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List of patrol vessels of the United States Navy

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Ships of the
United States Navy
Ships in current service
Ships grouped alphabetically
Ships grouped by type

This is a list of patrol vessels of the United States Navy.

Ship status is indicated as either currently active [A] (including ready reserve), inactive [I], or precommissioning [P]. Ships in the inactive category include only ships in the inactive reserve, ships which have been disposed from US service have no listed status. Ships in the precommissioning category include ships under construction or on order.

Patrol craft coastal (PC)

The original PC hull number sequence ended in 1964, and was then restarted with '1' for this class.

Cyclone-class

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Cyclone-class patrol ship

Cyclone-class patrol ship

The Cyclone-class patrol ships are a class of United States Navy coastal patrol boats. Most of these ships were launched between 1992 and 1994. The primary mission of these ships is coastal patrol and interdiction surveillance, an important aspect of littoral operations outlined in the Navy's strategy, "Forward...From the Sea." These ships also provide full mission support for U.S. Navy SEALs and other special operations forces.

USS Tempest (PC-2)

USS Tempest (PC-2)

USS Tempest (PC-2) is the second of the Cyclone-class of United States Navy coastal patrol ships, named for various weather phenomena. She was transferred to the US Coast Guard as USCGC Tempest (WPC-2), on 1 October 2004, and placed in 'Commission Special' status until December 2005, when she was formally commissioned as a Coast Guard cutter. She was returned to the US Navy on 22 August 2008.

USS Chinook (PC-9)

USS Chinook (PC-9)

The second USS Chinook (PC-9) is the ninth Cyclone-class patrol ship of the United States Navy. Contract awarded 19 July 1991 to Bollinger Shipyards, her keel was laid 16 June 1993, and she was launched 26 February 1994. She was delivered 7 October 1994 and commissioned 28 January 1995.

USS Whirlwind (PC-11)

USS Whirlwind (PC-11)

USS Whirlwind (PC-11) is the eleventh Cyclone-class patrol ship. Whirlwind was laid down 4 March 1994 by Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport, Louisiana and launched 9 September 1994. She was commissioned 1 July 1995 in Memphis, Tennessee. On 21 March 2022, Whirlwind was decommissioned at Naval Support Activity Bahrain.

Hovercraft

Patrol air cushion vehicle (PACV)

The Navy used 3 Patrol Air Cushion Vehicle hovercraft in Vietnam.

Hydrofoil vessels

Patrol craft hydrofoil (PCH)

Patrol gunboat hydrofoil (PGH)

Patrol missile hydrofoil (PHM)

Pegasus-class hydrofoil

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Pegasus-class hydrofoil

Pegasus-class hydrofoil

The Pegasus-class hydrofoils were a series of fast attack patrol boats employed by the United States Navy. They were in service from 1977 until 1993. These hydrofoils carried the designation "PHM" for "Patrol Hydrofoil, Missile." The Pegasus-class vessels were originally intended for NATO operations in the North Sea and Baltic Sea. Subsequently, participation by other NATO navies, including Germany and Italy, ceased and the U.S. Navy proceeded to procure six PHMs, which were highly successful in conducting coastal operations, such as narcotics interdiction and coastal patrol, in the Caribbean basin.

Hydrofoil

Hydrofoil

A hydrofoil is a lifting surface, or foil, that operates in water. They are similar in appearance and purpose to aerofoils used by aeroplanes. Boats that use hydrofoil technology are also simply termed hydrofoils. As a hydrofoil craft gains speed, the hydrofoils lift the boat's hull out of the water, decreasing drag and allowing greater speeds.

USS Pegasus (PHM-1)

USS Pegasus (PHM-1)

USS Pegasus (PHM-1) was the lead ship of her class of hydrofoils operated by the United States Navy. Pegasus-class vessels were designed for high speed and mobility, and carried a powerful armament for their size.

USS Hercules (PHM-2)

USS Hercules (PHM-2)

USS Hercules (PHM-2) was a United States Navy hydrofoil patrol vessel operated from 1982 to 1993. Pegasus class vessels were designed for high speed and mobility and carried a powerful armament for their size. The Hercules was named for the constellation.

USS Taurus (PHM-3)

USS Taurus (PHM-3)

USS Taurus (PHM-3) was the third ship of her class of hydrofoils operated by the United States Navy. Pegasus class vessels were designed for high speed and mobility, and carried a powerful armament. The ship was named for the constellation Taurus.

USS Aquila (PHM-4)

USS Aquila (PHM-4)

The second USS Aquila (PHM-4) was the fourth ship of her class of hydrofoils operated by the United States Navy. Pegasus class vessels were designed for high speed and mobility, and carried a powerful armament.

USS Aries (PHM-5)

USS Aries (PHM-5)

USS Aries (PHM-5) was the fifth ship of her class of hydrofoils operated by the United States Navy. Pegasus class vessels were designed for high speed and mobility. Despite being small in size, they carried a large 76 mm gun. Aries was named for the constellation.

USS Gemini (PHM-6)

USS Gemini (PHM-6)

USS Gemini (PHM-6) was the final ship of her class of hydrofoils operated by the U.S. Navy. She was named for the constellation.

Patrol boat, river (PBR)

The Patrol Boat, River was acquired for the Vietnam War: 718 of these 31/32-foot long boats were purchased with a peak of 250 used in Vietnam.

Patrol craft (PC)

The following submarine chasers were 173/174 feet long and used the PC designation. The large missing sections of these numbers for the most part come from the sharing of the same number sequence with the 110-foot submarine chasers that used the SC designation and the 134-foot patrol craft sweepers that used the PCS designation. This number sequence would end in 1964, and then restart with '1' for the Cyclone-class costal patrol craft.

PC-461-class submarine chasers

497-507, 511 to 522, and 524-539 were used by SC submarine chasers

1376 to 1465 used by PCS patrol minesweepers, a few did hold the PC designation at times

The Adroit-class was a group of PC-461-class submarine chasers completed as minesweepers (AM-82 through AM-99). However, they were considered unsatisfactory in this role, and were all eventually converted back into submarine chasers.[2]

Patrol craft, control (PCC)

Thirty-five submarine chasers (PC) were converted into amphibious landing control vessels during World War II and reclassified as Patrol Craft, Control after the war.

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USS PC-457

USS PC-457

USS PC-457 was a submarine chaser of the United States Navy before World War II.

Submarine chaser

Submarine chaser

A submarine chaser or subchaser is a small naval vessel that is specifically intended for anti-submarine warfare. Many of the American submarine chasers used in World War I found their way to Allied nations by way of Lend-Lease in World War II.

PC-461-class submarine chaser

PC-461-class submarine chaser

The PC-461-class submarine chasers were a class of 343 submarine chasers constructed mainly for the US Navy and built from 1941 to 1944. The PC-461s were based primarily on two experimental submarine chasers, PC-451 and PC-452. While PC-461 began the series, the first of the class to enter service was PC-471. As part of the Lend-Lease program, 46 ships of this class were transferred to allies of the United States. Fifty-nine PC-461s were converted to other types of patrol vessels. Eight vessels of this class were lost, and one vessel was lost after conversion to a PGM-9-class motor gunboat. Only one of the class, USS PC-566 commanded by Lieutenant Commander Herbert G. Claudius, actually sank a submarine, U-166, during World War II; however, the website 'Patrol Craft Sailors Association' cites PC-461-class ships sinking or assisting sinking up to 6 German and Japanese subs.

USS PC-465

USS PC-465

USS PC-465 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was later renamed Paragould (PC-465) but never saw active service under that name. In 1961 she was transferred to the Venezuelan Navy under the name ARV Pulpo (P-7). She remained active in Venezuelan service until 1968, when she was placed in reserve. She was stricken in 1978 but her ultimate fate is unknown.

HNoMS King Haakon VII

HNoMS King Haakon VII

HNoMS King Haakon VII was a Royal Norwegian Navy escort ship during World War II, named after King Haakon VII of Norway. She was given to the RNoN by the United States on 16 September 1942, in the presence of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Norwegian Crown Princess Märtha.

USS PC-470

USS PC-470

USS PC-470 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was later renamed Antigo (PC-470) but never saw active service under that name.

USS PC-472

USS PC-472

USS PC-472 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was transferred to the French Navy in June 1944 and renamed Le Ruse. She remained in French service until 1959.

USS PC-496

USS PC-496

USS PC-496 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She sank on 4 June 1943, in the Mediterranean. Although the cause was speculated as a naval mine at the time of her sinking, it was later revealed that PC-496 had been sunk by an Italian submarine.

USS PC-542

USS PC-542

USS PC-542 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was transferred to the French Navy under Lend-Lease in September 1944 and renamed Tirailleur.

USS PC-552

USS PC-552

USS PC-552 was a class-461 patrol craft ("PC") that was at the forefront of the naval efforts during the Normandy invasion. It served as convoy protection in the North Atlantic and as one of about ten PC control vessels off Omaha Beach during the Normandy invasion. PC-552 was among the first ships to reach waters off Omaha Beach. PC-552, primary control vessel for Fox Green sector of the beach, was forced into rescue efforts and recovery of bodies at the departure line for Fox Green when the Duplex Drive tanks that survived the initial disastrous launch were swamped at the line with only two surviving. The PC was diverted into this effort for forty-five minutes and ultimately only five tanks, the two that survived the launch disaster and three that were aboard LCT-600 whose commander raised his ramp when the first off foundered and instead landed them on the beach, reached the beach.

USS PC-558

USS PC-558

USS PC-558 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was sunk by German submarine U-230 on 9 May 1944 with the loss of about half of her complement; there were 30 survivors.

USS PC-565

USS PC-565

USS PC-565 was a PC-461-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was later renamed Gilmer (PC-565) but never saw active service under that name.

Patrol craft escort, and patrol craft escort rescue (PCE, PCER)

PCE-827 to PCE-841

PCE-842 to PCE-904

PCE-842-class patrol craft

PCE-905 to PCE-960

  • USS PCE-905, later AM-232
  • USS PCE-906, later AM-233
  • USS PCE-907, later AM-363
  • USS PCE-908, later AM-235
  • USS PCE-909, later AM-236
  • PCE-910 cancelled June 6, 1944
  • USS PCE-911, later AM-351
  • USS PCE-912, later AM-352
  • USS PCE-913, later AM-353
  • USS PCE-914, later AM-354
  • USS PCE-915, later AM-355
  • USS PCE-916, later AM-356
  • USS PCE-917, later AM-357
  • USS PCE-918, later AM-358
  • USS PCE-919, later AM-359
  • PCE-920 to PCE-934 canceled November 1, 1945
  • PCE(R)-935 to PCE(R)-946 canceled
  • PCE-947 to PCE-960 canceled

PCE-1604 to PCE-1609

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United Kingdom

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a country in Europe, off the north-western coast of the continental mainland. It comprises England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands within the British Isles. Northern Ireland shares a land border with the Republic of Ireland; otherwise, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, the North Sea, the English Channel, the Celtic Sea and the Irish Sea. The total area of the United Kingdom is 242,495 square kilometres (93,628 sq mi), with an estimated 2023 population of over 68 million people.

PCE-842-class patrol craft

PCE-842-class patrol craft

The PCE-842-class patrol craft were United States Navy patrol craft escorts designed during World War II that were intended for coastal and convoy escort. The design was derived from the 180-foot (55 m) Admirable-class minesweeper as a substitute for the 173-foot (53 m) PC-461-class submarine chasers that were used for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) in coastal areas. At 185 feet long and 640 tons, the PCE is more than twice the displacement of the PC and thus and in combination with a less powerful engine also much slower. It has a crew complement of 99 officers and men.

USS Somersworth (PCE(R)-849)

USS Somersworth (PCE(R)-849)

USS Somersworth was a United States Navy PCE(R)-848-class Patrol Craft Escort (Rescue), in commission from April 1944 to September 1965. The ship was named after the city of Somersworth, New Hampshire.

USS PCE-867

USS PCE-867

USS PCE-867 was a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was renamed ROCS Yong Tai (PCE-41) and ROCS Shan Hai (PCE-62) after being acquired by the Republic of China Navy on 7 February 1948.

USS PCE-869

USS PCE-869

USS PCE-869 was a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was renamed ROCS Yong Xing (PCE-42) and ROCS Wei Yuan (PCE-68) after being acquired by the Republic of China Navy on 28 August 1945.

USS PCE-872

USS PCE-872

USS PCE-872 was a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was renamed Caribe after being acquired by the Cuban Navy on 1 October 1947.

USS Havre (PCE(C)-877)

USS Havre (PCE(C)-877)

The USS Havre was a United States Navy PCE-842-class patrol craft escort in commission from 14 February 1944 to 1 July 1970. She served in the Central Pacific during World War II, supporting invasions of Battle of Iwo Jima and the Battle of Okinawa, and was present in Tokyo Bay for the formal Surrender of Japan on 2 September 1945. Unlike other ships from this class, which were scrapped or sold to other nations, the (PCE-877) stayed the property of the United States Navy, who transferred ownership to the United States Navy Reserve as Naval Reserve Training Ship for 9th Naval District (Chicago) in April 1954. She was renamed USS Havre (PCE-877) on 15 February 1956 as part of a Navy-wide initiative to provide names to all numbered ships. The USS Havre served on Great Lakes until struck from Navy list 1 July 1970.

USS PCE-882

USS PCE-882

USS PCE-882 was a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was renamed ROKS Noryang (PCEC-51) after being acquired by the Republic of Korea Navy on 11 February 1955.

Patrol craft fast (PCF)

The Patrol Craft Fast, also known as the Swift Boats, were acquired for the Vietnam War; 193 of these 50 foot boats were purchased.[5]

Patrol craft sweeper (PCS)

At least 90 134-foot YMS-1-class minesweeper hulls were completed as patrol craft. These were judged to not be successful, and many were converted to sonar school ships or back to minesweepers.[6]

Patrol craft sweeper, control (PCSC)

Thirteen patrol craft sweepers (PCS) were converted into amphibious landing control vessels during World War II and reclassified as Patrol Craft Sweeper, Control.

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YMS-1-class minesweeper

YMS-1-class minesweeper

The YMS-1 class of auxiliary motor minesweepers was established with the laying down of YMS-1 on 4 March 1941. Some were later transferred to the United Kingdom as part of the World War II Lend-Lease pact between the two nations. One ship eventually made its way into the Royal Canadian Navy postwar.

USS PCS-1379

USS PCS-1379

USS PCS-1379 was the fourth of twelve patrol craft sweepers constructed by Wheeler Shipbuilding Corporation, Whitestone, Long Island, New York.

USS Hampton (PCS-1386)

USS Hampton (PCS-1386)

USS PCS-1386, later renamed USS Hampton (PCS-1386), was a United States Navy patrol craft sweeper - a type of patrol minesweeper - in commission from 1944 to 1956. When renamed, she became the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name Hampton.

USS Beaufort (PCS-1387)

USS Beaufort (PCS-1387)

USS Beaufort (PCS-1387) – initially known as USS PCS-1387 -- was a PCS-1376-class submarine chaser acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. Although constructed and designed as an anti-submarine patrol ship, she was used throughout the war, and afterwards, as a training ship for sonar operators.

USS PCS-1405

USS PCS-1405

USS PCS-1405 was a United States Navy minesweeper in commission from 1944 to 1946. She saw service in the latter stages of World War II.

USS PCS-1425

USS PCS-1425

USS PCS-1425 was a United States Navy minesweeper and patrol ship in service during World War II. Her keel was laid in 1943 as PC-1425, before being reclassified three months later as a "patrol craft sweeper" (PCS). After the war, the ship served as a test platform for the development of naval radios, being the first ship to demonstrate the use of an automatically aligning UHF directional antenna.

USS PCS-1450

USS PCS-1450

USS PCS-1450, ex-PC-1450, was a United States Navy minesweeper in commission from 1944 to 1946. She saw service in the latter stages of World War II.

Patrol escort (PE)

Of 112 Eagle class patrol craft planned 60 of these World War I era ships were completed, being given numbers from 1 to 60. Only three were commissioned prior to the Armistice which ended World War I and only eight saw service in World War II of which PE-56 was sunk by a U-boat.

Designation Keel Laid Launched Commissioned Disposition
PE-1 7 May 1918 11 July 1918 27 October 1918 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-2 10 May 1918 19 August 1918 11 July 1918 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-3 16 May 1918 11 September 1918 11 November 1918 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-4 21 May 1918 15 September 1918 14 November 1918 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-5 28 May 1918 28 September 1918 19 November 1918 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-6 3 June 1918 16 October 1918 21 November 1918 Destroyed as target 30 November 1934
PE-7 8 June 1918 5 October 1918 24 November 1918 Destroyed as target 30 November 1934
PE-8 10 June 1918 11 November 1918 31 October 1919 Sold 1 April 1931
PE-9 17 June 1918 8 November 1918 27 October 1919 Sold 26 May 1930
PE-10 6 July 1918 9 November 1918 31 October 1919 Destroyed 19 August 1937
PE-11 13 July 1918 14 November 1918 29 May 1919 Sold 16 January 1935
PE-12 13 July 1918 12 November 1918 6 November 1919 Sold 30 December 1935
PE-13 15 July 1918 9 January 1919 2 April 1919 Sold 26 May 1930
PE-14 20 July 1918 23 January 1919 17 June 1919 Destroyed as target 22 November 1934
PE-15 21 July 1918 25 January 1919 11 June 1919 Sold 14 June 1934
PE-16 22 July 1918 11 January 1919 5 June 1919 Transferred to the Coast Guard late 1919
PE-17 3 August 1918 1 February 1919 3 July 1919 Wrecked off Long Island, New York 22 May 1922
PE-18 5 August 1918 10 February 1919 7 August 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-19 6 August 1918 30 January 1919 25 June 1919 Destroyed 6 August 1946
PE-20 26 August 1918 15 February 1919 28 July 1919 Transferred to USCG late 1919
PE-21 31 August 1918 15 February 1919 31 July 1919 Transferred to USCG late 1919
PE-22 5 September 1918 10 February 1919 17 July 1919 Transferred to USCG late 1919
PE-23 11 September 1918 20 February 1919 19 June 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-24 13 September 1918 24 February 1919 12 July 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-25 17 September 1918 19 February 1919 30 June 1919 Lost 11 June 1930
PE-26 25 September 1918 1 March 1919 1 October 1919 Sold 29 August 1938
PE-27 22 October 1918 1 March 1919 14 July 1919 Sold 4 June 1946
PE-28 23 October 1918 1 March 1919 28 July 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-29 18 November 1918 8 March 1919 20 August 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-30 19 November 1918 8 March 1919 14 August 1919 Transferred to USCG late 1919
PE-31 19 November 1918 8 March 1919 14 August 1919 Sold 18 May 1923
PE-32 30 November 1918 15 March 1919 4 September 1919 Sold 3 March 1947
PE-33 14 February 1918 15 March 1919 4 September 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-34 8 January 1919 15 March 1919 3 September 1919 Sold 9 June 1932
PE-35 13 January 1919 22 March 1919 22 August 1919 Sold 7 June 1938
PE-36 22 January 1919 22 March 1919 20 August 1919 Sold 27 February 1936
PE-37 27 January 1919 25 March 1919 30 September 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-38 31 January 1919 29 March 1919 30 July 1919 Sold 3 March 1947
PE-39 3 February 1919 29 March 1919 20 September 1919 Sold 7 June 1938
PE-40 7 February 1919 5 April 1919 1 October 1919 Destroyed as target 19 November 1934
PE-41 20 February 1919 5 April 1919 26 September 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-42 13 February 1919 17 May 1919 3 October 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-43 17 February 1919 17 May 1919 2 October 1919 Sold 26 May 1930
PE-44 20 February 1919 24 May 1919 30 September 1919 Disposed of 14 May 1938
PE-45 20 February 1919 17 May 1919 2 October 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-46 24 February 1919 24 May 1919 3 October 1919 Sold 10 December 1936
PE-47 3 March 1919 19 June 1919 4 October 1919 Sold 30 December 1935
PE-48 3 March 1919 24 May 1919 8 October 1919 Sold 10 October 1946
PE-49 4 March 1919 14 June 1919 10 October 1919 Sold 20 September 1930
PE-50 10 March 1919 18 July 1919 6 October 1919 Sold 11 June 1930
PE-51 10 March 1919 14 June 1919 2 October 1919 Sold 29 August 1938
PE-52 10 March 1919 9 July 1919 10 October 1919 Sold 29 August 1938
PE-53 17 March 1919 13 August 1919 20 October 1919 Sold 26 August 1938
PE-54 17 March 1919 17 July 1919 10 October 1919 Sold 26 May 1930
PE-55 17 March 1919 22 July 1919 10 October 1919 Sold 3 March 1947
PE-56 25 March 1919 15 August 1919 26 October 1919 Exploded off Portland, Maine, on 23 April 1945 after being torpedoed by U-853, 49 killed
PE-57 25 March 1919 29 July 1919 15 October 1919 Sold March 5, 1947
PE-58 25 March 1919 2 August 1919 20 October 1919 Disposed of 30 June 1940
PE-59 31 March 1919 12 April 1919 19 September 1919 Sold 29 August 1938
PE-60 31 March 1919 13 August 1919 27 October 1919 Sold 29 August 1938

PE-61 through PE-112 were cancelled on November 30, 1918. PE-5, PE-15, PE-25, PE-45, PE-65, PE-75, PE-86, PE-95, PE-105, and PE-112 were allotted for transfer to Italy, though this plan was cancelled and none were ever delivered.

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United States Coast Guard

United States Coast Guard

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is the maritime security, search and rescue, and law enforcement service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the country's eight uniformed services. The service is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the United States military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters and a federal regulatory agency mission as part of its duties. It is the largest and most powerful coast guard in the world, rivaling the capabilities and size of most navies.

USCGC Earp (ex-Eagle 22)

USCGC Earp (ex-Eagle 22)

USCGC Earp was a 200-foot (61 m) U.S. Coast Guard anti-submarine Eagle–class vessel built by Ford Motor Co. in Detroit, Michigan. Earp was named by the Coast Guard for Ensign James Marsden Earp, a crewmember killed in the September 1918 U-boat sinking of USCGC Tampa. All of the Eagle–class cutters were named for deceased Tampa Coast Guardsmen. Earp was designed for quick construction and was one of 100 ordered by the Navy. Five Eagle–class vessels were transferred to the Coast Guard and proved unsuitable for service because poor manueuvering characteristics and sea-keeping qualities. Earp was launched on 5 August 1918 and commissioned on 17 July 1919 by the United States Navy. The Navy transferred control of Earp to the Coast Guard on 19 December 1919 at New London, Connecticut. She was placed in commission by the Coast Guard at New London on 17 March 1920 and departed for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay, Maryland on 8 May. On 2 June 1920 she departed the yard and arrived at Norfolk, Virginia on 27 June after sea trials. On 9 July she was assigned a permanent station at Honolulu, Hawaii and arrived 13 December after repairs at Mare Island, California. Earp was decommissioned by the Coast Guard at Pearl Harbor on 1 January 1923 and returned to Navy control on 22 May 1923.

Portland, Maine

Portland, Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine and the seat of Cumberland County. Portland's population was 68,408 in April 2020. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, the 104th-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Portland's economy relies mostly on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port is known for its nightlife and 19th-century architecture. Marine industry plays an important role in the city's economy, with an active waterfront that supports fishing and commercial shipping. The Port of Portland is the second-largest tonnage seaport in New England.

German submarine U-853

German submarine U-853

German submarine U-853 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. Her keel was laid down on 21 August 1942 by DeSchiMAG AG Weser of Bremen. She was commissioned on 25 June 1943 with Kapitänleutnant Helmut Sommer in command. U-853 saw action during the Battle of the Atlantic in World War II. She conducted three patrols, sinking two ships totalling 5,353 GRT and 430 tons.

Italy

Italy

Italy, officially the Italian Republic or the Republic of Italy, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, it consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and surrounded by several islands; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region. Italy shares land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. It has a territorial exclave in Switzerland, Campione. Italy covers an area of 301,230 km2 (116,310 sq mi), with a population of about 60 million. It is the third-most populous member state of the European Union, the sixth-most populous country in Europe, and the tenth-largest country in the continent by land area. Italy's capital and largest city is Rome.

Patrol frigate (PF)

Tacoma-class frigates


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USS Asheville (PF-1)

USS Asheville (PF-1)

USS Asheville (PF-1) was an Asheville-class patrol frigate of the United States Navy that served during World War II. She was laid down on 10 March 1942 by Canadian Vickers Ltd. in Montreal, Quebec, Canada as the River-class frigate HMS Adur (K296) to serve in the British Royal Navy. She was launched on 22 August 1942 but due to a lack of American vessels for convoy protection she was transferred to the United States Navy prior to completion. On 1 December 1942, she was commissioned in Montreal as USS Asheville (PG-101), a patrol gunboat. She was reclassified PF-1 on 15 April 1943.

USS Natchez (PF-2)

USS Natchez (PF-2)

USS Natchez (PG-102/PF-2) was a River-class frigate acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. She was originally ordered and laid down as HMS Annan for the Royal Navy, and renamed as HMCS Annan for the Royal Canadian Navy before transfer to the U.S. Navy before launch. She was used for anti-submarine patrol work during the war.

Tacoma-class frigate

Tacoma-class frigate

The Tacoma class of patrol frigates served in the United States Navy during World War II and the Korean War. Originally classified as gunboats (PG), they were reclassified as patrol frigates (PF) on 15 April 1943. The class is named for its lead ship, Tacoma, a Maritime Commission (MARCOM) S2-S2-AQ1 design, which in turn was named for the city of Tacoma, Washington. Twenty-one ships were transferred to the British Royal Navy, in which they were known as Colony-class frigates, and twenty-eight ships were transferred under Lend-Lease to the Soviet Navy, where they were designated as storozhevoi korabl, during World War II. All Tacoma-class ships in US service during World War II were manned by United States Coast Guard crews. Tacoma-class ships were transferred to the United States Coast Guard and various navies post-World War II.

USS Albuquerque (PF-7)

USS Albuquerque (PF-7)

USS Albuquerque (PG-115/PF-7), a Tacoma-class patrol frigate in commission from 1943 to 1945 and from 1950 to 1953, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Albuquerque, New Mexico. She also served in the Soviet Navy as EK-14 and in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as JDS Tochi (PF-16/PF-296) and as YAC-15.

USS Everett (PF-8)

USS Everett (PF-8)

USS Everett (PG-116/PF-8), a Tacoma-class patrol frigate in commission from 1944 to 1945 and from 1950 to 1953, thus far has been the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Everett, Washington. She also served in the Soviet Navy as EK-15 and in the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force as JDS Kiri (PF-11/PF-291/YAC-20).

USS Grand Forks (PF-11)

USS Grand Forks (PF-11)

USS Grand Forks (PG-119/PF-11), a Tacoma-class patrol frigate, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Grand Forks, North Dakota.

USS Casper (PF-12)

USS Casper (PF-12)

USS Casper (PG-120/PF-12), a Tacoma-class patrol frigate, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Casper, Wyoming.

USS Grand Island (PF-14)

USS Grand Island (PF-14)

USS Grand Island (PF-14), a Tacoma-class frigate, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Grand Island, Nebraska.

USS Annapolis (PF-15)

USS Annapolis (PF-15)

USS Annapolis (PF-15) was a United States Navy Tacoma-class frigate in commission from 1944 to 1946. She was the second ship of the U.S. Navy to be named for Annapolis, Maryland. She later served in the Mexican Navy as ARM General Vicente Guerrero.

USS Key West (PF-17)

USS Key West (PF-17)

USS Key West (PG-125/PF-17), a Tacoma-class frigate, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Key West, Florida.

USS Alexandria (PF-18)

USS Alexandria (PF-18)

USS Alexandria (PF-18), originally classified PG-126, a Tacoma-class frigate, was the second ship of the United States Navy to hold that name, but it was the first to be named for the city of Alexandria, Virginia.

USS Huron (PF-19)

USS Huron (PF-19)

USS Huron (PF-19), a Tacoma-class frigate, was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for Huron, South Dakota.

Patrol gunboat (PG)

Tacoma-class frigates

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USS Concord (PG-3)

USS Concord (PG-3)

USS Concord was a member of the Yorktown class of steel-hulled, twin-screw gunboats in the United States Navy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She was the second U.S. Navy ship named in honor of the town of Concord, Massachusetts, site of the Battle of Concord in the American Revolutionary War.

USS Bennington (PG-4)

USS Bennington (PG-4)

USS Bennington was a member of the Yorktown class of steel-hulled, twin-screw gunboats in the United States Navy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. She was the first U.S. Navy ship named in honor of the town of Bennington, Vermont, site of the Battle of Bennington in the American Revolutionary War.

USS Machias (PG-5)

USS Machias (PG-5)

The first USS Machias (PG-5), a schooner-rigged gunboat, was laid down in February 1891 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. She was launched on 8 December 1891. She was sponsored by Miss Ethel Hyde, daughter of President Hyde of Bath Iron Works and commissioned at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 20 July 1893, Commander Charles J. Train in command.

USS Castine (PG-6)

USS Castine (PG-6)

USS Castine (PG-6) was a gunboat of the United States Navy in commission from 1894 to 1901, from 1903 to 1905, and from 1908 to 1919. The first U.S. Navy ship named for Castine, Maine, she saw service during the Spanish–American War, the Philippine–American War, and World War I.

USS Nashville (PG-7)

USS Nashville (PG-7)

USS Nashville (PG-7), a gunboat, was the only ship of its class. It was the first of three ships of the United States Navy to hold the name Nashville.

USS Helena (PG-9)

USS Helena (PG-9)

USS Helena (PG-9) was a Wilmington-class gunboat of the United States Navy. She participated in the Spanish–American War, and served in the Far East for many years. The (PG-9) was the first of five Navy vessels named after the capital city of Montana.

USS Annapolis (PG-10)

USS Annapolis (PG-10)

The first USS Annapolis (PG-10/IX-1) was a gunboat in the United States Navy. She was named for Annapolis, Maryland.

USS Newport (PG-12)

USS Newport (PG-12)

USS Newport was a United States Navy gunboat. She was laid down by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine in March 1896, launched on 5 December 1896, sponsored by Miss Frances La Farge, and commissioned on 5 October 1897, Comdr. B. F. Tilley in command.

USS Marietta (PG-15)

USS Marietta (PG-15)

USS Marietta was a schooner-rigged gunboat. She was laid down by Union Iron Works, San Francisco, California, on 13 April 1896 and launched on 18 March 1897, sponsored by Mrs. C. L. More, daughter of Brigadier General T. C. H. Smith and commissioned in September 1897.

USS Palos (PG-16)

USS Palos (PG-16)

The second USS Palos (PG-16), a shallow draft gunboat built for service on the Yangtze River, China, was pre-constructed at Mare Island Navy Yard in 1912; dismantled and shipped to Shanghai, China: laid down by the Shanghai Dock and Engineering Co., on 28 April 1913; launched on 23 April 1914; sponsored by Mrs. Lee S. Border, wife of Naval Constructor Border who supervised the gunboat's construction ; and commissioned on 24 June 1914, Lt. Frank Rorschach in command.

USS Dubuque (PG-17)

USS Dubuque (PG-17)

USS Dubuque (PG-17) was a United States Navy patrol combatant ship that served in both World War I and World War II. She was named for Dubuque, Iowa.

USS Paducah (PG-18)

USS Paducah (PG-18)

USS Paducah (PG-18) was a Dubuque-class gunboat acquired by the US Navy prior to World War I. Her task was to patrol, escort, and protect Navy ships.

Patrol motor gunboat (PGM)

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USS PGM-1

USS PGM-1

USS PGM-1 was a PGM-1 class motor gunboat that served in the United States Navy during World War II.

USS PGM-2

USS PGM-2

USS PGM-2 was a PGM-1 class motor gunboat that served in the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally laid down as an SC-497 class submarine chaser on 16 July 1942 by the Robinson Marine in Benton Harbor, Michigan and launched on 17 June 1943. She was commissioned as USS SC-757 on 12 August 1943. She was later converted to a PGM-1 class motor gunboat and renamed PGM-2 on 10 December 1943. After the war she was sold and transferred to the Foreign Liquidations Commission at Subic Bay, Philippines on 20 May 1947. Her exact fate is unknown.

USS PGM-3

USS PGM-3

USS PGM-3 was a PGM-1 class motor gunboat that served in the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally laid down as an SC-497 class submarine chaser on 7 September 1942 by the Peterson Boat Works in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin and launched on 12 April 1943. She was commissioned as USS SC-1035 on 17 May 1943. She was later converted to a PGM-1 class motor gunboat and renamed PGM-3 on 10 December 1943. After the war she was transferred to the Foreign Liquidations Commission on 20 May 1947. She was turned over to the Chinese Navy at the mouth of the Yangtze River in the summer of 1947.

USS PGM-4

USS PGM-4

USS PGM-4 was a PGM-1 class motor gunboat that served in the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally laid down as an SC-497 class submarine chaser on 11 April 1942 by the Wilmington Boat Works, Inc. in Wilmington, California and launched on 7 September 1942. She was commissioned as USS SC-1053 on 17 March 1943. She was later converted to a PGM-1 class motor gunboat and renamed PGM-4 on 10 December 1943. After the war she was transferred to the Foreign Liquidations Commission on 9 June 1947. Her exact fate is unknown.

USS PGM-5

USS PGM-5

USS PGM-5 was a PGM-1 class motor gunboat that served in the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally laid down as an SC-497 class submarine chaser on 14 May 1942 by the Wilmington Boat Works in Wilmington, California and launched on 2 November 1942. She was commissioned as USS SC-1056 on 15 June 1943. She was later converted to a PGM-1 class motor gunboat and renamed PGM-5 on 10 December 1943. After the war she was transferred to the Foreign Liquidations Commission on 7 May 1947. Her exact fate is unknown.

USS PGM-10

USS PGM-10

USS PGM-10 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat that was in service with the United States Navy during World War II, and transferred to the Philippine Navy shortly thereafter.

USS PGM-11

USS PGM-11

USS PGM-11 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat in service with the United States Navy during World War II.

USS PGM-17

USS PGM-17

USS PGM-17 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was laid down and launched as USS PC-1189, a PC-461-class submarine chaser, but was renamed and reclassified before her November 1944 commissioning. She ran aground near Okinawa in May 1945. She was salvaged a month later, but was never repaired. She was towed to deep water and sunk in October 1945.

USS PGM-18

USS PGM-18

USS PGM-18 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was built and originally commissioned as USS PC-1255, a PC-461-class submarine chaser, and was decommissioned and converted in late 1944. USS PGM-18 struck a mine off the coast of Okinawa in April 1945; 13 men lost their lives when PGM-18 sank.

USS PGM-32

USS PGM-32

USS PGM-32 was a PGM-9-class motor gunboat in service with the United States Navy during the end of World War II, and briefly post-war.

USS Asheville (PGM-84)

USS Asheville (PGM-84)

USS Asheville (PGM-84/PG-84) was an Asheville-class gunboat acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of high speed patrolling in shallow waterways. The third ship to be named Asheville by the Navy, the vessel was laid down on 15 April 1964 at Tacoma, Washington, by the Tacoma Boatbuilding Company and launched on 1 May 1965, sponsored by Mrs. R. E. Harris. Asheville was commissioned on 6 August 1966, Lt. Henry Dale in command.

USS Gallup (PGM-85)

USS Gallup (PGM-85)

USS Gallup (PGM-85/PG-85) was an Asheville-class gunboat acquired by the United States Navy for the task of high speed patrolling in shallow waterways.

Patrol river gunboat (PR)

All built in Shanghai to serve on the Yangtze Patrol.

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Shanghai

Shanghai

Shanghai is one of the four direct-administered municipalities of the People's Republic of China (PRC). The city is located on the southern estuary of the Yangtze River, with the Huangpu River flowing through it. The population of the city proper is the third most populous in the world, with 24.89 million inhabitants in 2021, while the urban area is the most populous in China with 39,300,000 residents. As of 2018, the Greater Shanghai metropolitan area was estimated to produce a gross metropolitan product (nominal) of nearly 9.1 trillion RMB. Shanghai is one of the world's major centers for finance, business and economics, research, science and technology, manufacturing, transportation, tourism, and culture, and the Port of Shanghai is the world's busiest container port.

Yangtze Patrol

Yangtze Patrol

The Yangtze Patrol, also known as the Yangtze River Patrol Force, Yangtze River Patrol, YangPat and ComYangPat, was a prolonged naval operation from 1854–1949 to protect American interests in the Yangtze River's treaty ports. The Yangtze Patrol also patrolled the coastal waters of China where they protected U.S. citizens, their property, and Christian missionaries.

USS Tutuila (PR-4)

USS Tutuila (PR-4)

USS Tutuila (PR-4) was a gunboat in the service of the United States Navy from 1928, until her transfer to China, under lend-lease in 1942.

USS Panay (PR-5)

USS Panay (PR-5)

The second USS Panay (PR–5) of the United States Navy was a Panay-class river gunboat that served on the Yangtze Patrol in China until sunk by Japanese aircraft on 12 December 1937 on the Yangtze River.

USS Oahu (PR-6)

USS Oahu (PR-6)

The first USS Oahu (PR-6), a Yangtze River gunboat, was laid down by Kiangnan Dock and Engineering Works, Shanghai, China, 18 December 1926; launched as PG–46 on 26 November 1927; sponsored by Mrs. Bryson Bruce, wife of Comdr. Bruce; and commissioned 22 October 1928, Lt. Comdr. A. C. Thomas in command.

Corregidor

Corregidor

Corregidor is an island located at the entrance of Manila Bay in the southwestern part of Luzon in the Philippines, and is considered part of the Province of Cavite. Due to this location, Corregidor has historically been fortified with coastal artillery batteries to defend the entrance of Manila Bay and Manila itself from attacks by enemy warships. Located 48 kilometres (30 mi) inland, Manila is the nation's largest city and has been the most important seaport in the Philippines for centuries, from the colonial rule of Spain, Japan, and the United States, up through the establishment of the Third Philippine Republic in 1946.

USS Mindanao (PR-8)

USS Mindanao (PR-8)

The first USS Mindanao (PR‑8) was a river gunboat in the service of the United States Navy before and during World War II.

Patrol torpedo boat (PT)


Patrol yacht (PY)

By hull number

By name

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USS Mayflower (PY-1)

USS Mayflower (PY-1)

USS Mayflower (PY-1) was a 275 ft (84 m), 2,690 t (2,650 LT) motor vessel originally built as a private yacht that went on to serve in a variety of military, governmental, and commercial roles.

USS Scorpion (PY-3)

USS Scorpion (PY-3)

The fourth USS Scorpion was a steam yacht in commission in the United States Navy from 1898 to 1899, 1899 to 1901, and 1902 to 1927.

USS Vixen (PY-4)

USS Vixen (PY-4)

USS Vixen (PY-4) was a yacht acquired by the U.S. Navy for operations in the Spanish–American War, where she served with distinction during the Battle of Santiago. She was commissioned again for duty during World War I when she was assigned to patrol the U.S. East Coast.

USS Sylph (PY-5)

USS Sylph (PY-5)

USS Sylph (PY-5) was a steel hulled steam yacht that served as a presidential yacht operating from the Washington Navy Yard from the late 19th century through the presidency of Woodrow Wilson. Afterwards the yacht was used by the Secretary of the Navy and Assistant Secretary of the Navy. After decommissioning and sale in 1929 the yacht was used as a party fishing boat in New York and later a ferry. Sometime around 1950 the line went out of business and the vessel was abandoned at a pier at West 37th Street, Sea Gate, Brooklyn. The pier and abandoned vessel were reduced by fire and storms to the waterline and wreckage in the sands which still may be exposed by storms.

USS Sylph (PY-12)

USS Sylph (PY-12)

USS Sylph (PY-12), briefly YP-71, was a yacht in commission in the United States Navy as a patrol yacht from 1940 to 1946.

USS Siren (PY-13)

USS Siren (PY-13)

USS Siren (PY-13), briefly CMc-1, was built by Pusey and Jones, Wilmington, Delaware and launched 15 November 1929 as the yacht Lotosland. The yacht was acquired by the United States Navy in October 1940 and placed in commission as a Patrol Yacht from 1940 to 1946.

USS Argus (PY-14)

USS Argus (PY-14)

The American motor yacht Haida was built in Germany in 1929 for Max C. Fleischmann and later saw service in the United States Navy during World War II as patrol yacht USS Argus (PY-14) and USC&GS Pioneer. In 1946 she returned to her role as a private yacht under a sequence of names and owners, and after a further refit in 2016 is now Haida 1929.

USS Coral (PY-15)

USS Coral (PY-15)

USS Coral (PY-15), previously USS Sialia (SP-543), was a yacht in commission in the United States Navy as a Patrol Yacht from 1940 to 1943.

USS Zircon (PY-16)

USS Zircon (PY-16)

USS Zircon (PY-16) was the private yacht Nakhoda acquired by the United States Navy in 1940 serving as an armed yacht from 1941 to 1946. The yacht Nakhoda was built for automobile executive Frederick J. Fisher by Pusey and Jones Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware delivered in 1930. After the war the yacht was sold and reverted to the original name until sold in 1951 to the United New York Sandy Hook Pilots Association and renamed New York.

USS Jade (PY-17)

USS Jade (PY-17)

USS Jade (PY-17), was a yacht in commission in the United States Navy as a Patrol Yacht from 1940 to 1945. The vessel was constructed as the yacht Athero II for Jesse Lauriston Livermore in 1926, then sold to Eldridge R. Johnson to be renamed Caroline until replaced by a much larger vessel, also named Caroline, in 1931. The smaller yacht was sold to Joseph M. Schenck of Los Angeles and New York, briefly, before being sold John R. Brinkley, M.D. of Del Rio, Texas, and renamed Doctor Brinkley. In 1940, the US Navy purchased her and renamed her Jade, after the ornamental mineral jade; she is the only Navy ship to bear this name.

USS Carnelian (PY-19)

USS Carnelian (PY-19)

USS Carnelian (PY-19) was a converted yacht that patrolled with the United States Navy in World War II. She was named for carnelian.

USS Ruby (PY-21)

USS Ruby (PY-21)

USS Ruby (PY-21) was a converted yacht that patrolled with the United States Navy in World War II.

Patrol yacht, coastal (PYc)

By hull number

By name

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USS Emerald (PYc-1)

USS Emerald (PYc-1)

The third USS Emerald (PYC-1), was a yacht built in 1922 as Tamarack IV by the Consolidated Shipbuilding Company in Morris Heights, New York. She was acquired by the US Navy on 25 October 1940 and commissioned 27 December 1940, with Lieutenant Robert W. Graham in command.

USS Sapphire (PYc-2)

USS Sapphire (PYc-2)

The second USS Sapphire (PYc-2) was a patrol boat in the United States Navy.

USS Onyx (PYc-5)

USS Onyx (PYc-5)

USS Onyx (PYc-5), was a diesel coastal patrol yacht of the United States Navy during World War II.

USS Opal (PYc-8)

USS Opal (PYc-8)

USS Opal (PYc-8), formerly the yacht named Coronet (1928), was a patrol boat in the United States Navy during World War II and then served in the Ecuadorian navy.

USS Moonstone (PYc-9)

USS Moonstone (PYc-9)

USS Moonstone (PYc-9) was a coastal patrol yacht in the service of the United States Navy. She was built in 1929 as Nancy Baker by Germaniawerft in Kiel, Germany, later renamed Mona, and subsequently acquired by the Navy as the Lone Star on 10 February 1941. Renamed Moonstone and designated PYc-9, she was converted for U.S. Navy service in Jacksonville, Florida, and commissioned on 10 April 1941. She was named for the gemstone moonstone.

USS Topaz (PYc-10)

USS Topaz (PYc-10)

USS Topaz (PYc-10) was a coastal patrol yacht in the service of the United States Navy. She was named for the gemstone Topaz.

USS Sardonyx (PYc-12)

USS Sardonyx (PYc-12)

USS Sardonyx (PYc-12), formerly the yacht named Queen Anne (1928), was a patrol boat in the United States Navy during World War II.

USS Jasper (PYc-13)

USS Jasper (PYc-13)

USS Jasper (PYc-13) was a coastal patrol yacht in the service of the United States Navy. She was named for the gemstone Jasper.

USS Garnet (PYc-15)

USS Garnet (PYc-15)

USS Garnet (PYc-15) was a coastal patrol yacht in the service of the United States Navy.

USS Phenakite

USS Phenakite

USS Phenakite (PYc-25) was a converted yacht that was used by the United States Navy during World War I and World War II. The vessel was also known as Celt, Sachem (SP-192), Sightseer and Circle Line V.

USS Cymophane (PYc-26)

USS Cymophane (PYc-26)

USS Cymophane (PYc-26) was a Cymophane-class patrol yacht acquired by the United States Navy early during World War II. She was used for patrol, escort, anti-submarine, and rescue operations along coastal waters.

USS Ability (PYc-28)

USS Ability (PYc-28)

The first USS Ability (PYc-28) was a yacht in the service of the United States Navy used for anti-submarine warfare during World War II.

Submarine chaser (SC)

These submarine chasers were 110 feet long and used the SC designation. The large missing sections of numbers in designation for the most part come from sharing the same number set as the other bigger 173 foot subchasers that used the PC designation.

SC-1 class (SC-1 to SC-448)

SC 497 class

SC-497-class submarine chaser

Mainly SC-497 to 775, SC-977 to 1076, SC-1267 to 1367, SC-1474 to 1626. Also several were modified to be SCC's a command versions.

509 and 510 used by PC submarine chasers

523 used by PC submarine chaser

776-976 used by PC submarine chasers

1077-1265 used by PC submarine chasers

SC-1466 to SC-1473

These were British design Fairmile B motor launches built in Canada and loaned to US.

SC-1474 to SC-1626

(incomplete listing)

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Submarine chaser

Submarine chaser

A submarine chaser or subchaser is a small naval vessel that is specifically intended for anti-submarine warfare. Many of the American submarine chasers used in World War I found their way to Allied nations by way of Lend-Lease in World War II.

SC-1-class submarine chaser

SC-1-class submarine chaser

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 boats built from 1917 to 1919.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-1 to SC-50)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-1 to SC-50)

The SC-1-class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 boats built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the first 50 ships of the class.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-51 to SC-100)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-51 to SC-100)

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 vessels built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the second 50 ships of the class.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-101 to SC-150)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-101 to SC-150)

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 vessels built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the third 50 ships of the class.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-151 to SC-200)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-151 to SC-200)

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 vessels built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the fourth 50 ships of the class.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-201 to SC-250)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-201 to SC-250)

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 vessels built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the fifth group of 50 ships of the class.

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-251 to SC-300)

List of SC-1-class subchasers (SC-251 to SC-300)

The SC-1 class was a large class of submarine chasers built during World War I for the United States Navy. They were ordered in very large numbers in order to combat attacks by German U-boats, with 442 vessels built from 1917 to 1919. This article lists details of the sixth group of 50 ships of the class.

USS SC-1

USS SC-1

USS SC-1, prior to July 1920 known as USS Submarine Chaser No. 1 or USS S.C. 1, was an SC-1-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War I.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a country located primarily in Western Europe. It also includes overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, giving it one of the largest discontiguous exclusive economic zones in the world. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and had a total population of over 68 million as of January 2023. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre; other major urban areas include Marseille, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, and Nice.

USS SC-17

USS SC-17

USS SC-17, until July 1920 known as USS Submarine Chaser No. 17 or USS S.C. 17, was an SC-1-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War I.

USS SC-18

USS SC-18

USS SC-18, until July 1920 known as USS Submarine Chaser No. 18 or USS S.C. 18, was an SC-1-class submarine chaser built for the United States Navy during World War I.

World War I section patrol (SP) series

Civilian boats and ships were registered during World War I for potential use as section patrol (SP) craft and given "SP" identification numbers in the "ID/SP" numbering series.

Source: "List of patrol vessels of the United States Navy", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 16th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_patrol_vessels_of_the_United_States_Navy.

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References

Citations

  1. ^ "Notable U.S. Navy Ships Lost Since World War II". US Naval Institute. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  2. ^ "The Pacific War Online Encyclopedia: Adroit Class, U.S. Fleet Minesweepers". pwencycl.kgbudge.com. Retrieved 22 December 2010.
  3. ^ "February 1, 1956". Ethiopia Observer. 1956.
  4. ^ Addisalem Mulat (2016-12-11). "Ethiopia's Navy Founder". The Ethiopian Herald. citato in Allafrica.com
  5. ^ Symmes War on the Rivers
  6. ^ Friedman, Small Combatants, pp. 91-93
  7. ^ "American Marine Engineer August-September, 1920". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 24 August 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  8. ^ "American Marine Engineer August-September, 1920". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 24 August 2020 – via Haithi Trust.
  9. ^ "American Marine Engineer August-September, 1920". National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association of the United States. Retrieved 24 August 2020 – via Haithi Trust.

Sources

  • Friedman, Norman (1987). U.S. Small Combatants: An Illustrated Design History. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 978-0870217135.

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