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Maeonius

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Maeonius
Emperor of Palmyra
Maeonius.jpg
Maeonius from Guillaume Rouillé's Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum
Emperor of the Palmyrene Empire
Reign267
PredecessorTitle created
SuccessorVaballathus
HouseHouse of Odaenathus
Zenobia sentences to death Maeonius, the murderer of her husband Odaenathus, end of 16th century, Bruxelles manufacture
Zenobia sentences to death Maeonius, the murderer of her husband Odaenathus, end of 16th century, Bruxelles manufacture

Maeonius (died c. 267), or Maconius, was a short-lived ruler of Palmyra.

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Philip the Arab

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Life

He was the nephew (according to Zonaras xii.24) or the cousin (according to Historia Augusta, which lists him among the Thirty Tyrants) of Odaenathus of Palmyra, who had taken control of the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire after the defeat in battle and capture of Emperor Valerian by Shapur I of the Sassanid Empire.

According to Historia Augusta, Maeonius killed Odaenathus and his son Hairan during a celebration, because of a conspiracy organised by Zenobia, wife of Odaenathus, who wanted her sons to succeed her husband instead of Hairan (who was the son of Odaenathus by another woman). According to Gibbon, the murder was revenge for a short confinement imposed on Maeonius by Odaenathus for being disrespectful.

Zonaras tells that Maeonius was killed immediately after the murder of Odaenathus, while Historia has Maeonius proclaiming himself emperor, with Zenobia having him soon killed, in order to take the power for herself.

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Odaenathus

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Palmyra

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Palmyra is an ancient city in present-day Homs Governorate, Syria. Archaeological finds date back to the Neolithic period, and documents first mention the city in the early second millennium BC. Palmyra changed hands on a number of occasions between different empires before becoming a subject of the Roman Empire in the first century AD.

Valerian (emperor)

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Shapur I

Shapur I

Shapur I was the second Sasanian King of Kings of Iran. The dating of his reign is disputed, but it is generally agreed that he ruled from 240 to 270, with his father Ardashir I as co-regent until the death of the latter in 242. During his co-regency, he helped his father with the conquest and destruction of the Arab city of Hatra, whose fall was facilitated, according to Islamic tradition, by the actions of his future wife al-Nadirah. Shapur also consolidated and expanded the empire of Ardashir I, waged war against the Roman Empire, and seized its cities of Nisibis and Carrhae while he was advancing as far as Roman Syria. Although he was defeated at the Battle of Resaena in 243 by Roman emperor Gordian III, he was the following year able to win the Battle of Misiche and force the new Roman Emperor Philip the Arab to sign a favorable peace treaty that was regarded by the Romans as "a most shameful treaty".

Zenobia

Zenobia

Septimia Zenobia was a third-century queen of the Palmyrene Empire in Syria. Many legends surround her ancestry; she was probably not a commoner and she married the ruler of the city, Odaenathus. Her husband became king in 260, elevating Palmyra to supreme power in the Near East by defeating the Sassanians and stabilizing the Roman East. After Odaenathus' assassination, Zenobia became the regent of her son Vaballathus and held de facto power throughout his reign.

Source: "Maeonius", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maeonius.

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