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Michael Zander

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Michael Zander
Professor Michael Zander, 1977.jpg
Professor Michael Zander, 1977
Born
NationalityBritish
Alma materUniversity of Cambridge
AwardsQC
Scientific career
FieldsLaw
InstitutionsLondon School of Economics

Michael Zander, KC, FBA, (born 16 November 1932[1] in Berlin) is a British legal scholar. He is Professor Emeritus of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and the author of several books known to generations of lawyers and law students alike. Professor Zander was a member of the Royal Commission on Criminal Justice (1991–1993).[2] He is currently a member of the Home Office's PACE Strategy Board.

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King's Counsel

King's Counsel

In the United Kingdom and in some Commonwealth countries, a King's Counsel during the reign of a king, or Queen's Counsel during the reign of a queen, is a lawyer who is typically a senior trial lawyer. Technically appointed by the monarch of the country to be one of 'His [Her] Majesty's Counsel learned in the law', the position originated in England and Wales. Some Commonwealth countries have either abolished the position, or renamed it so as to remove monarchical connotations, for example, 'Senior counsel' or 'Senior Advocate'.

Fellow of the British Academy

Fellow of the British Academy

Fellowship of the British Academy is an award granted by the British Academy to leading academics for their distinction in the humanities and social sciences. The categories are:Fellows – scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows – scholars resident overseas Honorary Fellows – an honorary academic title Deceased Fellows – Past Fellows of the British Academy

Berlin

Berlin

Berlin is the capital and largest city of Germany by both area and population. Its 3.7 million inhabitants make it the European Union's most populous city, according to population within city limits. One of Germany's sixteen constituent states, Berlin is surrounded by the State of Brandenburg and contiguous with Potsdam, Brandenburg's capital. Berlin's urban area, which has a population of around 4.5 million, is the second most populous urban area in Germany after the Ruhr. The Berlin-Brandenburg capital region has around 6.2 million inhabitants and is Germany's third-largest metropolitan region after the Rhine-Ruhr and Rhine-Main regions.

Royal Commission on Criminal Justice

Royal Commission on Criminal Justice

The Royal Commission on Criminal Justice, also known as the Runciman Commission, was established in London on 14 March 1991 by the Home Secretary for the purpose of examining the English system of criminal justice and make recommendations as to changes that should be made increase the efficiency of the system and the effective justice inherent in the process. It took effect in 1993. The Commission was the continuation of Sir John May's inquiry into the false convictions of the Maguire Seven and extension to other miscarriages of justice. Viscount Runciman was the original chairman.

Biography

He is the son of lawyer and scholar Walter Zander and Margarete (Gretl) Magnus. In 1937, when he was four years old, the family emigrated from Germany to England because of their Jewish background. His brother is the conductor Benjamin Zander.[3]

After attending the Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe from 1946 to 1951, he won an Open Exhibition in English at Jesus College, Cambridge, where he took a Double First Honours Degree in Law, then obtained a First Class in the LLB and was awarded the Whewell Scholarship in International Law. Zander then took an LLM at Harvard University. For a time, he worked with the law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell on Wall Street. After his return to the United Kingdom he qualified with Ashurst Morris Crisp and then briefly practised as a solicitor. During his clerkship he was legal adviser to Tony Benn in his battle to remain in the House of Commons.[4]

Zander joined the LSE Law Department in 1963 where he was appointed to a Chair in 1977; he was Convenor of the Law Department from 1984 to 1988 and again in 1997–98. He was appointed an Honorary Queen's Counsel in 1997 and was elected a Senior Fellow of the British Academy in 2005. Professor Zander retired from the LSE in 1998.[2]

For twenty-five years, from 1963 to 1988, he was Legal Correspondent of The Guardian newspaper, for which he wrote some 1,400 articles. He has frequently broadcast on radio and television, commenting on legal issues.

In 2010, Zander was awarded the Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws by King's College, London. The citation stated: "He has devoted a long and active career to the study, teaching, practice and improvement of the law, and has made outstanding contributions in both the academic and public spheres. There is no greater authority in the fields to which he has devoted himself: criminal procedure, civil procedure, legal system, legal profession and legal services. ... The central mission of his professional life has been to make the justice system work better."

In 2015, he received the Halsbury Lifetime Contribution Award. (These awards were established in 2013. In that year it went to Sir Sydney Kentridge KCMG, QC. In 2014 it went to Lord Judge, Lord Chief Justice 2008–13.)

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Walter Zander

Walter Zander

Walter Zander was a German-British lawyer, scholar and writer. He was Secretary of the British Friends of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem 1944-71, Governor of the University 1972-93, Senior Associate Fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford 1971-88, and author of several books and articles, many of them about Israel and its international relations.

Benjamin Zander

Benjamin Zander

Benjamin Zander is an English conductor, who is currently the musical director of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra and the Boston Philharmonic Youth Orchestra.

Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe

Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe

The Royal Grammar School, High Wycombe, is a selective boys' grammar school situated in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. As a state school, it does not charge fees for pupils to attend, but they must pass the 11 plus, an exam that some primary schools administer. In February 2011, the school became an Academy.

Jesus College, Cambridge

Jesus College, Cambridge

Jesus College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college's full name is The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge. Its common name comes from the name of its chapel, Jesus Chapel.

Harvard University

Harvard University

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1636 as Harvard College and named for its first benefactor, the Puritan clergyman John Harvard, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States and one of the most prestigious and highly ranked universities in the world.

Sullivan & Cromwell

Sullivan & Cromwell

Sullivan & Cromwell LLP is an American multinational law firm headquartered in New York City. Known as a white-shoe firm, Sullivan & Cromwell is recognized as a leader in business law, and is known for its impact on international affairs, such as the financing of the Panama Canal. The firm handles high profile work such as complex mergers and acquisitions, securities litigation, and white-collar defense and government investigations. It is one of the most profitable law firms in the world, with 2021 profits per partner exceeding $6 million and profits per lawyer exceeding $1.3 million.

Ashurst LLP

Ashurst LLP

Ashurst is a multinational law firm headquartered in London. It has 27 offices in 15 countries apart from the United Kingdom, across Asia, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and North America, and employs around 1,600 legal advisers. Ashurst is 63rd in the list of 100 largest law firms in the world by revenue, and 7th in the list of largest UK law firms by revenue.

Articled clerk

Articled clerk

Articled clerk is a title used in Commonwealth countries for one who is studying to be an accountant or a lawyer. In doing so, they are put under the supervision of someone already in the profession, now usually for two years, but previously three to five years was common. This can be compared as being an intern for a company. Trainees are obligated to sign a contract agreeing to the terms of being an articled clerk. The articled clerk signs a contract, known as "articles of clerkship", committing to a fixed period of employment. Wharton's Law Lexicon defines an articled clerk as "a pupil of a solicitor, who undertakes, by articles of clerkship, continuing covenants, mutually binding, to instruct him in the principles and practice of the profession". The contract is with a specific partner in the firm and not with the firm as a whole.

Peerage Act 1963

Peerage Act 1963

The Peerage Act 1963 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that permits women peeresses and all Scottish hereditary peers to sit in the House of Lords and allows newly inherited hereditary peerages to be disclaimed.

London School of Economics

London School of Economics

The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, Beatrice Webb, Graham Wallas, and George Bernard Shaw, LSE joined the University of London in 1900 and established its first degree courses under the auspices of the university in 1901. LSE began awarding its degrees in its own name in 2008, prior to which it awarded degrees of the University of London. It became a university in its own right within the University of London in 2022.

British Academy

British Academy

The British Academy for the Promotion of Historical, Philosophical and Philological Studies is the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. It was established in 1902 and received its royal charter in the same year. It is now a fellowship of more than 1,000 leading scholars spanning all disciplines across the humanities and social sciences and a funding body for research projects across the United Kingdom. The academy is a self-governing and independent registered charity, based at 10–11 Carlton House Terrace in London.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as The Manchester Guardian, and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers The Observer and The Guardian Weekly, The Guardian is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust. The trust was created in 1936 to "secure the financial and editorial independence of The Guardian in perpetuity and to safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of The Guardian free from commercial or political interference". The trust was converted into a limited company in 2008, with a constitution written so as to maintain for The Guardian the same protections as were built into the structure of the Scott Trust by its creators. Profits are reinvested in its journalism rather than distributed to owners or shareholders. It is considered a newspaper of record in the UK.

Selected publications

  • Lawyers and the Public Interest (1968)
  • Legal Services for the Community (1978)
  • A Matter of Justice (1989)
  • The Crown Court Study (1993)
  • A Bill of Rights? (4th ed.1997)
  • The State of Justice (2000)
  • The Law-Making Process (7th ed., 2015)
  • The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (7th ed.2015)
  • Cases and Materials on the English Legal System (10th ed., 2007)

Source: "Michael Zander", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Zander.

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References
  1. ^ http://www.rgs.tonyhare.co.uk/greybooks/1946/1946.htm"Grey Book for 1946". Tony Hare's Website for the High Wycombe Royal Grammar School. Retrieved 16 September 2014.
  2. ^ a b http://w.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/staff/michael-zander.htm"Michael Zander staff biography". London School of Economics. Retrieved 16 September 2014.
  3. ^ "Address by Michael Zander". BenjaminZander.com/. Archived from the original on 4 December 2008. Retrieved 16 September 2014.http://www.benjaminzander.com/walter/michael.asp
  4. ^ Zander, Michael (11 April 2014). "How to lose a title". New Law Journal (7602). Retrieved 12 June 2015.

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