Get Our Extension

List of fictional robots and androids

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
"Maria" from the 1927 film Metropolis. Statue in Babelsberg, Germany.
"Maria" from the 1927 film Metropolis. Statue in Babelsberg, Germany.

This list of fictional robots and androids is chronological, and categorised by medium. It includes all depictions of robots, androids and gynoids in literature, television, and cinema; however, robots that have appeared in more than one form of media are not necessarily listed in each of those media. This list is intended for all fictional computers which are described as existing in a humanlike or mobile form. It shows how the concept has developed in the human imagination through history.

Robots and androids have frequently been depicted or described in works of fiction. The word "robot" itself comes from a work of fiction, Karel Čapek's play, R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), written in 1920 and first performed in 1921.

Discover more about List of fictional robots and androids related topics

Theatre

  • Coppélia, a life-size dancing doll in the ballet of the same name, choreographed by Marius Petipa with music by Léo Delibes (1870)
  • The word robot comes from Karel Čapek's play, R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), written in 1920 in Czech and first performed in 1921. Performed in New York 1922 and an English edition published in 1923. In the play, the word refers to artificially created life forms.[1] Named robots in the play are Marius, Sulla, Radius, Primus, Helena, and Damon. The play introduced and popularized the term "robot". Čapek's robots are biological machines that are assembled, as opposed to grown or born.

Discover more about Theatre related topics

Coppélia

Coppélia

Coppélia is a comic ballet from 1870 originally choreographed by Arthur Saint-Léon to the music of Léo Delibes, with libretto by Charles-Louis-Étienne Nuitter. Nuitter's libretto and mise-en-scène was based upon E. T. A. Hoffmann's short story Der Sandmann. In Greek, κοπέλα means young woman. Coppélia premiered on 25 May 1870 at the Théâtre Impérial de l'Opéra, with the 16-year-old Giuseppina Bozzacchi in the principal role of Swanhilda and ballerina Eugénie Fiocre playing the part of Frantz en travesti. The costumes were designed by Paul Lormier and Alfred Albert, the scenery by Charles-Antoine Cambon, and Édouard Desplechin and Jean-Baptiste Lavastre.

Marius Petipa

Marius Petipa

Marius Ivanovich Petipa, born Victor Marius Alphonse Petipa, was a French ballet dancer, pedagogue and choreographer. Petipa is one of the most influential ballet masters and choreographers in ballet history.

Léo Delibes

Léo Delibes

Clément Philibert Léo Delibes was a French Romantic composer, best known for his ballets and operas. His works include the ballets Coppélia (1870) and Sylvia (1876) and the opera Lakmé (1883), which includes the well-known "Flower Duet".

Karel Čapek

Karel Čapek

Karel Čapek was a Czech writer, playwright and critic. He has become best known for his science fiction, including his novel War with the Newts (1936) and play R.U.R., which introduced the word robot. He also wrote many politically charged works dealing with the social turmoil of his time. Influenced by American pragmatic liberalism, he campaigned in favor of free expression and strongly opposed the rise of both fascism and communism in Europe.

Czech language

Czech language

Czech, historically also Bohemian, is a West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group, written in Latin script. Spoken by over 10 million people, it serves as the official language of the Czech Republic. Czech is closely related to Slovak, to the point of high mutual intelligibility, as well as to Polish to a lesser degree. Czech is a fusional language with a rich system of morphology and relatively flexible word order. Its vocabulary has been extensively influenced by Latin and German.

Artificial life

Artificial life

Artificial life is a field of study wherein researchers examine systems related to natural life, its processes, and its evolution, through the use of simulations with computer models, robotics, and biochemistry. The discipline was named by Christopher Langton, an American theoretical biologist, in 1986. In 1987 Langton organized the first conference on the field, in Los Alamos, New Mexico. There are three main kinds of alife, named for their approaches: soft, from software; hard, from hardware; and wet, from biochemistry. Artificial life researchers study traditional biology by trying to recreate aspects of biological phenomena.

Literature

19th century and earlier

Early 1900s

  • The "Metal Men" automata designed by a Thomas Edison-like scientist in Gustave Le Rouge's La Conspiration des Milliardaires (1899–1900)
  • Tik-Tok and Iron giant from L. Frank Baum's Ozma of Oz (1907). The movie Return to Oz, largely based on Ozma of Oz.
  • A robot chess-player in Moxon's Master by Ambrose Bierce (first published in the San Francisco Examiner on 16 Aug. 1899)
  • In Gaston Leroux's La Poupée Sanglante (The Bloody Doll) and La Machine à Assassiner (The Murdering Machine), the lead character, Bénédict Masson, is wrongly accused of murder and guillotined. His brain is later attached to an automaton created by scientist Jacques Cotentin, and Masson goes on to track and punish those who caused his death.

1920s

  • R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) (1921), by Karel Čapek – credited with coining the term "robot". In its original Czech, "robota" means forced labour, and is derived from "rab", meaning "slave." R.U.R. depicts the first elaborate depiction of a machine take-over. Čapek's robots can also be seen as the first androids: they are in fact organic.
  • Le Singe (The Monkey) (1925), by Maurice Renard and Albert Jean, imagined the creation of artificial lifeforms through the process of "radiogenesis", a sort of human electrocopying or cloning process.
  • The Metal Giants (1926), by Edmond Hamilton, in which a computer brain who runs on atomic power creates an army of 300-foot-tall robots.
  • Metropolis (1927), by Thea von Harbou as novel, by Fritz Lang as film, character Maria and her robot double.
  • Automata (1929), by S. Fowler Wright, about machines doing the humans' jobs before wiping them out.

1930s

1940s

1950s and 1960s

  • Astro Boy, series by Osamu Tezuka (published in Japan but available in English), an atomic-powered robot of 100,000 horsepower built to resemble a little boy, most specifically Tobio, the deceased son of Dr. Tenma. When not in school, Astro Boy spent his time dealing with robots & aliens. (1952)
  • The Gallegher series of stories by Lewis Padgett (Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore) collected in Robots Have No Tails (1952)
  • The Mechanical Hound from Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (1953)
  • Bors, an old government integration robot pivotal to Philip K. Dick's novelette The Last of the Masters (1954)
  • The Fury, a large steel robot that acts as jailer and executioner, in Henry Kuttner's "Two-Handed Engine" (1955)
  • Zane Gort, a robot novelist in the short story "The Silver Eggheads" by Fritz Leiber (1959)
  • SHROUD (Synthetic Human, Radiation OUtput Determined) and SHOCK (Synthetic Human Object, Casualty Kinematics), the sentient test dummies in the novel V. by Thomas Pynchon (1963)
  • Frost, the Beta-Machine, Mordel, and the Ancient Ore Crusher in Roger Zelazny's short story "For a Breath I Tarry" (1966)
  • Trurl and Klapaucius, the robot geniuses of The Cyberiad (Cyberiada, 1967; translated by Michael Kandel 1974) – collection of humorous stories about the exploits of Trurl and Klapaucius, "constructors" among robots
  • The Iron Man in the novel The Iron Man: A Children's Story in Five Nights by Ted Hughes, illustrated by Andrew Davidson (1968), later changed to The Iron Giant to avoid confusion with its predecessor, the comic superhero of the same name
  • Roy Batty, Pris, Rachael and several other Nexus-6 model androids. "Androids, fully organic in nature – the products of genetic engineering – and so human-like that they can only be distinguished by psychological tests; some of them don't even know that they're not human." – Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (1968)
  • Diktor, the robotic lover in the comics and film Barbarella (1968)
  • "The Electric Grandmother" in the short story of the same name, from I Sing the Body Electric by Ray Bradbury (1969), based on a 1962 Twilight Zone episode of the same name
  • Mech Eagles from the novel Logan's Run (1967), robotic eagles designed to track and kill people who refuse to die at age 21
  • Richard Daniel, an intensely loyal, old, un-remodeled robot, belonging to one family for generations, in "All the Traps of Earth" by Clifford Simak. When the last of his entire extended family of owners died, after 200 years, he is required by law to be disassembled; humans who made the law are still threatened by robots who are superior to them in functionality. He is sentient enough to take exception to that policy.
  • Jenkins, the robot who served generations of the Webster family for nearly a thousand years, then the dogs modified by one of the Websters, dogs capable of reading and speech, who inherited the earth when humans left it by various methods, through all of the stories contained in the collection "City" by Clifford Simak. Humans entered "the sleep", or had their bodies converted to Jovian lifeforms to live on Jupiter.

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

Discover more about Literature related topics

Kalevala

Kalevala

The Kalevala is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology, telling an epic story about the Creation of the Earth, describing the controversies and retaliatory voyages between the peoples of the land of Kalevala called Väinölä and the land of Pohjola and their various protagonists and antagonists, as well as the construction and robbery of the epic mythical wealth-making machine Sampo.

Homer

Homer

Homer was a Greek poet who is credited as the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are foundational works of ancient Greek literature. Homer is considered one of the most revered and influential authors in history.

Plato

Plato

Plato was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Athens during the Classical period in Ancient Greece. In Athens, Plato founded the Academy, a philosophical school where he taught the philosophical doctrines that would later became known as Platonism.

Pindar

Pindar

Pindar was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, his work is the best preserved. Quintilian wrote, "Of the nine lyric poets, Pindar is by far the greatest, in virtue of his inspired magnificence, the beauty of his thoughts and figures, the rich exuberance of his language and matter, and his rolling flood of eloquence, characteristics which, as Horace rightly held, make him inimitable." His poems can also, however, seem difficult and even peculiar. The Athenian comic playwright Eupolis once remarked that they "are already reduced to silence by the disinclination of the multitude for elegant learning". Some scholars in the modern age also found his poetry perplexing, at least until the 1896 discovery of some poems by his rival Bacchylides; comparisons of their work showed that many of Pindar's idiosyncrasies are typical of archaic genres rather than of only the poet himself. His poetry, while admired by critics, still challenges the casual reader and his work is largely unread among the general public.

Iliad

Iliad

The Iliad is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is one of the oldest extant works of literature still widely read by modern audiences. As with the Odyssey, the poem is divided into 24 books and contains 15,693 lines in its most widely accepted version, and was written in dactylic hexameter. Set towards the end of the Trojan War, a ten-year siege of the city of Troy by a coalition of Mycenaean Greek states, the poem depicts significant events in the siege's final weeks. In particular, it depicts a fierce quarrel between King Agamemnon and a celebrated warrior, Achilles. It is a central part of the Epic Cycle. The Iliad is often regarded as the first substantial piece of European literature.

Hephaestus

Hephaestus

Hephaestus is the Greek god of blacksmiths, metalworking, carpenters, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metallurgy, fire, and volcanoes. Hephaestus's Roman counterpart is Vulcan. In Greek mythology, Hephaestus was either the son of Zeus and Hera or he was Hera's parthenogenous child. He was cast off Mount Olympus by his mother Hera because of his lameness, the result of a congenital impairment; or in another account, by Zeus for protecting Hera from his advances.

Pandora

Pandora

In Greek mythology, Pandora was the first human woman created by Hephaestus on the instructions of Zeus. As Hesiod related it, each god cooperated by giving her unique gifts. Her other name—inscribed against her figure on a white-ground kylix in the British Museum—is Anesidora, "she who sends up gifts".

Cyprus

Cyprus

Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is an island country located south of the Anatolian Peninsula in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. It is geographically in Western Asia, but its cultural ties and geopolitics are overwhelmingly Southeastern European. Cyprus is the third-largest and third-most populous island in the Mediterranean. It is located north of Egypt, east of Greece, south of Turkey, and west of Lebanon and Syria. Its capital and largest city is Nicosia. The northeast portion of the island is de facto governed by the self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus.

Galatea (mythology)

Galatea (mythology)

Galatea is a name popularly applied to the statue carved of ivory by Pygmalion of Cyprus, which then came to life in Greek mythology. In modern English, the name usually alludes to that story.

Aphrodite

Aphrodite

Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, lust, beauty, pleasure, passion, and procreation. She was syncretized with the Roman goddess Venus. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite was worshipped as a warrior goddess. She was also the patron goddess of prostitutes, an association which led early scholars to propose the concept of "sacred prostitution" in Greco-Roman culture, an idea which is now generally seen as erroneous.

Apollonius of Rhodes

Apollonius of Rhodes

Apollonius of Rhodes was an ancient Greek author, best known for the Argonautica, an epic poem about Jason and the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece. The poem is one of the few extant examples of the epic genre and it was both innovative and influential, providing Ptolemaic Egypt with a "cultural mnemonic" or national "archive of images", and offering the Latin poets Virgil and Gaius Valerius Flaccus a model for their own epics. His other poems, which survive only in small fragments, concerned the beginnings or foundations of cities, such as Alexandria and Cnidus places of interest to the Ptolemies, whom he served as a scholar and librarian at the Library of Alexandria. A literary dispute with Callimachus, another Alexandrian librarian/poet, is a topic much discussed by modern scholars since it is thought to give some insight into their poetry, although there is very little evidence that there ever was such a dispute between the two men. In fact almost nothing at all is known about Apollonius and even his connection with Rhodes is a matter for speculation. Once considered a mere imitator of Homer, and therefore a failure as a poet, his reputation has been enhanced by recent studies, with an emphasis on the special characteristics of Hellenistic poets as scholarly heirs of a long literary tradition writing at a unique time in history.

Argonautica

Argonautica

The Argonautica is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from remote Colchis. Their heroic adventures and Jason's relationship with the dangerous Colchian princess/sorceress Medea were already well known to Hellenistic audiences, which enabled Apollonius to go beyond a simple narrative, giving it a scholarly emphasis suitable to the times. It was the age of the great Library of Alexandria, and his epic incorporates his research in geography, ethnography, comparative religion, and Homeric literature. However, his main contribution to the epic tradition lies in his development of the love between hero and heroine – he seems to have been the first narrative poet to study "the pathology of love". His Argonautica had a profound impact on Latin poetry: it was translated by Varro Atacinus and imitated by Valerius Flaccus, it influenced Catullus and Ovid, and it provided Virgil with a model for his Roman epic, the Aeneid.

Radio

Discover more about Radio related topics

Marvin the Paranoid Android

Marvin the Paranoid Android

Marvin the Paranoid Android is a fictional character in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams. Marvin is the ship's robot aboard the starship Heart of Gold. Originally built as one of many failed prototypes of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation's GPP technology, Marvin is afflicted with severe depression and boredom, in part because he has a "brain the size of a planet" which he is seldom, if ever, given the chance to use. Instead, the crew request him merely to carry out mundane jobs such as "opening the door". Indeed, the true horror of Marvin's existence is that no task he could be given would occupy even the tiniest fraction of his vast intellect. Marvin claims he is 50,000 times more intelligent than a human, though this is, if anything, an underestimation. When kidnapped by the bellicose Krikkit robots and tied to the interfaces of their intelligent war computer, Marvin simultaneously manages to plan the entire planet's military strategy, solve "all of the major mathematical, physical, chemical, biological, sociological, philosophical, etymological, meteorological and psychological problems of the Universe, except his own, three times over", and compose a number of lullabies.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is a comedy science fiction franchise created by Douglas Adams. Originally a 1978 radio comedy broadcast on BBC Radio 4, it was later adapted to other formats, including novels, stage shows, comic books, a 1981 TV series, a 1984 text-based computer game, and 2005 feature film.

James Follett

James Follett

James Follett was an English author and screenwriter. Follett became a full-time fiction writer in 1976, after resigning from contract work as a technical writer for the Ministry of Defence. He wrote over 20 novels, several television plays and many radio dramas.

Earthsearch

Earthsearch

Earthsearch: A Ten-Part Adventure Serial in Time and Space is a science fiction radio series written by James Follett. It consists of ten half-hour episodes. It was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 between January and March 1981. There is also a novelisation by Follett of the same name. The series has been released on cassette and audio CD. Since 2003 it has been re-broadcast, several times in the Seventh Dimension science fiction slot on BBC 7 and its successor BBC Radio 4 Extra.

Nineteen Ninety-Four

Nineteen Ninety-Four

Nineteen Ninety-Four is a BBC Radio 4 comedy series and a book written by William Osborne and Richard Turner. The six-part radio series was first broadcast in March 1985, and the book published in 1986. The title is a reference to the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell.

Music

Discover more about Music related topics

Mr. Roboto

Mr. Roboto

"Mr. Roboto" is a song by American rock band Styx, released as the lead single from their eleventh studio album, Kilroy Was Here (1983). It was written by band member Dennis DeYoung. In Canada, it went to #1 on the RPM national singles chart. In the U.S., it reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in April 1983.

Rock opera

Rock opera

A rock opera is a collection of rock music songs with lyrics that relate to a common story. Rock operas are typically released as concept albums and are not scripted for acting, which distinguishes them from operas, although several have been adapted as rock musicals. The use of various character roles within the song lyrics is a common storytelling device. The success of the rock opera genre has inspired similar works in other musical styles, such as rap opera.

Kilroy Was Here (album)

Kilroy Was Here (album)

Kilroy Was Here is the eleventh studio album by the American rock band Styx, released on February 22, 1983. A concept album and rock opera about a world where rock music is outlawed, it is named after a famous World War II graffiti tag, "Kilroy was here". It was the last album of original material to be released by the "classic" lineup of Dennis DeYoung, Tommy Shaw, James "J.Y." Young, John Panozzo, and Chuck Panozzo.

Styx (band)

Styx (band)

Styx is an American rock band formed in Chicago, Illinois, in 1972 and is known for incorporating hard rock guitar balanced with acoustic guitar, synthesizers mixed with acoustic piano, upbeat tracks with power ballads, and incorporating elements of international musical theatre. The band established itself with a progressive rock sound in the 1970s, and began to incorporate pop and soft rock elements in the 1980s.

Hip hop music

Hip hop music

Hip hop music or hip-hop music, also known as rap music and formerly known as disco rap, is a genre of popular music that originated in New York City in the 1970s. It consists of stylized rhythmic music that commonly accompanies rapping, a rhythmic and rhyming speech that is chanted. It developed as part of hip hop culture, a subculture defined by four key stylistic elements: MCing/rapping, DJing/scratching with turntables, break dancing, and graffiti writing. Other elements include sampling beats or bass lines from records, and rhythmic beatboxing. While often used to refer solely to rapping, "hip hop" more properly denotes the practice of the entire subculture. The term hip hop music is sometimes used synonymously with the term rap music, though rapping is not a required component of hip hop music; the genre may also incorporate other elements of hip hop culture, including DJing, turntablism, scratching, beatboxing, and instrumental tracks.

Toaster

Toaster

A toaster is a small electric appliance that uses radiant heat to brown sliced bread into toast.

Fake Songs

Fake Songs

Fake Songs is the third studio album by American musician Liam Lynch, released on April 1, 2003 through S-Curve Records and distributed worldwide by Capitol Records. The album is known for featuring his best-known song "United States of Whatever", which was released as a single in 2002. The album features a bonus DVD that compiles two-hours of various shorts and skits created by Lynch in his home studio.

Liam Lynch (musician)

Liam Lynch (musician)

William Patrick Niederst, better known as Liam Lynch, is an American filmmaker, singer, musician, songwriter, and puppeteer.

Janelle Monáe

Janelle Monáe

Janelle Monáe Robinson is an American singer, rapper and actress. She is signed to Atlantic Records, as well as to her own imprint, the Wondaland Arts Society. Monáe has received eight Grammy Award nominations, and has won an MTV Video Music Award and the ASCAP Vanguard Award in 2010. Monáe was also honored with the Billboard Women in Music Rising Star Award in 2015 and the Trailblazer of the Year Award in 2018. Boston City Council named October 16, 2013 "Janelle Monáe Day" in recognition of her artistry and activism.

Gorillaz

Gorillaz

Gorillaz are an English virtual band formed in 1998 by musician Damon Albarn and artist Jamie Hewlett, from London. The band primarily consists of four fictional members: 2-D, Murdoc Niccals, Noodle, and Russel Hobbs (drums). Their universe is presented in music videos, interviews, comic strips and short cartoons. Gorillaz' music has featured collaborations with a wide range of featured artists, with Albarn as the only permanent musical contributor.

Plastic Beach

Plastic Beach

Plastic Beach is the third studio album by British virtual band Gorillaz. It was released on 3 March 2010 by Parlophone internationally and by Virgin Records in the United States. Conceived from an unfinished project called Carousel, the album was recorded from June 2008 to November 2009, and was produced primarily by group co-creator Damon Albarn. It features guest appearances by such artists as Snoop Dogg, Gruff Rhys, De La Soul, Bobby Womack, Mos Def, Lou Reed, Mark E. Smith, Bashy, Kano and Little Dragon.

VIXX

VIXX

VIXX is a South Korean boy band formed by Jellyfish Entertainment through the 2012 reality show MyDOL. Originally a sextet, the group is presently composed of five members: N, Leo, Ken, Ravi and Hyuk—former vocalist Hongbin left the group and the agency in August 2020. They are predominantly known as a concept or performance group whose music, lyrics, choreography, and overall stage performances are crafted together to tell a story or concept.

Film

1940s and earlier

Italian film The Mechanical Man (1921), a movie which shows a battle between robots.
Italian film The Mechanical Man (1921), a movie which shows a battle between robots.

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

2020s

  • Sox, a robotic cat from Pixar's Lightyear (2022)
  • M3GAN , an android companion created for the main character of the film M3GAN (2023)

Discover more about Film related topics

Ben Turpin

Ben Turpin

Bernard "Ben" Turpin was an American comedian and actor, best remembered for his work in silent films. His trademarks were his cross-eyed appearance and adeptness at vigorous physical comedy. Turpin worked with notable performers such as Charlie Chaplin and Laurel and Hardy, and was a part of the Mack Sennett studio team. He is believed to have been the first filmed "victim" of the pie in the face gag. When sound came to films, Turpin chose to retire, having invested profitably in real estate, although he did do occasional cameos.

A Clever Dummy

A Clever Dummy

A Clever Dummy is a 1917 American short comedy film directed by Ferris Hartman, Robert P. Kerr, Herman C. Raymaker, and Mack Sennett.

Mack Sennett

Mack Sennett

Mack Sennett was a Canadian actor, filmmaker, and studio head, known as the 'King of Comedy'.

Harry Houdini

Harry Houdini

Harry Houdini was a Hungarian-American escape artist, magic man, and stunt performer, noted for his escape acts. His pseudonym is a reference to his spiritual master, French magician Robert-Houdin (1805–1871).

André Deed

André Deed

Henri André Chapais, known as André Deed, was a French actor and director, best known for his Foolshead comedies, produced in the 1900s and 1910s. André Deed was one of the first named actors in cinema, and his film series based around Foolshead were a global success.

Maschinenmensch

Maschinenmensch

The Maschinenmensch is a fictional robot featured in Fritz Lang's film Metropolis. It/she was played by German actress Brigitte Helm both as a robot and in human guise. A gynoid, she was created by the scientist Rotwang. Maschinenmensch was one of the first fictional robots ever depicted in cinema and still one of the most famous.

Robotics

Robotics

Robotics is an interdisciplinary branch of computer science and engineering. Robotics involves the design, construction, operation, and use of robots. The goal of robotics is to design machines that can help and assist humans. Robotics integrates fields of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, information engineering, mechatronics, electronics, bioengineering, computer engineering, control engineering, software engineering, mathematics, etc.

Gynoid

Gynoid

A gynoid, or fembot, is a feminine humanoid robot. Gynoids appear widely in science fiction film and art. As more realistic humanoid robot design becomes technologically possible, they are also emerging in real-life robot design.

Brigitte Helm

Brigitte Helm

Brigitte Helm was a German actress, best remembered for her dual role as Maria and her double named Futura, in Fritz Lang's 1927 silent film, Metropolis.

Metropolis (1927 film)

Metropolis (1927 film)

Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction film directed by Fritz Lang and written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang from von Harbou's 1925 novel of the same name. Intentionally written as a treatment, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge, and Brigitte Helm. Erich Pommer produced it in the Babelsberg Studios for Universum Film A.G. (UFA). The silent film is regarded as a pioneering science-fiction movie, being among the first feature-length movies of that genre. Filming took place over 17 months in 1925–26 at a cost of more than five million Reichsmarks, or the equivalent of about €21 million.

Science fiction film

Science fiction film

Science fiction is a film genre that uses speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel, time travel, or other technologies. Science fiction films have often been used to focus on political or social issues, and to explore philosophical issues like the human condition.

Fritz Lang

Fritz Lang

Friedrich Christian Anton Lang, known as Fritz Lang, was an Austrian film director, screenwriter, and producer who worked in Germany and later the United States. One of the best-known émigrés from Germany's school of Expressionism, he was dubbed the "Master of Darkness" by the British Film Institute. He has been cited as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time.

Television films and series

1960s and earlier

  • Mechano, the robotic cat programmed to kill or banish mice from houses, from the 1952 episode, "Push-Button Kitty" of Tom and Jerry.
  • Adventures of Superman (1952–1958), "The Runaway Robot" episode (1953).
  • In The Thin Man (1957–1959):
    • Robby (Robby the Robot), a robot accused of murder in the episode "Robot Client" (1958)
  • In The Twilight Zone (1961–1962):
  • Andromeda in A for Andromeda (1961)
  • In Supercar (1961–1962):
    • The Robot Servants of Professor Watkins in the episode "The Lost City" (1961)
  • Rosie the Maid, Mac and UniBlab in The Jetsons (1962)
  • In Hazel (1961–1966):
  • In Fireball XL5 (1962–1963):
    • Robert, the transparent auto-pilot robot invented by Professor Matic
    • The Granatoid Robots in the episode "The Granatoid Tanks" (1963)
    • The Robots of Robotvia in the episode "Trial By Robot" (1963)
  • Various unnamed robots in Space Patrol (1963–1964) (US title: Planet Patrol)
  • In The Outer Limits (1963–64)
    • Trent, an android from the far future in the episode "Demon with a Glass Hand" (1964)
    • Adam Link, a robot accused of the murder of his creator in the episode "I, Robot" (1964)
  • In Doctor Who (Seasons One to Six) (1963–1969) (see also List of Doctor Who robots):
  • In Thunderbirds (1965–1966):
    • Braman, a robot invented by Brains seen in the episodes "Sun Probe" (1965), "Edge of Impact" (1965) and "The Cham-Cham" (1966)
    • The plutonium store Security Robots in the episode "30 Minutes After Noon" (1965)
  • Astro Boy in the Japanese animated series (1963–1966)
  • Rhoda Miller (a.k.a. AF709) in My Living Doll (1964), a fembot played by Julie Newmar
  • Gigantor (1963–1966), Japanese animated TV series about the giant titular robot.
  • In The Avengers (1965–1969):
    • The Cybernauts in the episodes "The Cybernauts" (1965) and "Return of the Cybernauts" (1967)
    • Robot duplicates in the episode "Never, Never Say Die" (1967)
  • Tobor, the android in the Japanese anime series 8 Man (1965) and his older, stronger but less sophisticated sister Samantha 7
  • The Deep Space Probe in "The Indestructible Man" (1965) episode of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1964–1968)
  • Giant Toy Robot in "The Fun-Fun Killer" (1966) episode of Honey West (1965–1966)
  • In Lost in Space (1965–1968):
    • Robot B-9 (a.k.a. The Robot), Class M-3 General Utility Non-Theorizing Environmental Control Robot assigned to the space craft Jupiter 2
    • The Robotoid (Robby the Robot) in the episode "War of the Robots" (1966)
    • Verda, a gynoid in the episodes "The Android Machine" (1966) and "Revolt of the Androids" (1967)
    • Raddion, a male android in the episode "The Dream Monster" (1966)
    • The IDAK Super Androids in the episode "Revolt of the Androids" (1967)
    • The Industro Mini Robots in the episode "The Mechanical Men" (1967)
    • The robot prison guard (Robby the Robot) in the episode "Condemned of Space" (1967)
    • The Xenian Androids in the episode "Kidnapped in Space" (1967)
    • The Female Robot and Mechanical Men in the episode "Deadliest of the Species" (1967)
    • The Junkman in the episode "Junkyard in Space" (1968)
  • In Ultra Seven (1967–68):
    • Windom, one of the three capsule monsters used by Ultraseven
    • King Joe in the episode "Ultra Garrison Goes West, Part 1"
    • Zero One, a human female looking android in the episode "Android Zero Directive"
    • Crazygon, a robot designed by an alien race to steal cars.
  • In Get Smart (1965–1970):
    • Hymie the Robot, a robot originally created by KAOS an organization of evil, but turned to the side of good and niceness by CONTROL agent Maxwell Smart; first appeared in episode 19, "Back to the Old Drawing Board"
  • In Gilligan's Island:
    • The Government test robot in the episode "Gilligan's Living Doll" (1966)
  • In Frankenstein Jr. and The Impossibles
    • Frankenstein Jr
  • In The Addams Family (1964–1966):
    • Smiley the Robot (Robby the Robot) in the episode "Lurch's Little Helper" (1966)
  • In Star Trek (1966–1969):
    • Dr. Roger Korby, Andrea, Dr. Brown, Ruk and the Kirk android in the episode "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" (1966)
    • Nomad, a sentient robot probe in the episode "The Changeling" (1967)
    • The Norman, Alice, Herman, Barbara, Maizie, Annabelle and Trudy series androids and the Stella Mudd androids in the episode "I, Mudd" (1967)
    • Rayna Kapec in the episode "Requiem for Methuselah" (1969)
    • The android replicas of Mr. Atoz in the episode "All Our Yesterdays" (1969)
  • Serendipity Dog, a robot dog who asks questions on the BBC children's science series Tom Tom (1966–1969)
  • Robot "driver" of the race car Melange / X3 in the Speed Racer episodes "Revenge of Marengo (Part one)" and "(Part two)" / "Race for Revenge: Part 1" and "Part 2" (1967)
  • Giant Robo/Flying Robot and others in the series Johnny Sokko and His Flying Robot (1967–1968)
  • In Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967–1968):
    • The Mysteron construction robots in the episode "Crater 101" (1968)
  • Mildred the Maid (Robby the Robot) in The Banana Splits Adventure Hour (1968–1970)
  • In Joe 90 (1968–1969):
    • The Spider riot control robots in the episode "The Professional" (1969)
  • In Land of the Giants (1968–1970):
    • Professor Gorn's Super Giant Robot, a giant android, in the episode "The Mechanical Man" (1969)
  • Slim John, rebel robot in the BBC series (1969)

1970s

  • Robot dog Dynomutt in animated series Dynomutt, Dog Wonder
  • Zed, the rebel robot in The Ed and Zed Show (c. 1970)
  • In Doctor Who (Seasons 7 to 17) (1970–1980):
    • The IMC Mining Robot in the serial Colony in Space (1971)
    • The Sontaran Knight Robot in the serial The Time Warrior (1973–1974)
    • The K1 Robot invented by Professor Kettlewell in the serial Robot (1974–1975)
    • The Sontaran Surveillance Robot in the serial The Sontaran Experiment (1975)
    • The Osirian Service Robots, mummy-like robot servants of Sutekh in the serial Pyramids of Mars (1975)
    • The Kraal Androids, including android duplicates of the Doctor, Harry Sullivan and RSM Benton, in the serial The Android Invasion (1975)
    • Dum, Voc and Supervoc robots in the serial The Robots of Death (1977)
    • K9, the Doctor's robot dog companion with encyclopaedic knowledge and vast computer intelligence, created by Professor Marius and introduced in the serial The Invisible Enemy (1977)
    • The Seers of the Oracle in the serial Underworld (1978)
    • K9 MkII, the second version of the Doctor's robot dog companion, introduced in the serial The Ribos Operation (1978)
    • The Polyphase Avatron, the Captain's robot parrot in the serial The Pirate Planet (1978)
    • The Taran Androids, including an android duplicate of Romana, in the serial The Androids of Tara (1978)
    • The Movellans, android enemies of the Daleks, in the serial Destiny of the Daleks (1979)
  • Numerous android characters in the Japanese superhero series Kikaider (1972), including the title character
  • S.A.M. (Super Automated Machine) the "perfect machine" robot in Sesame Street (1969–present), introduced in episode 0406 (1972)
  • In Here Come the Double Deckers! (1971):
    • Robbie, a dancing robot invented by Brains in the episode "Robbie the Robot" (1971)
  • In Columbo (1971–1993):
  • In Robbi, Tobbi und das Fliewatüüt, a German television series for children (1972):
    • Robbi a.k.a. ROB 344–66/IIIa, co-pilot of the Fliewatüüt and student of a third class at robot school (1972)
  • In Kolchak: The Night Stalker (1972–1975):
    • "Mr. R.I.N.G." (Robomatic Internalized Nerve Ganglia), a top secret military robot in the episode of the same name (1975)
  • In The Six Million Dollar Man (1973–1978):
    • A robot double of Major Fred Sloane in the episode "Day of the Robot" (1974)
    • A robot double of Oscar Goldman in the episode "Return of the Robot Maker" (1975)
    • Sasquatch, the robot watchdog of marooned aliens in the episodes "The Secret of Bigfoot – Part 1" (1976), "The Secret of Bigfoot – Part 2" (1976), "The Return of Bigfoot – Part 1" (1976) and "Bigfoot V" (1977)
    • The Fembots and a robot double of Oscar Goldman in the episode "Kill Oscar – Part II" (1976)
    • Death Probe, a Soviet Venusian robot probe in the episodes "Death Probe – Part 1" (1977), "Death Probe – Part 2" (1977), "Return of the Death Probe – Part 1" (1978) and "Return of the Death Probe – Part 2" (1978)
  • Questor in The Questor Tapes (1974)
  • In Space: 1999 (1975–1977):
  • Fi and Fum, the time-travelling androids from the children's series The Lost Saucer (1975–1976)
  • In The New Avengers (1976–1977):
    • A Cybernaut in the episode "The Last of the Cybernauts...??" (1976)
  • In Ark II (1976):
  • In The Bionic Woman (1976–1978):
    • Sasquatch, the robot watchdog of marooned aliens in the episode "The Return of Bigfoot – Part 2" (1976)
    • The Fembots in the episodes "Kill Oscar" (1976), "Kill Oscar – Part III" (1976), "Fembots in Las Vegas – Part 1" (1977) and "Fembots in Las Vegas – Part 2" (1977)
  • Yo-Yo, a.k.a. Geogory Yoyonovitch in Holmes & Yo-Yo (1976)
  • Officer Haven in Future Cop (1976–77)
  • In The Fantastic Journey (1977):
    • Cyrus, Rachel, Daniel, Michael and the other android members of Jonathan Willoway's community in the episode "Beyond the Mountain" (1977)
  • In Logan's Run (1977–78):
    • REM, a male android who joins Logan and Jessica in their search for Sanctuary
    • Draco, a male android, and Siri, a gynoid, in the pilot TV movie (1977)
    • Friend and Nanny, Lisa's robot companions in the episode "The Innocent" (1977)
    • Ariana, a gynoid, in the episode "Futurepast" (1978)
  • The Clinkers in Shields and Yarnell (1977–78)
  • Peepo, the robot in the children's series Space Academy (1977–1979)
  • In Space Sentinels (1977):
    • MO (Maintenance Operator), Sentinel One's maintenance robot
  • Haro in Mobile Suit Gundam (1979)
  • Voltes V of the Japanese animated series Chōdenji Machine Voltes V (1977)
  • P.O.P.S. (Robot B-9 modified) in Mystery Island (1977–78)
  • 7-Zark-7 and 1-Rover-1 in the animated series Battle of the Planets (1978)
  • In Battlestar Galactica (1978–1979):
    • The Cylons, mechanical men created by a race of reptile-like creatures
    • Muffit Two, a robot daggit who becomes Boxey's pet
    • Lucifer, an IL series Cylon, the robot assistant to Count Baltar introduced in "Saga of a Star World – Part III" (1978)
    • Specter, an I-L series Cylon, the garrison commander on Antilla in the episode "The Young Lords" (1978)
    • Hector and Vector in the episode "Greetings from Earth" (1979)
  • IQ-9 in Star Blazers (1978–1984), originally called "Analyzer" in Space Battleship Yamato (1974–1980)
  • H.E.R.B.I.E. (Humanoid Experimental Robot, B-type, Integrated Electronics) in the 1978 Fantastic Four animated series
  • Blake's 7 (1978–81) featured several robots and androids.
  • In The New Adventures of Wonder Woman (1977–1979):
    • Dr. Solano's swordmaster robot in the pilot movie "The Return of Wonder Woman" (1977)
    • Orlick Hoffman's android duplicates of Dr. Tobias, Dr. Prescott, Dr. Lazaar and Wonder Woman in the episode "The Deadly Toys" (1977)
    • Rover, the IADC's robot dog, Cori, William Havitol's robot secretary, and Havitol's evil duplicate of Rover in the episode "IRAC is Missing" (1978)
  • In Quark (1977–1978):
    • Andy the Robot, a cowardly robot built by Adam Quark from spare parts
  • In Mork & Mindy (1978–1982):
  • In Salvage 1 (1979):
    • Mermadon, a junked government-constructed android in the episode "Mermadon" (1979)
  • In Buck Rogers in the 25th Century (First Season) (1979–1980):
    • Twiki, Buck's ambuquad robot who wears Dr. Theopolis, a brilliant talking computer, around his neck
    • Tina, a golden ambuquad that Twiki falls in love with in the episode "Cruise Ship to the Stars"
    • Humanoid robot security guards in the episode "Unchained Woman"
  • W1k1 (or Wiki), the pocket-sized robot in the children's series Jason of Star Command (1979–1981)
  • The TV movie Romie-0 and Julie-8 (1979) features two androids who fall in love.

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

Discover more about Television films and series related topics

Adventures of Superman (TV series)

Adventures of Superman (TV series)

Adventures of Superman is an American television series based on comic book characters and concepts that Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created in 1938. The show was the first television series to feature Superman and began filming in 1951 in California on RKO-Pathé stages and the RKO Forty Acres back lot. Cereal manufacturer Kellogg's sponsored the show. The first and last airdates of the show, which was produced for first-run syndication rather than for a network, are disputed, but they are generally accepted as September 19, 1952, and April 28, 1958. The show's first two seasons were filmed in black and white; seasons three through six were filmed in color.

The Thin Man (TV series)

The Thin Man (TV series)

The Thin Man is a half-hour weekly television series based on the mystery novel The Thin Man (1933) by Dashiell Hammett. The 72 episodes were produced by MGM Television and broadcast by NBC for two seasons from 1957–1959 on Friday evening. It was the first TV series produced by MGM.

Robby the Robot

Robby the Robot

Robby the Robot is a fictional character and science fiction icon who first appeared in the 1956 film Forbidden Planet. He made a number of subsequent appearances in science fiction films and television programs, which has given him the distinction as "the hardest working robot in Hollywood".

Inger Stevens

Inger Stevens

Inger Stevens was a Swedish-American film, stage and Golden Globe-winning television actress.

The Lateness of the Hour (The Twilight Zone)

The Lateness of the Hour (The Twilight Zone)

"The Lateness of the Hour" is episode 44 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. It originally aired on December 2, 1960 on CBS. It was one of the six episodes of the second season which was shot on videotape in a short-lived experiment aimed to cut costs.

I Sing the Body Electric (The Twilight Zone)

I Sing the Body Electric (The Twilight Zone)

"I Sing the Body Electric" is episode 100 of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. The 1962 script was written by Ray Bradbury, and became the basis for his 1969 short story of the same name, itself named after an 1855 Walt Whitman poem. Although Bradbury contributed several scripts to The Twilight Zone, this was the only one produced.

In His Image

In His Image

"In His Image" is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone aired on January 3, 1963. This was the first episode of the fourth season. Each episode was expanded to an hour from "In His Image" until "The Bard". The fourth season is the only season of The Twilight Zone to have each episode one hour long. In this episode, a man finds his hometown is suddenly inconsistent with his memories of it and begins experiencing irrational urges to commit murder, two mysteries which together lead him to an unpleasant discovery about his identity.

The Brain Center at Whipple's

The Brain Center at Whipple's

"The Brain Center at Whipple's" is episode 153 of the American television series The Twilight Zone. It originally aired on May 15, 1964 on CBS.

A for Andromeda

A for Andromeda

A for Andromeda is a British television science fiction drama serial first made and broadcast by the BBC in seven parts in 1961. Written by cosmologist Fred Hoyle, in conjunction with author and television producer John Elliot, it concerns a group of scientists who detect a radio signal from another galaxy that contains instructions for the design of an advanced computer. When the computer is built, it gives the scientists instructions for the creation of a living organism named Andromeda, but one of the scientists, John Fleming, fears that Andromeda's purpose is to subjugate humanity.

Supercar (TV series)

Supercar (TV series)

Supercar is a British children's television series produced by Gerry Anderson and Arthur Provis' AP Films (APF) for ATV and ITC Entertainment. Thirty-nine episodes were produced between 1961 and 1962, and it was Anderson's first half-hour series. In the UK it was seen on ITV, in Canada on the CBC, and in the US in syndication debuting in January 1962. The series uses Supermarionation, based on the complex and difficult Czech style of marionette puppetry. The creation of the series was credited to Gerry Anderson and Reg Hill, but it incorporates elements of Beaker's Bureau, a series proposed to the BBC by Hugh Woodhouse that was never produced. Anderson would later claim that the whole point of having a series based on a vehicle was to minimize having to show the marionettes walking, an action which he felt never looked convincing.

The Jetsons

The Jetsons

The Jetsons is an American animated sitcom produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. It originally aired in prime time from September 23, 1962, to March 17, 1963, on ABC, then later aired in reruns via syndication, with new episodes produced from 1985 to 1987. It was Hanna-Barbera's Space Age counterpart to The Flintstones.

Hazel (TV series)

Hazel (TV series)

Hazel is an American sitcom about a spunky live-in maid named Hazel Burke and her employers, the Baxters. The five-season, 155-episode series aired in prime time from September 28, 1961, to April 11, 1966, and was produced by Screen Gems. The first four seasons of Hazel aired on NBC, and the fifth and final season aired on CBS. Season 1 was broadcast in black-and-white except for one episode which was in color, and seasons 2–5 were all broadcast in color. The show was based on the single-panel comic strip of the same name by cartoonist Ted Key, which appeared in The Saturday Evening Post.

Comics

Comic books/graphic novels

American

Australian

British

Franco-Belgian

  • Unnamed robot by Hergé from first adventure of Belgian series Jo, Zette et Jocko (1936)
  • Otomox, the self-proclaimed "Robot Master" by André Mavimus (writer) and Roger Roux (artist) (1943)[4]
  • Radar le robot by André Franquin from Belgian series Spirou et Fantasio (1947)
  • Madame Adolphine by Peyo, an evil android in the guise of a harmless grandma, from the Belgian series Benoît Brisefer (1963)
  • La Schtroumpfette (Smurfette) by Peyo, a golem in the guise of a female smurf, from Belgian series Les Schtroumpfs (1966)
  • Exploding robots in the shape of guard dogs, in the episode "Pâtée explosive" from Belgian series Gil Jourdan by Maurice Tillieux (1969)
  • Cyanure by Tome and Janry, an evil sexy female android from Spirou et Fantasio (1983)
  • Robo-cops from Incal (by Moebius and Jodorowsky)

Other European

  • The domestico elettrodomestico, one of the more striking robots in Disney comics, looking like a clown, from the comic "Zio Paperone e il domestico elettrodomestico" by Guido Martina and Giuseppe Perego (1967)
  • Robbie, a recurring robot constructed by inventor Knox in German series Fix und Foxi, first drawn by Massimo Fecchi (1976)
  • Robots from the planet Des from the Polish series Bogowie z kosmosu (Gods from the Space), written by Arnold Mostowicz and Alfred Górny and illustrated by Bogusław Polch (1978)
  • RanXerox, a mechanical creature made from Xerox photocopier parts, by Italian artists Stefano Tamburini and Tanino Liberatore; first appeared in 1978, in Italian, in the magazine Cannibale
  • Uèr, an "electro-chemical" android capable of human feelings, in the Italian comic book Milady 3000 by Magnus (1980)
  • Link is an android in a team of human agents in the Italian comics series Agenzia Alfa, published by Sergio Bonelli (1997–present; Nathan Never and Legs Weaver are on the same team, although having series of their own). Link's name could be a tribute to Adam Link. His look has some similarity to Star Trek's Data in an alternate timeline, except for a silver strip of hair on top of his head.

South American

Manga (Japanese comics)

Comic strips

  • Awbry from the comic strip Nancy
  • Beetle Bot from the comic strip Beetle Bailey
  • Bossbot, a robot created by Dilbert
  • Kollege Blech from the comic strips of East German caricaturist Erich Schmitt (1965)
  • Robotman (1985) in the comic strip of the same name, which eventually became "Monty". Robotman left the strip and found happiness with his girlfriend Robota on another planet.
  • A heroic female robot called Mimi, an evil robot doppelganger of Mickey Mouse, and a robot army led by Peg-Leg Pete in the newspaper strip The World of Tomorrow (1944) by Floyd Gottfredson and Bill Walsh
  • Rubert, a robot created by Dilbert
  • Tickle-Bot 3000 from the comic strip Thatababy
  • The Vacunator from the comic strip Pooch Cafe
  • Robot Cartoons Cartoon catalog featuring the work of Dan Rosandich

Web comics

  • Anima: Age of the Robots (Anima) is an 18-chapter webcomic series depicting robots taking over the fictional planet of Anima, homeworld of talking animals.
  • "Clanks", various (steam powered?) robots in Phil Foglio's steampunk fantasy Girl Genius
  • Eve, a female android from Applegeeks, built using Apple Macintosh parts
  • Emotibot, a robot programmed to feel emotions, from Beaver and Steve
  • Evil Killer Death Spybot 5000 from Mark Shallow's Adventurers!, a robot originally designed to spy on the party, who eventually becomes a playable character
  • Ezekiel a.k.a. "Zeke", formerly known as the "X-bot", the anthropomorphised Xbox console from the webcomic Ctrl+Alt+Del
  • Fruit Fucker, a semi-sentient kitchen appliance in the webcomic Penny Arcade that has sex with fruit and ejaculates the juice
  • Carl Swangee, a sentient android from the Penny Arcade 'Automata' storyline
  • J-LB8/Jalea Bates in Melonpool, started as a robot, later became a human
  • Kleptobot, a supposedly Soviet-made robot programmed to steal anything and everything, from Joe and Monkey
  • Medivac 911 ("Doc"), a steam-powered medical/janitorial droid from Polymer City Chronicles
  • The Ottobot,[5] a robot duplicate of the character Francis Ray Ottoman featured in PvP
  • PC, ASCII and O in Funny Farm
  • Ping, the PlayStation 2 accessory robot-girl from Fred Gallagher's Megatokyo
  • Pintsize, an AnthroPC from Questionable Content; also other AnthroPCs
  • Various characters from Homestuck by Andrew Hussie
  • Various characters from Diesel Sweeties, including Clango Cyclotron

Discover more about Comics related topics

Mad Thinker

Mad Thinker

The Mad Thinker is a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He is portrayed to be an evil genius specializing in robotics. He is sometimes referred to just as "The Thinker".

Awesome Android

Awesome Android

The Awesome Android is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character first appeared in Fantastic Four #15 and was created by writer Stan Lee and artist and co-plotter Jack Kirby.

Fantastic Four

Fantastic Four

The Fantastic Four is a superhero team appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The team debuted in The Fantastic Four #1, helping usher in a new level of realism in the medium. It was the first superhero team created by artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby and editor/co-plotter Stan Lee, who developed a collaborative approach to creating comics with this title.

Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is an American comic book publisher and the flagship property of Marvel Entertainment, a division of The Walt Disney Company since September 1, 2009. Evolving from Timely Comics in 1939, Magazine Management/Atlas Comics in 1951 and its predecessor, Marvel Mystery Comics, the Marvel Comics title/name/brand was first used in June 1961.

Micronauts (comics)

Micronauts (comics)

The Micronauts are comic books featuring a group of characters based on the Mego Micronauts toy line. The first title was published by Marvel Comics in 1979, with both original characters and characters based on the toys. Marvel published two Micronauts series, mostly written by Bill Mantlo, until 1986, well after the toy line was cancelled in 1980. In the 2000s, Image Comics and Devil's Due Publishing each briefly published their own Micronauts series. Byron Preiss Visual Publications also published three paperback novels based on the Micronauts. In 2016, IDW Publishing published a new comic book series. A live-action film version of the Micronauts was in development by Hasbro Studios and Paramount in 2015.

Coheed and Cambria

Coheed and Cambria

Coheed and Cambria are an American progressive rock band from Nyack, New York, formed in 1995. The band consists of Claudio Sanchez, Travis Stever, Josh Eppard, and Zach Cooper. The group's music incorporates aspects of progressive rock, pop, heavy metal, and post-hardcore.

Claudio Sanchez

Claudio Sanchez

Claudio Paul Sanchez III is an American writer and musician of Puerto Rican and Italian descent best known for being the lead singer, guitarist and primary lyricist for the alternative/progressive rock group Coheed and Cambria. He is the creator of the comic book series The Amory Wars, as well as Key of Z and Kill Audio, both co-written with his wife Chondra Echert. Sanchez co-authored the novel Year of the Black Rainbow with Peter David.

Brainiac 5

Brainiac 5

Brainiac 5 is a fictional superhero appearing in comics published by DC Comics. He is from the planet Colu and is a long-standing member of the Legion of Super-Heroes in the 30th and 31 centuries.

Doctor Doom

Doctor Doom

Doctor Victor Von Doom is a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, and first appeared in The Fantastic Four #5 in July 1962. The monarch of the fictional nation of Latveria, Doom primarily serves as the archenemy of Reed Richards and the Fantastic Four. He has also come into conflict with other superheroes in the Marvel Universe, including Spider-Man, Iron Man, Doctor Strange, Black Panther, the X-Men, and the Avengers. He has also been portrayed as an antihero at times, working with the heroes if their goals align and only if it benefits him.

Dreadnought (comics)

Dreadnought (comics)

Dreadnoughts are a type of fictional robot appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Frequently employed by villainous organizations, different forms are depicted within said organizations. The robots first appeared in Strange Tales #154.

G.I. Robot

G.I. Robot

The G.I. Robot is the name of a series of six fictional robots that appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. The first four G.I. Robot characters were all created by writer Robert Kanigher, though each was designed by a different artist. Each incarnation of the G.I. Robot is an android of advanced, experimental technology designed to carry out combat and rescue missions. Multiple versions of the G.I. Robot seem to develop their own free will, as well as loyalty and a sense of friendship towards human soldiers they work alongside.

Captain Future

Captain Future

Captain Future is a pulp science fiction hero — a space-traveling scientist and adventurer —originally published in his namesake pulp magazine from 1940 to 1944. The character was created by editors Mort Weisinger and Leo Margulies. The majority of the stories were authored by Edmond Hamilton. A number of adaptations and derivative works followed. Significant was a 1978-79 Japanese anime (キャプテン・フューチャー), which was dubbed into several languages and proved popular, particularly in Spanish, French, German, Italian and Arabic. His francophone name is Capitaine Futur, although he is better known in francophone countries under the name Capitaine Flam.

Web-based media

  • Stella 4D, a.k.a. Manager 45, on GO Moonbase;[6] first appears in episode 26

Animated shorts/series

  • Jewbot/Robobot from SuperMansion
  • Deathbots from SuperMansion

Flash

  • Rya Botkins and June Crane of Matt Wilson's Bonus Stage (though Crane's status is disputed, as she has claimed to be human)
  • The Robot, a contestant in the Strongest Man in the World Contest, from Homestar Runner.[7]
  • The Visor Robot, a futuristic robot with a visor, from Homestar Runner[8]
  • The Grape-Nuts Robot, created by Bubs to imitate Strong Bad from Homestar Runner[9]
  • Schniz, Fulker, CPDoom, and various background characters from Andrew Kauervane's[10] My God, Robots!

Web series

  • Penny Polendina, a sentient android from the Rooster Teeth web series RWBY
  • Robo Fizz, from Helluva Boss
  • Bot Best Friend, a commercially sold robot with five different "friendship modes" from the Smosh video Awesome New Robot!
  • Tari, an amnesiac cyborg girl from Meta Runner

Machinima

  • Lopez, Church and Tex, characters from the Rooster Teeth machinima Red vs. Blue. Only Lopez is a true artificial life-form, as both Church and Tex existed only as ghosts ( later in the series through solid proof showed that they both are AI programs like O'Malley the whole time ). Both characters were blown up during the course of the series, existing from that point onward in robot bodies other than their originals. They possess mechanical bodies similar to Lopez in design.

Podcasts

  • Little Button Puss, character from Episode #310 of the Comedy Bang! Bang! podcast, played by John Gemberling. Little Button Puss, a.k.a. HPDP69-B, is a promotional robot built by Hewlett-Packard and is the first ever robot created with a fully sentient artificial intelligence, personality, and speaking function. It was designed by HP engineers for the express purpose of sexually pleasing humans. Comedy Bang! Bang! host Scott Aukerman was sent Little Button Puss as part of a promotional advertising campaign for the line of sex-robots. Little Button Puss looks like a metal dog, and has small flesh patches where its genitals are. Elsewhere, it's described as having the appearance of "nickel blue, gun metal". It is verified in the episode that Scott Aukerman lustily removed Little Button Puss's retractable genitals, threw them in a trash can, and then proceeded to use the HPDP69-B for its intended purpose. Afterwards, according to Comedy Bang! Bang! official canon, Aukerman looked back on the incident with shame. A complaint about the HPDP69-B is that for a sex-robot, "it looks too much like a metal dog". In a brief look into its past, Little Button Puss recounts an old romantic relationship with its long lost love, United Flight 93, who "died in the September 11th attacks".[11]
  • The Co-Host 3000 (later Sidekick 3000), character from the Spill and Double Toasted podcasts, voiced by Tony Guerrero.
  • NO-3113 (Pronounced "Noelle"), a "hug-sized" robot in the Dungeons & Dragons podcast The Adventure Zone, created by Clinton, Justin, Travis, and Griffin McElroy. She is a robot created by the scientist Lucas Miller. She is described as looking pieced together from assorted parts with the sequence "NO-3113" written on her side. She floats above the ground and is able to administer healing shots. Later, she upgrades her body into a gorilla-like robot with four arms. It is later revealed that she is a ghost inhabiting the body of robot and was Lucas' first trial in retrieving a human soul from the Astral Plane and putting it inside a fusebox. Her original identity was Noelle Redcheek - a red-haired halfling girl part of a cider-brewing family business.

Discover more about Web-based media related topics

Homestar Runner

Homestar Runner

Homestar Runner is an American Flash animated comedy web series and website created by Mike and Matt Chapman, known collectively as The Brothers Chaps. The series centers on the adventures of a large and diverse cast of characters, headed by the lovable yet dense athlete Homestar Runner. It uses a blend of surreal humour, self-parody, and references to popular culture, in particular video games, classic television, and popular music.

Strong Bad

Strong Bad

Strong Bad is a fictional character from Homestar Runner, a series of animated Flash videos, who is inspired by "The Strong Bads" from the video game Tag Team Wrestling. He is voiced by Matt Chapman, the principal voice actor and co-creator of the series. Strong Bad enjoys pranking the other characters of the series, along with his ever-diligent lackey pet named "The Cheat" and his older brother Strong Mad. The main segment that Strong Bad is a part of is Strong Bad Email, in which he answers emails sent to him by fans. The Strong Bad Email series grew to be so popular that seven DVDs featuring the emails have been released, as well as a podcast where emails could be downloaded to digital media players, since its first episode in 2001.

Rooster Teeth

Rooster Teeth

Rooster Teeth Productions, LLC is an American digital media company headquartered in Austin, Texas. Founded in 2003 by Burnie Burns, Matt Hullum, Geoff Ramsey, Jason Saldaña, Gus Sorola, and Joel Heyman, Rooster Teeth is a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Discovery Global Streaming & Interactive Entertainment, a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Discovery.

RWBY

RWBY

RWBY is an American anime-influenced computer-animated web series created by Monty Oum for Rooster Teeth. It is set in the fictional world of Remnant, where young people train to become warriors to protect their world from monsters called Grimm. The name RWBY is derived from the four main protagonists' forenames: Ruby, Weiss, Blake, and Yang, and their respective theme colors.

Helluva Boss

Helluva Boss

Helluva Boss is an American adult animated web series created by Vivienne "VivziePop" Medrano. It revolves around the misadventures of the employees of I.M.P., an assassination company in Hell. The pilot was released on November 25, 2019, while the first episode of the first season was released on October 31, 2020. The show is produced by SpindleHorse Toons. The first season was released exclusively to Medrano's YouTube channel, as she has done for other animations. On November 13, 2021, the show was confirmed to be renewed for a second season, which premiered on July 30, 2022.

Smosh

Smosh

Smosh is an American YouTube sketch comedy-improv collective founded by Anthony Padilla and Ian Hecox. In 2002, Padilla created a website named "smosh.com" for making Flash animations, and he was later joined by Hecox. They began to post videos on Smosh's YouTube channel in the autumn of 2005 and quickly became one of the most popular channels on the site. As of May 2022, the Smosh channel has over 10 billion views and over 25 million subscribers.

Meta Runner

Meta Runner

Meta Runner is an Australian adult computer-animated cyberpunk web series created by Kevin and Luke Lerdwichagul. It is produced by Glitch Productions, with production funding provided by Screen Australia, financed with support from Crunchyroll and AMD, and financed in association with Epic Games. It premiered on the YouTube channel SMG4 on July 25, 2019, with season 2 premiering on the channel GLITCH on October 16, 2020. A third and final season premiered on July 22, 2022.

Red vs. Blue

Red vs. Blue

Red vs. Blue, often abbreviated as RvB, is an American web series created by Burnie Burns with his production company Rooster Teeth. The show is based on the setting of the military science fiction first-person shooter series and media franchise Halo. It is distributed through Rooster Teeth's website, as well as on DVD, Blu-ray, and formerly on the El Rey Network and Netflix. The series initially centers on two opposite teams fighting in an ostensible civil war—shown to actually be a live fire exercise for elite soldiers—in the middle of Blood Gulch, a desolate box canyon, in a parody of first-person shooter video games, military life, and science fiction films. Initially intended to be a short series of six to eight episodes, the project quickly and unexpectedly achieved significant popularity following its premiere on April 1, 2003. The series consists of eighteen seasons and five mini-series. Red vs. Blue is the third longest-running animated webseries of all time, behind Homestar Runner and Neurotically Yours.

Comedy Bang! Bang!

Comedy Bang! Bang!

Comedy Bang! Bang! is a weekly comedy audio podcast, which originally began airing as a radio show on May 1, 2009. Popularly known as Humanity's Podcast, it is hosted by writer and comedian Scott Aukerman, best known for his work on the 1990s HBO sketch comedy program Mr. Show with Bob and David, creating and hosting the Comedy Bang! Bang! TV series, and co-founding the weekly Comedy Death-Ray stage show at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Hollywood.

John Gemberling

John Gemberling

John Gemberling is an American actor and comedian best known for roles as Bevers on the Comedy Central series Broad City, as Gil on the NBC sitcom Marry Me, and as John Hancock on the Fox sitcom Making History. He also portrayed Steve Bannon on Comedy Central's political satire late night series The President Show, and Griff in the second season of Mixed-ish.

Hewlett-Packard

Hewlett-Packard

The Hewlett-Packard Company, commonly shortened to Hewlett-Packard or HP, was an American multinational information technology company headquartered in Palo Alto, California. HP developed and provided a wide variety of hardware components, as well as software and related services to consumers, small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs), and large enterprises, including customers in the government, health, and education sectors. The company was founded in a one-car garage in Palo Alto by Bill Hewlett and David Packard in 1939, and initially produced a line of electronic test and measurement equipment. The HP Garage at 367 Addison Avenue is now designated an official California Historical Landmark, and is marked with a plaque calling it the "Birthplace of 'Silicon Valley'".

Scott Aukerman

Scott Aukerman

Scott David Aukerman is an American writer, actor, comedian, television personality, director, producer, and podcast host. Starting as a writer and performer in the later seasons of the sketch series Mr. Show, Aukerman is best-known as the host of the weekly comedy podcast Comedy Bang! Bang! as well as the IFC original television series of the same name. Aukerman is the cocreator of Between Two Ferns with Zach Galifianakis and cofounder of the Earwolf podcast network.

Computer and video games

Discover more about Computer and video games related topics

Kirby: Planet Robobot

Kirby: Planet Robobot

Kirby: Planet Robobot is a 2016 platform game developed by HAL Laboratory and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 3DS. It is the eleventh mainline installment in the Kirby series and the spiritual sequel to Triple Deluxe. The story follows Kirby as he defends Planet Popstar from an alien corporation known as the Haltmann Works Company that wishes to mechanize the planet so that they can plunder its natural resources. New to the series in this game is Kirby's ability to utilize a mecha suit known as the Robobot Armor to solve puzzles and fight enemies.

Jet Set Radio Future

Jet Set Radio Future

Jet Set Radio Future is a 2002 action game developed by Smilebit and published by Sega for the Xbox; it is a sequel to the Dreamcast game Jet Set Radio (2000). As a re-imagining of the original game, it features improved gameplay mechanics, updated graphics, larger open world environments, new characters, a new soundtrack and multiplayer gameplay. The player controls members of a street gang that use inline skates to traverse a futuristic Tokyo, spraying graffiti, challenging rival gangs and evading authorities. Like Jet Set Radio, Future uses a cel-shaded style of animation.

Doom Eternal

Doom Eternal

Doom Eternal is a first-person shooter game developed by id Software and published by Bethesda Softworks. The sequel to Doom (2016), and the sixth main game in the Doom series, it was released on March 20, 2020, for PlayStation 4, Stadia, Windows, and Xbox One, with a version for Nintendo Switch being released on December 8, 2020, and versions for PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X and Series S being released on June 29, 2021. Set some time after the events of the 2016 game, the story follows the Doomslayer once again, on a mission to end Hell's consumption of Earth and foil the alien Maykrs' plans to exterminate humanity.

Detroit: Become Human

Detroit: Become Human

Detroit: Become Human is a 2018 adventure video game developed by Quantic Dream and published by Sony Interactive Entertainment. The plot follows three androids: Kara, who escapes her owner to explore her newfound sentience and protect a young girl; Connor, whose job is to hunt down sentient androids; and Markus, who devotes himself to releasing other androids from servitude.

Fallout: New Vegas

Fallout: New Vegas

Fallout: New Vegas is a 2010 action role-playing game developed by Obsidian Entertainment and published by Bethesda Softworks. It was announced in April 2009 and released for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360 on October 19, 2010. A spin-off of the main Fallout series, the game is set in a post-apocalyptic open world environment that encompasses a region consisting of parts of Arizona, California, and Nevada. It is set in a world that deviated onto an alternate timeline thanks to Atomic Age technology, which eventually led to a global nuclear apocalypse in the year 2077 in an event referred to as "The Great War", caused by a major conflict between the U.S. and China over natural resources. The main story of New Vegas takes place in the year 2281, four years after the events of Fallout 3 and 204 years after the bombs fell. It is not a direct sequel, but does feature the return of several elements found in Fallout 2.

Heroes of the Storm

Heroes of the Storm

Heroes of the Storm is a crossover multiplayer online battle arena video game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment. It was released for Microsoft Windows and macOS on June 2, 2015. The game features various characters from Blizzard's franchises as playable heroes, as well as different battlegrounds based on Warcraft, Diablo, StarCraft, and Overwatch universes.

Characters of Overwatch

Characters of Overwatch

The 2016 first-person shooter video game Overwatch, developed by Blizzard Entertainment, features 32 playable characters known as heroes and a number of supporting characters as part of the game's narrative, which is told through animated media and digital comics outside of the game. Its sequel, Overwatch 2, was released in October 2022 and replaced Overwatch. The sequel builds upon the same hero roster and added more characters, launching with 35 heroes. However, as Overwatch 2 had been developed to be a faster game with five-versus-five teams rather than six-versus-six, several of the characters had tweaks or major rebuilds within Overwatch 2.

Metal Arms: Glitch in the System

Metal Arms: Glitch in the System

Metal Arms: Glitch in the System is a third-person shooter action-adventure video game, developed by American team Swingin' Ape Studios, published by Vivendi Universal Games and their subsidiary Sierra Entertainment and released in 2003. The game follows a robot named Glitch as he joins forces with the Droids in their fight against General Corrosive and his Milbots.

League of Legends

League of Legends

League of Legends (LoL), commonly referred to as League, is a 2009 multiplayer online battle arena video game developed and published by Riot Games. Inspired by Defense of the Ancients, a custom map for Warcraft III, Riot's founders sought to develop a stand-alone game in the same genre. Since its release in October 2009, League has been free-to-play and is monetized through purchasable character customization. The game is available for Microsoft Windows and macOS.

Game Boy Advance

Game Boy Advance

The Game Boy Advance (GBA) is a 32-bit handheld game console developed, manufactured and marketed by Nintendo as the successor to the Game Boy Color. It was released in Japan on March 21, 2001, in North America on June 11, 2001, in the PAL region on June 22, 2001, and in mainland China as iQue Game Boy Advance on June 8, 2004. The GBA is part of the sixth generation of video game consoles. The original model does not have an illuminated screen; Nintendo addressed that with the release of a redesigned model with a frontlit screen, the Game Boy Advance SP, in 2003. A newer revision of the redesign was released in 2005, with a backlit screen. Around the same time, the final redesign, the Game Boy Micro, was released in September 2005.

Banjo-Kazooie: Grunty's Revenge

Banjo-Kazooie: Grunty's Revenge

Banjo-Kazooie: Grunty's Revenge is a 2003 platform game by Rare for Nintendo's Game Boy Advance (GBA). It is the third instalment in the Banjo-Kazooie series and takes place between the events of the Nintendo 64 (N64) games Banjo-Kazooie (1998) and Banjo-Tooie (2000). In Grunty's Revenge, the evil witch Gruntilda travels back in time to prevent the events of Banjo-Kazooie from happening, and the bear Banjo and his bird friend Kazooie set out to stop her. Grunty's Revenge retains the focus on collecting items and most of the other game mechanics from its predecessors, but is presented in 2D rather than 3D. Aside from the main game, players can also access minigames such as fishing and target shooting.

Banjo-Kazooie

Banjo-Kazooie

Banjo-Kazooie is a series of video games developed by Rare. The games feature a male bear named Banjo and his friend, a large female red bird named Kazooie, who are both controlled by the player. Banjo originally made his debut as a playable character in 1997 as part of the cast of Diddy Kong Racing. Throughout the various games, they are tasked with thwarting the various evil schemes of a witch named Gruntilda. The first game, Banjo-Kazooie, was released in 1998 to critical acclaim and was followed by three sequels and a spin-off racing game.

Source: "List of fictional robots and androids", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_robots_and_androids.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

Notes
  1. ^ Long, Tony (25 January 2011). "Jan. 25, 1921: Robots First Czech In". Wired.com. Archived from the original on 18 May 2017. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  2. ^ Hitchcock, Susan Tyler (2007). Frankenstein: A Cultural History. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-393-06144-4.
  3. ^ "Fight Evil with Evil". Archived from the original on 13 May 2012. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  4. ^ Otomox Archived 14 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine at http://www.coolfrenchcomics.com Archived 16 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 17 October 2007. Retrieved 12 July 2005.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  6. ^ "GO Moonbase". Archived from the original on 13 January 2009.
  7. ^ The Homestar Runner Enters the Longest Page Title on the Website Contest! Archived 23 June 2016 at the Wayback Machine at http://www.homestarrunner.com Archived 26 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Homestarloween Party Archived 25 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine at http://www.homestarrunner.com Archived 26 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Compy 386! Archived 20 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine at http://www.homestarrunner.com Archived 26 February 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "Andrew Kauervane". Archived from the original on 25 February 2012. Retrieved 12 April 2012.
  11. ^ "Little Button Puss, episode #310 of Comedy Bang Bang: The Podcast on Earwolf". Archived from the original on 16 January 2015. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  12. ^ "Bastion". Archived from the original on 4 March 2017. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  13. ^ "Bastion". Archived from the original on 1 April 2017. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  14. ^ "Virtual Woman by CyberPunk Software". virtualwoman.net. Retrieved 20 June 2020.
  15. ^ "ModTheSims - Servo from The Sims 2". Mod The Sims. Retrieved 8 February 2021.
  16. ^ "ModTheSims - Servo - Complete Conversion". Mod The Sims. Retrieved 8 February 2021.
  17. ^ "Space Channel 5 Part #2 - Space Channel 5 Profiles - Courtesy of Evila!". lparchive.org. Retrieved 18 November 2021.
  18. ^ "Space Channel 5 Part #3 - Space Channel 5 Part 2 Profiles". lparchive.org. Retrieved 18 November 2021.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.