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List of shipwrecks in November 1887

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The list of shipwrecks in November 1887 includes ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during November 1887.

1 November

List of shipwrecks: 1 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Alabama  United Kingdom The barque was driven ashore and wrecked at Cape Henry, Virginia, United States. She was on a voyage from Saint John, New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada to Washington, D.C.[1][2]
Alert, and
Egeria
 United Kingdom
 United States
The barque Egeria was driven into the paddle steamer Alert at Woodside, Cheshire. Both vessels were damaged.[3]
Alice  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Cardiff, Glamorgan.[3]
Ann Knox  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore and wrecked at Douglas, Isle of Man. Her three crew were rescued by rocket apparatus. She was on a voyage from Newry, County Antrim to Garston, Lancashire.[3][4]
Ayrsome  United Kingdom The steamship departed from Landskrona, Sweden for Antwerp, Belgium. No further trace, reported missing.[5]
Bilow  United Kingdom The steamship arrived at Dover, Kent on fire. She was on a voyage from Antwerp, Belgium to Genoa, Italy. The fire was extinguished.[3]
Bloomer  United Kingdom The schooner was scuttled at Whiting Bay, Isle of Arran.[6]
Bolivar  Austria-Hungary The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Bilbao, Spain.[6]
Bridget  United Kingdom The schooner was driven againts the breakwater at Holyhead, Anglesey. Her five crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Dungarvan, County Antrim to Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire. She subsequently floated off and capsized.[6][3]
Christiania  Norway The schooner was driven ashore at the mouth of the River Voryd. She was refloated and towed in to Caernarfon, United Kingdom.[3]
Cloffock  United Kingdom The schooner was wrecked at Ramsey, Isle of Man. Her four crew were rescued by rocket apparatus. She was on a voyage from Workington, Cumberland to the Strangford Lough.[6][3]
Concordia Flag unknown The brig was driven ashore at Abersoch, Glamorgan. Her crew were rescued.[3]
Crosbie  United Kingdom The schooner foundered in the Irish Sea off Lytham St. Annes, Lancashire. Her eight crew were rescued.[3]
Eastward  United Kingdom The schooner collided with the training ship Indefatigable ( United Kingdom). She was then collided with a shrimp boat and a schooner before she was driven into the landing stage, capsized and sank at Tranmere, Cheshire and sank with the loss of three of her five crew. She was on a voyage from the Weston Point Docks, Cheshire to Irvine, Ayrshire.[3][4][7]
E. B. Everman  United States The schooner was wrecked on the coast of Virginia with the loss of one of her five crew. Survivors were rescued by the steamship Wyanoke ( United States). E. B. Everman was on a voyage from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Richmond, Virginia.[2]
Faith  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore at Lamlash, Isle of Arran.[4]
Flower of May  United Kingdom The ship ran aground and sank off the Conishead Priory, Lancashire. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Ulverston to Lytham St. Annes.[4]
Gazelle  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Cardiff.[6]
Glad Tidings  United Kingdom The ship was driven into other vessels at Portmadoc, Caernarfonshire and was damaged.[7]
Happy Go Lucky  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore on the Isle of Whithorn, Wigtownshire.[8]
Harvester  United Kingdom The barque was driven ashore at Cape Henry. She was on a voyage from Londonderry to Baltimore, Maryland, United States.[4][2]
Helvetia  Norway The barque was wrecked in Rhossili Bay. A crew member was rescued by breeches buoy, the rest reaching safety in the ship's boat. She was on a voyage from Campbellton, New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada to Swansea, Glamorgan.[9]
Humble  United Kingdom The fishing trawler was driven ashore at Plymouth, Devon. She was refloated with assistance from the tug Vixen ( United Kingdom).[3]
Idea  United Kingdom The ship was driven into other vessels at Porthmadog and was damaged.[7]
Industry  United Kingdom The ship was driven into other vessels at Porthmadog and was damaged.[7]
Kittie Darling  United Kingdom The schooner was abandoned off Ramsey. Her three crew were rescued by the Ramsey Lifeboat Two Sisters (Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.svg Royal National Lifeboat Institution).[3]
Laurette  United Kingdom The cutter yacht was driven ashore and wrecked at Fortuneswell, Dorset with the loss of all ten people on board.[3]
Lerry  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore in Angle Bay. She was on a voyage from Gloucester to Fishguard, Pembrokeshire.[4]
Lussignano  Austria-Hungary The barque caught fire off Gibraltar and was abandoned. Her crew were rescued by the barque Gaspare ( Italy). Lussignano subsequently sank.[4]
Manantico  United States The schooner was wrecked on the cost of Virginia with the loss of two of her crew.[2]
Maren  Denmark The brigantine was driven ashore at Greenhill, Dorset. Her crew were rescued by the Weymouth Lifeboat. She was on a voyage from "Laguna, Mexico" to Hamburg, Germany.[6][3][4]
Margaret Johns  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at "Caerury". Her crew survived.[4]
Mary Ann  United Kingdom The fishing vessel was driven ashore near the Mumbles, Glamorgan.[4]
Mary Johns  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at Fowey, Cornwall.[6]
Mary Wilson  United Kingdom The brig was driven ashore and wrecked on Oronsay, Inner Hebrides. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Ardrossan, Ayrshire to Limerick.[4]
Maude  United Kingdom The fishing trawler was driven ashore in Deadman's Bay, Devon. She was refloated with assistance from Bell ( United Kingdom).[3]
Mayo  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground on the Kimmeridge Ledge, in the English Channel the coast of Dorset.[6] Her crew were rescued by rocket apparatus. She was a total loss.[4]
Memi  United Kingdom The yacht sank in the Cattewater.[3]
Natal  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at Nixton Point, Cornwall.[3]
Nautilus  Netherlands The brig was driven ashore at Falmouth, Cornwall, United Kingdom with the loss of a crew member.[3]
Ocean Bird  United States The schooner sank in the Pasquatolik River with the loss of all nineteen people on board. She was on a voyage from Nag's Head to Elizabeth, North Carolina.[2]
Phœnix  United Kingdom The smack was driven ashore in Angle Bay.[4]
Phosphorus  United Kingdom The ketch sank at Plymouth, Devon.[3]
Prothesa  United Kingdom The brigantine was abandoned off Ramsey. Her seven crew were rescued by the Ramsey Lifeboat Two Sisters (Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.svg Royal National Lifeboat Institution).[3]
Robert Preston  United Kingdom The brigantine was driven ashore on the Isle of Whithorn.[8]
Red Rover  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore at Abersoch. Her crew were rescued.[3]
Rudolph Ebel Flag unknown The ship departed from Falmouth for Cádiz, Spain. No further trace, reported overdue.[10]
Samuel Dixon  United Kingdom The schooner was abandoned in the Irish Sea off Wicklow. Her four crew were rescued by the Wicklow Lifeboat Robert T. Garden (Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.svg Royal National Lifeboat Institution).[3]
Sendre  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Cardiff.[3]
Sparkling Wave  United Kingdom The fishing trawler was driven ashore in Deadman's Bay. She was refloated with assistance from Bell ( United Kingdom).[6]
Susan Vittery  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at Nixton Point.[3]
Thursnella  Denmark The brigantine was driven ashore and wrecked at Trefusis Point, Cornwall with the loss of her captain.[3][4]
Token  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Cardiff.[6]
Tregonel  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Penarth, Glamorgan. Her crew were rescued.[3]
Trevaunce  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore and severely damaged at Cardiff.[3]
Water Lily  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Cardiff.[3]
Wild Hunter  United Kingdom The schooner was driven into the landing stage and wrecked at Tranmere.[6]
Unnamed Flag unknown The steamship was driven ashore on Heligoland.[6]
Several unnamed vessels  United Kingdom The Mersey Flats sank at Tranmere.[3]
Unnamed  United Kingdom The powder hulk broke from her moorings in the River Mersey. She was beached at Eastham, Cheshire with assistance from the ferry Firefly ( United Kingdom).[3]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

Cape Henry

Cape Henry

Cape Henry is a cape on the Atlantic shore of Virginia located in the northeast corner of Virginia Beach. It is the southern boundary of the entrance to the long estuary of the Chesapeake Bay.

Saint John, New Brunswick

Saint John, New Brunswick

Saint John is a seaport city of the Atlantic Ocean located on the Bay of Fundy in the province of New Brunswick, Canada. Saint John is the oldest incorporated city in Canada, established by royal charter on May 18, 1785, during the reign of King George III. The port is Canada's third-largest port by tonnage with a cargo base that includes dry and liquid bulk, break bulk, containers, and cruise. The city was the most populous in New Brunswick until the 2016 census, when it was overtaken by Moncton. It is currently the second-largest city in the province, with a population of 69,895 over an area of 315.59 km2 (121.85 sq mi).

United States

United States

The United States of America, commonly known as the United States or informally America, is a country in North America. It consists of 50 states, a federal district, five major unincorporated territories, nine Minor Outlying Islands, and 326 Indian reservations. It is the third-largest country by both land and total area. The United States shares land borders with Canada to its north and with Mexico to its south. It has maritime borders with the Bahamas, Cuba, Russia, and other nations. With a population of over 331 million, it is the third most populous country in the world. The national capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city and financial center is New York City.

Paddle steamer

Paddle steamer

A paddle steamer is a steamship or steamboat powered by a steam engine that drives paddle wheels to propel the craft through the water. In antiquity, paddle wheelers followed the development of poles, oars and sails, where the first uses were wheelers driven by animals or humans.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Cardiff is the capital and largest city of Wales. It forms a principal area, officially known as the City and County of Cardiff, and the city is the eleventh-largest in the United Kingdom. Located in the south-east of Wales and in the Cardiff Capital Region, Cardiff is the county town of the historic county of Glamorgan and in 1974–1996 of South Glamorgan. It belongs to the Eurocities network of the largest European cities. A small town until the early 19th century, its prominence as a port for coal when mining began in the region helped its expansion. In 1905, it was ranked as a city and in 1955 proclaimed capital of Wales. Cardiff Built-up Area covers a larger area outside the county boundary, including the towns of Dinas Powys and Penarth.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Douglas, Isle of Man

Douglas, Isle of Man

Douglas is the capital and largest town of the Isle of Man, with a population of 27,938 (2011). It is located at the mouth of the River Douglas, and on a sweeping bay of two miles. The River Douglas forms part of the town's harbour and main commercial port.

Newry

Newry

Newry is a city in Northern Ireland, divided by the Clanrye river in counties Armagh and Down, 34 miles (55 km) from Belfast and 67 miles (108 km) from Dublin. It had a population of 26,967 in 2011.

County Antrim

County Antrim

County Antrim is one of six counties of Northern Ireland and one of the thirty-two counties of Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,086 square kilometres (1,192 sq mi) and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster.

2 November

List of shipwrecks: 2 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Ann Francis  United Kingdom The ship was run into by the steamship Countess of Dublin ( United Kingdom) and sank at Millwall, Essex.[4]
England's Rose  United Kingdom The ship was driven onto the Saltcar Rocks, on the coast of Yorkshire. She was on a voyage from Great Yarmouth, Norfolk to Hartlepool, County Durham.[4]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Millwall

Millwall

Millwall is a district on the western and southern side of the Isle of Dogs, in east London, England, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It lies to the immediate south of Canary Wharf and Limehouse, north of Greenwich and Deptford, east of Rotherhithe, west of Cubitt Town, and has a long shoreline along London's Tideway, part of the River Thames. It was part of the County of Middlesex and from 1889 the County of London following the passing of the Local Government Act 1888, it later became part of Greater London in 1965.

Essex

Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west. There are three cities in Essex: Southend, Colchester and Chelmsford, in order of population. For the purposes of government statistics, Essex is placed in the East of England region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the ancient county. Next, the largest is the former postal county, followed by the ceremonial county, with the smallest being the administrative county—the area administered by the County Council, which excludes the two unitary authorities of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea. The ceremonial county occupies the eastern part of what was, during the Early Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Essex. As well as rural areas and urban areas, it forms part of the wider Home Counties of England.

North Riding of Yorkshire

North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is a subdivision of Yorkshire, England, alongside York, the East Riding and West Riding. The riding's highest point is at Mickle Fell with 2,585 ft (788 metres).

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth, often called Yarmouth, is a seaside town and unparished area in, and the main administrative centre of, the Borough of Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, England; it straddles the River Yare and is located 20 miles (30 km) east of Norwich. A population of 38,693 in the 2011 Census made it Norfolk's third most populous. Its fishing industry, mainly for herring, shrank after the mid-20th century and has all but ended. North Sea oil from the 1960s supplied an oil-rig industry that services offshore natural gas rigs; more recently, offshore wind power and other renewable energy industries have ensued.

Norfolk

Norfolk

Norfolk is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the north-west, Cambridgeshire to the west and south-west, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea, with The Wash to the north-west. The county town is the city of Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile. Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).

Hartlepool

Hartlepool

Hartlepool is a seaside and port town in County Durham, England. It is the largest settlement and administrative centre of the Borough of Hartlepool. With an estimated population of 90,123, it is the second-largest settlement in County Durham.

County Durham

County Durham

County Durham, officially simply Durham, is a ceremonial county in North East England. The ceremonial county spawned from the historic County Palatine of Durham in 1853. In 1996, the county gained part of the abolished ceremonial county of Cleveland. The county town is the city of Durham. The county borders Cumbria to the west, North Yorkshire to the south, and Tyne and Wear and Northumberland to the north. Boundaries initially aligned to the historic county, stretching between the rivers Tyne and Tees. The County Borough of Teesside formed in 1968, the ceremonial boundaries adjusted while the historic boundaries remained. The Local Government Act 1972 in 1974 further separated the boundaries. The largest settlement is Darlington (92,363) followed by Hartlepool (88,855) and Stockton-on-Tees (82,729).

3 November

List of shipwrecks: 3 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Canos  United Kingdom The steamship ran ashore in the River Thames near Gravesend, Kent.[1]
England''s Rose  United Kingdom The collier, a brigantine, foundered off the coast of Kent.[11]
Graphic  United Kingdom The steam hoy was driven ashore in Pegwell Bay, Kent. She was on a voyage from Sandwich, Kent to the River Thames or vice versa.[11]
John Hannah  United Kingdom The brigantine ran aground on the Felixtowe Ledge, in the North Sea off the coast of Suffolk. Her crew survived. She was on a voyage from Seaham, County Durham to Ramsgate, Kent.[1]
Saffron  United Kingdom The collier, a brig, foundered off the Kent coast.[11]
Wheatsheaf  United Kingdom The Thames barge foundered off the Isle of Grain, Kent. Her crew were rescued by the tug London ( United Kingdom).[1]
Unnamed Flag unknown The brig was driven ashore at Deal, Kent.[1]
Unnamed Flag unknown The brig was driven ashore in Pegwell Bat.[11]

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Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

River Thames

River Thames

The River Thames, known alternatively in parts as the River Isis, is a river that flows through southern England including London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England and the second-longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn.

Brigantine

Brigantine

A brigantine is a two-masted sailing vessel with a fully square-rigged foremast and at least two sails on the main mast: a square topsail and a gaff sail mainsail. The main mast is the second and taller of the two masts.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Hoy (boat)

Hoy (boat)

A hoy is a small sloop-rigged coasting ship or a heavy barge used for freight, usually with a burthen of about 60 tons (bm). The word derives from the Middle Dutch hoey. In 1495, one of the Paston Letters included the phrase, An hoye of Dorderycht, in such a way as to indicate that such contact was then no more than mildly unusual. The English term was first used on the Dutch Heude-ships that entered service with the Royal Navy.

Pegwell Bay

Pegwell Bay

Pegwell Bay is a shallow inlet in the English Channel coast astride the estuary of the River Stour north of Sandwich Bay, between Ramsgate and Sandwich in Kent. Part of the bay is a nature reserve, with seashore habitats including mudflats and salt marsh with migrating waders and wildfowl. The public can access the nature reserve via Pegwell Bay Country Park, which is off the A256 Ramsgate to Dover road.

Sandwich, Kent

Sandwich, Kent

Sandwich is a town and civil parish in the Dover District of Kent, south-east England. It lies on the River Stour and has a population of 4,985. Sandwich was one of the Cinque Ports and still has many original medieval buildings, including several listed public houses and gates in the old town walls, churches, almshouses and the White Mill. While once a major port, it is now two miles from the sea due to the disappearance of the Wantsum Channel. Its historic centre has been preserved. Sandwich Bay is home to nature reserves and two world-class golf courses, Royal St George's and Prince's. The town is also home to many educational and cultural events. Sandwich also gave its name to the food by way of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, and the word sandwich is now found in several languages.

North Sea

North Sea

The North Sea lies between Great Britain, Norway, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium. An epeiric sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the Atlantic Ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, covering 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi).

Suffolk

Suffolk

Suffolk is a ceremonial county of England in East Anglia. It borders Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south; the North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket, and Felixstowe which has one of the largest container ports in Europe.

Seaham

Seaham

Seaham is a seaside town in County Durham, England. Located on the Durham Coast, Seaham is situated 6 miles south of Sunderland and 13 miles (21 km) east of Durham. The town grew from the late 19th century onwards as a result of investments in its harbour and coal mines. The town is twinned with the German town of Gerlingen.

County Durham

County Durham

County Durham, officially simply Durham, is a ceremonial county in North East England. The ceremonial county spawned from the historic County Palatine of Durham in 1853. In 1996, the county gained part of the abolished ceremonial county of Cleveland. The county town is the city of Durham. The county borders Cumbria to the west, North Yorkshire to the south, and Tyne and Wear and Northumberland to the north. Boundaries initially aligned to the historic county, stretching between the rivers Tyne and Tees. The County Borough of Teesside formed in 1968, the ceremonial boundaries adjusted while the historic boundaries remained. The Local Government Act 1972 in 1974 further separated the boundaries. The largest settlement is Darlington (92,363) followed by Hartlepool (88,855) and Stockton-on-Tees (82,729).

Ramsgate

Ramsgate

Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of about 40,000. In 2011, according to the Census, there was a population of 40,408. Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing. The town has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate provided cross-channel ferries for many years.

5 November

List of shipwrecks: 5 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Livingstone  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore at Dungeness, Kent with the loss of a crew member. She was on a voyage from Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland to Teignmouth, Devon.[12] She was refloated on 12 November.[13]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newcastle upon Tyne, or simply Newcastle, is a city and metropolitan borough in Tyne and Wear, England. The city is located on the River Tyne's northern bank and forms the largest part of the Tyneside built-up area. Newcastle is also the most populous city of North East England. Newcastle developed around a Roman settlement called Pons Aelius and the settlement later took the name of a castle built in 1080 by William the Conqueror's eldest son, Robert Curthose.

Northumberland

Northumberland

Northumberland is a county in Northern England, one of two counties in England which border with Scotland. Notable landmarks in the county include Alnwick Castle, Bamburgh Castle, Hadrian's Wall and Hexham Abbey.

Teignmouth

Teignmouth

Teignmouth is a seaside town, fishing port and civil parish in the English county of Devon. It is situated on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign, about 12 miles south of Exeter. The town had a population of 14,749 at the last census in 2011.

Devon

Devon

Devon is a county in South West England, reaching from the Bristol Channel in the north to the English Channel in the south. It is bounded by Cornwall to the west, Somerset to the north-east and Dorset to the east. The county includes the districts of East Devon, Mid Devon, North Devon, South Hams, Teignbridge, Torridge and West Devon and the city of Exeter, its county town. The other two large urban areas Plymouth and Torbay are each geographically part of Devon, but are administered as unitary authorities. Combined as a ceremonial county, Devon's area is 6,707 km2 and its population is about 1.2 million.

7 November

List of shipwrecks: 7 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Earl of Beaconsfield  United Kingdom The full-rigged ship was driven ashore 6 nautical miles (11 km) north of Withernsea, Yorkshire. She was on a voyage from Calcutta, India to Hull, Yorkshire.[12] She subsequently broke up.[14]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Full-rigged ship

Full-rigged ship

A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Such vessels also have each mast stepped in three segments: lower mast, top mast, and topgallant mast. Other large, multi-masted sailing vessels may be regarded as ships while lacking one of the elements of a full-rigged ship, e.g. having one or more masts support only a fore-and-aft sail or having a mast that only has two segments.

Withernsea

Withernsea

Withernsea is a seaside resort and civil parish in Holderness, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. Its white inland lighthouse, rising around 127 feet (39 m) above Hull Road, now houses a museum to 1950s actress Kay Kendall, who was born in the town.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

British Raj

British Raj

The British Raj was the rule of the British Crown on the Indian subcontinent; it is also called Crown rule in India, or Direct rule in India, and lasted from 1858 to 1947. The region under British control was commonly called India in contemporaneous usage and included areas directly administered by the United Kingdom, which were collectively called British India, and areas ruled by indigenous rulers, but under British paramountcy, called the princely states. The region was sometimes called the Indian Empire, though not officially.

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull, usually abbreviated to Hull, is a port city and unitary authority in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It lies upon the River Hull at its confluence with the Humber Estuary, 25 miles (40 km) inland from the North Sea and 50 miles (80 km) south-east of York, the historic county town. With a population of 259,778 (mid-2019 est.), it is the fourth-largest city in the Yorkshire and the Humber region after Leeds, Sheffield and Bradford.

8 November

List of shipwrecks: 8 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Ariel  United Kingdom The ship was abandoned in the North Sea off the Coquet Islands, Northumberland. Her crew were rescued by the steamship Otto McCombie ( United Kingdom).[15]
Gamecock  United Kingdom The brig was run into by the steamship Mastiff ( United Kingdom) and sank at Dalmuir, Renfrewshire. Her crew were rescued by Mastiff. Gamecock was on a voyage from Glasgow, Renfrewshire to Dundalk, County Louth.[15]
Lene  United Kingdom The schooner was abandoned in the North Sea 240 nautical miles (440 km) north east of Spurn Point, Yorkshire. Her crew were rescued by the smack 'Integrity ( United Kingdom). Lene was on a voyage from Fowey, Cornwall to Stettin, Germany.[16]

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North Sea

North Sea

The North Sea lies between Great Britain, Norway, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium. An epeiric sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the Atlantic Ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, covering 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi).

Northumberland

Northumberland

Northumberland is a county in Northern England, one of two counties in England which border with Scotland. Notable landmarks in the county include Alnwick Castle, Bamburgh Castle, Hadrian's Wall and Hexham Abbey.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Brig

Brig

A brig is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: two masts which are both square-rigged. Brigs originated in the second half of the 18th century and were a common type of smaller merchant vessel or warship from then until the latter part of the 19th century. In commercial use, they were gradually replaced by fore-and-aft rigged vessels such as schooners, as owners sought to reduce crew costs by having rigs that could be handled by fewer men. In Royal Navy use, brigs were retained for training use when the battle fleets consisted almost entirely of iron-hulled steamships.

Dalmuir

Dalmuir

Dalmuir is an area nine miles northwest of Glasgow, Scotland, on the western side of Clydebank, and part of West Dunbartonshire Council Area. The name is a lowland Scots derivation of the Gaelic meaning Big Field. The area was originally two separate villages with Dalmuir Shore joining with Clydebank in 1886 and Dalmuir Village in 1906, during a period of rapid industrialization and expansion. Dalmuir is bounded by the village of Old Kilpatrick to the west, the Mountblow and Parkhall housing schemes to the north, and the Clydebank town centre area to the east. To the south is the River Clyde.

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire or the County of Renfrew is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It contains the local government council areas of Inverclyde, Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire, as well as parts of Glasgow and is occasionally named Greater Renfrewshire to distinguish the county from the modern council area.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland and the fourth-most populous city in the United Kingdom, as well as being the 27th largest city by population in Europe. In 2020, it had an estimated population of 635,640. Straddling the border between historic Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City Council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and is governed by Glasgow City Council. It is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands.

Dundalk

Dundalk

Dundalk, meaning "the fort of Dealgan", is the county town of County Louth, Ireland. The town is on the Castletown River, which flows into Dundalk Bay on the east coast of Ireland. It is halfway between Dublin and Belfast, close to the border with Northern Ireland. It is the eighth largest urban area in Ireland, with a population of 39,004 as of the 2016 census.

County Louth

County Louth

County Louth is a coastal county in the Eastern and Midland Region of Ireland, within the province of Leinster. Louth is bordered by the counties of Meath to the south, Monaghan to the west, Armagh to the north and Down to the north-east, across Carlingford Lough. It is the smallest county in Ireland by land area and the 17th most populous, with just over 139,100 residents as of 2022. The county is named after the village of Louth. Louth County Council is the local authority for the county.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

Smack (ship)

Smack (ship)

A smack was a traditional fishing boat used off the coast of Britain and the Atlantic coast of America for most of the 19th century and, in small numbers, up to the Second World War. Many larger smacks were originally cutter-rigged sailing boats until about 1865, when smacks had become so large that cutter main booms were unhandy. The smaller smacks retain the gaff cutter rig. The larger smacks were lengthened and re-rigged and new ketch-rigged smacks were built, but boats varied from port to port. Some boats had a topsail on the mizzen mast, while others had a bowsprit carrying a jib.

9 November

List of shipwrecks: 9 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Drysdale  United Kingdom The steamship sank at the stern at Greenock, Renfrewshire.[15] She was refloated on 12 November and placed under repair.[13]
Olga  Austria-Hungary The full-rigged ship was wrecked between "Island Corrente" and Portopalo di Capo Passero, Sicily, Italy. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States to Fiume.[16]
Sovereign  United Kingdom The barquentine was abandoned by all but two of her crew. She was on a voyage from Miramichi, New Brunswick, Dominion of Canada to a British port. She was subsequently taken in to Crookhaven, County Cork in a waterlogged condition.[17]

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Greenock

Greenock

Greenock is a town and administrative centre in the Inverclyde council area in Scotland and a former burgh within the historic county of Renfrewshire, located in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It forms part of a contiguous urban area with Gourock to the west and Port Glasgow to the east.

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire or the County of Renfrew is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It contains the local government council areas of Inverclyde, Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire, as well as parts of Glasgow and is occasionally named Greater Renfrewshire to distinguish the county from the modern council area.

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Dual Monarchy, or Austria, was a constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918. It was formed with the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 in the aftermath of the Austro-Prussian War and was dissolved shortly after its defeat in the First World War.

Full-rigged ship

Full-rigged ship

A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Such vessels also have each mast stepped in three segments: lower mast, top mast, and topgallant mast. Other large, multi-masted sailing vessels may be regarded as ships while lacking one of the elements of a full-rigged ship, e.g. having one or more masts support only a fore-and-aft sail or having a mast that only has two segments.

Portopalo di Capo Passero

Portopalo di Capo Passero

Portopalo di Capo Passero is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Syracuse, Sicily (Italy). The southernmost commune of the island of Sicily, it is about 220 kilometres (140 mi) southeast of Palermo and about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southwest of Syracuse. As of February 2017, it had a population of 3,916 and an area of 14.9 square kilometres (5.8 sq mi). The nearest city is Pachino with a population of nearly 10,000. Portopalo belonged to the municipality of Pachino until 1975 when it became an autonomous municipality itself. Portopalo is widely considered to have some of the best fishing that the Mediterranean area has to offer because of its location, connection of the Ionian and Mediterranean Seas and its temperate climate, which provides average temperatures between 14° and 25 °C.

Sicily

Sicily

Sicily is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 20 regions of Italy. The Strait of Messina divides it from the region of Calabria in Southern Italy. It is one of the five Italian autonomous regions and is officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. The region has 5 million inhabitants. Its capital city is Palermo.

Kingdom of Italy

Kingdom of Italy

The Kingdom of Italy was a state that existed from 1861, when Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy, until 1946, when civil discontent led to an institutional referendum to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic. The state resulted from a decades-long process, the Risorgimento, of consolidating the different states of the Italian Peninsula into a single state. That process was influenced by the Savoy-led Kingdom of Sardinia, which can be considered Italy's legal predecessor state.

Barquentine

Barquentine

A barquentine or schooner barque is a sailing vessel with three or more masts; with a square rigged foremast and fore-and-aft rigged main, mizzen and any other masts.

Miramichi

Miramichi

The name "Miramichi" was first applied to a region in the northeast of New Brunswick, Canada, and has since been applied to other places in Canada and the United States. Although other interpretations have been suggested, it is believed that "Miramichi" was derived from the Montagnais words "Maissimeu Assi", and was perhaps introduced for use in European languages by Jacques Cartier in 1535.

New Brunswick

New Brunswick

New Brunswick is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is one of the three Maritime provinces and one of the four Atlantic provinces. It is the only province with both English and French as its official languages.

Crookhaven

Crookhaven

Crookhaven is a village in County Cork, Ireland, on the most southwestern tip of the island of Ireland. With an out-of-season population of about sixty, it swells in the summer season to about four hundred, when the occupants of the seasonal holiday homes arrive.

County Cork

County Cork

County Cork is the largest and the southernmost county of Ireland, named after the city of Cork, the state's second-largest city. It is in the province of Munster and the Southern Region. Its largest market towns are Mallow, Macroom, Midleton, and Skibbereen. As of 2022 the county had a population of 581,231, making it the third-most populous county in Ireland. Cork County Council is the local authority for the county, while Cork City Council governs the city of Cork and its environs. Notable Corkonians include Michael Collins, Jack Lynch, Roy Keane, Sonia O'Sullivan and Cillian Murphy.

11 November

List of shipwrecks: 11 November 1887
Ship Country Description
City of Newcastle  United Kingdom The steamship caught fire off the Old Head of Kinsale, County Cork.[16]
Java  United Kingdom The ship departed from Pensacola, Florida, United States for Hull, Yorkshire. No further trace, reported missing.[18]
Marie Constance  United Kingdom The ship departed from Ballyshannon, County Donegal for Cardiff, Glamorgan. No further trace, reported overdue.[10]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Old Head of Kinsale

Old Head of Kinsale

The Old Head of Kinsale is a headland near Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland.

County Cork

County Cork

County Cork is the largest and the southernmost county of Ireland, named after the city of Cork, the state's second-largest city. It is in the province of Munster and the Southern Region. Its largest market towns are Mallow, Macroom, Midleton, and Skibbereen. As of 2022 the county had a population of 581,231, making it the third-most populous county in Ireland. Cork County Council is the local authority for the county, while Cork City Council governs the city of Cork and its environs. Notable Corkonians include Michael Collins, Jack Lynch, Roy Keane, Sonia O'Sullivan and Cillian Murphy.

Pensacola, Florida

Pensacola, Florida

Pensacola is the westernmost city in the Florida Panhandle, and the county seat and only incorporated city of Escambia County, Florida, United States. As of the 2020 United States census, the population was 54,312. Pensacola is the principal city of the Pensacola Metropolitan Area, which had an estimated 502,629 residents as of 2019.

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull, usually abbreviated to Hull, is a port city and unitary authority in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It lies upon the River Hull at its confluence with the Humber Estuary, 25 miles (40 km) inland from the North Sea and 50 miles (80 km) south-east of York, the historic county town. With a population of 259,778 (mid-2019 est.), it is the fourth-largest city in the Yorkshire and the Humber region after Leeds, Sheffield and Bradford.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

Ballyshannon

Ballyshannon

Ballyshannon is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. It is located at the southern end of the county where the N3 from Dublin ends and the N15 crosses the River Erne. Incorporated in 1613, it is one of the oldest towns in Ireland.

County Donegal

County Donegal

County Donegal is a county of Ireland in the province of Ulster and in the Northern and Western Region. It is named after the town of Donegal in the south of the county. It has also been known as County Tyrconnell, after the historic territory of the same name, on which it was based. Donegal County Council is the local council and Lifford the county town.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Cardiff is the capital and largest city of Wales. It forms a principal area, officially known as the City and County of Cardiff, and the city is the eleventh-largest in the United Kingdom. Located in the south-east of Wales and in the Cardiff Capital Region, Cardiff is the county town of the historic county of Glamorgan and in 1974–1996 of South Glamorgan. It belongs to the Eurocities network of the largest European cities. A small town until the early 19th century, its prominence as a port for coal when mining began in the region helped its expansion. In 1905, it was ranked as a city and in 1955 proclaimed capital of Wales. Cardiff Built-up Area covers a larger area outside the county boundary, including the towns of Dinas Powys and Penarth.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

12 November

List of shipwrecks: 12 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Hoy Head  United Kingdom The steamship foundered off the Godrevy Lighthouse, Cornwall. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Swansea, Glamorgan to Rouen, Seine-Inférieure, France.[19]
Syren  United Kingdom The barque foundered at sea. Her crew were rescued by the barque Indien ( France). Syren was on a voyage from "Tuyu" to Falmouth, Cornwall.[20]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Godrevy Lighthouse

Godrevy Lighthouse

Godrevy Lighthouse was built in 1858–1859 on Godrevy Island in St Ives Bay, Cornwall. Standing approximately 300 metres (980 ft) off Godrevy Head, it marks the Stones reef, which has been a hazard to shipping for centuries.

Cornwall

Cornwall

Cornwall is a historic county and ceremonial county in South West England. It is recognised as one of the Celtic nations, and is the homeland of the Cornish people. Cornwall is bordered to the north and west by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, with the River Tamar forming the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The southwesternmost point is Land's End and the southernmost Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 568,210 and an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi). The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately. The administrative centre of Cornwall is Truro, its only city.

Swansea

Swansea

Swansea is a coastal city and the second-largest city of Wales. It forms a principal area, officially known as the City and County of Swansea.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

Rouen

Rouen

Rouen is a city on the River Seine in northern France. It is the prefecture of the region of Normandy and the department of Seine-Maritime. Formerly one of the largest and most prosperous cities of medieval Europe, the population of the metropolitan area is 702,945 (2018). People from Rouen are known as Rouennais.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a transcontinental country predominantly located in Western Europe and spanning overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Due to its several coastal territories, France has the largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Andorra, and Spain in continental Europe, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname, and Brazil in the Americas via its overseas territories in French Guiana and Saint Martin. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain close to 68 million people. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre; other major urban areas include Marseille, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, and Nice.

Falmouth, Cornwall

Falmouth, Cornwall

Falmouth is a town, civil parish and port on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It has a total resident population of 21,797.

13 November

List of shipwrecks: 13 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Bakuin  United Kingdom The steamship collided with the steamship Derwentwater ( United Kingdom) and was severely damaged. She was taken in to Penarth, Glamorgan in a waterlogged condition.[17]
Betsey  United Kingdom The schooner sprang a leak and foundered 8 nautical miles (15 km) south south west of the Cardigan Bay Lightship (Trinity House Ensign (pre-1937).svg Trinity House). Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Caernarfon to Hull, Yorkshire.[17]
Glenholme  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground off Whitefarland Point, Renfrewshire.[17]
Recepta  United Kingdom The steamship was severely damaged by fire at South Shields, County Durham.[17]
San Marco  Italy The steamship departed from Penarth, Glamorgan for Genoa. No further trace, reported overdue.[21]

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Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Penarth

Penarth

Penarth is a town and community in the Vale of Glamorgan, Wales, approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Cardiff city centre on the north shore of the Severn Estuary at the southern end of Cardiff Bay.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Trinity House

Trinity House

The Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond, also known as Trinity House, is the official authority for lighthouses in England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar. Trinity House is also responsible for the provision and maintenance of other navigational aids, such as lightvessels, buoys, and maritime radio/satellite communication systems. It is also an official deep sea pilotage authority, providing expert navigators for ships trading in Northern European waters.

Caernarfon

Caernarfon

Caernarfon is a royal town, community and port in Gwynedd, Wales, with a population of 9,852. It lies along the A487 road, on the eastern shore of the Menai Strait, opposite the Isle of Anglesey. The city of Bangor is 8.6 miles (13.8 km) to the north-east, while Snowdonia fringes Caernarfon to the east and south-east. Carnarvon and Caernarvon are Anglicised spellings that were superseded in 1926 and 1974 respectively.

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull

Kingston upon Hull, usually abbreviated to Hull, is a port city and unitary authority in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It lies upon the River Hull at its confluence with the Humber Estuary, 25 miles (40 km) inland from the North Sea and 50 miles (80 km) south-east of York, the historic county town. With a population of 259,778 (mid-2019 est.), it is the fourth-largest city in the Yorkshire and the Humber region after Leeds, Sheffield and Bradford.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire or the County of Renfrew is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It contains the local government council areas of Inverclyde, Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire, as well as parts of Glasgow and is occasionally named Greater Renfrewshire to distinguish the county from the modern council area.

South Shields

South Shields

South Shields is a coastal town in South Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England. It is on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne. Historically, it was known in Roman times as Arbeia, and as Caer Urfa by Early Middle Ages. According to the 2011 census, the town had a population of 75,337. It is the fourth largest settlement in Tyne and Wear; after Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland and Gateshead.

County Durham

County Durham

County Durham, officially simply Durham, is a ceremonial county in North East England. The ceremonial county spawned from the historic County Palatine of Durham in 1853. In 1996, the county gained part of the abolished ceremonial county of Cleveland. The county town is the city of Durham. The county borders Cumbria to the west, North Yorkshire to the south, and Tyne and Wear and Northumberland to the north. Boundaries initially aligned to the historic county, stretching between the rivers Tyne and Tees. The County Borough of Teesside formed in 1968, the ceremonial boundaries adjusted while the historic boundaries remained. The Local Government Act 1972 in 1974 further separated the boundaries. The largest settlement is Darlington (92,363) followed by Hartlepool (88,855) and Stockton-on-Tees (82,729).

Kingdom of Italy

Kingdom of Italy

The Kingdom of Italy was a state that existed from 1861, when Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy, until 1946, when civil discontent led to an institutional referendum to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic. The state resulted from a decades-long process, the Risorgimento, of consolidating the different states of the Italian Peninsula into a single state. That process was influenced by the Savoy-led Kingdom of Sardinia, which can be considered Italy's legal predecessor state.

14 November

List of shipwrecks: 14 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Adrastea  Austria-Hungary The barque ran aground at "Galippa", Tunisia. She was on a voyage from Jaffa, Ottoman Syria to London, United Kingdom. She was refloated and taken in to Tunis, Tunisia in a waterlogged condition.[22]

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Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Dual Monarchy, or Austria, was a constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918. It was formed with the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 in the aftermath of the Austro-Prussian War and was dissolved shortly after its defeat in the First World War.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

Jaffa

Jaffa

Jaffa, in Hebrew Yafo and in Arabic Yafa and also called Japho or Joppa, the southern and oldest part of Tel Aviv-Yafo, is an ancient port city in Israel. Jaffa is known for its association with the biblical stories of Jonah, Solomon and Saint Peter as well as the mythological story of Andromeda and Perseus, and later for its oranges.

Ottoman Syria

Ottoman Syria

Ottoman Syria refers to divisions of the Ottoman Empire within the region of Syria, usually defined as being east of the Mediterranean Sea, west of the Euphrates River, north of the Arabian Desert and south of the Taurus Mountains.

London

London

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with a population of just under 9 million. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a 50-mile (80 km) estuary down to the North Sea, and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium and retains its medieval boundaries. The City of Westminster, to the west of the City of London, has for centuries hosted the national government and parliament. Since the 19th century, the name "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between the counties of Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which largely comprises Greater London, governed by the Greater London Authority.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Tunis

Tunis

Tunis is the capital and largest city of Tunisia. The greater metropolitan area of Tunis, often referred to as "Grand Tunis", has about 2,700,000 inhabitants. As of 2020, it is the third-largest city in the Maghreb region and the eleventh-largest in the Arab world.

15 November

List of shipwrecks: 15 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Wah Young  United Kingdom The steamship was destroyed by fire at sea with the loss of 400 lives She was on a voyage from Hong Kong to Canton, China.[23]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

British Hong Kong

British Hong Kong

Hong Kong was a colony and subsequently a dependent territory of the British Empire from 1841 to 1997, apart from a period of occupation under the Japanese Empire from 1941 to 1945 during the Pacific War. The colonial period began with the British occupation of Hong Kong Island in 1841, during the First Opium War between the British and the Qing dynasty. The Qing had wanted to enforce its prohibition of opium importation within the dynasty that was being exported mostly from British India, as it was causing widespread addiction among its populace.

Qing dynasty

Qing dynasty

The Qing dynasty, officially the Great Qing, was a Manchu-led imperial dynasty of China and the last orthodox dynasty in Chinese history. It emerged from the Later Jin dynasty founded by the Jianzhou Jurchens, a Tungusic-speaking ethnic group who unified other Jurchen tribes to form a new "Manchu" ethnic identity. The dynasty was officially proclaimed in 1636 in Manchuria. It seized control of Beijing in 1644, then later expanded its rule over the whole of China proper and Taiwan, and finally expanded into Inner Asia. The dynasty lasted until 1912 when it was overthrown in the Xinhai Revolution. In orthodox Chinese historiography, the Qing dynasty was preceded by the Ming dynasty and succeeded by the Republic of China. The multiethnic Qing empire lasted for almost three centuries and assembled the territorial base for modern China. It was the largest imperial dynasty in the history of China and in 1790 the fourth-largest empire in world history in terms of territorial size. With 419,264,000 citizens in 1907, it was the world's most populous country at the time.

16 November

List of shipwrecks: 16 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Fatfield  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground in the Humber at Whitton, Lincolnshire. She was on a voyage from Bilbao, Spain to Goole, Yorkshire.[19]
Idomene  United Kingdom The ship was wrecked in Quora Bay, 2+12 nautical miles (4.6 km) from Mazeppa Bay, with the loss of thirteen of her 24 crew. She was on a voyage from Rangoon, Burma to the English Channel.[22][24][25]
Tom Roberts  United Kingdom The schooner foundered off Ballaugh, Isle of Man. All four crew were rescued.[26]
Vespasian  United Kingdom The ship departed from Saigon, French Indo-China for Manila, Spanish East Indies. No further trace, reported overdue.[27]
Wah Yeung  United Kingdom The steamship was destroyed by fire in the Canton River with the loss of about 400 lives.[28]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Whitton, Lincolnshire

Whitton, Lincolnshire

Whitton is a village and civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England. The 2011 census found 212 inhabitants, in 92 households. It is situated at the northern termination of the Lincoln Cliff range of hills, on the south shore of the Humber about 3 miles (4.8 km) below Trent Falls, and 9 miles (14 km) west of Barton-upon-Humber. The parish is bounded on the west by Alkborough, on the east by Winteringham and, to the south, by West Halton.

Bilbao

Bilbao

Bilbao is a city in northern Spain, the largest city in the province of Biscay and in the Basque Country as a whole. It is also the largest city proper in northern Spain. Bilbao is the tenth largest city in Spain, with a population of 345,141 as of 2015. The Bilbao metropolitan area has 1,037,847 inhabitants, making it one of the most populous metropolitan areas in northern Spain; with a population of 875,552 the comarca of Greater Bilbao is the fifth-largest urban area in Spain. Bilbao is also the main urban area in what is defined as the Greater Basque region.

Goole

Goole

Goole is a port town and civil parish on the River Ouse in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The town's historic county is the West Riding of Yorkshire.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

Mazeppa Bay

Mazeppa Bay

Mazeppa Bay is a town in Amathole District Municipality in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.It is famous for fishing trips hosted by Owen Richter “wild coast angling” and frequented by the 6 legends Leon Roos Gerhard Vanrensburg Willie Hattingh Johan Grobbelaar Deon Scholtz and Roos’s 2nd best friend the legendary J J Rossouw.

English Channel

English Channel

The English Channel is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates Southern England from northern France. It links to the southern part of the North Sea by the Strait of Dover at its northeastern end. It is the busiest shipping area in the world.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Ballaugh

Ballaugh

Ballaugh is a small village on the Isle of Man in the parish of the same name, in the sheading of Michael. It is the only village in the parish.

Isle of Man

Isle of Man

The Isle of Man, also known as Mann, is a self-governing British Crown Dependency in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland. As head of state, Charles III holds the title Lord of Mann and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. The United Kingdom is responsible for the isle's military defence and represents it abroad.

Manila

Manila

Manila, known officially as the City of Manila, is the capital of the Philippines, and its second-most populous city. It is highly urbanized and as of 2019 was the world's most densely populated city proper. Manila is considered to be a global city and rated as an Alpha – City by Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC). It was the first chartered city in the country, designated as such by the Philippine Commission Act 183 of July 31, 1901. It became autonomous with the passage of Republic Act No. 409, "The Revised Charter of the City of Manila", on June 18, 1949. Manila is considered to be part of the world's original set of global cities because its commercial networks were the first to extend across the Pacific Ocean and connect Asia with the Spanish Americas through the galleon trade; when this was accomplished, it marked the first time in world history that an uninterrupted chain of trade routes circling the planet had been established. It is among the most populous and fastest growing cities in Southeast Asia.

17 November

List of shipwrecks: 17 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Consul  United Kingdom The steamship struck a rock off Small Island, in the Sea of Marmara and sank. All eighteen people on board were rescued by Marquis Sciciuana (Flag unknown).[29]
Faithful  United Kingdom The steamship collided with the steamship Capella ( Germany) in the River Thames at Gravesend, Kent and was beached. Her passengers were taken off by the tug Cambria ( United Kingdom).[22] Faithful was refloated in early December and towed to Northfleet, Kent, where she was beached.[30]
Princess Louise  United Kingdom The steam yacht ran aground at Dundee, Forfarshire.[22]
Revivalist  United Kingdom The fishing trawler was run into by the steamship Connaught ( United Kingdom) and sank at Kingstown, County Dublin. Her crew survived.[31]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Sea of Marmara

Sea of Marmara

The Sea of Marmara, also known as the Marmara Sea, is an inland sea located entirely within the borders of Turkey. It connects the Black Sea to the Aegean Sea via the Bosporus and Dardanelles straits, separating the country's European and Asian sides. The Sea of Marmara is a small sea with an area of 11,350 km2 (4,380 sq mi), and dimensions of 280 km × 80 km. Its greatest depth is 1,370 m (4,490 ft).

German Empire

German Empire

The German Empire, also referred to as Imperial Germany, the Kaiserreich, the Second Reich, as well as simply Germany, was the period of the German Reich from the unification of Germany in 1871 until the November Revolution in 1918, when the German Reich changed its form of government from a monarchy to a republic.

River Thames

River Thames

The River Thames, known alternatively in parts as the River Isis, is a river that flows through southern England including London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England and the second-longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn.

Tugboat

Tugboat

A tugboat or tug is a marine vessel that manoeuvres other vessels by pushing or pulling them, with direct contact or a tow line. These boats typically tug ships in circumstances where they can or should not move under their own power, such as in crowded harbour or narrow canals, or cannot move at all, such as barges, disabled ships, log rafts, or oil platforms. Some are ocean-going, some are icebreakers or salvage tugs. Early models were powered by steam engines, long ago superseded by diesel engines. Many have deluge gun water jets, which help in firefighting, especially in harbours.

Northfleet

Northfleet

Northfleet is a town in the borough of Gravesham in Kent, England. It is located immediately west of Gravesend, and on the border with the Borough of Dartford. Northfleet has its own railway station on the North Kent Line, just east of Ebbsfleet International railway station on the High Speed 1 line.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Steam yacht

Steam yacht

A steam yacht is a class of luxury or commercial yacht with primary or secondary steam propulsion in addition to the sails usually carried by yachts.

Dundee

Dundee

Dundee is Scotland's fourth-largest city and the 51st-most-populous built-up area in the United Kingdom. The mid-year population estimate for 2016 was 148,210, giving Dundee a population density of 2,478/km2 or 6,420/sq mi, the second-highest in Scotland. It lies within the eastern central Lowlands on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, which feeds into the North Sea. Under the name of Dundee City, it forms one of the 32 council areas used for local government in Scotland.

Fishing trawler

Fishing trawler

A fishing trawler is a commercial fishing vessel designed to operate fishing trawls. Trawling is a method of fishing that involves actively dragging or pulling a trawl through the water behind one or more trawlers. Trawls are fishing nets that are pulled along the bottom of the sea or in midwater at a specified depth. A trawler may also operate two or more trawl nets simultaneously.

18 November

List of shipwrecks: 18 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Alice Craig  United States The schooner foundered in Lake Superior off the coast of Bayfield County, Wisconsin. Her crew were rescued by a fishing yawl the next day. Alice Craig remained afloat and later came ashore nearby on the coast of Wisconsin in the vicinity of 46°52.645′N 091°10.990′W / 46.877417°N 91.183167°W / 46.877417; -91.183167 (Alice Craig), where she was stripped and abandoned. Her rudder washed ashore in Eagle Bay on the coast of Wisconsin in 1907.[32]
City of Newcastle  United Kingdom The steamship put in to Falmouth, Cornwall on fire and was scuttled. She was on a voyage from Charlestown, South Carolina, United States to Queenstown, County Cork and Havre de Grâce, Seine-Inférieure, France.[31]
Dauntless  United Kingdom The yawl yacht ran aground and was damaged at Dover, Kent.[31]
Neto flag Portugal The brigantine foundered off Madeira. Her crew survived. She was on a voyage from the Azores to Lisbon.[31]
Peter D. Smith  United Kingdom The fishing schooner departed from Gloucester, Massachusetts, United States. No further trace, presumed foundered with the loss of all twelve crew. She was probably lost on 4 December on the Georges Bank.[33][34][35]
Vortigern  United Kingdom The steamship foundered at seawith the loss of nineteen lives. She was on a voyage from Sourabaya, Netherlands East Indies to Hong Kong.[36][37]
Unnamed  Italy The smack was run into by the royal yacht SMS Greif ( Austro-Hungarian Navy) and sank off Rovigno with the loss of a crew member. Survivors were rescued by SMS Greif.[38]

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United States

United States

The United States of America, commonly known as the United States or informally America, is a country in North America. It consists of 50 states, a federal district, five major unincorporated territories, nine Minor Outlying Islands, and 326 Indian reservations. It is the third-largest country by both land and total area. The United States shares land borders with Canada to its north and with Mexico to its south. It has maritime borders with the Bahamas, Cuba, Russia, and other nations. With a population of over 331 million, it is the third most populous country in the world. The national capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city and financial center is New York City.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Lake Superior

Lake Superior

Lake Superior in central North America is the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area and the third-largest by volume, holding 10% of the world's surface fresh water. The northern and westernmost of the Great Lakes of North America, it straddles the Canada–United States border with the province of Ontario to the north, and the states of Minnesota to the northwest and Wisconsin and Michigan to the south. It drains into Lake Huron via St. Marys River, then through the lower Great Lakes to the St. Lawrence River and the Atlantic Ocean.

Bayfield County, Wisconsin

Bayfield County, Wisconsin

Bayfield County is the northernmost county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2020 census, its population is 16,220. Its county seat is Washburn. The county was created in 1845 and organized in 1850. The Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa has a reservation in Bayfield County and is the county's largest employer.

Rudder

Rudder

A rudder is a primary control surface used to steer a ship, boat, submarine, hovercraft, aircraft, or other vehicle that moves through a fluid medium. On an aircraft the rudder is used primarily to counter adverse yaw and p-factor and is not the primary control used to turn the airplane. A rudder operates by redirecting the fluid past the hull (watercraft) or fuselage, thus imparting a turning or yawing motion to the craft. In basic form, a rudder is a flat plane or sheet of material attached with hinges to the craft's stern, tail, or after end. Often rudders are shaped so as to minimize hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag. On simple watercraft, a tiller—essentially, a stick or pole acting as a lever arm—may be attached to the top of the rudder to allow it to be turned by a helmsman. In larger vessels, cables, pushrods, or hydraulics may be used to link rudders to steering wheels. In typical aircraft, the rudder is operated by pedals via mechanical linkages or hydraulics.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Falmouth, Cornwall

Falmouth, Cornwall

Falmouth is a town, civil parish and port on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It has a total resident population of 21,797.

Dover

Dover

Dover is a town and major ferry port in Kent, South East England. It faces France across the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part of the English Channel at 33 kilometres (21 mi) from Cap Gris Nez in France. It lies south-east of Canterbury and east of Maidstone. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District and home of the Port of Dover.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Portugal

Portugal

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country whose mainland is located on the Iberian Peninsula of Southwestern Europe, and whose territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira. It features the westernmost point in continental Europe, and its Iberian portion is bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain, the sole country to have a land border with Portugal. Its two archipelagos form two autonomous regions with their own regional governments. Lisbon is the capital and largest city by population.

Brigantine

Brigantine

A brigantine is a two-masted sailing vessel with a fully square-rigged foremast and at least two sails on the main mast: a square topsail and a gaff sail mainsail. The main mast is the second and taller of the two masts.

19 November

List of shipwrecks: 19 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Alfred Watts  United States The full-rigged ship capsized 600 to 700 nautical miles (1,100 to 1,300 km) off the Bahamas with the loss of 26 of the 28 people on board. Survivors were rescued on 20 December by the barque Lizzie Perry (Canada Dominion of Canada). Alfred Watts was on a voyage from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Japan.[39]
Douro  United Kingdom The steamship foundered off the Berlengas, Portugal with the loss of eight of her sixteen crew. Survivors were rescued by Brackley ( United Kingdom). Douro was on a voyage from Glasgow, Renfrewshire to Barcelona, Spain.[40]
W. A. Scholten  Netherlands The steamship was run into by the steamship Rosa Mary ( United Kingdom) and sank in the English Channel 12 nautical miles (22 km) off the South Sands Head Lightship (Trinity House Ensign (pre-1937).svg Trinity House) and 3 nautical miles (5.6 km) off Dover, Kent, United Kingdom with the loss of 132 of the 210 people on board. Some of the survivors were rescued by the steamship Ebro ( United Kingdom), others by a Coastguard boat, a shore boat or landed in two of the ship's lifeboats. W. A. Scholten was on a voyage from Rotterdam, South Holland to New York, United States.[41]

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Full-rigged ship

Full-rigged ship

A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Such vessels also have each mast stepped in three segments: lower mast, top mast, and topgallant mast. Other large, multi-masted sailing vessels may be regarded as ships while lacking one of the elements of a full-rigged ship, e.g. having one or more masts support only a fore-and-aft sail or having a mast that only has two segments.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

Canada

Canada

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering over 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern and western border with the United States, stretching 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest binational land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Empire of Japan

Empire of Japan

The Empire of Japan, also known as the Japanese Empire or Imperial Japan, was a historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 until the enactment of the post-World War II 1947 constitution and subsequent formation of modern Japan. It encompassed the Japanese archipelago and several colonies, protectorates, mandates, and other territories.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Berlengas

Berlengas

The Berlengas are a Portuguese archipelago consisting of small Atlantic islands 10 to 17 kilometres off the coast of Peniche, Portugal, in the Oeste region. These islands were traditionally known to British mariners as "the Burlings". The only inhabited island is its largest island, Berlenga Grande, although there is currently no permanent habitation in the archipelago. The other islands are grouped into two groups of islets, the Estelas Islets and the Farilhões-Forcados Islets.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland and the fourth-most populous city in the United Kingdom, as well as being the 27th largest city by population in Europe. In 2020, it had an estimated population of 635,640. Straddling the border between historic Lanarkshire and Renfrewshire, the city now forms the Glasgow City Council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and is governed by Glasgow City Council. It is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands.

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire (historic)

Renfrewshire or the County of Renfrew is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the west central Lowlands of Scotland. It contains the local government council areas of Inverclyde, Renfrewshire and East Renfrewshire, as well as parts of Glasgow and is occasionally named Greater Renfrewshire to distinguish the county from the modern council area.

Barcelona

Barcelona

Barcelona is a city on the coast of northeastern Spain. It is the capital and largest city of the autonomous community of Catalonia, as well as the second most populous municipality of Spain. With a population of 1.6 million within city limits, its urban area extends to numerous neighbouring municipalities within the Province of Barcelona and is home to around 4.8 million people, making it the fifth most populous urban area in the European Union after Paris, the Ruhr area, Madrid, and Milan. It is one of the largest metropolises on the Mediterranean Sea, located on the coast between the mouths of the rivers Llobregat and Besòs, and bounded to the west by the Serra de Collserola mountain range, the tallest peak of which is 512 metres high.

Netherlands

Netherlands

The Netherlands, informally Holland, is a country located in Northwestern Europe with overseas territories in the Caribbean. It is the largest of four constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Netherlands consists of twelve provinces; it borders Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, with a North Sea coastline to the north and west. It shares maritime borders with the United Kingdom, Germany and Belgium in the North Sea. The country's official language is Dutch, with West Frisian as a secondary official language in the province of Friesland. Dutch Low Saxon and Limburgish are recognised regional languages, while Dutch Sign Language, Sinte Romani and Yiddish are recognised non-territorial languages. Dutch, English and Papiamento are official in the Caribbean territories.

English Channel

English Channel

The English Channel is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates Southern England from northern France. It links to the southern part of the North Sea by the Strait of Dover at its northeastern end. It is the busiest shipping area in the world.

Trinity House

Trinity House

The Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond, also known as Trinity House, is the official authority for lighthouses in England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar. Trinity House is also responsible for the provision and maintenance of other navigational aids, such as lightvessels, buoys, and maritime radio/satellite communication systems. It is also an official deep sea pilotage authority, providing expert navigators for ships trading in Northern European waters.

20 November

List of shipwrecks: 20 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Anna  Norway The brig foundered off the Cabo da Roca, Portugal. Her crew were resued by the barque Amalia ( Sweden). Anna was on a voyage from Cádiz, Spain to Kristiansund.[42]
Baroda  United Kingdom The full-rigged ship collided with Buccleuch and sank in the River Mersey. Baroda was on a voyage from Calcutta, India to Liverpool, Lancashire.[43]
Telephone  United States The steamship caught fire near Astoria, Oregon, and was beached. One person died. She later was refloated and rebuilt.[44]

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Norway

Norway

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northern Europe, the mainland territory of which comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula. The remote Arctic island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard also form part of Norway. Bouvet Island, located in the Subantarctic, is a dependency of Norway; it also lays claims to the Antarctic territories of Peter I Island and Queen Maud Land. The capital and largest city in Norway is Oslo.

Brig

Brig

A brig is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: two masts which are both square-rigged. Brigs originated in the second half of the 18th century and were a common type of smaller merchant vessel or warship from then until the latter part of the 19th century. In commercial use, they were gradually replaced by fore-and-aft rigged vessels such as schooners, as owners sought to reduce crew costs by having rigs that could be handled by fewer men. In Royal Navy use, brigs were retained for training use when the battle fleets consisted almost entirely of iron-hulled steamships.

Cabo da Roca

Cabo da Roca

Cabo da Roca or Cape Roca is a cape which forms the westernmost point of the Sintra Mountain Range, of mainland Portugal, of continental Europe, and of the Eurasian landmass. It is situated in the municipality of Sintra, near Azóia, in the southwest of the district of Lisbon. Notably the point includes a lighthouse that started operation in 1772.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

Cádiz

Cádiz

Cádiz is a city and port in southwestern Spain. It is the capital of the Province of Cádiz, one of eight that make up the autonomous community of Andalusia.

Kristiansund

Kristiansund

Kristiansund is a municipality on the western coast of Norway in the Nordmøre district of Møre og Romsdal county. The administrative center of the municipality is the town of Kristiansund, which is the major town for the whole Nordmøre region. Other notable settlements in the municipality include the villages of Kvalvåg, Rensvik, and Nedre Frei.

Full-rigged ship

Full-rigged ship

A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Such vessels also have each mast stepped in three segments: lower mast, top mast, and topgallant mast. Other large, multi-masted sailing vessels may be regarded as ships while lacking one of the elements of a full-rigged ship, e.g. having one or more masts support only a fore-and-aft sail or having a mast that only has two segments.

River Mersey

River Mersey

The River Mersey is in North West England. Its name derives from Old English and means "boundary river", possibly referring to its having been a border between the ancient kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria. For centuries it has formed part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

British Raj

British Raj

The British Raj was the rule of the British Crown on the Indian subcontinent; it is also called Crown rule in India, or Direct rule in India, and lasted from 1858 to 1947. The region under British control was commonly called India in contemporaneous usage and included areas directly administered by the United Kingdom, which were collectively called British India, and areas ruled by indigenous rulers, but under British paramountcy, called the princely states. The region was sometimes called the Indian Empire, though not officially.

Liverpool

Liverpool

Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in Merseyside, England. With a population of 498,042 in 2019, it is the 10th largest English district by population and its metropolitan area is the fifth largest in the United Kingdom, with a population of 2.24 million.

Lancashire

Lancashire

Lancashire is the name of a historic county, ceremonial county, and non-metropolitan county in North West England. The boundaries of these three areas differ significantly.

Astoria, Oregon

Astoria, Oregon

Astoria is a port city and the seat of Clatsop County, Oregon, United States. Founded in 1811, Astoria is the oldest city in the state of Oregon and was the first permanent American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains. The county is the northwest corner of Oregon, and Astoria is located on the south shore of the Columbia River, where the river flows into the Pacific Ocean. The city is named for John Jacob Astor, an investor and entrepreneur from New York City, whose American Fur Company founded Fort Astoria at the site and established a monopoly in the fur trade in the early nineteenth century. Astoria was incorporated by the Oregon Legislative Assembly on October 20, 1876.

21 November

List of shipwrecks: 21 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Polynoris  United Kingdom The steamship struck the wreck of W. A. Scholten ( Netherlands) and sank in the English Channel 4 nautical miles (7.4 km) off Folkestone, Kent. Her crew were rescued.[45]
Triton  Sweden The schooner was driven ashore and wrecked at "Makkehead", Denmark.[42]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Netherlands

Netherlands

The Netherlands, informally Holland, is a country located in Northwestern Europe with overseas territories in the Caribbean. It is the largest of four constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Netherlands consists of twelve provinces; it borders Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, with a North Sea coastline to the north and west. It shares maritime borders with the United Kingdom, Germany and Belgium in the North Sea. The country's official language is Dutch, with West Frisian as a secondary official language in the province of Friesland. Dutch Low Saxon and Limburgish are recognised regional languages, while Dutch Sign Language, Sinte Romani and Yiddish are recognised non-territorial languages. Dutch, English and Papiamento are official in the Caribbean territories.

English Channel

English Channel

The English Channel is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates Southern England from northern France. It links to the southern part of the North Sea by the Strait of Dover at its northeastern end. It is the busiest shipping area in the world.

Folkestone

Folkestone

Folkestone is a port town on the English Channel, in Kent, south-east England. The town lies on the southern edge of the North Downs at a valley between two cliffs. It was an important harbour and shipping port for most of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Sweden

Sweden

Sweden, formally the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Nordic country in Scandinavia. It borders Norway to the west and north, Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge–tunnel across the Öresund. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest Nordic country, the third-largest country in the European Union, and the fifth-largest country in Europe. The capital and largest city is Stockholm. Sweden has a total population of 10.5 million, and a low population density of 25.5 inhabitants per square kilometre (66/sq mi), with around 87% of Swedes residing in urban areas in the central and southern half of the country.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

22 November

List of shipwrecks: 22 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Charles P. Chouteau  United States The steamship was destroyed by fire in the Mississippi River at Sunflower Landing 135 miles (217 km) downstream of Memphis, Tennessee. One of her firemen died.[44]
Palais Gallien Flag unknown The ship was driven ashore at Ronehamn, Gotland, Sweden.[42]
Palmyra  United Kingdom The steamship was run into by the steamship Odessa ( United Kingdom) at Gravesend, Kent and was beached. Palmyra was on a voyage from London to Genoa, Italy.[42]
Sir Robert Peel  United Kingdom The ship capsized. She was righted the next day.[42]
William Parsons II  United Kingdom The fishing schooner departed from Gloucester, Massachusetts, United States. No further trace, lost with all twelve crew. She may have foundered on 4 December on the Georges Bank.[46][47][35]
E. F. Sawyer  United States The full-rigged ship was run into by a steamship and sank in the English Channel off Sandgate, Kent, United Kingdom with the loss of fourteen of her 22 crew. Survivors were rescued by the steamship.[45][48]

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Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Mississippi River

Mississippi River

The Mississippi River is the second-longest river and chief river of the second-largest drainage system in North America, second only to the Hudson Bay drainage system. From its traditional source of Lake Itasca in northern Minnesota, it flows generally south for 2,340 miles (3,770 km) to the Mississippi River Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 32 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian mountains. The main stem is entirely within the United States; the total drainage basin is 1,151,000 sq mi (2,980,000 km2), of which only about one percent is in Canada. The Mississippi ranks as the thirteenth-largest river by discharge in the world. The river either borders or passes through the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.

Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee. It is the seat of Shelby County in the southwest part of the state; it is situated along the Mississippi River. With a population of 633,104 at the 2020 U.S. census, Memphis is the second-most populous city in Tennessee, after Nashville.

Fireman (steam engine)

Fireman (steam engine)

A fireman, stoker or watertender is a person whose occupation it is to tend the fire for the running of a boiler, heating a building, or powering a steam engine. Much of the job is hard physical labor, such as shoveling fuel, typically coal, into the boiler's firebox. On steam locomotives the title fireman is usually used, while on steamships and stationary steam engines, such as those driving saw mills, the title is usually stoker. The German word Heizer is equivalent and in Dutch the word stoker is mostly used too. The United States Navy referred to them as watertenders.

Ronehamn

Ronehamn

Ronehamn is a settlement in Rone on the southeast coast of Gotland island, Sweden, with 129 inhabitants in 2005.

Gotland

Gotland

Gotland, also historically spelled Gottland or Gothland, is Sweden's largest island. It is also a province, county, municipality, and diocese. The province includes the islands of Fårö and Gotska Sandön to the north, as well as the Karlsö Islands to the west. The population is 61,001, of which about 23,600 live in Visby, the main town. Outside Visby, there are minor settlements and a mainly rural population. The island of Gotland and the other areas of the province of Gotland make up less than one percent of Sweden's total land area. The county formed by the archipelago is the second smallest by area and is the least populated in Sweden. In spite of the small size due to its narrow width, the driving distance between the furthermost points of the populated islands is about 170 kilometres (110 mi).

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

London

London

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with a population of just under 9 million. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a 50-mile (80 km) estuary down to the North Sea, and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium and retains its medieval boundaries. The City of Westminster, to the west of the City of London, has for centuries hosted the national government and parliament. Since the 19th century, the name "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between the counties of Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which largely comprises Greater London, governed by the Greater London Authority.

Genoa

Genoa

Genoa is the capital of the Italian region of Liguria and the sixth-largest city in Italy. In 2015, 594,733 people lived within the city's administrative limits. As of the 2011 Italian census, the Province of Genoa, which in 2015 became the Metropolitan City of Genoa, had 855,834 resident persons. Over 1.5 million people live in the wider metropolitan area stretching along the Italian Riviera.

Kingdom of Italy

Kingdom of Italy

The Kingdom of Italy was a state that existed from 1861, when Victor Emmanuel II of Sardinia was proclaimed King of Italy, until 1946, when civil discontent led to an institutional referendum to abandon the monarchy and form the modern Italian Republic. The state resulted from a decades-long process, the Risorgimento, of consolidating the different states of the Italian Peninsula into a single state. That process was influenced by the Savoy-led Kingdom of Sardinia, which can be considered Italy's legal predecessor state.

Gloucester, Massachusetts

Gloucester, Massachusetts

Gloucester is a city in Essex County, Massachusetts, in the United States. It sits on Cape Ann and is a part of Massachusetts's North Shore. The population was 29,729 at the 2020 U.S. Census. An important center of the fishing industry and a popular summer destination, Gloucester consists of an urban core on the north side of the harbor and the outlying neighborhoods of Annisquam, Bay View, Lanesville, Folly Cove, Magnolia, Riverdale, East Gloucester, and West Gloucester.

Full-rigged ship

Full-rigged ship

A full-rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel's sail plan with three or more masts, all of them square-rigged. A full-rigged ship is said to have a ship rig or be ship-rigged. Such vessels also have each mast stepped in three segments: lower mast, top mast, and topgallant mast. Other large, multi-masted sailing vessels may be regarded as ships while lacking one of the elements of a full-rigged ship, e.g. having one or more masts support only a fore-and-aft sail or having a mast that only has two segments.

23 November

List of shipwrecks: 23 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Leander  Germany The steamship collided with the wreck of E. F. Sawyer ( United States off Sandgate, Kent, United Kingdom. She was towed in to Dover, Kent in a sinking condition. She was on a voyage from Cádiz, Spain to Bremen.[48][49]
Margaret and Ann  United Kingdom The schooner ran aground on the Maplin Sand, in the North Sea off the coast of Essex.[50]

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German Empire

German Empire

The German Empire, also referred to as Imperial Germany, the Kaiserreich, the Second Reich, as well as simply Germany, was the period of the German Reich from the unification of Germany in 1871 until the November Revolution in 1918, when the German Reich changed its form of government from a monarchy to a republic.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

United States

United States

The United States of America, commonly known as the United States or informally America, is a country in North America. It consists of 50 states, a federal district, five major unincorporated territories, nine Minor Outlying Islands, and 326 Indian reservations. It is the third-largest country by both land and total area. The United States shares land borders with Canada to its north and with Mexico to its south. It has maritime borders with the Bahamas, Cuba, Russia, and other nations. With a population of over 331 million, it is the third most populous country in the world. The national capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city and financial center is New York City.

Sandgate, Kent

Sandgate, Kent

Sandgate is a village in the Folkestone and Hythe Urban Area in the Folkestone and Hythe district of Kent, England. It had a population of 4,225 at the 2001 census. It is the site of Sandgate Castle, a Device Fort. H.G. Wells lived at Spade House, and it is also the birthplace of comedian Hattie Jacques. Sandgate is the location of the Shorncliffe Redoubt, a Napoleonic-era earthwork fort associated with Sir John Moore and the 95th Regiment of Foot, known as the 95th Rifles. St Paul's Church lies next to the Saga building, which is built on the site of Embrook House.

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Dover

Dover

Dover is a town and major ferry port in Kent, South East England. It faces France across the Strait of Dover, the narrowest part of the English Channel at 33 kilometres (21 mi) from Cap Gris Nez in France. It lies south-east of Canterbury and east of Maidstone. The town is the administrative centre of the Dover District and home of the Port of Dover.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Cádiz

Cádiz

Cádiz is a city and port in southwestern Spain. It is the capital of the Province of Cádiz, one of eight that make up the autonomous community of Andalusia.

Bremen

Bremen

Bremen, officially the City Municipality of Bremen, is the capital of the German state Free Hanseatic City of Bremen, a two-city-state consisting of the cities of Bremen and Bremerhaven. With about 570,000 inhabitants, the Hanseatic city is the 11th largest city of Germany and the second largest city in Northern Germany after Hamburg.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

North Sea

North Sea

The North Sea lies between Great Britain, Norway, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium. An epeiric sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the Atlantic Ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, covering 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi).

Essex

Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west. There are three cities in Essex: Southend, Colchester and Chelmsford, in order of population. For the purposes of government statistics, Essex is placed in the East of England region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the ancient county. Next, the largest is the former postal county, followed by the ceremonial county, with the smallest being the administrative county—the area administered by the County Council, which excludes the two unitary authorities of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea. The ceremonial county occupies the eastern part of what was, during the Early Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Essex. As well as rural areas and urban areas, it forms part of the wider Home Counties of England.

24 November

List of shipwrecks: 24 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Jane Roberts  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at Cullercoats, Northumberland.[50]
Serpho  United Kingdom The steamship foundered off the coast of Portugal. Her crew were rescued by the steamship Gwalior ( United Kingdom).[51]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Cullercoats

Cullercoats

Cullercoats is a coastal settlement in the metropolitan borough of North Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, North East England. Historically in Northumberland, it has now been absorbed into the wider Tyneside conurbation, sitting between Tynemouth to the south and Whitley Bay to the north. The population of this North Tyneside ward at the 2011 census was 9,202.

Northumberland

Northumberland

Northumberland is a county in Northern England, one of two counties in England which border with Scotland. Notable landmarks in the county include Alnwick Castle, Bamburgh Castle, Hadrian's Wall and Hexham Abbey.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

27 November

List of shipwrecks: 27 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Michael and Christopher  United Kingdom The schooner sprang a leak and was abandoned off the Turnberry Lighthouse, Ayrshire. She was on a voyage from Arklow, County Wicklow to Ayr. She subsequently foundered off the Isle of Arran.[5]
Unnamed  Austria-Hungary The fishing boat was run into by the steamship Vera ( United Kingdom) and sank off Fiume. Her crew were rescued by Vera.[36]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Schooner

Schooner

A schooner is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine. Many schooners are gaff-rigged, but other examples include Bermuda rig and the staysail schooner.

Turnberry Lighthouse

Turnberry Lighthouse

Turnberry Lighthouse. or Turnberry Point Lighthouse, is a category B listed minor light on the South Ayrshire coast of Scotland. It was designed by David and Thomas Stevenson and completed in 1873. It is a conspicuous landmark from the Ayrshire Coastal Path and the Trump Turnberry golf resort.

Ayrshire

Ayrshire

Ayrshire is a historic county and registration county in south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. Its principal towns include Ayr, Kilmarnock and Irvine and it borders the counties of Renfrewshire and Lanarkshire to the north-east, Dumfriesshire to the south-east, and Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire to the south. Like many other counties of Scotland it currently has no administrative function, instead being sub-divided into the council areas of North Ayrshire, South Ayrshire and East Ayrshire. It has a population of approximately 366,800.

Arklow

Arklow

Arklow is a town in County Wicklow on the southeast coast of Ireland. The town is overlooked by Ballymoyle Hill. It was founded by the Vikings in the ninth century. Arklow was the site of one of the bloodiest battles of the 1798 rebellion. Its proximity to Dublin led to it becoming a commuter town with a population of 13,163 as of the 2016 census.

County Wicklow

County Wicklow

County Wicklow is a county in Ireland. The last of the traditional 32 counties, having been formed as late as 1606, it is part of the Eastern and Midland Region and the province of Leinster. It is bordered by the Irish Sea to the east and the counties of Wexford to the south, Carlow to the southwest, Kildare to the west, and South Dublin and Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown to the north.

Ayr

Ayr

Ayr is a town situated on the southwest coast of Scotland. It is the administrative centre of the South Ayrshire council area and the historic county town of Ayrshire. With a population of 46,982 Ayr is the 15th largest settlement in Scotland and largest town in Ayrshire by population. The town is contiguous with the smaller town of Prestwick to the north.

Isle of Arran

Isle of Arran

The Isle of Arran or simply Arran is an island off the west coast of Scotland. It is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde and the seventh-largest Scottish island, at 432 square kilometres (167 sq mi). Historically part of Buteshire, it is in the unitary council area of North Ayrshire. In the 2011 census it had a resident population of 4,629. Though culturally and physically similar to the Hebrides, it is separated from them by the Kintyre peninsula. Often referred to as "Scotland in Miniature", the island is divided into highland and lowland areas by the Highland Boundary Fault and has been described as a "geologist's paradise".

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Dual Monarchy, or Austria, was a constitutional monarchy and great power in Central Europe between 1867 and 1918. It was formed with the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 in the aftermath of the Austro-Prussian War and was dissolved shortly after its defeat in the First World War.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

28 November

List of shipwrecks: 28 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Lady Mostyn  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground at Llanelly, Glamorgan and was run into by the steamship Creaden ( United Kingdom). Lady Mostyn was refloated and put back to Llanelly.[52]
Thetford  United Kingdom The steamship was run into by the steamship Hawarden Castle ( United Kingdom) and sank in the River Thames at Blackwall, Middlesex. Her crew were rescued by the tug Renown ( United Kingdom).[52] Thetford was refloated on 14 December.[53]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Llanelli

Llanelli

Llanelli is a market town and the largest community in Carmarthenshire and the preserved county of Dyfed, Wales. It is located on the Loughor estuary 10.5 miles (16.9 km) north-west of Swansea and 12 miles (19 km) south-east of the county town, Carmarthen. The town had a population of 25,168 in 2011, estimated in 2019 at 26,225. The local authority was Llanelli Borough Council when the county of Dyfed existed, but it has been under Carmarthenshire County Council since 1996.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

River Thames

River Thames

The River Thames, known alternatively in parts as the River Isis, is a river that flows through southern England including London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England and the second-longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn.

Tugboat

Tugboat

A tugboat or tug is a marine vessel that manoeuvres other vessels by pushing or pulling them, with direct contact or a tow line. These boats typically tug ships in circumstances where they can or should not move under their own power, such as in crowded harbour or narrow canals, or cannot move at all, such as barges, disabled ships, log rafts, or oil platforms. Some are ocean-going, some are icebreakers or salvage tugs. Early models were powered by steam engines, long ago superseded by diesel engines. Many have deluge gun water jets, which help in firefighting, especially in harbours.

29 November

List of shipwrecks: 29 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Catherine  United Kingdom The ship ran aground on the Swadman Rocks. She was on a voyage from London to Kirkcaldy, Fife. She was refloated and completed her voyage in a leaky condition.[5]
Monday  United Kingdom The Thames barge was run into by the steamshp Arno ( United Kingdom) in the Thames Estuary. Monday was beached at Hope Point.[5]

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United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

London

London

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with a population of just under 9 million. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a 50-mile (80 km) estuary down to the North Sea, and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium and retains its medieval boundaries. The City of Westminster, to the west of the City of London, has for centuries hosted the national government and parliament. Since the 19th century, the name "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between the counties of Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which largely comprises Greater London, governed by the Greater London Authority.

Kirkcaldy

Kirkcaldy

Kirkcaldy is a town and former royal burgh in Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. It is about 11.6 miles (19 km) north of Edinburgh and 27.6 miles (44 km) south-southwest of Dundee. The town had a recorded population of 49,460 in 2011, making it Fife's second-largest settlement and the 12th most populous settlement in Scotland.

Fife

Fife

Fife is a council area, historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries with Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer. In older documents the county was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire.

Thames Estuary

Thames Estuary

The Thames Estuary is where the River Thames meets the waters of the North Sea, in the south-east of Great Britain.

30 November

List of shipwrecks: 30 November 1887
Ship Country Description
Laleham  United Kingdom The steamship was damaged by fire at Cardiff, Glamorgan.[5]
Tafna  United Kingdom The steamship was run into by the steamship Express at South Shields, County Durham and was severely damaged.[30]

Discover more about 30 November related topics

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was a sovereign state in the British Isles that existed between 1801 and 1922, when it included all of Ireland. It was established by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland into a unified state. The establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922 led to the remainder later being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in 1927.

Steamship

Steamship

A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer. As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels.

Cardiff

Cardiff

Cardiff is the capital and largest city of Wales. It forms a principal area, officially known as the City and County of Cardiff, and the city is the eleventh-largest in the United Kingdom. Located in the south-east of Wales and in the Cardiff Capital Region, Cardiff is the county town of the historic county of Glamorgan and in 1974–1996 of South Glamorgan. It belongs to the Eurocities network of the largest European cities. A small town until the early 19th century, its prominence as a port for coal when mining began in the region helped its expansion. In 1905, it was ranked as a city and in 1955 proclaimed capital of Wales. Cardiff Built-up Area covers a larger area outside the county boundary, including the towns of Dinas Powys and Penarth.

Glamorgan

Glamorgan

Glamorgan, or sometimes Glamorganshire, is one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county of Wales. Originally an early medieval petty kingdom of varying boundaries known in Welsh as the Kingdom of Morgannwg, which was then invaded and taken over by the Normans as the Lordship of Glamorgan. The area that became known as Glamorgan was both a rural, pastoral area, and a conflict point between the Norman lords and the Welsh princes. It was defined by a large concentration of castles.

South Shields

South Shields

South Shields is a coastal town in South Tyneside, Tyne and Wear, England. It is on the south bank of the mouth of the River Tyne. Historically, it was known in Roman times as Arbeia, and as Caer Urfa by Early Middle Ages. According to the 2011 census, the town had a population of 75,337. It is the fourth largest settlement in Tyne and Wear; after Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland and Gateshead.

County Durham

County Durham

County Durham, officially simply Durham, is a ceremonial county in North East England. The ceremonial county spawned from the historic County Palatine of Durham in 1853. In 1996, the county gained part of the abolished ceremonial county of Cleveland. The county town is the city of Durham. The county borders Cumbria to the west, North Yorkshire to the south, and Tyne and Wear and Northumberland to the north. Boundaries initially aligned to the historic county, stretching between the rivers Tyne and Tees. The County Borough of Teesside formed in 1968, the ceremonial boundaries adjusted while the historic boundaries remained. The Local Government Act 1972 in 1974 further separated the boundaries. The largest settlement is Darlington (92,363) followed by Hartlepool (88,855) and Stockton-on-Tees (82,729).

Unknown date

List of shipwrecks: Unknown date in November 1887
Ship Country Description
Activ  Germany The brig ran aground on the Lillegrund, in the Baltic Sea, and sank. Her crew were rescued.[14]
Adela  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore near Saint-Brieuc, Côtes-du-Nord, France. She was on a voyage from Burntisland, Fife to Saint-Brieuc.[31]
Agnes Louise  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground in the River Tees. She was on a voyage from Dordrecht, South Holland, Netherlands to Middlesbrough, Yorkshire.[4]
Albany  United States The ship was driven ashore. She was later refloated and taken in to Cheboygan, Michigan.[52]
Albatross  Netherlands The barque collided with the steamship Allerwash ( United Kingdom) and was severely damaged.[17]
Alberta  United Kingdom The schooner collided with the dynamite magazine Alpha ( United Kingdom) in the River Thames and was beached.[48]
Alerte  Germany The schooner was wrecked on the Dungeness Spit, in the Strait of Magellan on or before 9 November.[53]
Andrea  Austria-Hungary The barque foundered at sea. Her crew were rescued by the barque Lennatin ( Russia). Andrea was on a voyage from Genoa, Italy to New York, United States.[16]
Angeline  Norway The brig was abandoned in the North Sea. Her crew were rescued by the barque Mathilde ( Sweden). Angeline was on a voyage from Grimsby, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom to Christiania.[14]
Arizona  United States The steamship was destroyed by fire at Marquette, Michigan.[31]
Augusta  Sweden The barque foundered at sea with the loss of at least two lives. There were six survivors, whe were rescued by the barque Gerson ( Denmark). Augusta was on a voyage from Swansea, Glamorgan to Aspinwall, Colombia.[54][28]
Baring Brothers  United States The ship ran aground at San Francisco, California. She was refloated and found to be severely leaky.[14]
Bassano  United Kingdom The steamship caught fire at Gothenburg, Sweden. She was on a voyage from New York to Gothenburg.[5]
Belle of Devon  United Kingdom The schooner was lost whilst on a voyage from Sydney, Nova Scotia, Dominion of Canada to Saint John's, Newfoundland Colony.[2]
Bellerophen  United Kingdom The fishing smack was run into by a steamship and sank off Flamborough Head, Yorkshire. Her crew were rescued.[48]
Bellona  United Kingdom The steamship was wrecked off Imbros, Ottoman Empire. Her crew were rescued.[50]
Ben Nevis  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore at Sfântu-Gheorge, Romania.[52]
Betty Sauber, and
Cumberland
 Germany
 United Kingdom
The steamship Cumberland was run into by the steamship Betty Sauber at Hamburg. Both vessels were severely damaged. Betty Sauber was on a voyage from Hamburg to Sunderland, County Durham. Cumberland was on a voyage from Grangemouth, Stirlingshire to Hamburg. She ran aground.[55]
Boreas  United Kingdom The smack was driven ashore 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) north of Easington, Yorkshire. Her five crew were rescued by rocket apparatus.[55]
Brabo  Belgium The steamship ran aground off Cape Corrientes, Cuba.[36] She was refloated two days lated and taken in to Mobile, Alabama, United States.[52]
Britannia  United Kingdom The schooner was driven ashore at Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire. She was refloated and taken in to Sandhaven, Aberdeenshire in a leaky condition.[16]
Bucephalus  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore in the Torres Strait. She was refloated.[19]
Capri  United Kingdom The steamship was wrecked on the Kentish Knock. Her crew were rescued by the Walton Lifeboat.[56]
Choteau  United States The steamship was destroyed by fire near Greenville, Mississippi. She was on a voyage from Memphis, Tennessee to New Orleans.[50]
Christina  Norway The barque ran aground on a sunken wreck at Pensacola, Florida, United States. She was on a voyage from Pensacola to Buenos Aires, Argentina.[13]
Coban  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore at "Traverse", Dominion of Canada. She was on a voyage from Montrea. Quebec to Sydney, Nova Scotia, Dominion of Canada.[52]
Cobden  United Kingdom The steamship ran ashore at Thameshaven, Essex.[19]
Condoren  Denmark The schooner was driven ashore at Snekkersten. She was on a voyage from Ystadt, Sweden to Bordeaux, Gironde, France.[31]
County of Pembroke  United Kingdom The barque ran aground on the Juister Riff, off Juist, Germany and was wrecked. Her crew were rescued by the Juist Lifeboat. She was on a voyage from Hamburg to London.[55][16] She was later refloated with the assistance of a steamship and was taken in to the Ems.[13]
Dahlia  United Kingdom The ship was abandoned at sea. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Brazil to Saint John's, Newfoundland Colony.[17]
Diomeda, and
William Symington
 United Kingdom The steamships collided at Constantinople, Ottoman Empire and were both severely damaged.[31]
Director  United Kingdom The ship struck rocks off Balabac Island, Spanish East Indies and was abandoned. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Singapore, Straits Settlements to Shanghai, China.[30]
Dragoman  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground in the Suez Canal. She was refloated on 28 November.[57]
Duchess of Argyle  United Kingdom The ship was driven ashore and wrecked at Victoria, British Columbia, Dominion of Canada.[12][55]
Eliza Ecles  United Kingdom The smack foundered in the North Sea with the loss of all hands.[11]
Eros  Norway The barque ran aground at Falsterbo, Sweden.[31]
Garibaldi  Norway The brig was run into by another vessel. She was on a voyage from Pori, Grand Duchy of Finland to Grimsby. She put in to Helsingør, Denmark in a waterlogged condition.[15]
General Havelock  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground in the River Thames at Ratcliff, Middlesex. She was the run into by the tug Midge ( United Kingdom). General Havelock was refloated and resumed her voyage.[22]
Genesta  United Kingdom The sailing barge collided with the brig Ebenezer ( United Kingdom) 7 nautical miles (13 km) south of Flamborough Head and was severely damaged. Genesta was on a voyage from Sunderland to Faversham, Kent. She was towed in to Scarborough, Yorkshire.[12]
Guyandotte  United States The ship collided with a schooner and was severely damaged. She was on a voyage from Norfolk, Virginia to New York.[29]
Harbinger  United Kingdom The steamship collided with the steamship Rowan ( United Kingdom) in the River Thames and was beached.[22]
Harrowgate  United Kingdom The steamship caught fire at New Orleans, Louisiana, United Stated.[14]
Hawarden  United Kingdom The steamship arrived at Queenstown, County Cork on fire. She was on a voyage from Savannah, Georgia, United States to Reval, Russia.[1]
Hbar  Sweden The ship was lost at Sanlúcar de Barrameda, Spain.[1]
Hutton Hall  United Kingdom The ship caught fire at Calcutta, India.[55] The fire was extinguished.[15]
Ianthe  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore at Smyrna, Ottoman Empire. She was refloated with assistance and taken in to Mersina, Ottoman Empire.[50]
Impi  Russia The brig was driven ashore at Hittarp, Sweden.[15]
Italia Flag unknown The ship struck rocks at Oporto, Portugal. She was refloated, towed in to Oporto in a waterlogged condition and was beached.[42]
Killarney  United Kingdom The ship collided with Cruisader and sank off Yloilo, Spanish East Indies. Her crew survived.[22]
Kimberley  United Kingdom The steamship caught fire at New Orleans. The fire was extinguished.[42]
Lavinia  Germany The steamship struck a sunken rock at Corral, Chile and became leaky.[4]
Llavarello Siroceri  Italy The ship was abandoned in the Mediterranean Sea. Her crew survived.[19]
Lombard  United Kingdom The steamship collided with the quayside at Hull, Yorkshire and sank at the bow. She was on a voyage from Odessa, Russia to Hull.[42]
Lorely  Germany The barque was driven ashore at "Loosen". She was on a voyage from Hull to Dantsic.[19]
Maria  Sweden The brig was driven ashore at Gothenburg. She was on a voyage from Uddevalla to Hartlepool, County Durham.[50]
Mary Lohden Flag unknown The ship ran aground at Juniskär, Sweden.[29]
Monmouthshire  United Kingdom The ship ran aground at Montrose, Forfarshire. She was on a voyage from Montrose to Sydney, New South Wales.[14] She was refloated and put back to Montrose.[19]
Muxal  United Kingdom The brig ran aground on the Cheney Rock Spit, in the Thames Estuary.[14]
Nedsjed  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground in the River Tees and was severely damaged. She was on a voyage from Middlesbrough to Bombay, India. She was refloated on 18 November and put back to Middlesbrough.[31][29]
Newnham  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground at Atherfield, Isle of Wight. She was refloated on 21 November.[42]
Onkshaia  Denmark The brig ran aground on Kalbaden, in the Baltic Sea. She was on a voyage from Kotka, Grand Duchy of Finland to Leith, Lothian, United Kingdom.[50]
Osseo  United States The ship was abandoned at sea. She was on a voyage from New York to Trinidad.[55]
Pansewitz  Germany The barque was driven ashore on "Amack", Denmark. She was on a voyage from Dantsic to Gloucester, United Kingdom. She was refloated with assistance and taken in to Copenhagen, Denmark.[31]
Paolina B  Italy The barque was driven ashore at "Cedevia", Spain. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdom to an American port.[55]
Pembury  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore. She was on a voyage from Ängelholm, Sweden to Cork. She was refloated with assistance and taken in to Cuxhaven, Germany.[4]
Plover  United Kingdom The steamship struck a rock at "Trillingate" and sank. She was a total loss.[13]
Polynia  United Kingdom The steam whaler was driven ashore in Prince Regent's Inlet. She was refloated three days later.[17]
Prince Eugene United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Guernsey The ship foundered off Alderney, Channel Islands. She was on a voyage from Guernsey to London.[29]
Queen of the Isles  United Kingdom The schooner ran aground in the River Liffey. She was on a voyage from Dublin to Irvine, Ayrshire.[14]
Rebecca  Germany The brig was wrecked at Savanilla, Colombia. Her crew were rescued.[16]
Rebecca Mary  United Kingdom The schooner ran aground in the River Mersey. She was refloated.[52]
Rivas Flag unknown The ship was driven ashore at Maassluis, South Holland. She was refloated.[42]
Southella Flag unknown The steamship was driven ashore at "Storjungfron", Sweden.[50]
Stockholm  Germany The steamship ran aground at Stockholm, Sweden. She was on a voyage from Hamburg to Stockholm.[14]
Stork  United Kingdom The steamship was driven ashore near Cuxhaven. She was on a voyage from Hamburg to London.[55]
Sunshine  United Kingdom The ship ran aground on the Montejo Reef, off Sanlúcar de Barrameda. She was later refloated and towed in to Bonanza, Spain.[12]
Svalen Flag unknown The brig was driven ashore and wrecked at Mogador, Morocco. Her crew were rescued. She was on a voyage from Sunderland to Mogador.[19]
Sylphiden  Denmark The schooner collided with the steamship Eastwood ( United Kingdom) and sank off Sandhammaren, Sweden. Her crew were rescued. Sylphiden was on a voyage from Fraserburgh to Liepāva, Russia.[19]
To Brodre Flag unknown The ship ran aground. She was later refloated and taken in to Garston, Lancashire, United Kingdom.[52]
Tønsberg  Norway The barque was abandoned in the Atlantic Ocean. Her crew were rescued by Clara B. Parodi (Flag unknown).[17]
Trio  United Kingdom The steamship ran aground and was holed by her anchor at Beuville, Calvados, France. She was on a voyage from Newcastle upon Tyne, Northumberland to Beuville.[55]
Universe  United Kingdom The paddle steamer ran aground at Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire. She was refloated and taken in to Barrow-in-Furnesss in a leaky condition.[19]
Victoria  United Kingdom The ketch caught fire and was abandoned in the Thames Estuary. She was on a voyage from Ipswich, Suffolk to London.[22]
Vionis  United Kingdom The steamship was lost with all seven crew. She was on a voyage from Lunenberg, Nova Scotia to Puerto Rico.[2]
Vlaanderen  Belgium The steamship was wrecked on the French coast. She was on a voyage from Banana, Congo Free State to Antwerp.[45]
Wilhelmine Agatha  United Kingdom The barquentine was driven ashore north of "Drumore". She was on a voyage from Liverpool, Lancashire to Belfast, County Antrim.[4]
Winchester  United States The ship arrived at Bermuda on fire. She was on a voyage from New Orleans to Sevastopol, Russia. The fire was extinguished.[55]

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German Empire

German Empire

The German Empire, also referred to as Imperial Germany, the Kaiserreich, the Second Reich, as well as simply Germany, was the period of the German Reich from the unification of Germany in 1871 until the November Revolution in 1918, when the German Reich changed its form of government from a monarchy to a republic.

Brig

Brig

A brig is a type of sailing vessel defined by its rig: two masts which are both square-rigged. Brigs originated in the second half of the 18th century and were a common type of smaller merchant vessel or warship from then until the latter part of the 19th century. In commercial use, they were gradually replaced by fore-and-aft rigged vessels such as schooners, as owners sought to reduce crew costs by having rigs that could be handled by fewer men. In Royal Navy use, brigs were retained for training use when the battle fleets consisted almost entirely of iron-hulled steamships.

Baltic Sea

Baltic Sea

The Baltic Sea is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that is enclosed by Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia, Sweden and the North and Central European Plain.

Burntisland

Burntisland

Burntisland is a former royal burgh and parish in Fife, Scotland, on the northern shore of the Firth of Forth. According to the 2011 census, the town has a population of 6,269. It was previously known as Wester Kinghorn or Little Kinghorn.

Fife

Fife

Fife is a council area, historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries with Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife within Scotland. A person from Fife is known as a Fifer. In older documents the county was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire.

River Tees

River Tees

The River Tees, in Northern England, rises on the eastern slope of Cross Fell in the North Pennines and flows eastwards for 85 miles (137 km) to reach the North Sea between Hartlepool and Redcar near Middlesbrough. The modern day history of the river has been tied with the industries on Teesside in its lower reaches, where it has provided the means of import and export of goods to and from the North East England. The need for water further downstream also meant that reservoirs were built in the extreme upper reaches, such as Cow Green.

Dordrecht

Dordrecht

Dordrecht, historically known in English as Dordt or Dort, is a city and municipality in the Western Netherlands, located in the province of South Holland. It is the province's fifth-largest city after Rotterdam, The Hague, Zoetermeer and Leiden, with a population of 118,654.

Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough is a town on the southern bank of the River Tees in North Yorkshire, England. It is near the North York Moors national park and the main town of its local council and borough.

North Riding of Yorkshire

North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is a subdivision of Yorkshire, England, alongside York, the East Riding and West Riding. The riding's highest point is at Mickle Fell with 2,585 ft (788 metres).

Cheboygan, Michigan

Cheboygan, Michigan

Cheboygan is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 4,876. It is the county seat of Cheboygan County.

Netherlands

Netherlands

The Netherlands, informally Holland, is a country located in Northwestern Europe with overseas territories in the Caribbean. It is the largest of four constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Netherlands consists of twelve provinces; it borders Germany to the east, Belgium to the south, with a North Sea coastline to the north and west. It shares maritime borders with the United Kingdom, Germany and Belgium in the North Sea. The country's official language is Dutch, with West Frisian as a secondary official language in the province of Friesland. Dutch Low Saxon and Limburgish are recognised regional languages, while Dutch Sign Language, Sinte Romani and Yiddish are recognised non-territorial languages. Dutch, English and Papiamento are official in the Caribbean territories.

Barque

Barque

A barque, barc, or bark is a type of sailing vessel with three or more masts having the fore- and mainmasts rigged square and only the mizzen rigged fore and aft. Sometimes, the mizzen is only partly fore-and-aft rigged, bearing a square-rigged sail above.

Source: "List of shipwrecks in November 1887", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_shipwrecks_in_November_1887.

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References
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Ship events in 1887
Ship launches: 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892
Ship commissionings: 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892
Ship decommissionings: 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892
Shipwrecks: 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892

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