as a member of the Liberal Party. From 2019 to 2021, she served as minister of public services and procurement and oversaw Canada's procurement of vaccines and personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic. As minister of national defence, Anand has led Canada's efforts to provide military aid to Ukraine since the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine. She is the first Hindu to become a federal minister in Canada.

House of Commons

House of Commons

The House of Commons is the name for the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada. In both of these countries, the Commons holds much more legislative power than the nominally upper house of parliament. The leader of the majority party in the House of Commons by convention becomes the prime minister. Other parliaments have also had a lower house called the "House of Commons".

Bryan May

Bryan May

Bryan J. May is a Canadian politician who was elected in the 2015 and 2019 Canadian federal elections to represent the electoral district of Cambridge as a Member of Parliament in the House of Commons of Canada. He is a member of the Liberal Party.

History

On 1 January 1923, the National Defence Act, 1922 came into effect, merging the Department of Militia and Defence, the Department of the Naval Service, and the Air Board to form the Department of National Defence. The ministerial heads of the former departments, the minister of militia and defence, the minister of the naval service, and the minister of aviation were merged to form a new position, the minister of national defence.

During the Second World War, the minister of national defence was assisted by two subordinate ministers. The minister of national defence for air was an additional minister in the Department of National Defence responsible for the Royal Canadian Air Force; while the minister of national defence for naval services was another minister in the Department of National Defence responsible for the Royal Canadian Navy. The air and naval post was reincorporated into the portfolio of the minister of national defence following the Second World War.

The Munsinger affair was Canada's first national political sex scandal in 1966. The affair involved Gerda Munsinger, a German citizen who had been convicted in Germany as a common prostitute, a petty thief and a smuggler, who emigrated to Canada in 1956 in spite of a warning card dated 1952, and who was in 1960 the mistress of the former Associate Minister of National Defence Pierre Sévigny. Munsinger was "a self-admitted espionage agent" in the employ of the "Russian Intelligence Service".[13]

Canadian military spending
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Military spending: as percent share of GDP (1950–2020)[14]
Canadian military spending
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Military spending: Constant 2019 USD million (1953–2020)[15]

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Department of Militia and Defence

Department of Militia and Defence

The Department of Militia and Defence was the department responsible for military land forces in Canada from 1906 to 1921.

Air Board (Canada)

Air Board (Canada)

The Air Board was Canada's first governing body for aviation, operating from 1919 to 1923. The Canadian government established the Air Board by act of Parliament on June 6, 1919, with the purpose of controlling all flying within Canada. Canada was the first country to legislate and implement rules governing the entire domain of aviation.

Department of National Defence (Canada)

Department of National Defence (Canada)

The Department of National Defence is the department of the Government of Canada which supports the Canadian Armed Forces in its role of defending Canadian national interests domestically and internationally. The department is a civilian organization, part of the public service, and supports the armed forces; however, as a civilian organization is separate and not part of the military itself. National Defence is the largest department of the Government of Canada in terms of budget, and it is the department with the largest number of buildings.

Minister of Militia and Defence

Minister of Militia and Defence

The Minister of Militia and Defence was the federal government minister in charge of the volunteer army units in Canada, the Canadian Militia.

Minister of the Naval Service (Canada)

Minister of the Naval Service (Canada)

The Minister of the Naval Service (Canada) was the federal government minister charged with oversight of the Royal Canadian Navy.

Minister of Aviation (Canada)

Minister of Aviation (Canada)

The Minister of Aviation (Canada) was the minister in charge of the military air service in Canada prior to the creation of the RCAF. There was no official minister in charge of this department as Canada did not have a formal air force.

Minister of National Defence for Air (Canada)

Minister of National Defence for Air (Canada)

Minister of National Defence for Air (Canada) was the minister responsible for the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II. post created by the 1940 War Measures Act. The act specifically amended the National Defence Act of 1923.

Minister of National Defence for Naval Services (Canada)

Minister of National Defence for Naval Services (Canada)

Minister of National Defence for Naval Services (Canada) was the minister responsible for the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II. The post was merged into the current post of the Minister of National Defence (Canada)

Munsinger affair

Munsinger affair

The Munsinger affair was Canada's first national political sex scandal in 1966. The affair involved Gerda Munsinger, a German citizen who had been convicted in Germany as a common prostitute, a petty thief and a smuggler, who emigrated to Canada in 1956 in spite of a warning card dated 1952, and who was in 1960 the mistress of the former Associate Minister of National Defence Pierre Sévigny. Munsinger was "a self-admitted espionage agent" in the employ of the "Russian Intelligence Service".

Canada

Canada

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, making it the world's second-largest country by total area, with the world's longest coastline. It is characterized by a wide range of both meteorologic and geological regions. The country is sparsely inhabited, with most residing south of the 55th parallel in urban areas. Canada's capital is Ottawa and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Gerda Munsinger

Gerda Munsinger

Gerda Munsinger was an East German prostitute and alleged Soviet spy. She immigrated to Canada in 1955. Munsinger was the central protagonist of the Munsinger Affair, the first national political sex scandal in Canada, and was dubbed "the Mata Hari of the Cold War" because of her involvement with several Canadian politicians. She returned to Germany in 1961, became the centre of press attention in 1966 when the scandal was publicly revealed, and was the subject of a feature film.

Associate Minister of National Defence

Associate Minister of National Defence

The associate minister of national defence is a member of the Canadian cabinet who is responsible for various files within the defence department as assigned by the prime minister or defence minister.

The Defence Portfolio

The Defence Portfolio is a collection of organizations and agencies that report to the minister of national defence. Although deputy heads for individual agencies direct and oversee the activities of their agency, the minister is accountable to Parliament its activities.[16] The Defence Portfolio includes:[17]

The minister of national defence is also the designated lead minister for search and rescue (LMSAR) within the federal government.

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Canadian Armed Forces

Canadian Armed Forces

The Canadian Armed Forces are the unified military forces of Canada, including sea, land, and air elements referred to as the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force.

Communications Security Establishment

Communications Security Establishment

The Communications Security Establishment, formerly called the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), is the Government of Canada's national cryptologic agency. It is responsible for foreign signals intelligence (SIGINT) and communications security (COMSEC), protecting federal government electronic information and communication networks, and is the technical authority for cyber security and information assurance.

Defence Research and Development Canada

Defence Research and Development Canada

Defence Research and Development Canada is a special operating agency of the Department of National Defence (DND), whose purpose is to provide the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), other government departments, and public safety and national security communities with knowledge and technology.

Department of National Defence (Canada)

Department of National Defence (Canada)

The Department of National Defence is the department of the Government of Canada which supports the Canadian Armed Forces in its role of defending Canadian national interests domestically and internationally. The department is a civilian organization, part of the public service, and supports the armed forces; however, as a civilian organization is separate and not part of the military itself. National Defence is the largest department of the Government of Canada in terms of budget, and it is the department with the largest number of buildings.

Canadian Cadet Organizations

Canadian Cadet Organizations

The Canadian Cadet Organizations, marketed under the name of Cadets Canada, are a youth program known as the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets, Royal Canadian Army Cadets, and Royal Canadian Air Cadets. The program is sponsored by the Canadian Armed Forces and funded through the Department of National Defence (DND), with additional support from the civilian Navy League, the Army Cadet League and the Air Cadet League, as well as local community sponsors that include service organizations and parent sponsoring groups supervised by the Leagues.

Canadian Forces Housing Agency

Canadian Forces Housing Agency

The Canadian Forces Housing Agency is a special operating agency that manages military housing on behalf of the Canadian Department of National Defence for members of the Canadian Armed Forces and their families located on wings and bases.

Judge Advocate General (Canada)

Judge Advocate General (Canada)

The judge advocate general of the Canadian Forces is the senior legal officer who superintends the administration of military justice in the Canadian Armed Forces, and provides legal advice on military matters to the governor general, the minister of national defence, the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. The office is defined in section 9 of the National Defence Act.

Military Police Complaints Commission

Military Police Complaints Commission

The Military Police Complaints Commission of Canada is a Canadian federal government independent, quasi-judicial body, established by the Parliament of Canada in December 1999.

National Search and Rescue Secretariat

National Search and Rescue Secretariat

The National Search and Rescue Secretariat (NSS) was an independent portfolio organization within the Government of Canada's Department of National Defence, established in 1986 as one of the recommendations resulting from the Royal Commission of Enquiry into the Ocean Ranger disaster.

List of ministers

Key:

No. Portrait Name Term of office Political party Ministry
1 George Perry Graham.jpg George Perry Graham January 1, 1923 April 27, 1923 Liberal 12 (King)
2 Edward Mortimer Macdonald.jpg Edward Mortimer Macdonald April 28, 1923
(Acting until Aug.17)
June 28, 1926 Liberal
3 Hugh Guthrie.jpg Hugh Guthrie June 29, 1926
(Acting until Jul.13)
September 25, 1926 Conservative (historical) 13 (Meighen)
VACANT September 25, 1926 September 30, 1926 14 (King)
James Alexander Robb.jpg James Robb
(Acting)
October 1, 1926 October 7, 1926 Liberal
4 James Ralston3.png James Ralston
(1st time)
October 8, 1926 August 7, 1930 Liberal
5 Donald Matheson Sutherland.jpg Donald Matheson Sutherland August 7, 1930 November 16, 1934 Conservative (historical) 15 (Bennett)
6 Grote Stirling.jpg Grote Stirling November 17, 1934 October 23, 1935 Conservative (historical)
7 Ian Alastair Mackenzie.jpg Ian Alistair Mackenzie October 24, 1935 September 18, 1939 Liberal 16 (King)
8 Norman McLeod Rogers.jpg Norman McLeod Rogers September 19, 1939 June 10, 1940 Liberal
Charles Gavan Chubby Power.jpg Charles Power
(Acting)
June 11, 1940 July 4, 1940 Liberal
(4) James Ralston3.png James Ralston
(2nd time)
July 5, 1940 November 1, 1944 Liberal
9 LGen Andrew McNaughton, 1942 cropped.jpg Andrew McNaughton November 2, 1944 August 20, 1945 Military
10 Douglas Charles Abbott.jpg Douglas Abbott August 21, 1945 December 9, 1946 Liberal
11 Brooke Claxton.jpg Brooke Claxton December 10, 1946 November 15, 1948 Liberal
November 15, 1948 June 30, 1954 17 (St. Laurent)
12 Ralph Osborne Campney portrait.jpg Ralph Campney July 1, 1954 June 20, 1957 Liberal
13 George Pearkes 1917.jpg George Pearkes June 21, 1957 October 10, 1960 Progressive Conservative 18 (Diefenbaker)
14 Douglas Harkness.jpeg Douglas Harkness October 11, 1960 February 3, 1963 Progressive Conservative
VACANT February 4, 1963 February 11, 1963
15 Gordon Churchill portrait.jpg Gordon Churchill February 12, 1963 April 21, 1963 Progressive Conservative
16 Paul Hellyer-c1969.jpg Paul Hellyer April 22, 1963 September 18, 1967 Liberal 19 (Pearson)
17 No image.svg Léo Cadieux September 18, 1967 April 19, 1968 Liberal
April 20, 1968 September 16, 1970 20 (P. E. Trudeau)
Charles Drury
(1st time; Acting)
September 17, 1970 September 23, 1970 Liberal
18 No image.svg Donald Macdonald September 24, 1970 January 27, 1972 Liberal
19 Edgar Benson January 28, 1972 August 31, 1972 Liberal
No image.svg Jean-Eudes Dubé
(Acting)
September 1, 1972 September 6, 1972 Liberal
Charles Drury
(2nd time; Acting)
September 7, 1972 November 26, 1972 Liberal
20 No image.svg James Richardson November 27, 1972 October 12, 1976 Liberal
21 No image.svg Barney Danson October 13, 1976
(Acting until Nov.3)
June 3, 1979 Liberal
22 No image.svg Allan McKinnon June 4, 1979 March 2, 1980 Progressive Conservative 21 (Clark)
23 No image.svg Gilles Lamontagne March 3, 1980 August 11, 1983 Liberal 22 (P. E. Trudeau)
24 No image.svg Jean–Jacques Blais August 12, 1983 June 29, 1984 Liberal
June 30, 1984 September 16, 1984 23 (Turner)
25 No image.svg Robert Coates September 17, 1984 February 11, 1985 Progressive Conservative 24 (Mulroney)
26 No image.svg Erik Nielsen February 12, 1985
(Acting until Feb.26)
June 29, 1986 Progressive Conservative
27 No image.svg Perrin Beatty June 30, 1986 January 29, 1989 Progressive Conservative
28 Bill McKnight.jpg Bill McKnight January 30, 1989 April 20, 1991 Progressive Conservative
29 Marcel Masse 2012-04-12.jpg Marcel Masse April 21, 1991 January 3, 1993 Progressive Conservative
30 KimCampbell.jpg Kim Campbell January 4, 1993 June 24, 1993 Progressive Conservative
31 No image.svg Tom Siddon June 25, 1993 November 3, 1993 Progressive Conservative 25 (Campbell)
32 No image.svg David Collenette November 4, 1993 October 4, 1996 Liberal 26 (Chrétien)
33 No image.svg Doug Young October 5, 1996 June 10, 1997 Liberal
34 Art Eggleton 1.JPG Art Eggleton June 11, 1997 June 25, 2002 Liberal
35 John McCallum.jpg John McCallum June 26, 2002 December 11, 2003 Liberal
36 David Pratt December 12, 2003 July 19, 2004 Liberal 27 (Martin)
37 Bill Graham by Rod Brito.jpg Bill Graham July 20, 2004 February 5, 2006 Liberal
38 Gordon O'Connor with Robert Gates, Jan 23, 2007, cropped.jpg Gordon O'Connor February 6, 2006 August 14, 2007 Conservative 28 (Harper)
39 Peter MacKay crop.JPG Peter MacKay August 14, 2007 July 15, 2013 Conservative
40 Rob Nicholson infobox.jpg Rob Nicholson July 15, 2013 February 9, 2015 Conservative
41 Jason Kenney in 2019 - cropped.jpg Jason Kenney February 9, 2015 November 4, 2015 Conservative
42 Canadian Minister of Defense Harjit Sajjan.jpg Harjit Sajjan November 4, 2015 October 26, 2021 Liberal 29 (J. Trudeau)
43 Anita Anand (cropped).jpg Anita Anand October 26, 2021 Incumbent Liberal

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Liberal Party of Canada

Liberal Party of Canada

The Liberal Party of Canada is a federal political party in Canada. The party espouses the principles of liberalism, and generally sits at the centre to centre-left of the Canadian political spectrum, with their rival, the Conservative Party, positioned to their right and the New Democratic Party, who at times aligned itself with the Liberals during minority governments, positioned to their left. The party is described as "big tent", practising "brokerage politics", attracting support from a broad spectrum of voters. The Liberal Party is the longest-serving and oldest active federal political party in the country, and has dominated federal politics of Canada for much of its history, holding power for almost 70 years of the 20th century. As a result, it has sometimes been referred to as Canada's "natural governing party".

Liberal-Conservative Party

Liberal-Conservative Party

The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, and again from 1922 to 1938, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives before 1873. In many of Canada's early elections, there were both "Liberal-Conservative" and "Conservative" candidates; however, these were simply different labels used by candidates of the same party. Both were part of Sir John A. Macdonald's government and official Conservative and Liberal-Conservative candidates would not, generally, run against each other. It was also common for a candidate to run on one label in one election and the other in a subsequent election.

Conservative Party of Canada (1867–1942)

Conservative Party of Canada (1867–1942)

The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. Initially known as the "Liberal-Conservative Party", it dropped "Liberal" from its name in 1873, although many of its candidates continued to use this name.

Conservative Party of Canada

Conservative Party of Canada

The Conservative Party of Canada, colloquially known as the Tories, is a federal political party in Canada. It was formed in 2003 by the merger of the two main right-leaning parties, the Progressive Conservative Party and the Canadian Alliance, the latter being the successor of the Western Canadian-based Reform Party. The party sits at the centre-right to the right of the Canadian political spectrum, with their federal rival, the Liberal Party of Canada, positioned to their left. The Conservatives are defined as a "big tent" party, practising "brokerage politics" and welcoming a broad variety of members, including "Red Tories" and "Blue Tories".

George Perry Graham

George Perry Graham

George Perry Graham, was a journalist, editor and politician in Ontario, Canada.

12th Canadian Ministry

12th Canadian Ministry

The Twelfth Canadian Ministry was the first cabinet chaired by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. It governed Canada from 29 December 1921 to 28 June 1926, including the 14th Canadian Parliament and most of the 15th. The government was formed by the Liberal Party of Canada. Mackenzie King was also Prime Minister in the Fourteenth and Sixteenth Canadian Ministries.

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Edward Mortimer Macdonald, was a Canadian politician.

Hugh Guthrie

Hugh Guthrie

Hugh Guthrie, was a Canadian lawyer and politician who served as a minister in the governments of Sir Robert Borden, Arthur Meighen and R. B. Bennett.

13th Canadian Ministry

13th Canadian Ministry

The Thirteenth Canadian Ministry was the second cabinet chaired by Prime Minister Arthur Meighen. It governed Canada from 29 June 1926 to 25 September 1926, including only the last three months of the 15th Canadian Parliament, all cabinet ministers were acting cabinet ministers as Meighen hadn't been given the confidence of the house, and any cabinet ministers appointed by him would have had to resign their seats and run for re-election. The government was formed by the old Conservative Party of Canada. Meighen was also Prime Minister in the Eleventh Canadian Ministry.

Arthur Meighen

Arthur Meighen

Arthur Meighen was a Canadian lawyer and politician who served as the ninth prime minister of Canada from 1920 to 1921 and from June to September 1926. He led the Conservative Party from 1920 to 1926 and from 1941 to 1942.

14th Canadian Ministry

14th Canadian Ministry

The Fourteenth Canadian Ministry was the second cabinet chaired by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. It governed Canada from 25 September 1926 to 7 August 1930, including only the 16th Canadian Parliament. The government was formed by the Liberal Party of Canada. Mackenzie King was also Prime Minister in the Twelfth and Sixteenth Canadian Ministries.

James Robb (politician)

James Robb (politician)

James Alexander Robb, was a Canadian Member of Parliament and cabinet minister. Robb was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Ministers with military experience

Name Rank Branch Position (if applicable) / Unit(s)
James Ralston Colonel Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) Commanding Officer, 85th (Nova Scotia Highlanders) Battalion, CEF
Donald Matheson Sutherland Lieutenant Colonel CEF Officer Commanding, 52nd Battalion (New Ontario) and A Company 1st Battalion, Major, A Squadron 24th Regiment Grey's Horse
Andrew McNaughton General CEF / Canadian Militia / Permanent Active Militia Commanding Officer, 5th Battalion Canadian Mounted Rifles and Canadian Corps
Ralph Campney Lieutenant CEF / Canadian Army / Royal Flying Corps No.5 Stationary or General Hospital (Queen's), Commissioned Officer, 19th Canadian Infantry Battalion
Norman McLeod Rogers Lieutenant CEF 6th Nova Scotia Mounted Rifles
Charles Gavan Power Acting Major CEF Canadian Corps
Brooke Claxton Battery Sergeant-Major Victoria Rifles of Canada
George Pearkes Major General CEF / Canadian Militia and Canadian Army Commanding Officer, Canadian Corps
Douglas Harkness Lieutenant Colonel Canadian Army Royal Canadian Artillery
Gordon Churchill Lieutenant Colonel CEF Vickers Machine Gunner, Commanding Officer Fort Garry Horse and 1st Canadian Carrier Regiment (Canadian Corps)
Paul Hellyer Gunner Canadian Army Royal Canadian Artillery
Charles Drury Brigadier General Canadian Army Commanding Officer, 4th Field Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery, General Staff Officer of the 2nd Canadian Division and acting commander of the Royal Artillery 4th Canadian Division
Edgar Benson Sergeant Canadian Corps (Canadian Army) 1st Survey Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery
Barney Danson Lieutenant Canadian Army The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
James Armstrong Richardson Pilot Officer RCAF Consolidated Liberator anti-submarine patrol squadron of the (No. 10 Squadron RCAF)
Allan McKinnon Major Canadian Army Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery and Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
Erik Nielsen Pilot Officer (RAF) / Adjutant (RCAF) Royal Flying Corps / RCAF 101 Squadron and 126 Squadron; RCAF Legal Officer
Gilles Lamontagne Flight Lieutenant RCAF bomber pilot No. 425 Bomber Squadron
Gordon O'Connor Brigadier General Canadian Army Royal Canadian Armoured Corps
Harjit Sajjan Lieutenant Colonel Canadian Army The British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own), Royal Canadian Armoured Corps

Bill Graham was enrolled under the University Naval Training Division of the Royal Canadian Naval Reserve and received commission as Sub Lieutenant in 1960. Graham did not serve in the Navy following his commission and thus does not have military experience.

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James Ralston

James Ralston

James Layton Ralston was a Canadian lawyer, soldier, and politician. A Nova Scotian and a lawyer by training, Ralston fought with distinction during the First World War and pursued a career in the Canadian Army, before becoming a Liberal Member of Parliament. During the Second World War, he served as Minister of National Defence from 1940 to 1944, when he was forced to resign by prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King because of his support for the introduction of conscription.

Colonel

Colonel

Colonel is a senior military officer rank used in many countries. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations.

Canadian Expeditionary Force

Canadian Expeditionary Force

The Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) was the expeditionary field force of Canada during the First World War. It was formed following Britain’s declaration of war on Germany on 15 August 1914, with an initial strength of one infantry division. The division subsequently fought at Ypres on the Western Front, with a newly raised second division reinforcing the committed units to form the Canadian Corps. The CEF and corps was eventually expanded to four infantry divisions, which were all committed to the fighting in France and Belgium along the Western Front. A fifth division was partially raised in 1917, but was broken up in 1918 and used as reinforcements following heavy casualties.

Donald Matheson Sutherland

Donald Matheson Sutherland

Donald Matheson Sutherland, was a Canadian physician and politician.

52nd Battalion (New Ontario), CEF

52nd Battalion (New Ontario), CEF

The 52nd Battalion, CEF, was an infantry battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the Great War.

24th Regiment Grey's Horse

24th Regiment Grey's Horse

The 24th Regiment Grey's Horse was a Canadian Militia cavalry regiment and part of the Non-Permanent Active Militia.

Andrew McNaughton

Andrew McNaughton

General Andrew George Latta McNaughton was a Canadian electrical engineer, scientist, army officer, cabinet minister, and diplomat.

Canadian Militia

Canadian Militia

The Canadian Militia is a historical title for military units raised for the defence of Canada. The term has been used to describe sedentary militia units raised from local communities in Canada; as well as the regular army for the Province of Canada and post-confederated Canada, referred to as the active militias.

Permanent Active Militia

Permanent Active Militia

Permanent Active Militia (PAM), also known as Permanent Force (PF), was the proper name of Canada's full-time professional land forces from 1855 to 1940, when it was reorganized into the Canadian Army. PAM was in effect Canada's standing army, consisting of one regular infantry regiment and two cavalry regiments in 1914.

Canadian Corps

Canadian Corps

The Canadian Corps was a World War I corps formed from the Canadian Expeditionary Force in September 1915 after the arrival of the 2nd Canadian Division in France. The corps was expanded by the addition of the 3rd Canadian Division in December 1915 and the 4th Canadian Division in August 1916. The organization of a 5th Canadian Division began in February 1917 but it was still not fully formed when it was broken up in February 1918 and its men used to reinforce the other four divisions.

Lieutenant

Lieutenant

A lieutenant is a commissioned officer rank in the armed forces of many nations.

Canadian Army

Canadian Army

The Canadian Army is the command responsible for the operational readiness of the conventional ground forces of the Canadian Armed Forces. It maintains regular forces units at bases across Canada, and is also responsible for the Army Reserve, the largest component of the Primary Reserve. The Army is headed by the concurrently held Commander of the Canadian Army and Chief of the Army Staff, who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Staff. The Army is also supported by 3,000 civilian employees from the civil service.

Source: "Minister of National Defence (Canada)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 11th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minister_of_National_Defence_(Canada).

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References
  1. ^ "The Canadian Parliamentary system - Our Procedure - House of Commons". www.ourcommons.ca. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  2. ^ "Review of the Responsibilities and Accountabilities of Ministers and Senior Officials" (PDF).
  3. ^ "Constitutional Duties". The Governor General of Canada. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  4. ^ "House of Commons Procedure and Practice - 1. Parliamentary Institutions - Canadian Parliamentary Institutions". www.ourcommons.ca. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  5. ^ "Indemnities, Salaries and Allowances". Library of Parliament. April 11, 2018. Archived from the original on June 1, 2017. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  6. ^ "Laws Defining Responsibilities and Authorities of National Defence". Department of National Defence. March 25, 2010. Archived from the original on July 10, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  7. ^ "About DND - What is the relationship between DND and the Canadian Forces?". Department of National Defence. February 1, 2012. Archived from the original on March 1, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
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