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Metropolitan line

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Metropolitan line
Metropolitan line flag box.svg
A grey, blue and red S8 stock train waiting at the platform at Croxley station
A northbound S8 Stock Metropolitan line train at Croxley heading to Watford
Overview
Stations34 (9 step free)
Colour on mapMagenta
Websitehttp://tfl.gov.uk
Service
Type
SystemLondon Underground
Depot(s)Neasden
Rolling stockS8 Stock
Ridership66.8 million (2011/12)[1] passenger journeys
History
Opened10 January 1863; 159 years ago (1863-01-10)
Last extension1925
Technical
Line length67 km (42 mi)
Number of tracks2, except
CharacterSub-surface
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge
Electrification630 V DC fourth rail
Operating speed62 mph (100 km/h) maximum
London Underground
Bakerloo
Central
Circle
District
Hammersmith & City
Jubilee
Metropolitan
Northern
Piccadilly
Victoria
Waterloo & City
Other TfL Modes
DLR
Elizabeth line
London Overground
Tramlink

The Metropolitan line, colloquially known as the Met, is a London Underground line between Aldgate in the City of London and Amersham and Chesham in Buckinghamshire, with branches to Watford in Hertfordshire and Uxbridge in Hillingdon. Printed in magenta on the tube map, the line is 41.4 miles (66.7 km) in length and serves 34 stations (9 of which are step free). Between Aldgate and Finchley Road, the track is mostly in shallow "cut and cover" tunnels, apart from short sections at Barbican and Farringdon stations. The rest of the line is above ground, with a loading gauge of a similar size to those on main lines. Just under 67 million passenger journeys were made on the line in 2011/12.

The line is one of just two Underground lines to cross the Greater London boundary (the other being the Central line). It is the only Underground line with an express service at peak times; the resulting longer distance between stations means trains can achieve the system's highest speeds of over 60 miles per hour (100 km/h) on some sections.

In 1863, the Metropolitan Railway began the world's first underground railway between Paddington and Farringdon with wooden carriages and steam locomotives, but its most important route became the line north-west into the Middlesex countryside, where it stimulated the development of new suburbs. Harrow was reached in 1880, and ultimately the line continued as far as Verney Junction in Buckinghamshire, more than 50 miles (80 km) from Baker Street. From the end of the 19th century, the railway shared tracks with the Great Central Railway out of Marylebone. The central London lines were electrified by 1907 but electric locomotives were exchanged for steam locomotives on trains heading north of Harrow. After the railway was absorbed by the London Passenger Transport Board in 1933, the line was cut back to Aylesbury. Steam trains ran until 1961, when the line was electrified to and services were curtailed at Amersham. The Hammersmith & City line was shown on the tube map as a part of the Metropolitan line until 1990, when it appeared as a separate line. The current S8 Stock trains entered service between 2010 and 2012, replacing the A Stock trains, that served the line since 1961.

The section between Aldgate and Baker Street is shared with the Circle line; between Liverpool Street and Baker Street with the Hammersmith & City line; between Rayners Lane and Uxbridge with the Piccadilly line; and between Harrow-on-the-Hill and Amersham with the London–Aylesbury line operated by Chiltern Railways. Baker Street is the southbound terminus for some trains not continuing to Aldgate. Most of the route has two tracks, except for the single-track Chesham branch and a four-track section between Wembley Park and Moor Park that allows fast and semi-fast services to overtake "all stations" trains. There are four tracks between Wembley Park and Finchley Road, but only the outer ones are used by the Metropolitan line's non-stop trains: the inner pair was transferred to the Bakerloo line in 1939 (becoming the Jubilee line in 1979) with services calling at all stations.

Discover more about Metropolitan line related topics

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate is a London Underground station near Aldgate in the City of London. The station is on the Circle line between Tower Hill and Liverpool Street, and is the eastern terminus of the Metropolitan line. It is in Travelcard Zone 1.

Amersham station

Amersham station

Amersham is a London Underground and National Rail station in Amersham in the Chiltern district of Buckinghamshire, England.

Chesham tube station

Chesham tube station

Chesham is a London Underground station in Chesham, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom. The station opened on the 8 July 1889 by the Metropolitan Railway (MR). It is the terminus station of the Chesham branch of the Metropolitan line, which runs from Chalfont & Latimer. The station, a Grade II listed building, is in London fare Zone 9.

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England that borders Greater London to the south-east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north-east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Barbican tube station

Barbican tube station

Barbican is a London Underground station situated near the Barbican Estate, on the edge of the ward of Farringdon Within, in the City of London in Central London. It has been known by various names since its opening in 1865, mostly in reference to the neighbouring ward of Aldersgate.

Central line (London Underground)

Central line (London Underground)

The Central line is a London Underground line that runs through central London, from Epping, Essex, in the north-east to Ealing Broadway and West Ruislip in west London. Printed in red on the Tube map, the line serves 49 stations over 46 miles (74 km). It is one of only two lines on the Underground network to cross the Greater London boundary, the other being the Metropolitan line. One of London's deep-level railways, Central line trains are smaller than those on British main lines.

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street is a London Underground station at the junction of Baker Street and the Marylebone Road in the City of Westminster. It is one of the original stations of the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the world's first underground railway, opened on 10 January 1863.

Aylesbury railway station

Aylesbury railway station

Aylesbury railway station is a railway station in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, on the London–Aylesbury line from London Marylebone via Amersham. It is 38 miles (61 km) from Aylesbury to Marylebone. A branch line from Princes Risborough on the Chiltern Main Line terminates at the station. It was the terminus for London Underground's Metropolitan line until the service was cut back to Amersham in 1961. The station was also known as Aylesbury Town under the management of British Railways from c. 1948 until the 1960s.

Circle line (London Underground)

Circle line (London Underground)

The Circle line is a spiral-shaped London Underground line, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddington. Unlike London's deep-level lines, the Circle line tunnels are just below the surface and are of similar size to those on British main lines. Printed in yellow on the Tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line termini. Almost all of the route, and all the stations, are shared with one or more of the three other sub-surface lines, namely the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines combined, over 114 million passenger journeys were recorded in 2011/12.

Chiltern Railways

Chiltern Railways

Chiltern Railways is a British train operating company that has operated the Chiltern Railways franchise since July 1996. Since 2009, it has been a subsidiary of Arriva UK Trains.

Chesham branch

Chesham branch

The Chesham branch is a single-track railway branch line in Buckinghamshire, England, owned and operated by the London Underground. It runs from a junction at Chalfont & Latimer station on the Metropolitan line for 3.89 miles (6.26 km) northwest to Chesham. The line was built as part of Edward Watkin's scheme to turn his Metropolitan Railway (MR) into a direct rail route between London and Manchester, and it was envisaged initially that a station outside Chesham would be an intermediate stop on a through route running north to connect with the London and North Western Railway (LNWR). Deteriorating relations between the MR and LNWR led to the MR instead expanding to the northwest via Aylesbury, and the scheme to connect with the LNWR was abandoned. By this time much of the land needed for the section of line as far as Chesham had been bought. As Chesham was at the time the only significant town near the MR's new route, it was decided to build the route only as far as Chesham, and to complete the connection with the LNWR at a future date if it proved desirable. Local residents were unhappy at the proposed station site outside Chesham, and a public subscription raised the necessary additional funds to extend the railway into the centre of the town. The Chesham branch opened in 1889.

Bakerloo line

Bakerloo line

The Bakerloo line is a London Underground line that goes from Harrow & Wealdstone in suburban north-west London to Elephant & Castle in south London, via the West End. Printed in brown on the Tube map, it serves 25 stations, 15 of which are underground, over 14.4 miles (23.2 km). It runs partly on the surface and partly in deep-level tube tunnels.

History

Metropolitan Railway

Construction of the Metropolitan line near King's Cross station (1861)
Construction of the Metropolitan line near King's Cross station (1861)

The Metropolitan Railway, also known as the Met, was a passenger and goods railway that served London from 1863 to 1933, its main line heading north-west from the City to what were to become the Middlesex suburbs. Its first line connected the mainline railway termini at Paddington, Euston and King's Cross to the City, built beneath the New Road using the cut-and-cover method between Paddington and King's Cross, and in tunnel and cuttings beside Farringdon Road from King's Cross to near Smithfield. The world's first underground railway, it opened on 10 January 1863 with gas-lit wooden carriages hauled by steam locomotives. The line operated at a frequency of three trains per hour, rising to four trains per hour during the peak periods.[2][3][4] In the 1871 plans for an underground railway in Paris, it was called the Métropolitain.[5]

The railway was soon extended from both ends and northwards via a branch from Baker Street. It reached Hammersmith in 1864 and Richmond in 1877; it completed the Inner Circle in 1884,[6] but the most important route became the line west and north-west into the Middlesex countryside, where it stimulated the development of new suburbs. Harrow was reached in 1880, and ultimately, as far as Verney Junction in Buckinghamshire, more than 50 miles (80 kilometres) from Baker Street. From the end of the 19th century, the railway shared tracks with the Great Central Railway route out of Marylebone.[7]

Electric traction was introduced in 1905 with electric multiple units operating between Uxbridge, Harrow-on-the-Hill and Baker Street. To remove steam and smoke from the tunnels in central London, the railway purchased electric locomotives, exchanged for steam locomotives at Harrow from 1908.[8] In 1910, a seventeen-minute silent film was made showing large portions of the journey from Baker Street to Aylesbury and Uxbridge, seen from the cab of a train.[9]

Unlike other railways in the London area, the Met developed land for housing, thus benefitting from the increase in the value of its land caused by the building of the railway. After World War I it promoted its housing estates near the railway with the "Metro-land" brand.

To improve services, more powerful electric and steam locomotives were purchased in the 1920s. A short branch opened from Rickmansworth to Watford in 1925. After World War I, the 4-mile (6.4 km) Stanmore branch was built from Wembley Park.[10]

London Transport

Electric Locomotive No.12 "Sarah Siddons" seen at a heritage event at Amersham in 2008
Electric Locomotive No.12 "Sarah Siddons" seen at a heritage event at Amersham in 2008
An up train passing Neasden Depot in 1959
An up train passing Neasden Depot in 1959
A stock at Amersham
A stock at Amersham

On 1 July 1933, the Metropolitan was amalgamated with other Underground railways, tramway companies and bus operators to form the London Passenger Transport Board, and a period of rationalisation followed.

While the Metropolitan was run as an outer suburban route with steam-hauled trains and goods services, the LPTB wished to focus on electrified trains and suburban traffic. Goods services were passed to the London and North Eastern Railway, which also took over the role of providing steam locomotives for trains beyond the end of electrification at Rickmansworth. All services north-west of Aylesbury were withdrawn by 1936[11] though services returned to Quainton Road between 1943 and 1948.[12]

The 1930s was a period of rapid growth for the north-western suburbs of London, and LPTB developed ambitious plans to simplify the Metropolitan line and expand capacity. Several stations on the Uxbridge branch were rebuilt, replacing temporary wooden buildings with modernist designs and giving Uxbridge station a new site in the town centre. A major bottleneck in the line, the double-track tunnel from Baker Street to Finchley Road, was bypassed by boring two tube tunnels underneath the Metropolitan tunnels, transferring slow services and the Stanmore branch to the Bakerloo line.[13] (This route was transferred to the Jubilee line in 1979.)[14] In 1936, the line was extended east from Whitechapel to Barking along the tracks of the District line.[15] London Transport inherited incompatible electric multiple units from the railway, including the 1927–33 multiple-unit compartment stock used on routes to Watford and Rickmansworth, and these were refurbished to form a uniform fleet and designated London Underground T Stock.[16] In the 1950s, F Stock trains, with sliding doors under the control of the guard, were transferred from the District line; these mainly worked the semi-fast Harrow and Uxbridge services.[17]

A major rebuilding of the main line from Wembley Park to Amersham was planned in the 1930s but delayed by the war. The line from Wembley to Harrow was rebuilt immediately after the war and the project was completed from 1956–1962, on a more modest scale than originally planned. Until 1961, passenger trains continued to be attached to a steam locomotive at Rickmansworth to run to Aylesbury. The rebuilding electrified the line from Rickmansworth to Amersham, transferring all Aylesbury services to British Railways. A pair of fast lines was added from Harrow to north of Moor Park by 1962, allowing outer-suburban trains to run fast to Moor Park.[18] Aluminium A stock, originally unpainted, replaced the T stock and locomotive-hauled trains. More A Stock trains were built in 1962–63 to replace the trains on the Uxbridge service, giving the main line a single train type for all services. A Stock was four-car units that could operate as four- or eight-car trains;[19] normally operated as eight cars, a four-car unit operated the Chesham shuttle.[20] One person operation of the trains was proposed in 1972, but due to conflict with the trade unions was not introduced on the line until 1986.[21]

A separate identity

A Stock vehicles at Rayners Lane in their original unpainted livery
A Stock vehicles at Rayners Lane in their original unpainted livery

Although the East London line had been an isolated shuttle since 1939,[15] it was shown on London Underground maps as part of the Metropolitan line until 1968.[22] In 1970, it was shown with a thin white line in the middle and labelled the "East London section".[23] By the 1985 map, it had become the "East London Line", remaining the same colour as the Metropolitan line with a white line in the middle,[24] changed to orange by the 1990 map.[25] In 1990, the Hammersmith & City line became a separate line from Hammersmith to Whitechapel (Barking during the peak), the Metropolitan line being from Aldgate to Baker Street and northwards to Amersham with branches to Chesham, Uxbridge and Watford.[15][25]

In 2003, the infrastructure was partly privatised in a public–private partnership managed by the Metronet consortium. Metronet entered administration in 2007 and Transport for London took over responsibilities.[26]

On 12 December 2010, the service to Amersham was reduced from four trains per hour to two, and a direct service between Chesham and central London was introduced, replacing the 4-car Chesham to Chalfont & Latimer shuttle.[27] The final passenger services operated by the A Stock ran on 26 September 2012,[28] followed by a ticketed public railtour on 29 September.[29]

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Metropolitan Railway

Metropolitan Railway

The Metropolitan Railway was a passenger and goods railway that served London from 1863 to 1933, its main line heading north-west from the capital's financial heart in the City to what were to become the Middlesex suburbs. Its first line connected the main-line railway termini at Paddington, Euston, and King's Cross to the City. The first section was built beneath the New Road using cut-and-cover between Paddington and King's Cross and in tunnel and cuttings beside Farringdon Road from King's Cross to near Smithfield, near the City. It opened to the public on 10 January 1863 with gas-lit wooden carriages hauled by steam locomotives, the world's first passenger-carrying designated underground railway.

City of London

City of London

The City of London is a city, ceremonial county and local government district that contains the historic centre and constitutes, alongside Canary Wharf, the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the modern area named London has since grown far beyond the City of London boundary. The City is now only a small part of the metropolis of Greater London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, the City of London is not one of the London boroughs, a status reserved for the other 32 districts. It is also a separate ceremonial county, being an enclave surrounded by Greater London, and is the smallest ceremonial county in the United Kingdom.

Euston railway station

Euston railway station

Euston railway station is a central London railway terminus in the London Borough of Camden, managed by Network Rail. It is the southern terminus of the West Coast Main Line, the UK's busiest inter-city railway. Euston is the eleventh-busiest station in Britain and the country's busiest inter-city passenger terminal, being the gateway from London to the West Midlands, North West England, North Wales and Scotland.

London King's Cross railway station

London King's Cross railway station

King's Cross railway station, also known as London King's Cross, is a passenger railway terminus in the London Borough of Camden, on the edge of Central London. It is in the London station group, one of the busiest stations in the United Kingdom and the southern terminus of the East Coast Main Line to North East England and Scotland. Adjacent to King's Cross station is St Pancras International, the London terminus for Eurostar services to continental Europe. Beneath both main line stations is King's Cross St Pancras tube station on the London Underground; combined they form one of the country's largest and busiest transport hubs.

Farringdon Road

Farringdon Road

Farringdon Road is a road in Clerkenwell, London.

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street is a London Underground station at the junction of Baker Street and the Marylebone Road in the City of Westminster. It is one of the original stations of the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the world's first underground railway, opened on 10 January 1863.

Hammersmith tube station (Circle and Hammersmith & City lines)

Hammersmith tube station (Circle and Hammersmith & City lines)

Hammersmith is a London Underground station in Hammersmith. It is the western terminus of the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2 and is a short walk from the station of the same name on the Piccadilly and District lines. The two stations are separated by Hammersmith Broadway. They are about 60 m (200 ft) apart door to door, although the positions of the pedestrian crossings on the Broadway makes it seem much longer on foot. The Circle line has served Hammersmith since 13 December 2009. By June 2011 all of the platforms had been lengthened to accommodate the new and longer S7 Stock trains, that first entered service on the Hammersmith and City Line from the beginning of July 2012. These new trains are seven cars in length instead of the six cars of C Stock that previously operated.

Circle line (London Underground)

Circle line (London Underground)

The Circle line is a spiral-shaped London Underground line, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddington. Unlike London's deep-level lines, the Circle line tunnels are just below the surface and are of similar size to those on British main lines. Printed in yellow on the Tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line termini. Almost all of the route, and all the stations, are shared with one or more of the three other sub-surface lines, namely the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines combined, over 114 million passenger journeys were recorded in 2011/12.

Harrow-on-the-Hill station

Harrow-on-the-Hill station

Harrow-on-the-Hill is an interchange railway station in Harrow, served by suburban London Underground Metropolitan line services and commuter National Rail services on the London–Aylesbury line. It is 9 miles 18 chains down the line from London Marylebone. Harrow-on-the-Hill is the final Metropolitan line stop from Central London before the line splits with the main branch towards Moor Park and the diverged Uxbridge branch towards Uxbridge. It is in Travelcard Zone 5.

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England that borders Greater London to the south-east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north-east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Great Central Railway

Great Central Railway

The Great Central Railway in England was formed when the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway changed its name in 1897, anticipating the opening in 1899 of its London Extension. On 1 January 1923, the company was grouped into the London and North Eastern Railway.

Electric multiple unit

Electric multiple unit

An electric multiple unit or EMU is a multiple-unit train consisting of self-propelled carriages using electricity as the motive power. An EMU requires no separate locomotive, as electric traction motors are incorporated within one or a number of the carriages. An EMU is usually formed of two or more semi-permanently coupled carriages, but electrically powered single-unit railcars are also generally classed as EMUs. The great majority of EMUs are passenger trains, but versions also exist for carrying mail.

Route

The route of the Metropolitan line through the Greater London Boroughs and the English Counties of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. More details of the route between Baker Street and Aldgate are shown on Circle line: Map
The route of the Metropolitan line through the Greater London Boroughs and the English Counties of Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. More details of the route between Baker Street and Aldgate are shown on Circle line: Map
Metropolitan line
Dates relate to Metropolitan Railway operations
Aldgate Circle line (London Underground)
Joint section with Circle and H&C lines
Liverpool Street Central line (London Underground) Hammersmith & City Line London Overground Elizabeth line National Rail
Moorgate Northern Line Elizabeth Line National Rail
Barbican Elizabeth Line
Farringdon Elizabeth Line National Rail Thameslink
King's Cross St Pancras
Northern Line Piccadilly Line Victoria Line
National Rail Thameslink Eurostar
Euston Square
Great Portland Street
Baker Street Bakerloo Line Circle line (London Underground) Hammersmith & City Line Jubilee Line
Non-stop section
Lord's
1868–1939
St John's Wood (Jubilee Line)
Marlborough Road
1868–1939
Swiss Cottage (Jubilee Line)
1868–1940
Finchley Road Jubilee Line
Non-stop section
West Hampstead (Jubilee Line London Overground)
1879–1940
Kilburn (Jubilee Line)
1879–1940
Willesden Green (Jubilee Line)
Dollis Hill (Jubilee Line)
1909–1940
Neasden (Jubilee Line)
Wembley Park Jubilee Line
former Stanmore branch
 now Jubilee line
Kingsbury
1932–1939
Queensbury
1934–1939
Canons Park
1932–1939
Stanmore
1932–1939
Preston Road (original site)
1908–1932
Preston Road
Northwick Park
Harrow-on-the-Hill National Rail
West Harrow
Rayners Lane Piccadilly Line
Eastcote
Ruislip Manor
Ruislip
Ickenham
Hillingdon (original site)
1923–1992
Hillingdon
Uxbridge depot
Uxbridge (original site)
1904–1938
Uxbridge
North Harrow
Pinner
Northwood Hills
Northwood
Moor Park
Watford curve
Croxley
proposed Croxley Rail Link
Cassiobridge
Watford Vicarage Road
Watford High Street
Watford Junction
Watford
Rickmansworth
Chorleywood
Chalfont & Latimer National Rail
Chesham
Amersham National Rail
to Verney Junction & Brill branch
Great Missenden
1892–1961
Wendover
1892–1961
Stoke Mandeville
1892–1961
Aylesbury (original site)
1892–1893
Aylesbury
1894–1961
Aylesbury Vale Parkway
Waddesdon
1897–1936
Quainton Road
1896–1936
1943–1948
Quainton Road (original site)
1891–1896
Granborough Road
1891–1936
Winslow Road
1891–1936
Verney Junction
1891–1936
Waddesdon Road
1899–1935
Westcott
1899–1935
Wotton
1899–1935
Wood Siding
1899–1935
Brill
1899–1935

The Metropolitan line is 42 miles (67 km) long and serves 34 stations.[30] It is electrified with a four-rail DC system: a central conductor rail is energised at –250 V and a rail outside the running rail at +500 V, giving a potential difference of 750 V, except for the section from Uxbridge to Finchley Road (via Harrow-on-the-Hill) which is energised at –210 V and +420 V respectively (630 V potential difference) to maintain compatibility with 1973 Stock and 1996 Stock that runs in those areas.[31][32] The first 6 miles (9.7 km) from Aldgate are below ground,[33] shared with the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines to Baker Street, where the line diverges, remaining in tunnel until Finchley Road.[34] Metropolitan line trains essentially skips two stops between Baker Street and Finchley Road, with the Jubilee line serving the intermediate stations on an adjacent parallel line. The Jubilee line then joins the Metropolitan line in the same right-of-way at Finchley Road. Metropolitan line trains then run express from Finchley Road to Wembley Park, with the Jubilee line serving the intermediate stations. Metropolitan line platforms at Willesden Green and Neasden remain for emergency use.[35] At Wembley Park the Jubilee line diverges to the Stanmore branch at a grade-separated junction. From just after Finchley Road, these four tracks run parallel with the Network Rail Chiltern Main Line from Marylebone.[34]

Between Wembley Park and Harrow-on-the-Hill, the Metropolitan is four-track, with fast and slow lines paired by direction, paralleling the two-track un-electrified London–Aylesbury line. The slow lines are between the fast lines, and the two intermediate stations have island platforms.[34] Harrow-on-the-Hill has platforms on all six lines.[34] The central slow lines diverge here at a grade-separated junction to become the 7.5 miles (12.1 km) Uxbridge branch. After West Harrow, at Rayners Lane the line is joined by the Piccadilly line, which shares the tracks to Uxbridge; a turnback siding allows some Piccadilly line services to terminate at Rayners Lane.[34][36]

On the main line between Harrow-on-the-Hill and Moor Park, the line is four-track, paired by use. The western fast tracks are shared with Aylesbury line services from Marylebone; the eastern slow tracks have platforms at the intermediate stations.

North of Moor Park, the Watford branch diverges from the slow lines.[34] This double-track branch has stations at Croxley and Watford.[34][37] The Watford branch has a triangle junction with the main line, with a north-facing curve between Croxley and Rickmansworth. This route, Watford North Curve, is used daily for a few services and empty stock movements.[38]

From the Watford triangle to Amersham, the line has two tracks. At Chalfont & Latimer, the 3.89 miles (6.26 km) single-track Chesham branch diverges, running parallel to the main line for a distance.[30][34] The Metropolitan line ends at Amersham, where there are turnback sidings just beyond the platforms. The route continues to Aylesbury with Chiltern Railways trains only.[39]

The fast (non-stopping) lines between Wembley Park and Harrow on the Hill are signalled with LUL signalling, but using four-aspect Network Rail signal heads.[40] The upper two lights are a two-aspect stop signal displaying either a green or red aspect, the lower two lights a repeater signal for the next stop signal ahead showing a green or yellow aspect, or no aspect when the stop signal shows a red aspect. Thus they are effectively four-light three-aspect signals with green/red/green/yellow lights from the top, danger being a single red light, caution the top green light over a yellow light, and clear two green lights.[40]

The Metropolitan line's suburban rail character opposed to other London Underground lines is also shown by the long distances between stops. Eight of the top 10 furthest apart stations on the Underground are on the Metropolitan line. The section between Chalfont & Latimer and Chesham is the longest at 3.9 miles (6.3 km),[41] whilst the Finchley Road to Wembley Park section is the second longest, and Rickmansworth to Chorleywood the fourth longest overall.

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Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire

Hertfordshire is one of the home counties in southern England. It borders Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire to the north, Essex to the east, Greater London to the south, and Buckinghamshire to the west. For government statistical purposes, it forms part of the East of England region.

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England that borders Greater London to the south-east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north-east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Circle line (London Underground)

Circle line (London Underground)

The Circle line is a spiral-shaped London Underground line, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddington. Unlike London's deep-level lines, the Circle line tunnels are just below the surface and are of similar size to those on British main lines. Printed in yellow on the Tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line termini. Almost all of the route, and all the stations, are shared with one or more of the three other sub-surface lines, namely the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines combined, over 114 million passenger journeys were recorded in 2011/12.

Tower Hill tube station

Tower Hill tube station

Tower Hill is a London Underground station in Tower Hill in the East End of London. It is on the Circle line between Monument and Aldgate stations, and the District line between Monument and Aldgate East. Tower Hill is within Travelcard zone 1 and is a short distance from Tower Gateway station for the Docklands Light Railway, Fenchurch Street station for National Rail mainline services, and Tower Millennium Pier for River Services.

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate is a London Underground station near Aldgate in the City of London. The station is on the Circle line between Tower Hill and Liverpool Street, and is the eastern terminus of the Metropolitan line. It is in Travelcard Zone 1.

Hammersmith & City line

Hammersmith & City line

The Hammersmith & City line is a London Underground line that runs between Hammersmith in west London and Barking in east London. Printed in pink on the Tube map, it serves 29 stations over 15.8 miles (25.5 km). Between Farringdon and Aldgate East it skirts the City of London, the capital's financial heart, hence the line's name. Its tunnels are just below the surface and are a similar size to those on British main lines. Most of the track and all stations are shared with either the District, Circle, or Metropolitan lines. Over 114 million passenger journeys are made each year on the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines.

Barking station

Barking station

Barking is an interchange station serving the town of Barking, east London. It is served by London Underground, London Overground and National Rail main line services. It is located on Station Parade, in the town centre.

Central line (London Underground)

Central line (London Underground)

The Central line is a London Underground line that runs through central London, from Epping, Essex, in the north-east to Ealing Broadway and West Ruislip in west London. Printed in red on the Tube map, the line serves 49 stations over 46 miles (74 km). It is one of only two lines on the Underground network to cross the Greater London boundary, the other being the Metropolitan line. One of London's deep-level railways, Central line trains are smaller than those on British main lines.

London Overground

London Overground

London Overground is a suburban rail network serving London and its environs. Established in 2007 to take over Silverlink Metro routes, it now serves a large part of Greater London as well as the home county of Hertfordshire, with 113 stations on nine different routes.

Elizabeth line

Elizabeth line

The Elizabeth line is a high-frequency hybrid urban–suburban rail service in London and its suburbs. It runs services on dedicated infrastructure in central London from the Great Western Main Line west of Paddington to Abbey Wood and via Whitechapel to the Great Eastern Main Line near Stratford; along the Great Western Main Line from London Paddington to Reading and Heathrow Airport in the west; and along the Great Eastern Main Line between Stratford and Shenfield in the east. The service is named after Queen Elizabeth II, who officially opened the line on 17 May 2022 during her Platinum Jubilee year; passenger services started on 24 May 2022.

National Rail

National Rail

National Rail (NR) is the trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group, an unincorporated association whose membership consists of the passenger train operating companies (TOCs) of England, Scotland, and Wales. The TOCs run the passenger services previously provided by the British Railways Board, from 1965 using the brand name British Rail. Northern Ireland, which is bordered by the Republic of Ireland, has a different system. National Rail services share a ticketing structure and inter-availability that generally do not extend to services which were not part of British Rail.

Services

The Metropolitan line is the only London Underground line to operate non-stop services through some of its stations, although since 11 December 2011 these only run on weekdays during peak times (southbound in the morning peak, northbound in the evening peak).[42] Depending on the stopping pattern, services are advertised as either all-stations, semi-fast or fast on platform information boards and on-train announcements. The stopping pattern of each type of service is as follows:

  • All-stations services call at all stations en route[42]
  • Semi-fast services run non-stop between Wembley Park and Harrow-on-the-Hill, and call at all other stations en route[42]
  • Fast services run non-stop between Wembley Park and Harrow-on-the-Hill and between Harrow-on-the-Hill and Moor Park[42]
  • In the southbound direction, fast and semi-fast trains do not call at Wembley Park, and instead run non-stop from Harrow-on-the-Hill to Finchley Road[42]

Owing to the track layout, fast services can only run to/from Amersham or Chesham. The Uxbridge branch diverges from the rest of the line before the "fast" section, while the Watford branch is not directly connected with the fast line at Moor Park.[43]

No Metropolitan line trains call at any intermediate stations between Finchley Road and Wembley Park. These stations are served by the Jubilee line which runs parallel to the Metropolitan line along this section.[42]

Frequency

During the off-peak the service pattern on the line, in trains per hour (tph), is as follows:[42]

These services combine to give a total frequency of 16tph between Baker Street and Harrow-on-the-Hill. Of these, 12tph run between Aldgate and Baker Street which, together with the 6tph frequencies on both the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines,[44] gives a total of 24 trains every hour on the central-London section between Liverpool Street and Baker Street.

In the morning peak, the southbound service pattern is strengthened to the following:[42]

The northbound frequencies in the morning peak are similar on each route, except all trains run as all-stations services.

Similarly, in the evening peak, the northbound service pattern is strengthened to the following:[42]

The southbound frequencies in the evening peak are similar on each route, except all trains run as all-stations services.

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Harrow-on-the-Hill station

Harrow-on-the-Hill station

Harrow-on-the-Hill is an interchange railway station in Harrow, served by suburban London Underground Metropolitan line services and commuter National Rail services on the London–Aylesbury line. It is 9 miles 18 chains down the line from London Marylebone. Harrow-on-the-Hill is the final Metropolitan line stop from Central London before the line splits with the main branch towards Moor Park and the diverged Uxbridge branch towards Uxbridge. It is in Travelcard Zone 5.

Moor Park tube station

Moor Park tube station

Moor Park is a London Underground station in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, serving those living on the Moor Park estate, and also on the neighbouring Eastbury and South Oxhey estates. The station is outside the Greater London boundary but is in both Zone 6 and Zone 7, between the Metropolitan line stations of Rickmansworth, Croxley and Northwood.

Finchley Road tube station

Finchley Road tube station

Finchley Road is a London Underground station at the corner of Finchley Road and Canfield Gardens in the London Borough of Camden, north London. It is on the Jubilee line, between West Hampstead and Swiss Cottage stations and on the Metropolitan line between Wembley Park and Baker Street stations. It is in Travelcard Zone 2.

Amersham station

Amersham station

Amersham is a London Underground and National Rail station in Amersham in the Chiltern district of Buckinghamshire, England.

Chesham tube station

Chesham tube station

Chesham is a London Underground station in Chesham, Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom. The station opened on the 8 July 1889 by the Metropolitan Railway (MR). It is the terminus station of the Chesham branch of the Metropolitan line, which runs from Chalfont & Latimer. The station, a Grade II listed building, is in London fare Zone 9.

Uxbridge tube station

Uxbridge tube station

Uxbridge is a London Underground station in Uxbridge in the London Borough of Hillingdon, West London. The station is the terminus of the Uxbridge branches of both the Metropolitan line and the Piccadilly line. The next station towards London is Hillingdon. The station is 15.5 miles (25 km) west of Charing Cross and is in Travelcard Zone 6. The closest station on the Chiltern Line and Central line is West Ruislip, accessible by the U1 and U10 buses. The closest station on the Great Western Main Line is West Drayton, accessible by the U1, U3, U5 and 222 buses. Uxbridge was formerly the terminus of a branch of the District line which ran from Ealing Common; the Piccadilly line took over in 1933.

Watford tube station

Watford tube station

Watford tube station is the terminus of a Metropolitan line branch line in the north-western part of the London Underground in Zone 7. The station opened in 1925.

Jubilee line

Jubilee line

The Jubilee line is a London Underground line that runs between Stratford in east London and Stanmore in the suburban north-west, via the Docklands, South Bank and West End. Opened in 1979, it is the newest line on the Underground network, although some sections of track date back to 1932 and some stations to 1879.

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate is a London Underground station near Aldgate in the City of London. The station is on the Circle line between Tower Hill and Liverpool Street, and is the eastern terminus of the Metropolitan line. It is in Travelcard Zone 1.

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street tube station

Baker Street is a London Underground station at the junction of Baker Street and the Marylebone Road in the City of Westminster. It is one of the original stations of the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the world's first underground railway, opened on 10 January 1863.

Circle line (London Underground)

Circle line (London Underground)

The Circle line is a spiral-shaped London Underground line, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddington. Unlike London's deep-level lines, the Circle line tunnels are just below the surface and are of similar size to those on British main lines. Printed in yellow on the Tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line termini. Almost all of the route, and all the stations, are shared with one or more of the three other sub-surface lines, namely the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines combined, over 114 million passenger journeys were recorded in 2011/12.

Hammersmith & City line

Hammersmith & City line

The Hammersmith & City line is a London Underground line that runs between Hammersmith in west London and Barking in east London. Printed in pink on the Tube map, it serves 29 stations over 15.8 miles (25.5 km). Between Farringdon and Aldgate East it skirts the City of London, the capital's financial heart, hence the line's name. Its tunnels are just below the surface and are a similar size to those on British main lines. Most of the track and all stations are shared with either the District, Circle, or Metropolitan lines. Over 114 million passenger journeys are made each year on the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines.

Rolling stock

S8 Stock trains featuring partial transverse seating, reminiscent of the older A Stock trains
S8 Stock trains featuring partial transverse seating, reminiscent of the older A Stock trains

Since 20 September 2012, all services have been provided by eight-car S Stock trains[45] introduced in July 2010 to replace the 1960s A Stock.[46] Part of Bombardier's Movia family, they have air-conditioning, feasible because the sub-surface tunnels, unlike tube tunnels, are able to disperse the exhausted hot air.[47][48] They have regenerative brakes, returning around 20% of their energy to the network and thus reducing energy consumption.[49] With fewer seats than the older A Stock – 306 compared with 448 – they can accommodate 697 standing passengers, compared with 597 in A Stock,[note 1] and have dedicated space for wheelchairs.[50] They have a top speed of 62 miles per hour (100 km/h),[47] being the only London Underground stock to travel at that speed, doing so on the long-distance sections north of Finchley Road.

There are 58 S8 Stock trains in operation, as well as one eight-car S7 Stock also called 'S7+1' – which retains the all-longitudinal seating of the normal seven-car S7 Stock that is operated on London Underground's other sub-surface lines.

It is planned to increase the traction voltage from the present nominal 630 V to 750 V to give better performance and allow the trains to return more energy to the network through their regenerative brakes.[51]

Depot

The line is served by a depot at Neasden.[note 2] The Metropolitan Railway opened a carriage works at Neasden in 1882 and the following year the locomotive works were moved from Edgware Road.[52] In 1904–05, the depot was refitted to take the new electric multiple units[53] and accommodation enlarged in 1932–3.[54] After the amalgamation into the LTPB, the depot was rebuilt from 1936 to 1939. The depot was upgraded in 2010–11 to enable it to maintain S Stock trains.[55] Trains are also stored overnight at Uxbridge, Watford, Rickmansworth and Wembley Park.[56]

Steam on the Met

LMS Black 5 44932 at Amersham in 1992
LMS Black 5 44932 at Amersham in 1992

In 1989, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Metropolitan to Chesham, the first Steam on the Met event took place with London Underground running two weekends of steam specials between Chesham and Watford.[57] The event was a success and so in 1990 London Underground ran steam between Harrow and Amersham. In 1992, to celebrate 100 years of the Met at Amersham, the event was extended to five days at the end of May. From 1994, diesel locomotive 20227, owned by the Class 20 Locomotive Society, and electric locomotive Sarah Siddons provided air braking for the coaches. In 1995, trains ran between Amersham and Watford.[58]

Engines used included BR standard class 5 and BR standard class 4 and GWR Pannier tanks. There was other rolling stock on static display at Rickmansworth sidings. The steam trains ran between normal Metropolitan and main line services. Due to the imminent partial privatisation of LUL and the stock condition, the last steam excursion took place in 2000. In 2008, special trains ran on using Metropolitan Railway electric locomotive "Sarah Siddons" and diesel Class 20 locomotives.[59]

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of the opening of the Metropolitan, special services ran in January 2013 using a restored 1892 "Jubilee" carriage, 1898–1900 Ashbury and Cravens bogie carriages, Metropolitan Railway milk van No.3, Metropolitan Railway E Class steam locomotive No. 1 and electric locomotive Sarah Siddons.[60] Further events were planned for 2013 involving Locomotive No. 1, Sarah Siddons and the Jubilee carriage, including a Steam back on the Met scheduled for May.[61]

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BR Standard Class 4 2-6-4T

BR Standard Class 4 2-6-4T

The British Railways Standard Class 4 tank is a class of steam locomotive, one of the BR standard classes built during the 1950s. They were used primarily on commuter and outer suburban services. They were capable of reaching speeds of 75 mph (121 km/h).

GWR 0-6-0PT

GWR 0-6-0PT

The GWR 0-6-0PT, is a type of steam locomotive built by the British Great Western Railway with the water tanks carried on both sides of the boiler, in the manner of panniers. They were used for local, suburban and branch line passenger and goods traffic, for shunting duties, and as banker engines on inclines. The early examples, such as the 1901 and 2021 classes, were rebuilt from saddle or side tanks when the locos received a Belpaire firebox – this type of firebox has a square top and is incompatible with a curved saddle tank. This process mostly took place during the tenure at Swindon Works of George Jackson Churchward. Only a very small number of saddle tank locomotives escaped rebuilding as panniers, notably the 1361 Class built new under Churchward in 1910, by which date a few of the 1813 Class had already been rebuilt as pannier tanks.

Rolling stock

Rolling stock

The term rolling stock in the rail transport industry refers to railway vehicles, including both powered and unpowered vehicles: for example, locomotives, freight and passenger cars, and non-revenue cars. Passenger vehicles can be un-powered, or self-propelled, single or multiple units. A connected series of railway vehicles is a train.

British Rail Class 20

British Rail Class 20

The British Rail Class 20, otherwise known as an English Electric Type 1, is a class of diesel-electric locomotive. In total, 228 locomotives in the class were built by English Electric between 1957 and 1968, the large number being in part because of the failure of other early designs in the same power range to provide reliable locomotives.

Metropolitan Railway E Class

Metropolitan Railway E Class

The Metropolitan Railway E Class is a class of 0-4-4T steam locomotives. A total of seven locomotives were built between 1896 and 1901 for the Metropolitan Railway: three by the railway at their Neasden Works and four by Hawthorn Leslie and Company in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Four Lines Modernisation (4LM)

It was planned that a new signalling system would be used first on the line north of Baker Street from the end of 2016,[62] but signalling contractor Bombardier was released from its contract by agreement in December 2013 amid heavy criticism of the procurement process[63] and London Underground subsequently awarded the contract for the project to Thales in August 2015.[64]

With the introduction of S8 Stock, the track, electrical supply, and signalling systems are being upgraded in a programme planned to increase peak-hour capacity on the line by 27 per cent by the end of 2023.[62][65][66] A single control room for the sub-surface railway opened at Hammersmith on 6 May 2018, and communications-based train control (CBTC) provided by Thales will progressively replace 'fixed block' signalling equipment dating back the 1940s.[62][67] Trackside signals with automatic train protection (ATP) will remain on the line north of Harrow-on-the-Hill, shared with Chiltern Railways DMUs.[62]

The rollout of CBTC has been split into sections, each known as a signal migration area (SMA), and are located on the line as follows:[68]

Metropolitan line signal migration areas
SMA[i] from to status date
2 Finchley Road Euston Square completed September 2019
3 Euston Square Aldgate completed July 2020
8 Finchley Road Preston Road planned March 2022 (TBC)
9 Preston Road
  • West Harrow
  • Moor Park
planned September 2022 (TBC)
13 Moor Park
  • Watford
  • Amersham
  • Chesham
planned February 2023 (TBC)
14 West Harrow Uxbridge deferred April 2023 (TBC)
  1. ^ SMAs 0.5, 1, 4–7 and 10–12 concern parts of the District, Circle, and Hammersmith & City lines.

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List of stations

Open stations

In order from east to west.

Station Image Opened[15] Branch Additional information Position
Aldgate Aldgate-Station-Entrance.jpg 18 November 1876 Main

line

Terminus. Connects with Circle line 51°30′50″N 000°04′34″W / 51.51389°N 0.07611°W / 51.51389; -0.07611 (01 – Aldgate tube station)
Liverpool Street National Rail London Overground Elizabeth Line Liverpool Street Underground concourse entr.JPG 12 July 1875 Main

line

Originally Bishopsgate, renamed 1 November 1909. Connects with Central and Hammersmith & City lines and London Overground, Elizabeth line and National rail services from Liverpool Street mainline station. Elizabeth Line services via Stratford and Shenfield from platforms 15, 16 and 17. 51°31′07″N 000°04′53″W / 51.51861°N 0.08139°W / 51.51861; -0.08139 (02 – Liverpool Street station). Elizabeth line.
Moorgate National Rail Elizabeth Line Moorgate.jpg 23 December 1865 Main

line

Originally Moorgate Street, renamed 24 October 1924. Connects with Northern line and National rail services from the main line Northern City Line. The Elizabeth line is interchangeable via the Northern Line platforms from Liverpool Street Station due to the long platforms. 51°31′07″N 000°05′19″W / 51.51861°N 0.08861°W / 51.51861; -0.08861 (03 – Moorgate station).
Barbican Barbican Station.jpg 23 December 1865 Main

line

Originally Aldersgate Street, renamed Aldersgate 1910, Aldersgate and Barbican 1923, Barbican 1968 51°31′13″N 000°05′52″W / 51.52028°N 0.09778°W / 51.52028; -0.09778 (04 – Barbican tube station)
Farringdon Disabled access National Rail Thameslink Elizabeth Line Farringdon station exterior.jpg 10 January 1863 Main

line

Resited 22 December 1865. Interchangeable with National Rail and Elizabeth line services. Originally Farringdon Street, renamed Farringdon & High Holborn 1922, Farringdon 1936 51°31′12″N 000°06′19″W / 51.52000°N 0.10528°W / 51.52000; -0.10528 (05 – Farringdon station)
King's Cross St Pancras Disabled access National Rail Eurostar King's Cross St Pancras tube stn Euston Rd NE entrance.JPG 10 January 1863 Main

line

Station resited 1941. Originally King's Cross, renamed King's Cross & St Pancras 1925, King's Cross St Pancras 1933. Connects with Northern, Piccadilly and Victoria lines 51°31′49″N 000°07′27″W / 51.53028°N 0.12417°W / 51.53028; -0.12417 (06 – King's Cross St Pancras tube station)
Euston Square Euston Square stn look east.JPG 10 January 1863 Main

line

Originally Gower Street, renamed 1909 51°31′33″N 000°08′09″W / 51.52583°N 0.13583°W / 51.52583; -0.13583 (07 – Euston Square tube station)
Great Portland Street Great Portland St Tube Station.jpg 10 January 1863 Main

line

Originally Portland Road, renamed Great Portland Street 1917, Great Portland Street & Regent's Park 1923, Great Portland Street 1933 51°31′26″N 000°08′38″W / 51.52389°N 0.14389°W / 51.52389; -0.14389 (08 – Great Portland Street tube station)
Baker Street BakerStEntrance.JPG 10 January 1863 Main
line
Metropolitan line platforms date from 1868. Connects with Bakerloo, Circle, Hammersmith & City and Jubilee lines. 51°31′19″N 000°09′25″W / 51.52194°N 0.15694°W / 51.52194; -0.15694 (09 – Baker Street tube station)
Finchley Road Finchley Road Tube.jpg 30 June 1879 Main
line
Finchley Road (South Hampstead) from 1885 to 1914. Connects with Jubilee line. 51°32′50″N 000°10′49″W / 51.54722°N 0.18028°W / 51.54722; -0.18028 (10 – Finchley Road tube station)
Wembley Park Disabled access Wembley Park tube station extension.jpg 12 May 1894 Main

line

Connects with Jubilee line. 51°33′49″N 000°16′46″W / 51.56361°N 0.27944°W / 51.56361; -0.27944 (11 – Wembley Park tube station)
Preston Road Preston Road Tube Station.jpg 21 May 1908 Main
line
Resited 1931/2 51°34′20″N 000°17′43″W / 51.57222°N 0.29528°W / 51.57222; -0.29528 (12 – Preston Road tube station)
Northwick Park Northwick Park tube station 1.jpg 28 June 1923 Main
line
Originally Northwick Park & Kenton, renamed 1937 51°34′43″N 000°19′07″W / 51.57861°N 0.31861°W / 51.57861; -0.31861 (13 – Northwick Park tube station)
Harrow-on-the-Hill National Rail Harrow-on-the-Hill stn north entrance.JPG 2 August 1880 Main
line
Originally Harrow, renamed 1894 51°34′46″N 000°20′13″W / 51.57944°N 0.33694°W / 51.57944; -0.33694 (14 – Harrow-on-the-Hill station)
West Harrow West Harrow tube station 2.jpg 17 November 1913 Uxbridge 51°34′47″N 000°21′12″W / 51.57972°N 0.35333°W / 51.57972; -0.35333 (15 – West Harrow tube station)
Rayners Lane Rayners Lane stn building.JPG 26 May 1906 Uxbridge Connects with Piccadilly line. 51°34′31″N 000°22′17″W / 51.57528°N 0.37139°W / 51.57528; -0.37139 (16 – Rayners Lane tube station)
Eastcote Eastcote tube station 1.jpg 26 May 1906 Uxbridge 51°34′36″N 000°23′49″W / 51.57667°N 0.39694°W / 51.57667; -0.39694 (17 – Eastcote tube station)
Ruislip Manor Ruislip Manor tube station 1.jpg 5 August 1912 Uxbridge 51°34′24″N 000°24′45″W / 51.57333°N 0.41250°W / 51.57333; -0.41250 (18 – Ruislip Manor tube station)
Ruislip Ruislip station building.JPG 4 July 1904 Uxbridge 51°34′17″N 000°25′16″W / 51.57139°N 0.42111°W / 51.57139; -0.42111 (19 – Ruislip tube station)
Ickenham Ickenham tube station 1.jpg 25 September 1905 Uxbridge Originally Ickenham Halte, rebuilt 1970/1 51°33′43″N 000°26′31″W / 51.56194°N 0.44194°W / 51.56194; -0.44194 (20 – Ickenham tube station)
Hillingdon Disabled access Hillingdon stn entrance.JPG 10 December 1923 Uxbridge Renamed Hillingdon (Swakeleys) 1934, suffix gradually dropped. Resited and rebuilt 1992 51°33′14″N 000°27′00″W / 51.55389°N 0.45000°W / 51.55389; -0.45000 (21 – Hillingdon tube station)
Uxbridge Disabled access Uxbridge station entrance.JPG 4 July 1904 Uxbridge Station resited from Belmont Road in 1938
Terminus
51°32′45″N 000°28′42″W / 51.54583°N 0.47833°W / 51.54583; -0.47833 (22 – Uxbridge tube station)
North Harrow N Harrow station.jpg 22 March 1915 Main
line
51°35′06″N 000°21′45″W / 51.58500°N 0.36250°W / 51.58500; -0.36250 (23 – North Harrow tube station)
Pinner Disabled access Pinner tube station.jpg 25 May 1885 Main
line
51°35′34″N 000°22′50″W / 51.59278°N 0.38056°W / 51.59278; -0.38056 (24 – Pinner tube station)
Northwood Hills Northwood Hills tube station.jpg 13 November 1933 Main
line
51°36′02″N 000°24′33″W / 51.60056°N 0.40917°W / 51.60056; -0.40917 (25 – Northwood Hills tube station)
Northwood Northwood tube station.jpg 1 September 1887 Main
line
The last station within Greater London 51°36′39″N 000°25′28″W / 51.61083°N 0.42444°W / 51.61083; -0.42444 (26 – Northwood tube station)
Moor Park Moor Park stn main entrance.JPG 9 May 1910 Main
line
Originally Sandy Lodge, renamed Moor Park & Sandy Lodge 18 October 1923, Moor Park 25 September 1950 51°37′47″N 000°25′58″W / 51.62972°N 0.43278°W / 51.62972; -0.43278 (27 – Moor Park tube station)
Croxley Croxley Tube Station - exterior.JPG 2 November 1925 Watford Originally Croxley Green, renamed 23 May 1949 51°38′51″N 000°26′29″W / 51.64750°N 0.44139°W / 51.64750; -0.44139 (28 – Croxley tube station)
Watford Watford Tube Station.JPG 2 November 1925 Watford Terminus 51°39′27″N 000°25′03″W / 51.65750°N 0.41750°W / 51.65750; -0.41750 (29 – Watford tube station)
Rickmansworth National Rail Rickmansworth station building.JPG 1 September 1887 Main
line
51°38′25″N 000°28′24″W / 51.64028°N 0.47333°W / 51.64028; -0.47333 (30 – Rickmansworth station)
Chorleywood Disabled access National Rail Chorleywood station building.JPG 8 July 1889 Main
line
The last station within Hertfordshire. Originally Chorley Wood, renamed Chorley Wood & Chenies 1 November 1915, Chorley Wood 1934, Chorleywood 1964 51°39′15″N 000°31′06″W / 51.65417°N 0.51833°W / 51.65417; -0.51833 (31 – Chorleywood station)
Chalfont & Latimer Disabled access National Rail Chalfont & Latimer station building.JPG 8 July 1889 Main
line
Originally Chalfont Road, renamed 1 November 1915 51°40′04″N 000°33′40″W / 51.66778°N 0.56111°W / 51.66778; -0.56111 (32 – Chalfont & Latimer station)
Chesham Disabled access Chesham station building.jpg 8 July 1889 Chesham Terminus 51°42′19″N 000°36′41″W / 51.70528°N 0.61139°W / 51.70528; -0.61139 (33 – Chesham tube station)
Amersham Disabled access National Rail Amersham tube station 1.jpg 1 September 1892 Amersham Renamed Amersham & Chesham Bois 12 March 1922, Amersham 1937
Terminus
51°40′27″N 000°36′27″W / 51.67417°N 0.60750°W / 51.67417; -0.60750 (34 – Amersham station)

Former stations

LT loco L92 at Croxley tip in 1969
LT loco L92 at Croxley tip in 1969

The Brill Tramway with stations Waddesdon Road, Westcott, Wotton, Church Siding, Wood Siding and Brill closed in 1935. In the following year, the line was cut back to Aylesbury, with Waddesdon station and Granborough Road, Winslow Road stations on the line to Verney Junction closing.[15] Initially Verney Junction and Quainton Road remained open, with main line services provided by the LNER.

In 1939, the Stanmore branch and the stopping service between Finchley Road and Wembley Park were transferred to the Bakerloo line. On the St John's Wood section, Lord's and Marlborough Road stations were replaced by St John's Wood, and Swiss Cottage replaced the Metropolitan line station.[13][15] The Bakerloo line service to Stanmore was transferred to the Jubilee line when that line opened in 1979.[14]

In 1961, when steam locomotives were replaced and the line was electrified to Amersham, the Underground service to Great Missenden, Wendover, Stoke Mandeville and Aylesbury was withdrawn.[15]

Goods-only branches

Between Moor Park and Croxley, a short branch ran south-east off the Watford branch, near its junction with the main line, to Croxley Tip, a rubbish dump beside the Grand Union Canal. This site began as a gravel loading point before becoming used by the railway to dump waste such as old ballast and waste from Neasden power station. This route, never used for passenger traffic, continued to be used by London Transport's small fleet of steam engines until 1971, when diesels replaced them. The branch closed some time after this, although a section of the spur line remained visible from a passing train.

A second short branch line, known as the Halton Railway, served RAF Halton near Wendover, across the Wendover Arm of the Grand Union Canal. The line was built during the First World War and closed in 1963.[69] The trackbed is now a footpath.[70]

Although not operated by Metropolitan passenger services, the line from South Harrow to Rayners Lane was built by the Metropolitan railway as the District Railway was in financial difficulties at the time. This included a short branch, part of which is still visible, on a viaduct to a gas works. Other minor freight connections along the line once included connections to the Midland main line at Finchley Road.

A single-track spur from a small yard between Ickenham and Ruislip stations connects to Ruislip Depot of the Central line. This line is used for engineering and empty stock transfers, although occasional plans suggest extending the Central line into Uxbridge by upgrading the connection. It was built in 1973.

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Aldgate tube station

Aldgate tube station

Aldgate is a London Underground station near Aldgate in the City of London. The station is on the Circle line between Tower Hill and Liverpool Street, and is the eastern terminus of the Metropolitan line. It is in Travelcard Zone 1.

Circle line (London Underground)

Circle line (London Underground)

The Circle line is a spiral-shaped London Underground line, running from Hammersmith in the west to Edgware Road and then looping around central London back to Edgware Road. The railway is below ground in the central section and on the loop east of Paddington. Unlike London's deep-level lines, the Circle line tunnels are just below the surface and are of similar size to those on British main lines. Printed in yellow on the Tube map, the 17-mile (27 km) line serves 36 stations, including most of London's main line termini. Almost all of the route, and all the stations, are shared with one or more of the three other sub-surface lines, namely the District, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines. On the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines combined, over 114 million passenger journeys were recorded in 2011/12.

Liverpool Street station

Liverpool Street station

Liverpool Street station, also known as London Liverpool Street, is a central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station in the north-eastern corner of the City of London, in the ward of Bishopsgate Without. It is the terminus of the West Anglia Main Line to Cambridge, the Great Eastern Main Line to Norwich, commuter trains serving east London and destinations in the East of England, and the Stansted Express service to Stansted Airport.

National Rail

National Rail

National Rail (NR) is the trading name licensed for use by the Rail Delivery Group, an unincorporated association whose membership consists of the passenger train operating companies (TOCs) of England, Scotland, and Wales. The TOCs run the passenger services previously provided by the British Railways Board, from 1965 using the brand name British Rail. Northern Ireland, which is bordered by the Republic of Ireland, has a different system. National Rail services share a ticketing structure and inter-availability that generally do not extend to services which were not part of British Rail.

London Overground

London Overground

London Overground is a suburban rail network serving London and its environs. Established in 2007 to take over Silverlink Metro routes, it now serves a large part of Greater London as well as the home county of Hertfordshire, with 113 stations on nine different routes.

Elizabeth line

Elizabeth line

The Elizabeth line is a high-frequency hybrid urban–suburban rail service in London and its suburbs. It runs services on dedicated infrastructure in central London from the Great Western Main Line west of Paddington to Abbey Wood and via Whitechapel to the Great Eastern Main Line near Stratford; along the Great Western Main Line from London Paddington to Reading and Heathrow Airport in the west; and along the Great Eastern Main Line between Stratford and Shenfield in the east. The service is named after Queen Elizabeth II, who officially opened the line on 17 May 2022 during her Platinum Jubilee year; passenger services started on 24 May 2022.

Central line (London Underground)

Central line (London Underground)

The Central line is a London Underground line that runs through central London, from Epping, Essex, in the north-east to Ealing Broadway and West Ruislip in west London. Printed in red on the Tube map, the line serves 49 stations over 46 miles (74 km). It is one of only two lines on the Underground network to cross the Greater London boundary, the other being the Metropolitan line. One of London's deep-level railways, Central line trains are smaller than those on British main lines.

Hammersmith & City line

Hammersmith & City line

The Hammersmith & City line is a London Underground line that runs between Hammersmith in west London and Barking in east London. Printed in pink on the Tube map, it serves 29 stations over 15.8 miles (25.5 km). Between Farringdon and Aldgate East it skirts the City of London, the capital's financial heart, hence the line's name. Its tunnels are just below the surface and are a similar size to those on British main lines. Most of the track and all stations are shared with either the District, Circle, or Metropolitan lines. Over 114 million passenger journeys are made each year on the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines.

Moorgate station

Moorgate station

Moorgate is a central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station on Moorgate in the City of London. Main line railway services for Hertford, Welwyn Garden City, Stevenage and Letchworth are operated by Great Northern, while the Underground station is served by the Circle, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan and Northern lines.

Northern City Line

Northern City Line

The Northern City Line is a commuter railway line in England, which runs from Moorgate station to Finsbury Park in London with services running beyond. It is part of the Great Northern Route services, and operates as the south-eastern branch of the East Coast Main Line (ECML). It is underground from Moorgate to Drayton Park in Highbury, from which point it runs in a cutting until joining the ECML south of Finsbury Park. Its stations span northern inner districts of Greater London southwards to the City of London, the UK's main financial centre. Since December 2015, its service timetable has been extended to run into the late evenings and at weekends, meeting a new franchise commitment for a minimum of six trains per hour until 23:59 on weekdays and four trains per hour at weekends.

Barbican tube station

Barbican tube station

Barbican is a London Underground station situated near the Barbican Estate, on the edge of the ward of Farringdon Within, in the City of London in Central London. It has been known by various names since its opening in 1865, mostly in reference to the neighbouring ward of Aldersgate.

Farringdon station

Farringdon station

Farringdon is a London Underground and connected main line National Rail station in Clerkenwell, central London. The station is in the London Borough of Islington, just outside the boundary of the City of London. Opened in 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground passenger railway, Farringdon is one of the oldest surviving underground railway stations in the world.

Metropolitan line extension

Diagram of the Croxley Rail Link
Diagram of the Croxley Rail Link

Also known as the Croxley Rail Link, an extension to the Metropolitan line was to reroute the Watford branch from the current terminus using the disused Croxley Green branch line to Watford Junction. Funding was agreed in December 2011[71] and the necessary permission was granted by the UK Government in July 2013.[72][37][73] Due to a funding shortfall, the project was cancelled in 2016.[73]

Source: "Metropolitan line", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolitan_line.

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References

Footnotes

Notes

  1. ^ "Performance: LU Performance Data Almanac". Transport for London. 2011–2012. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 17 January 2013.
  2. ^ Green 1987, pp. 3–5.
  3. ^ Edwards, Dennis; Pigram, Ron (1988). The Golden Years of the Metropolitan Railway and the Metro-land Dream. Bloomsbury. p. 32. ISBN 1-870630-11-4.
  4. ^ Pipe, Victoria; Marshall, Geoff (2018). The Railway Adventures: Places, Trains, People and Stations. Tewkesbury: September Publishing. p. 82. ISBN 9781910463871.
  5. ^ Bobrick, Benson (1981). Labyrinths of Iron. Newsweek books. p. 142. ISBN 9780882252995.
  6. ^ Green 1987, pp. 7–10.
  7. ^ Green 1987, pp. 11–14.
  8. ^ Green 1987, pp. 24–26.
  9. ^ "A Trip on the Metropolitan Railway (1910)". Screen Online. British Film Institute. Retrieved 25 January 2016.
  10. ^ Green 1987, pp. 43–45.
  11. ^ Green 1987, pp. 46–48.
  12. ^ Horne 2003, p. 69.
  13. ^ a b Green 1987, p. 51.
  14. ^ a b Green 1987, p. 63.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Rose, Douglas (December 2007) [1980]. The London Underground: A Diagrammatic History (8th ed.). London: Capital Transport. ISBN 978-1-85414-315-0.
  16. ^ Bruce 1983, pp. 72–74.
  17. ^ Bruce 1983, pp. 78–81.
  18. ^ Green 1987, p. 55.
  19. ^ Bruce 1983, p. 110.
  20. ^ Bruce 1983, p. 113.
  21. ^ Croome, Desmond F.; Jackson, Alan Arthur (1993). Rails Through the Clay: A History of London's Tube Railways. Capital Transport. p. 468. ISBN 978-1-85414-151-4.
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  37. ^ a b "Croxley Rail Link". Transport for London. 2012. Archived from the original on 25 March 2013. Retrieved 23 November 2012.
  38. ^ Louis, Nathan (8 August 2021). "The 'secret' Met line track near Watford known as 'North Curve'". Watford Observer. Retrieved 15 September 2021.
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  40. ^ a b Kichenside, G.M.; Williams, Alan. British Railway Signalling. p. 72.
  41. ^ "Facts & figures". tfl.gov.uk. Transport for London. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  42. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Working timetable 340 - Metropolitan line" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 May 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  43. ^ Detailed London transport map - Carto Metro
  44. ^ Working timetable 35 - Circle and Hammersmith & City lines
  45. ^ "Commissioner's Report" (PDF). Board Meeting Documents. paragraph 3.2: Transport for London. 20 September 2012. Archived (PDF) from the original on 26 August 2020. Retrieved 27 September 2012.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
  46. ^ Waboso, David (December 2010). "Transforming the tube". Modern Railways. London. pp. 42–45.
  47. ^ a b "Movia metro – London, United Kingdom". Bombardier. Retrieved 27 January 2011.
  48. ^ "'S' stock making its mark". Modern Railways. London. December 2010. p. 46.
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  50. ^ *"Rolling Stock: A Stock". Transport for London. Retrieved 25 November 2012.
  51. ^ "S stock". Transport for London. Archived from the original on 29 December 2013. Retrieved 10 January 2012. (Note: The table erroneously says "Length per car", instead of "Length per train".)
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  53. ^ Jackson 1986, p. 176.
  54. ^ Jackson 1986, p. 281.
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  63. ^ "London Underground and Bombardier abandon Tube signalling contract". International Railway Journal. 3 January 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
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  67. ^ Stewart, Rob (January 2013). "Cityflo 650 to control the SSR". Modern Railways. pp. 42–43.
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Sources

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